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The problem with the CCA era boats was they weren't very inventive about flying lots of sails at the same time. See also the picture of Finisterre, above.

 

That is pretty!

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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Check out this centre cockpit, kauri composite 52' Ketch, designed by Laurie Davidson. This boat could have very long legs. For sale in Brisbane, QLD, Australia: https://www.boatsonline.com.au/bo

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Thanks for that! I remember reading that! This caught my memory:

The fact that Lee refuses to create hull distortions demanded by some rules, and still wins, raises some blue-blazered pressures

 

 

Yep, Stormvogel. Just as you have always had a love of long thin boats, Kim, I've had a thing for light displacement since a Yachting magazine article comparing a pegging the dial on her 20 knot Kenyon speedometer. Of course she is no longer really light, but that is fine too. I guess narrow boats are always narrow.

 

Hell, we pegged the Mighty ATALANTA's B&G speedo at 20 knots once......all 120,000 pounds of her. The most scared I have ever been. 50 gusting 70 on a broad reach with a doubled reefed main off of Oregon one February. I sure don't want to ever do that again. (The boat didn't mind it, just the crew.)

 

I had a real thing for RAGTIME once. Actually considered quite seriously the idea of buying her. Did the same with MERLIN too. I love great old warhorses. And STORMVOGEL, and TICONDEROGA, and so many others.

 

 

I want to hear more about this trip--and the boat.

 

I'm out of my league with you guys.

 

No, you are doing just fine :-)

Now how about this one:

 

 

I'm sure there is a boat under all of that canvas, somewhere.

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Thanks for that! I remember reading that! This caught my memory:

The fact that Lee refuses to create hull distortions demanded by some rules, and still wins, raises some blue-blazered pressures

 

 

Yep, Stormvogel. Just as you have always had a love of long thin boats, Kim, I've had a thing for light displacement since a Yachting magazine article comparing a pegging the dial on her 20 knot Kenyon speedometer. Of course she is no longer really light, but that is fine too. I guess narrow boats are always narrow.

 

Hell, we pegged the Mighty ATALANTA's B&G speedo at 20 knots once......all 120,000 pounds of her. The most scared I have ever been. 50 gusting 70 on a broad reach with a doubled reefed main off of Oregon one February. I sure don't want to ever do that again. (The boat didn't mind it, just the crew.)

 

I had a real thing for RAGTIME once. Actually considered quite seriously the idea of buying her. Did the same with MERLIN too. I love great old warhorses. And STORMVOGEL, and TICONDEROGA, and so many others.

 

 

I want to hear more about this trip--and the boat.

 

I'm out of my league with you guys.

 

No, you are doing just fine :-)

Now how about this one:

post-64679-0-99971400-1434734755_thumb.j

 

Americas Cup Sloop Mischief?

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Hell, we pegged the Mighty ATALANTA's B&G speedo at 20 knots once......all 120,000 pounds of her. The most scared I have ever been. 50 gusting 70 on a broad reach with a doubled reefed main off of Oregon one February. I sure don't want to ever do that again. (The boat didn't mind it, just the crew.)

 

I had a real thing for RAGTIME once. Actually considered quite seriously the idea of buying her. Did the same with MERLIN too. I love great old warhorses. And STORMVOGEL, and TICONDEROGA, and so many others.

 

 

I want to hear more about this trip--and the boat.

 

It was pretty straight forward, my son was the professional skipper on the vessel, a Tripp designed A&R built CCA Maxi boat. Original name was Ondine III. 75 feet overall, ketch rig. We had done the Long Beach Cabo race and then the boat stayed in Baja for a few months. The owner decided he wanted it back in Seattle so my son with a crew of 5 (including me) sailed first to San Diago, then San Francisco and finally to Seattle.

 

Off Oregon we were hit with a pretty good breeze. Very hard to hear on deck. Lots of spray. Fortunately it was off our port quarter, so we were broad reaching with it. Double reef in main and hang on. (We would have put in the third reef, but no one wanted to go forward to do it and the boat seemed happy enough.)

 

At one point the B&G wind meter was pegged on 50 and I thought it was broken. Then we got hit with a big gust and a following wave and I saw the knot meter climb up to 20 and held for a couple seconds, I noticed the wind meter (apparent) lifted off of the peg and showed high 40's wind speed. That's how I know the gusts were around 70.

 

I think we averaged 16 knots for a couple hours. It was pretty epic. I don't want to do that again.

