Jump to content

Recommended Posts

SemI;

Great shot of that bow overhang doing absolutely nothing to enhance sailing length. I cover this in great detail in a chapter in my book. You can't add to the DWL unless you are in the water.

 

I can't see enough of the stern to be certain but I'd guess that dinky, cute little transom is far from immersed. There may be some length gained aft but given the sectional shape it will be very modest.

 

Later year 12 meter design was all about making those overhangs do some work. Look at the box-like sectional shapes aft. Look at the Davidson bow a perfect example of trying to get bow overhang to contribute.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 15.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

Posted Images

I always felt that this was a pretty good balance between waterline length and traditional type good looks. (but then I'm a bit biased) I often describe my Yankee One Design as the only boat I've ever loved. Plenty of boats I've liked. Plenty that did what they were intended to do. Only one I've loved.

 

 

YankeeOD.jpg 364×417 pixels.pdf

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now.... back to last century wood...... as you were.

 

:0

 

Your smiley is acknowledged but there are plenty of folks here who appreciate cutting edge design. All too often, however, it's used as an excuse for sloppy or flat-out poor aesthetic treatments. Yes, it does matter (except to but the Russian oligarchs, but that's a different thread).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Adlard Coles added 3' to the bow of 32' Cohoe I to bring it up to 35' minimum length for Bermuda race in the early 50s. He wrote that the extra overhang forward steadied the boat upwind in waves. I assume he meant the pitched less. Boat was a light displacement (for the era) Scandinavian-style double-ender.

I used to race a fairly light and narrow 27'er that had a lot of overhang forward. Nicest boat upwind in waves I ever sailed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Purely on the aesthetic front, this is my favourite bow of all time. Max Oertz's MARIANNA

 

Marianna.jpg

I like that vessel, where is it, England?
It looks very British. I don't think the bow is all that pretty, but it's bold and unusual so I like it.
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Purely on the aesthetic front, this is my favourite bow of all time. Max Oertz's MARIANNA

 

Marianna.jpg

I like that vessel, where is it, England?
It looks very British. I don't think the bow is all that pretty, but it's bold and unusual so I like it.

 

 

The designer was based in Hamburg, so not England.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think she's based in Belgium now. But German through and through. Lovely backside as well. I don't know what it is about the bow that I love so much, except that to my eye it has a sort of swagger, a self confident ease. She is a fast boat as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm normally a fan of spoon bows, but there's something about that one thats off to my eye. Like the waterline was pulled forward farther than it should have been or something. I can't quite place it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

As for the W22, what was wrong with the Hodgen 21? It's been called the most beautiful of all the one-designs. I've read that Sonny Hodgen was a pal of LFH, and I'd say the influence shows.

 

v3owh5.jpg

 

Actually Sonny started the Hodgdon 21 design with a model that his Uncle, Charles Hodgdon, had made in the late 1930's. Charles learned design and lofting while working at Herreshoff Manufacturing in Bristol. The boat has plenty of N. G. Herreshoff in it, but also a lot of Starling Burgess, who taught Sonny about design and half-models. The bow is mostly NGH while the stern is Burgess.......

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm normally a fan of spoon bows, but there's something about that one thats off to my eye. Like the waterline was pulled forward farther than it should have been or something. I can't quite place it.

That may be what I like about it! Looks fast and purposeful as well as swaggering.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think she's based in Belgium now. But German through and through. Lovely backside as well. I don't know what it is about the bow that I love so much, except that to my eye it has a sort of swagger, a self confident ease. She is a fast boat as well.

 

I'd call it pugnacious - like the boats jaw is thrust forward.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think she's based in Belgium now. But German through and through. Lovely backside as well. I don't know what it is about the bow that I love so much, except that to my eye it has a sort of swagger, a self confident ease. She is a fast boat as well.

 

I'd call it pugnacious - like the boats jaw is thrust forward.

 

 

Yes, kinda popeye'ish...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Purely on the aesthetic front, this is my favourite bow of all time. Max Oertz's MARIANNA

 

Marianna.jpg

 

Cool: http://www.jch-online.org/GB/show_certif_GB.php?Nom_Bateau=Marianna

 

Marianna.jpg

 

Build year :1925

Designer : Max Oertz

Design year : 1924

Shipyard : Heidtmann Hamburg

Lenght Over All (LOA) = 13.42 m

Length on the Water Line (LWL) = 10.50 m

Max width ( Bo ) = 3.20 m

draft ( Tmax ) = 2.10 m

 

800px-Classic_Channel_Regatta_2009_Paimp

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm normally a fan of spoon bows, but there's something about that one thats off to my eye. Like the waterline was pulled forward farther than it should have been or something. I can't quite place it.

