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Back when I lived in Miami I used to see the France (though she was called the Norway at the time) going in and out of Government cut. That was a pretty ship

 

attachicon.gifSS_Norway.jpg

 

The France surrendered and became the Norway. ;-)

 

Also, my Dad did 3 1/2 transatlantics between '53 and '56 on the SS United States, coming from Germany to the States to woo my Mom, who had to accompany her parents to the US after they escaped East Berlin. The last 1/2 was to stay in the US. One of the transat runs was a record-setter according to him; he loved that boat.

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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

A cool boat: Our dinghy. I had to replace the canvas rub rail this spring. This is the second one. It costs $150 to go around the boat with this stuff. Seems the last time I did it, it was less than $

Available as a sloop or yawl.

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Vikingsfjord is pure potato vodka. That's hard to find today.

Chopin is a potato vodka as well. As is Luksusowa, a very good and more affordable potato vodka than Chopin, but I bet you can't tell the difference. I happen to have a .5l bottle of Żubrówka in my Scotch cabinet that I picked up in Olecko about 10 years ago when I visited the Delphia factory. Maybe I'll open it and have a dram one day.

 

 

We have a domestic single-point-of-origin potato vodka here in Colorado, Woody Creek. From Hunter S. Thompson's old stomping ground - they grow the potatos, harvest them, distill, filter and age it all on site.

 

Our town hosted a Colorado distiller's show for which my wife's shop was a food pairing; to me the Woody Creek was the best Wodka by far. And we don't really like them folks up Aspen way ;-)

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I'm sort of picky. It's a fabulous boat. no question. But I'd like to tweak every line about 2.783" That is all it would take.

 

Ok, 2.82115". The extra room will help. I don't need all of it.

That cabin trunk may be "retro" but it's retro awful.

 

Ok Bob, should I ever get to win the Euromillions lottery, I'll let you design your updated version of the classic pilot cutter

 

I love the basic concept but I agree with you, looking at it more closely, there are some lines that are just a bit 'off'...

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

Bob, apart from the doghouse (which I grant is a bit crook - it looks like it's in its retracted position), what else is wrong? To my eye it looks a rather manly and matter of fact boat (if a bit chunky). And the "Pilot Cutter" thing has been somewhat overworked of late, it's true.

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

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Ed:

It's a nice boat. It's beautifully built.

 

I don't like:

the bowsprit treatment

the quasi rub strip line

the puny, thin bootstripe

the ultra boxy cabin trunk

the anemic, weak looking outboard rudder profile

The lack of character in the cockpit coamings.

 

 

It's all subjective. I understand I am being very picky. It's a knee jerk reaction for me to look at a boat and wonder what I would do differently. That's one way I try to continue learning my craft. I suspect Mr. Hoek would have the same reaction if he saw my CF cutter. He'd change everything to suit his eye.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

 

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed, I believe the line you're curious about is a strop hooked to the anchor chain. It takes the load of the chain and improves the effective scope, and prevents chafe on the bobstay.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

 

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed, I believe the line you're curious about is a strop hooked to the anchor chain. It takes the load of the chain and improves the effective scope, and prevents chafe on the bobstay.

 

 

I don't see any chain coming down from the boat anywhere...looks like rope rode spliced to chain to me. First pic is with breeze, second is calm with rope hanging with chain on the bottom.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

 

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed, I believe the line you're curious about is a strop hooked to the anchor chain. It takes the load of the chain and improves the effective scope, and prevents chafe on the bobstay.

 

 

I don't see any chain coming down from the boat anywhere...looks like rope rode spliced to chain to me. First pic is with breeze, second is calm with rope hanging with chain on the bottom.

 

On closer observation I see there's no hook on the line I guessed to be a strop and as in the first photo the anchor rode appears to be rope, for my guess to be correct it would be necessary to tie the strop onto the rode. This could be done with a timber hitch or two rolling hitches, but might slip when the rode became slack. Gate probably has a knot more suited to the job. On Van Diemen there is a hook on the nylon strop which grabs the chain and works very well.

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Another aesthetically challenged production train wreck, and it's pink!

 

attachicon.gif03.jpg

 

And I really want one. In light grey or powder blue....

 

We could paint your boat in Ugly camouflage. I'd kick in a can of Rustoleum.

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Ed:

It's a nice boat. It's beautifully built.

 

I don't like:

the bowsprit treatment

the quasi rub strip line

the puny, thin bootstripe

the ultra boxy cabin trunk

the anemic, weak looking outboard rudder profile

The lack of character in the cockpit coamings.