 

I have been close to 200 mph in a Ferrari 250LM on a race track (as a passenger) but this 20 knots surge was WAY scarier than that.

post-8115-0-36009000-1434752113_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-69379300-1434752190_thumb.jpg

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That is a shot of the Bill Lee designed submarine named Merlin.

 

Bill has been searching for the original picture, but last I heard he had not found it.

 

 

A long time ago my old man told me of how they would sometimes sail the clipper ships right under - that shot of Merlin really illustrates the phenomenon. Imagine that happening on something like Cutty Sark! :o

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Hell, we pegged the Mighty ATALANTA's B&G speedo at 20 knots once......all 120,000 pounds of her. The most scared I have ever been. 50 gusting 70 on a broad reach with a doubled reefed main off of Oregon one February. I sure don't want to ever do that again. (The boat didn't mind it, just the crew.)

 

I had a real thing for RAGTIME once. Actually considered quite seriously the idea of buying her. Did the same with MERLIN too. I love great old warhorses. And STORMVOGEL, and TICONDEROGA, and so many others.

 

 

I want to hear more about this trip--and the boat.

 

It was pretty straight forward, my son was the professional skipper on the vessel, a Tripp designed A&R built CCA Maxi boat. Original name was Ondine III. 75 feet overall, ketch rig. We had done the Long Beach Cabo race and then the boat stayed in Baja for a few months. The owner decided he wanted it back in Seattle so my son with a crew of 5 (including me) sailed first to San Diago, then San Francisco and finally to Seattle.

 

Off Oregon we were hit with a pretty good breeze. Very hard to hear on deck. Lots of spray. Fortunately it was off our port quarter, so we were broad reaching with it. Double reef in main and hang on. (We would have put in the third reef, but no one wanted to go forward to do it and the boat seemed happy enough.)

 

At one point the B&G wind meter was pegged on 50 and I thought it was broken. Then we got hit with a big gust and a following wave and I saw the knot meter climb up to 20 and held for a couple seconds, I noticed the wind meter (apparent) lifted off of the peg and showed high 40's wind speed. That's how I know the gusts were around 70.

 

I think we averaged 16 knots for a couple hours. It was pretty epic. I don't want to do that again.

 

I have been close to 200 mph in a Ferrari 250LM on a race track (as a passenger) but this 20 knots surge was WAY scarier than that.

 

I remember Ondine. I remember putting into Horta in the Azores and seeing where Ondine's crew had painted on the sea wall their time from Bermuda to Horta. Don't remember what that time was but I do remember that it was pretty damn fast. Way faster than ours.

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I love Stormvogel. She's one of my all-time favourite pretty boats. Van de Stadt had a magic touch with bows in the 1960s days, and I don't think he ever bettered Stormvogel's bow -- or indeed any part of her profile. In an era of long overhangs, Stormvogel's short overhangs must have looked radically truncated, but there is a real grace and subtlety to them. (Makes me think too of the superb subtlety which the maestro crafted the short end of Francis Lee).

 

However, a close competitor for my all-time favourite yachty eye-candy is the 55-foot McGruer ketch Cuilaun of Kinsale. She was built for the Irish businessman Stephen O'Flaherty, but he (or his heirs) now apparently keep her in on the wrong side of the Atlantic, Maine. As a teenager, I was invited on board her for a cuppa when she was in Irish waters, and she's a real jewel.

 

At launch in 1970

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More recently:

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post-51350-0-23789000-1434822922_thumb.jpg

 

post-51350-0-50947700-1434822948_thumb.jpg

 

 

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Ah Cuilaun is a lovely boat. She was in cowes classic in 2012 , we raced her in the carribean rorc 600 and Antigua classics this winter. I don't know where she is now tho. Very nice Irish chaps still and the boat is impeccable. Beautifly kept!

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It needs a RIB alongside like Culain has in one pic. Because that's a cute butt, but I wouldn't want to approach it with a dink.

 

Those are both pretty boats but they don't seem to have a good solution to the question of how do I bring a dink that will carry everyone with reasonable speed.

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This is actually Pacha. The name can be seen on the sail cover. Aluminum built by C&N, for Francis Bouygues. An early aluminum light displacement boat. I sailed on the boat Fastnet 1969. I remember that half way to the rock there was a much smaller red hull that we finally passed; the Dick Carter's Red Rooster.

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It needs a RIB alongside like Culain has in one pic. Because that's a cute butt, but I wouldn't want to approach it with a dink.

 

Those are both pretty boats but they don't seem to have a good solution to the question of how do I bring a dink that will carry everyone with reasonable speed.