Yeah, it's a little bit wierd. Even so, it's still a beautiful boat. The stem has a constant tight curvature in profile. I think it puts the volume (which is what you are trying to achieve with a spoon bow) too far above the waterline to do much good. In other words, when the boat heels, the waterline is not extended. That's what I see. The tight curvature ones usually have variable curvature, like a hint of a knuckle. See the photo above of the Hodgdon 21. This is what Bob keeps pointing out; overhangs have a purpose, if they are shaped right. The same can be said for spoon bows.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Atalanta.

 

Designed & built by C & W Bailey, Auckland in 1894. Tripple-skin kauri planked over kauri stringers & floors.

27' LWL

9' Maxbeam

40' Overall.

Lines taken off on hard.

Gaff-rigged cutter. Originally external lead ballasted centre-boarder. She was a light weather flyer.

 

Owned by Wellington Classic Yacht Trust. We're currently working on removing a twist in her counter and re-decking her (double-diagonal kauri [island] planked). Deck house, butterfly skylight and hatches are also to be be replaced.

 

C & W Bailey yachts were great competitors for Logan Brothers yachts of the period.

 

Today's job. Additional copper rivets through triple-skinned hull. She's a big job.

post-76289-0-75655500-1446879849_thumb.jpg

AtalantaLine.pdf

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like some curvature in a bow profile, and to me it's purely aesthetic. Add a bit of fullness to the shape above the waterline and taper it as you go down to get the profile desired.

 

Depending on the details of the taper the additional fullness will affect what the water sees significantly or not.

 

Geometrically to me this is obvious.

My understanding is that the rules that followed the CCA didn't like that extra fullness.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fast: My point was, that if you just let either the bow or the stern run-out as natural extensions of the midsection you will most often get flaccid ends that do not do much in terms of controlling volume.. This lazy treatment of the ends is very common and the easiest way for the designer to end the boat. I could give examples but I'd sound like a smart ass and you know that's not at all like me. I'll also say that I don;t expect everyone to understand what I am saying. This like this are far better explained with a sheet of paper and a pencil. It's tough with words.

 

I have never and will never do a double ender where either end is a product of "natural run-out".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I understand. And this is one of the limitations of developed hulls....

A lot of traditional designs look the way they do, at least in part, because a natural run of the planning made them easy to build. Not all, of course. Those round-bowed dutch boats must have been a bitch to build. But even there, they had to take the curve the planking would give them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always felt that this was a pretty good balance between waterline length and traditional type good looks. (but then I'm a bit biased) I often describe my Yankee One Design as the only boat I've ever loved. Plenty of boats I've liked. Plenty that did what they were intended to do. Only one I've loved.

 

 

Veeg, do you still own the Yankee One Design? A few days ago I re-read the article in WB magazine (#221). What beautiful boats. Do you have any pics? I'm curious as to their interior accommodations.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I kind of wonder about the W-22 concept. As folks have pointed out, there are a lot of one designs that seem to offer a lot more for a whole lot less: J22, Stuart Knockabout, and on and on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fast: My point was, that if you just let either the bow or the stern run-out as natural extensions of the midsection you will most often get flaccid ends that do not do much in terms of controlling volume.. This lazy treatment of the ends is very common and the easiest way for the designer to end the boat. I could give examples but I'd sound like a smart ass and you know that's not at all like me. I'll also say that I don;t expect everyone to understand what I am saying. This like this are far better explained with a sheet of paper and a pencil. It's tough with words.

 

I have never and will never do a double ender where either end is a product of "natural run-out".

I like "flaccid ends". Bet that's not in the index under F in Marchaj. Can you show us any examples of such lazy treatment? Feel free to be smart.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I kind of wonder about the W-22 concept. As folks have pointed out, there are a lot of one designs that seem to offer a lot more for a whole lot less: J22, Stuart Knockabout, and on and on.

Joel White's Sakonnet 23

 

That Stuart Knockabout is a very nice vessel. There used to be two of them on Bainbridge Island. Great looking boats.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Kim, I couldn't think of the Sakonnet 23, but it is another one.