 

 

It's all subjective. I understand I am being very picky. It's a knee jerk reaction for me to look at a boat and wonder what I would do differently. That's one way I try to continue learning my craft. I suspect Mr. Hoek would have the same reaction if he saw my CF cutter. He'd change everything to suit his eye.

 

 

Bob

 

Thanks for that! Lovely to hear you thinking out loud. Especially as to the lack of moral fibre in the coamings.

 

God is in the details, eh?

 

I'm pleased you weren't dissing the sheer line which I thought pleasant.

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Ed:

I like the boat but the designer in me says "I can do that better". I looked hard at the sheer and I agree with you, it's nice. But see that rub strip or bump or whatever that lump is running almost parallel to the sheer? I don't care for the interplay of that line with the sheer. It;s closer to the sheer forward and farther away from the sheer at the transom. I would drop it a bit forward. Just silly, subjective small changes.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

 

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed, I believe the line you're curious about is a strop hooked to the anchor chain. It takes the load of the chain and improves the effective scope, and prevents chafe on the bobstay.

 

 

I don't see any chain coming down from the boat anywhere...looks like rope rode spliced to chain to me. First pic is with breeze, second is calm with rope hanging with chain on the bottom.

 

On closer observation I see there's no hook on the line I guessed to be a strop and as in the first photo the anchor rode appears to be rope, for my guess to be correct it would be necessary to tie the strop onto the rode. This could be done with a timber hitch or two rolling hitches, but might slip when the rode became slack. Gate probably has a knot more suited to the job. On Van Diemen there is a hook on the nylon strop which grabs the chain and works very well.

 

I like this boat a lot but a couple questions. Is it wooden? The stem looks like wood but it was built in 2001 so maybe it was made to look like wood. What is the correct name for the structure projecting off the stern that the back stay attaches to?

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Ed:

I like the boat but the designer in me says "I can do that better". I looked hard at the sheer and I agree with you, it's nice. But see that rub strip or bump or whatever that lump is running almost parallel to the sheer? I don't care for the interplay of that line with the sheer. It;s closer to the sheer forward and farther away from the sheer at the transom. I would drop it a bit forward. Just silly, subjective small changes.

Damn, but you have a good eye. I thought the rub rail thing was just a paralell to the sheer to reduce the visual impact of the higher freeboard.

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Bird:

How you treat that "rub rail" line is a personal thing. I worked with a designer when I was young who always placed the rub rail half way between the sheer and the DWL. I thought it looked like shit there. I do it by eye with an eye to where max beam is and where I think it become less than effective for actual rubbing. I like to flatten the curvature of the rub rail. If it's really close to the sheer, say 6" or maybe 10" you can just parallel the sheer. That works in that case. But if it's further down the hull I use a flatter curve, closer to the sheer amidships and then dropping very slightly in the ends. I do the same thing with a cove stripe. I try to avoid the "smile" shape you get if you maintain a constant "on the skin" distance. It has to be a vertical distance regardless of the skin girth. For my eye anyway. If you look at CATARI, ND's boat, you can see I combined cove stripe and rub rail. I like the result. But I broke my own rule here and gave the curve a bit of a kick aft.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20C%201-27-15_

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Tintel is aluminum and the rub strip is probably welded on whilst the hull is upside down. It may be the strip is actually parallel to the sheer and is 'distorted' in the photo shown. When I look at the profile of Catari my cranky eyes interpret the cove stripe/rub rail has a greater curve than the sheer. I personally think the Hoek design is very attractive and needs no 'tweeks' To me that would be an insult to the designer.

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Thanks Globs. I don';t mean to imply either that my way is the "right way". There is no right way. These are very subjective elements and up to the eye of the individual designer. When I look at that Hoek design I digest it totally and store what I see that is different in my own data banks. I may pull out that detail that I don't like today and give it a try another day. I like trying new things.

rend%202_zpsat5j8hpm.jpg

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Dazzle would be cool. However,

 

594af1673a0f8e55c9726d2e6b7efc61.jpg

 

On one side, and on the other,

 

brick+2.jpg_sml.jpg

 

It would take "uniquely hideous" to a new level.

I think the first one definitely jumped the shark and the second one is apparently a 4 kt brick shithouse.

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Thanks for sharing the effort you put into the details Bob- I suspect much of the reason some production boats are described as bland or cookie cutter has to do with lack of skill or effort in the details. I often can't answer why a boat or car misses being beautiful to my eye, even though I'm sure how I feel. I struggle with the good folks at Brooklin Boat Yard (now Stephens/Waring) because most all of the boats I've seen in the flesh miss the mark for me by just a little, and they promote themselves as doing beautiful yachts, so I can't blame the clients.