Tom, I don't that questions of practicality apply to boats like Cuilaun. Those acres of varnished wood are so deeply impractical that the boat must require an army of full-time varnishers just to make it through the sailing season.

 

If you want pretty, look at Cuilaun. But if you want practical, look elsewhere :)

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This is actually Pacha. The name can be seen on the sail cover. Aluminum built by C&N, for Francis Bouygues. An early aluminum light displacement boat. I sailed on the boat Fastnet 1969. I remember that half way to the rock there was a much smaller red hull that we finally passed; the Dick Carter's Red Rooster.

Pacha had a major refit after nearly sinking at her berth at the CYC. sometime round 01??

This included moving the keel a few inches forward.

I delivered her to N.Z. in '03, my first real sail on her and she was beautifully balanced.

We were sailing along on a 2 sail reach in about 10 -12 knots, calm seas, and one of the crew came down and said the auto pilot was broken, said the boat would drift off course after about 5 mins, a quick check revealed it was turned off at master panel.

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Two legged, you might be surprised how quickly you can varnish a hull. On Night Runner, I could do the hull (roll and tip) faster than my crewmate could do the toerail. It took only a couple of hours since it was more like painting a wall and there wasn't much cutting in. Of course it's easier to maintain a boat if you have a willing crew :)

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Two legged, you might be surprised how quickly you can varnish a hull. On Night Runner, I could do the hull (roll and tip) faster than my crewmate could do the toerail. It took only a couple of hours since it was more like painting a wall and there wasn't much cutting in. Of course it's easier to maintain a boat if you have a willing crew :)

 

Well, I agree. A wooden boat, varnished, is not worse to maintain than a GRP. I have had both kinds.

But Sam is cheating here - it is not the varnishing that is time consuming, it is the sanding and all pre-varnishing work.

 

With a wooden boat one is more exposed and thus dependant on the weather. Things must be done in a certain order, on rather given dates - at least in the weather zones I am living in.

 

/J

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Sam's ride, NIGHT RUNNER. Over 30 years old and still looking good. One of my favorite designs.

NIGHTRUNNERjan1S_zps0627ffb1.jpg

Great lines, Bob. Nice boot topper treatment too.

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A new wood Johan Anker 12-meter was just launched.

The first wooden 12-metre yacht that was newly constructed of wood in more than 50 years went into the water for the first time. It is design number 434 of the famous Norwegian designer Johan Anker, dating from the year 1939, his last 12-metre and his second-last design overall – his last design ever was an 8-metre yacht.

This boat is beautifully built!

http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2015/06/22/photos-a-new-wooden-12-meter

 

anker_434_01_big.jpg

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post-106106-0-04649300-1435003566_thumb.png

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That is simply gorgeous. From the man who have us the Dragon comes another beauty. I very much like the natural finish on the topsides. Also the use of wood and stainless steel for the ribs is very interesting.

post-37611-0-24662700-1435005807_thumb.jpg

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The first wooden 12-metre yacht that was newly constructed of wood in more than 50 years went into the water for the first time.

 

 

I guess they have not heard of Kate? Designed in 1908 by Alfred Mylne and built by Philip Walwyn, launched 2007


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That is simply gorgeous. From the man who have us the Dragon comes another beauty. I very much like the natural finish on the topsides. Also the use of wood and stainless steel for the ribs is very interesting.

attachicon.gifBeauty.JPG

One of the ways you can confuse people with the use of the phrase "composite construction"

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That is simply gorgeous. From the man who have us the Dragon comes another beauty. I very much like the natural finish on the topsides. Also the use of wood and stainless steel for the ribs is very interesting.

attachicon.gifBeauty.JPG

One of the ways you can confuse people with the use of the phrase "composite construction"

 

:)

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I'm having fun tonight with this photograph. This kid thought he could be a yacht designer. It's 7:35pm and I'm tired. I have to get up at 4:30 to go fishing before I go got he boatyard. I'd like to keep this nice image in my head as I drift off.

Taka%20Ano%20Classic%20Rally%202014%201_

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That is simply gorgeous. From the man who have us the Dragon comes another beauty. I very much like the natural finish on the topsides. Also the use of wood and stainless steel for the ribs is very interesting.

attachicon.gifBeauty.JPG

I like out of the box thinking and combining different materials in non-traditional ways. Not a boat but I used that concept when I built my deck on my house. Wood is very expensive in Europe and steel is cheap so why not combine the two?