 

Here is a nice boat I saw for sale in WB, a Phil Rhodes Windward 34 located in Port Townsend. You probably know her. I like the doghouse and port lights. Also, it is a narrow rascal: LOA 34′6″, beam 8′6″, draft 5′2″. Would the narrow beam help the overhangs do their job, i.e. effectively lengthen the WL?

 

post-54228-0-00362100-1446921225_thumb.jpg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I always felt that this was a pretty good balance between waterline length and traditional type good looks. (but then I'm a bit biased) I often describe my Yankee One Design as the only boat I've ever loved. Plenty of boats I've liked. Plenty that did what they were intended to do. Only one I've loved.

 

 

Veeg, do you still own the Yankee One Design? A few days ago I re-read the article in WB magazine (#221). What beautiful boats. Do you have any pics? I'm curious as to their interior accommodations.

 

Alas, the last I heard of my old YOD was that it was sitting in a barn awaiting a 'someday' restoration. And I have far too few pics. But you should check out this website.

 

http://www.yankeeonedesign.com

 

The NWSchool of Wooden boat building built Gemini a few years ago. If it had been cold molded instead of traditionally built I'd be making offers on her even though she's not for sale to my knowledge.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Atalanta.

 

Designed & built by C & W Bailey, Auckland in 1894. Tripple-skin kauri planked over kauri stringers & floors.

27' LWL

9' Maxbeam

40' Overall.

Lines taken off on hard.

Gaff-rigged cutter. Originally external lead ballasted centre-boarder. She was a light weather flyer.

 

Owned by Wellington Classic Yacht Trust. We're currently working on removing a twist in her counter and re-decking her (double-diagonal kauri [island] planked). Deck house, butterfly skylight and hatches are also to be be replaced.

 

C & W Bailey yachts were great competitors for Logan Brothers yachts of the period.

 

Today's job. Additional copper rivets through triple-skinned hull. She's a big job.

That reminds me of ROASTBEEF.

 

I can see several similarities.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Kim, did you ever make it to the Sakonnet during your visit out here? Did I tell you my Sakonnet native american stories? Awashonks and all that?

 

Semi, I see your "natural run of the planking" thinking. Planks are splines. With modern materials is this an issue at all? One wants, to be a mathematician, "smoothness and simplicity of shape," but are there any other considerations?

 

Ann's home having just gotten an appendectomy. Nothing like your girl down to realize how much we depend on them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

kdh:

"Planks are splines",,,,sorta.

 

Splines can be shaped and tapered but usually are not when just extruded plastic. The old guys had tapered wooden splines. I've never even seen one.

 

But planks need to be SPILED and that means shaped from end to end so they fit with the ever changing girth of the hull. I imagine the spiled shape of a plank fr one of the those bath tub bows Dutch boats must be a very complex curve.

 

Or, maybe not considering how full the bow is indicating less of a change in girth length. Looking at the hull lines of the BOEIER type, for instance, the shape is so complex in the ends that is is something beyond my experience.

 

For more research, find the book HOLLANDSE JACHTEN VAN DE TOEKOMST I by Born N. V. UITGEVERSMAATSCHAPPIJ ( no, I am not making this up)

Link to post
Share on other sites

By "flaccid ends" I mean that the sheer spring in profile is not keeping up with the sheer curvature in plan view. I've written abut this many times.

 

The "nadir" of the sheer curvature in profile should match the "apex" of the sheer in plan view. if it doesn't the sheer can get odd and flaccid looking with the curvature in the ends drooping or just not standing up enough to get the job done.

 

This is NOT A RULE! It is only one way to do it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Kim, I couldn't think of the Sakonnet 23, but it is another one.

 

Here is a nice boat I saw for sale in WB, a Phil Rhodes Windward 34 located in Port Townsend. You probably know her. I like the doghouse and port lights. Also, it is a narrow rascal: LOA 34′6″, beam 8′6″, draft 5′2″. Would the narrow beam help the overhangs do their job, i.e. effectively lengthen the WL?

 

attachicon.gifRhodes Windward 34.jpg

 

Many, many years ago (early 1980's) we looked at her when she was for sale, we were very interested until we found TIOGA (IV) and purchased her instead. Very nice boat!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Kim, did you ever make it to the Sakonnet during your visit out here? Did I tell you my Sakonnet native american stories? Awashonks and all that?