 

Look at Italmus (http://stephenswaring.com/yachts/italmus/) compared to Thunderhead, and someone missed the mark, and it wasn't Rhodes.

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Tuck:

I think you and I may be on the very same page re the S/W boats. They almost make it. But in their defense, while our eyes may look for the authentic older details, you just can't do the anymore at a reasonable cost. And sometimes not at any cost. When we did Frankie I did not want to try to replicate a boat from 1952. Same with the CF cutters. It makes no sense when you are sing carbon fiber to try to "fake" old shape defining details, like stem. I'm not big on "faux" anything.

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"It has to be a vertical distance regardless of the skin girth. For my eye anyway."

 

Putting a visible line on a complex 3-D shape so that it looks right from all angles is a talent. It's a lot easier to draw back good-looking profile than to design a boat.

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For me too often it is the basic shapes- going back to the W class boats the bows just aren't right, and they certainly aren't Herreshoff. Now it is often the sheers and the transoms. I've probably sailed close to a dozen of these things, and especially at the Eggemoggin Races where they are sailing next to classics, they come up short.

 

The bow on Thunderhead and the sheer are not normal Rhodes, and I understand why people don't always like the boat, but it is true to itself in proportion and detail. Same for the S&S greats, they just sit right on the water. So do Newicks. I'd love to see more of yours, Bob in the flesh rather than pictures and drawings. I need to go west or KDH needs to step up.

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Ed:

I like the boat but the designer in me says "I can do that better". I looked hard at the sheer and I agree with you, it's nice. But see that rub strip or bump or whatever that lump is running almost parallel to the sheer? I don't care for the interplay of that line with the sheer. It;s closer to the sheer forward and farther away from the sheer at the transom. I would drop it a bit forward. Just silly, subjective small changes.

Damn, but you have a good eye. I thought the rub rail thing was just a paralell to the sheer to reduce the visual impact of the higher freeboard.

 

 

i like that boat quite a bit - just as it is

 

but i don't see what you are seeing - are you saying the line is not quite parallel, and that you would make it exactly parallel?

 

it looks pretty close to parallel to me, especially in the side on shot.

 

i also like the wally nano - not sure i would get pink, but i's a very good looking boat - to me at least

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You know all the Rhodes designs much better than I do, Bob- I always saw the clipper bow as uncommon for him. (I grew up sailing a Rhodes 18, though:-). I've sailed a Nordic 40, and loved it, and see plenty of your designs in Maine, I was thinking more of these recent custom projects like Catari and Francis Lee etc., as well as Amati, Icon and the rest. Ever been a Perry rendezvous on the east coast? I like rowing around a boat. I saw Inbox last summer, too.

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Tuck:

Rhodes did quite a number of boats with "clipperesque" bows. Not sure "clipper" is the right word to describe them. They had marked hollow in their profile with kind of a lump on the end. Somehow Rhodes managed to pull this unusual shape off. I'd be scared to try it myself.

 

If I had a Perry Rendezvous on the East Coats I'd have to go. That would mean leaving my shack and my dog. I take my dog to the Rendezvous here.

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Those clippers without a sprit are called "Bald Clipper Bows" aren't they?

 

To my eye Thunderhead is one of the most distinctive and good looking boats ever - the interior layout too.

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Those clippers without a sprit are called "Bald Clipper Bows" aren't they?

 

To my eye Thunderhead is one of the most distinctive and good looking boats ever - the interior layout too.

There's a sistership available in Newport Beach. If you're quick you could get her up to Canuckistan in time for the Van. And NO I don't work for Ardell,,,,,,

post-25637-0-42637900-1430169272_thumb.jpg

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Dazzle would be cool. However,

 

594af1673a0f8e55c9726d2e6b7efc61.jpg

 

On one side, and on the other,

 

brick+2.jpg_sml.jpg

 

It would take "uniquely hideous" to a new level.

:lol:

 

Although now that I ponder on it, the eyes on the shark (sic) are a bit much, no?. It would be soooo much better without the eyes.......

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Dazzle would be cool. However,

 

594af1673a0f8e55c9726d2e6b7efc61.jpg

 

On one side, and on the other,

 

brick+2.jpg_sml.jpg

 

It would take "uniquely hideous" to a new level.

:lol:

 

Although now that I ponder on it, the eyes on the shark (sic) are a bit much, no?. It would be soooo much better without the eyes.......