 

61080119-cbd5-465d-aaae-b50730d74f2e_zps2eaa96ed-8ce8-4428-8552-868a76b6f3f8_zps

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OK, nice boat, but I have to say that is the worst opening sentance I have read in a long time:

 

"The air was breathless, and a small crowd of onlookers held its collective breath Monday night as the crew from Brooklin Boat Yard launched what is probably the most complex yacht it has yet to build."

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The sail area reported in the article appears to be wrong, 1016 square feet does not seem to be enough for a 108' stick, I wonder if that is the main alone.

 

 

It's gotta be. Compare the new Hinckley 50 specs.

 

Hull LOA: 49’- 10” / 1520 m

LWL: 44’-11” / 13.69 m

Beam: 14’-3” / 4.35 m

Draft:

  • Keel up: 6’-6” / 1.98 m
  • Keel down: 11’-6” / 3.50m

Cruising Displacement: 25,353 lbs / 11.5 tonnes 1

Sail Area: (up wind) 1,624 ft2 / 151 m2

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It'll be interesting to see what Frank Gehry has done in the styling department on that boat.

 

I figure it's his boat. His initials are F.O.G and on another forum it was stated that he previously owned a Beneteau called Foggy.

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There is an interesting discussion of Adrenalin over on the Wooden Boat forum. There are plenty of pictures, including a close-up of the spring for the pivoting amas. (I'd post it but don't seem to be able to cut and paste from my current location)

 

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?103153-Gougeons-Formula-40-trimaran-Adrenalin

 

 

 

I took those photos. That was a while ago , I think she must have been packed and put away again. I seem to recall she was moored for about a season after that but then went away.... I don't know how she performed next to the Multi fleet here.

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Re Varnished hulls, the wonderful SUNSTONE still looks great after 15 (?) years solid cruising

 

 

Sunstone in dec 14 ... er maybe 13, down in Nelson . Yes she does look great , they work hard on her.. I think she gets a varnish job/TLC every 3 months or so.

 

IMG_4553.jpg

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Re Varnished hulls, the wonderful SUNSTONE still looks great after 15 (?) years solid cruising

 

 

Sunstone in dec 14 ... er maybe 13, down in Nelson . Yes she does look great , they work hard on her.. I think she gets a varnish job/TLC every 3 months or so.

 

IMG_4553.jpg

 

 

I think she was in Victoria in 2013. Maybe early 2014. Give me a couple of years to think about it.

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The sail area reported in the article appears to be wrong, 1016 square feet does not seem to be enough for a 108' stick, I wonder if that is the main alone.

 

 

It's gotta be. Compare the new Hinckley 50 specs.

 

Hull LOA: 49’- 10” / 1520 m

LWL: 44’-11” / 13.69 m

Beam: 14’-3” / 4.35 m

Draft:

  • Keel up: 6’-6” / 1.98 m
  • Keel down: 11’-6” / 3.50m

Cruising Displacement: 25,353 lbs / 11.5 tonnes 1

Sail Area: (up wind) 1,624 ft2 / 151 m2

 

Heck yeah, FRANCIS has 1185 SA to weather and her mast is only about 67' +/-.

(700 main, 485 jib or 110 m2)

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Re Varnished hulls, the wonderful SUNSTONE still looks great after 15 (?) years solid cruising

 

 

Sunstone in dec 14 ... er maybe 13, down in Nelson . Yes she does look great , they work hard on her.. I think she gets a varnish job/TLC every 3 months or so.

 

IMG_4553.jpg

 

 

I think she was in Victoria in 2013. Maybe early 2014. Give me a couple of years to think about it.

 

Must be late 13 I took that, I'm thinkin. Because its in my 14 christmas cruise file. ( I know , I know)

 

another one. She's a busy , busy boat , but you just know that all that gear has a reason and a function.

 

IMG_4560.jpg

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2940101330_79ab8dbc94.jpg

 

The problem with the CCA era boats was they weren't very inventive about flying lots of sails at the same time. See also the picture of Finisterre, above.

 

That is pretty!

 

Ease!!

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2940101330_79ab8dbc94.jpg

 

The problem with the CCA era boats was they weren't very inventive about flying lots of sails at the same time. See also the picture of Finisterre, above.

 

That is pretty!

 

Ease!!

 

 

The nice thing about racing boats like that: everybody has something to do, not just sitting on the rail playing Candy Crush on their iphones.

 

FB- Doug

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Americas Cup Sloop Mischief?

 

No, you are doing just fine :-)

Now how about this one:

post-64679-0-99971400-1434734755_thumb.j

 

 

s.

 

 

That (MISCHIEF)is actually just a few years younger than this boat. I'll give you a hint:

This boat was designed by one of the most important naval architects of all time. Her lines plan appears in one of Marchaj's books.

 

... ...

 

Hmm, I no longer have the earlier Marchaj books, just 'Aero-Hydrodynamics' but I'll take somewhat-wild* guess here and say SHADOW.

 

FB- Doug

 

* SHADOW's lines were very widely reprinted in a lot of design books, something about a "wave-line" theory generating her hull shape.

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Gloriana,

Capt. Nat

 

No, GLORIANA had a very stretched-out clipper (or semi-clipper) bow IIRC

I meant to say in the earlier post that FY's pic couldn't be one of the Cup sloops, much too small

 

I just happened to be browsing some old yacht design stuff and found this gem; for the eddification of those who think bowsprits and bulb keels are newfangled hi-tech recent inventions.

http://sailingtrivia.ravenyachts.fr/2011/09/fin-bulb-keels-1891-1893.html

 

FB- Doug

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2940101330_79ab8dbc94.jpg

 

The problem with the CCA era boats was they weren't very inventive about flying lots of sails at the same time. See also the picture of Finisterre, above.

 

That is pretty!

 

Ease!!

 

 

The nice thing about racing boats like that: everybody has something to do, not just sitting on the rail playing Candy Crush on their iphones.

 

FB- Doug

 

 

If the wind isn't really blowing, and once all the sails are up, it's not difficult for a small crew to sit, and relax while holding the spinnaker sheets.

 

I've sailed on a 40' yawl with all sail up like the picture of Finisterre. There were just three of us, and yes, we all got to pull some strings.

 

Disclaimer: I had the easy part, I handled the mizzen sail, and mizzen spinnaker.

 

Here is a photo of a much younger QBF slaving away on the fantail of said yawl.

post-106106-0-77086100-1435178379_thumb.jpg

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One of my brothers and I sailed the 50' Aage Nielsen Yawl TIOGA across the Straits of Juan de Fuca once and the two of us had every sail up, mizzen, mizzen kite, main, jib, asymmetrical kite. She sailed herself with a nicely balanced helm.

 

As we neared Mystery Bay we started to wonder how we were going to get everything down, but we managed without any stress.

 

Plan ahead and take one task at a time.

 

One of our most memorable crossings.

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Here is a photo of a much younger QBF slaving away on the fantail of said yawl.

 

Lovely shirt :)

 

 

My shirt, or the one the guy at the helm is wearing?

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One of my brothers and I sailed the 50' Aage Nielsen Yawl TIOGA across the Straits of Juan de Fuca once and the two of us had every sail up, mizzen, mizzen kite, main, jib, asymmetrical kite. She sailed herself with a nicely balanced helm.

 

As we neared Mystery Bay we started to wonder how we were going to get everything down, but we managed without any stress.

 

Plan ahead and take one task at a time.

 

One of our most memorable crossings.

 

We could have gone faster, but then we would have to put our hors d'oeuvre's away. Hors d'oeuvre's outweighed going faster.

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Here is a photo of a much younger QBF slaving away on the fantail of said yawl.

 

Lovely shirt :)

 

 

My shirt, or the one the guy at the helm is wearing?

 

 

The helmsman's shirt looks like he wiped his hands on it after committing a hatchet murder.

 

Fighting off pirates, or disciplining unruly crew?

 

FB- Doug

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Here is a photo of a much younger QBF slaving away on the fantail of said yawl.

 

Lovely shirt :)

 

 

My shirt, or the one the guy at the helm is wearing?

 

 

The helmsman's shirt looks like he wiped his hands on it after committing a hatchet murder.

 

Fighting off pirates, or disciplining unruly crew?

 

FB- Doug

 

 

The helmsman was a neighbor of the owner of the yawl. This was his first, and probably only time he got to helm a boat. That guy nearly succeeded putting the mast in the water twice within about five minutes. Needless to say, he was quickly relieved from his helming duties.

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That'll be Racundra, built for Arthur Ransome in Riga. My Grandfather said he owned it for a while, but I think lots of people said that - it's like Queen Elizabeth I having slept everywhere. Designed by Otto Eggers.