 

 

Maybe a patch?

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I'd really like to see a pic of the shark boat in the water. The shark nosed P40's from WWII are a classic image, maybe that boat wrap could be too. :D

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Thanks Globs. I don';t mean to imply either that my way is the "right way". There is no right way. These are very subjective elements and up to the eye of the individual designer. When I look at that Hoek design I digest it totally and store what I see that is different in my own data banks. I may pull out that detail that I don't like today and give it a try another day. I like trying new things.

rend%202_zpsat5j8hpm.jpg

My grandfather used to say there is the "right way", the "wrong way" and the "Lindsey Way" (his name) and by god we did her the Lindsey Way, I am quite enamored by the "Perry Way".

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Let me start with...as I get older the more I appreciate the traditional designs. This thing has a size and a comfort level that I love. Rails are maybe to early to discuss but change the look and function of other components, Eventually someone will need to build them.

Bow rail: Understand the true profile view for fwd tips of top rail and mid rail to match an angle that looks pleasing. I have found when forcing that midrail fwd it ends up a weak structure ( If you jump on it you can bend them. Can always put a vertical CL link between the mid and top rail) and kinda flaps out there (to far fwd), if viewed from anywhere but that side view. I understand the rail hight from from deck, whatever you have chosen, 28" 30" 32", whatever the client wants. I would like to see the lifeline hight intersect the the bow rail hight, and keep the the bow rail hight whatever it ends up being off the ground. Ya it's not as safe but not like you don't spend all day up there. I like 5/16" round rod life line attatchment points. Bent and welded to get that lifeline hitting dead on CL of the rail. Large enough for a halyard snapshackle to get in there too. 1/4" is too small and 3/8" looks fat too my eye.

Gate stanchions: I lean to the one piece 160 deg tight radius upper bend with same as above welded rod lifeline attatchment points. It's easier to build, I think stronger and when lifelines are done up completes that lifeline sharpness just fine. Mid rail becomes an issue. Bring it thru and press a ferrel in or throw another smaller dia tube at that hight or round rod, whatever. Each thing costs a little more but sometimes doesn't necessarily look better. Usually simple looks better.

Stern rail: Not even going to talk about it...unless we talk about the fwd things first.

I feel better now. Hope I made some sense.

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cje:

I added the centerline vertical bar at the front of the pulpit yesterday. I saw the same thing. The rest for now will stay as drawn. I like the gate stanchions as they are now shown, as I drew them. Might as well not even discuss the stern pulpit then. Somehow,,,,some way I'll manage to make it work. Always have.

cutter%20porn_zps5k4qbjxw.jpg

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Sy: I agree with you but there are some very beautiful traditional boat built as one off in Europe today.

I don't have a Euro bone in my body. I'm pure PNW and happy about it.

 

i like some, but not all, of both both approaches - traditional euro, e.g. K&M, which we have discussed a fair bit are generally very nice.., and contemporary euro like Solaris, and X-Yachts are also nice.

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70: I love some of those Euro modern styled boats but if I were asked to draw one I'm not sure my heart would be in it. Got an inquiry from Turkey this morning asking me to design a tugboat. Now that I can sink my teeth into.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=zs8AnSCX3jw#t=126

<iframe width="640" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zs8AnSCX3jw?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Tug boats are good!

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Nothing illustrates the concept of hull speed better than a tug running wide open.

 

They look like they are pushing 1/2 the harbour out of the way.

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Any time you hear someone make a comment like "It doesn't have to look good, it's only a workboat" or similar sentiments, show them this.

 

post-95343-0-06668500-1430247013_thumb.jpg

 

Beach Boy was a log salvage boat custom designed by Bill Garden back in the 70's. I doubt any type of boat has a harder service than a log salvor but look how good it looks 40 odd years later.

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I saw it brand new in False Creek before I saw any drawings or knew who designed it - I was spellbound that a workboat could look so good.

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It was a long time ago, I was pretty new to boats and I wasn't the font of design knowledge that I am now.

 

That's the story I'm stickin' with anyhow.

 

He sure was good wasn't he?

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Hey Bob! Now that more than a few euro boats are going this way aesthetically (reference post #4452), I'm confused.....

 

post-906-0-46094300-1430266465_thumb.jpg

 

I suppose you could change the shape of the big windows, add more teak, wheel, or wheels, and a square cockpit table, but she is a big assed girl...... B)

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The East Coast smacks have incredibly long sprits, and carry their jibs after they lose their staysails, because they have so much inbuilt weather helm. In a blow they often steer with tackles on the tiller.