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OK. Try this one, Mr Ed. She's a well known and much loved ketch:

Like Kimb's, beautiful Francis Lee, she was once described as 'a proper yacht' by a famous, seafaring KotR (England).

post-76289-0-44505100-1435283314_thumb.jpg

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That'll be Racundra, built for Arthur Ransome in Riga. My Grandfather said he owned it for a while, but I think lots of people said that - it's like Queen Elizabeth I having slept everywhere. Designed by Otto Eggers.

Wow that was quick.

 

Adlard Coles owned it after Ransome and renamed her Annette II.

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OK. Try this one, Mr Ed. She's a well known and much loved ketch:

Like Kimb's, beautiful Francis Lee, she was once described as 'a proper yacht' by a famous, seafaring KotR (England).

She's a Woollacott for sure...

 

I had to work out what KotR was...

 

at a guess Sir Peter Blake?

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…and with the power of Google; Ladybird, a Woollacott ketch that Peter Blake's family owned and he spent his youth aboard.

Well done, Tricky.

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  • 2 weeks later...

15 foot Custom Aluminum Mini Tugboat

* Length: 15 feet

* Beam: 7 feet

* Draft: 1 foot 8 inches

* Designer: Berkley Engineering with Dearden Marine modifications

* Displacement: 1600 lbs.(including 200 lbs. of ballast)

 

http://www.deardenmarine.com/Mini-tug-Dearden-Marine-Custom-Design.htm

 

 

 

 

Damn, that little thing is cool.

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15 foot Custom Aluminum Mini Tugboat

* Length: 15 feet

* Beam: 7 feet

* Draft: 1 foot 8 inches

* Designer: Berkley Engineering with Dearden Marine modifications

* Displacement: 1600 lbs.(including 200 lbs. of ballast)

 

http://www.deardenmarine.com/Mini-tug-Dearden-Marine-Custom-Design.htm

 

 

 

 

Damn, that little thing is cool.

 

 

I doubt it. Looks like a metal greenhouse in which you sit atop a diesel engine.

 

It's not even cool in the shade with a breeze here right now. That thing would cook you in minutes.

 

But it is a pretty neat little tug.

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15 foot Custom Aluminum Mini Tugboat

* Length: 15 feet

* Beam: 7 feet

* Draft: 1 foot 8 inches

* Designer: Berkley Engineering with Dearden Marine modifications

* Displacement: 1600 lbs.(including 200 lbs. of ballast)

 

http://www.deardenmarine.com/Mini-tug-Dearden-Marine-Custom-Design.htm

 

 

 

 

Damn, that little thing is cool.

 

 

I doubt it. Looks like a metal greenhouse in which you sit atop a diesel engine.

 

It's not even cool in the shade with a breeze here right now. That thing would cook you in minutes.

 

But it is a pretty neat little tug.

 

 

In Florida maybe, but up north it works well.

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15 foot Custom Aluminum Mini Tugboat

* Length: 15 feet

* Beam: 7 feet

* Draft: 1 foot 8 inches

* Designer: Berkley Engineering with Dearden Marine modifications

* Displacement: 1600 lbs.(including 200 lbs. of ballast)

 

http://www.deardenmarine.com/Mini-tug-Dearden-Marine-Custom-Design.htm

 

 

 

 

Damn, that little thing is cool.

 

 

I doubt it. Looks like a metal greenhouse in which you sit atop a diesel engine.

 

It's not even cool in the shade with a breeze here right now. That thing would cook you in minutes.

 

But it is a pretty neat little tug.

 

 

In Florida maybe, but up north it works well.

 

That's BC I'm sure. Gibsons maybe?

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15 foot Custom Aluminum Mini Tugboat

* Length: 15 feet

* Beam: 7 feet

* Draft: 1 foot 8 inches

* Designer: Berkley Engineering with Dearden Marine modifications

* Displacement: 1600 lbs.(including 200 lbs. of ballast)

 

http://www.deardenmarine.com/Mini-tug-Dearden-Marine-Custom-Design.htm

 

 

 

 

Damn, that little thing is cool.

 

 

I doubt it. Looks like a metal greenhouse in which you sit atop a diesel engine.

 

It's not even cool in the shade with a breeze here right now. That thing would cook you in minutes.

 

But it is a pretty neat little tug.

 

 

In Florida maybe, but up north it works well.

 

That's BC I'm sure. Gibsons maybe?

 

 

You are correct, it's Gibbons, BC, Canada

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Love that boat but with a Disp/Length of nearly 600 you would need a gale to go sailing. I always like Bruce Bingham's work. Really hat the hots for the FLICKA at one time.

 

8a108caa64d3633849253f81f9cb1279.jpg

I think the cat must be belowdecks…

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