 

Can you explain, Bob, why a skinny boat would develop more lee helm? Something to do with the change in the immersed shape? I think Uffa Fox wrote somewhere of sailing a plank on edge boat and of how much lee helm that had

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Ed: I think I read the same Uffa Fox piece about the boat being so tender and having so much lee help that he never saw his hand on the tiller the entire beat. It was under water! That was a plank of edge type. It has to do with the center of pressure on the hull not moving to leeward on a long skinny almost symetrcal hull. So the C of P of the rig has a big arm to work with to drive the boat down. That's as good an explanation as you are going to get from me. It happens and I know it happens and I know the boats it happens on.

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Here's Ted Turners old Lightnin' for sale. IIRC this design was the basis for the Yankee 38 and the subsequent Catalina 38.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1972/Sparkman-%26-StephensSlo...--2839004/Los-Angeles/CA/United-States#.VUZEd5Nq0dk

 

I always liked that Bubble deck era of S&S designs, especially Heaths two wood Morning Clouds. It worked better on the bigger boats.

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Here's Ted Turners old Lightnin' for sale. IIRC this design was the basis for the Yankee 38 and the subsequent Catalina 38.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1972/Sparkman-%26-StephensSlo...--2839004/Los-Angeles/CA/United-States#.VUZEd5Nq0dk

 

I always liked that Bubble deck era of S&S designs, especially Heaths two wood Morning Clouds. It worked better on the bigger boats.

 

Note to sellers- if you insist on name dropping, at least spell it right.

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Here's Ted Turners old Lightnin' for sale. IIRC this design was the basis for the Yankee 38 and the subsequent Catalina 38.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1972/Sparkman-%26-StephensSlo...--2839004/Los-Angeles/CA/United-States#.VUZEd5Nq0dk

 

I always liked that Bubble deck era of S&S designs, especially Heaths two wood Morning Clouds. It worked better on the bigger boats.

 

Note to sellers- if you insist on name dropping, at least spell it right.

 

 

IN case you can't be bothered to look it up, here's the broker's pitch, which takes the English as a Foreign Language award.

 

He can't spell "boat"?

 

  • A VERY FAST CUSTOM ALUMINUM BOST BUILT IN NEW YORK. THIS ONE TONE YACHT WAS OWNED AND SAILES BY TED TURNER IN THE 1973 ADMIRALS CUP RACE.

 

A VERY FAST CUSTOM ALUMINUM BOAT BUILT IN NEW YORK. THIS ONE TONER YACHT WAS OWNED AND SAILED BY TED TORNER IN THE 1973 ADMIRALS CUP RACE. SHE CAN BE A GREAT LIVE-ABOARD OR WORLD CRUISER. THE STORY IS, "IF YOU CAN'T BEAT IT, BUY IT !!!.OWNER ANXIOUS TO SALE. COME OVER AND MAKE THE OFFER.

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Twizzle is for sale too.

 

If Kokomo and Twizzle had a port/ starboard bingle in some super yacht regatta that's make $100 million worth of oops.

 

 

 

What sort of bragging rights is it to have four satellite domes? I mean, why? Four different networks? Two networks, with redundancy? Or just "I may not have bigger balls, but I have more of them?"

Apart from feeling in a bollocksy mood today and wanting to take the micky, I also would quite like to know the reason, if there is one.

Anyone know?

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Twizzle is for sale too.

 

If Kokomo and Twizzle had a port/ starboard bingle in some super yacht regatta that's make $100 million worth of oops.

 

 

 

What sort of bragging rights is it to have four satellite domes? I mean, why? Four different networks? Two networks, with redundancy? Or just "I may not have bigger balls, but I have more of them?"

Apart from feeling in a bollocksy mood today and wanting to take the micky, I also would quite like to know the reason, if there is one.

Anyone know?

 

 

Most supermegagigayacht owners are business people or heads of state etc, and require reliable communications where ever they are in the world.

 

Satellite domes are provided for:

-VSAT broadband communication.

-GMDSS Satellite communication.

-Something for voice, fax, and data communiction.

-DSS TV. Sometimes in pairs to assure seeing a satellite no matter the vessel's orientation.

-As Rasp pointed out, occasionally a dummy dome to balance the looks and/or provide for future expansion.

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The world would almost certainly be a whole lot better off if those kind of people were out of communications ability for an extended period of time.

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Damn man, can't you see that water is lapping over onto those billion dollar decks...

 

They do get left out in the rain, you know.

 

 

Not boathouse kept? Don't they care?

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