 

Semi, I see your "natural run of the planking" thinking. Planks are splines. With modern materials is this an issue at all? One wants, to be a mathematician, "smoothness and simplicity of shape," but are there any other considerations?

 

Ann's home having just gotten an appendectomy. Nothing like your girl down to realize how much we depend on them.

 

Ain't that the truth - when my wife was deathly ill a couple of years ago I found that out in spades. After 35 years together you become totally co-dependent.

Link to post
Share on other sites

By "flaccid ends" I mean that the sheer spring in profile is not keeping up with the sheer curvature in plan view. I've written abut this many times.

 

The "nadir" of the sheer curvature in profile should match the "apex" of the sheer in plan view. if it doesn't the sheer can get odd and flaccid looking with the curvature in the ends drooping or just not standing up enough to get the job done.

 

This is NOT A RULE! It is only one way to do it.

Finally... I've got it!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

By "flaccid ends" I mean that the sheer spring in profile is not keeping up with the sheer curvature in plan view. I've written abut this many times.

 

The "nadir" of the sheer curvature in profile should match the "apex" of the sheer in plan view. if it doesn't the sheer can get odd and flaccid looking with the curvature in the ends drooping or just not standing up enough to get the job done.

 

This is NOT A RULE! It is only one way to do it.

Finally... I've got it!!

 

 

I'm going to think about this.

 

But for now Adele and I are going to look at stars. To the N. Homework.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

By "flaccid ends" I mean that the sheer spring in profile is not keeping up with the sheer curvature in plan view. I've written abut this many times.

 

The "nadir" of the sheer curvature in profile should match the "apex" of the sheer in plan view. if it doesn't the sheer can get odd and flaccid looking with the curvature in the ends drooping or just not standing up enough to get the job done.

 

This is NOT A RULE! It is only one way to do it.

Finally... I've got it!!

 

 

Hah! My reaction to that post was more along the lines of "I'm sure glad that people like Bob figure this stuff out so I can play in boats!"

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

By "flaccid ends" I mean that the sheer spring in profile is not keeping up with the sheer curvature in plan view. I've written abut this many times.

 

The "nadir" of the sheer curvature in profile should match the "apex" of the sheer in plan view. if it doesn't the sheer can get odd and flaccid looking with the curvature in the ends drooping or just not standing up enough to get the job done.

 

This is NOT A RULE! It is only one way to do it.

Finally... I've got it!!

 

 

Hah! My reaction to that post was more along the lines of "I'm sure glad that people like Bob figure this stuff out so I can play in boats!"

 

I'm afraid we will both remain grasshoppers, I think.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Catboat Kathleen.

 

beetle-photos-167-706377.jpg

 

 

More info here.

I know this boat from when it was first launched.

The funny thing is that it's the first boat I have seen on this thread that I really groove on.

It's not that I like catboats particularly, but a few are really beautiful and this boat is a good example. I know that catboats are a compromise, but this boat can host a big party below, sail great most of the time and sail over really thin water and do everything it does with less parts and rigging and hassle than anything I know of.

Link to post
Share on other sites

By "flaccid ends" I mean that the sheer spring in profile is not keeping up with the sheer curvature in plan view. I've written abut this many times.

 

The "nadir" of the sheer curvature in profile should match the "apex" of the sheer in plan view. if it doesn't the sheer can get odd and flaccid looking with the curvature in the ends drooping or just not standing up enough to get the job done.

 

This is NOT A RULE! It is only one way to do it.

 

I found a couple of references. To my pondering a planar sheer satisfies the "nadir" and "apex" matching.

 

In your review of the Brewer 33: "To begin with look at that sheerline. No wimpy, flaccid, spineless sheer here. This sheer has strength in its spring."

 

About this 82'er built at Brooklin: "To my eye the sheer goes walkabout in several areas. It's flacid. Freres draws my favorite sheers. For more traditional, pronounced sheerlines look at the work of K. Aage Nielsen."

 

Screen-shot-2013-09-06-at-2.35.20-PM.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

From that angle I'd say that looks pretty damn good to my eye kdh.

If I were really to nit pick I might like to see the cove stripe NOT parallel the sheer. You can play a bit with the cove stripe spring and I like the classic way of giving it just a skosh less spring than the actual sheer.

 

Frers is the mat of sheers in my opinion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To my eye that Brooklin boat looks as flaccid as a rugby front row prop

 

article-1348901-0CD6BB6A000005DC-82_306x

 

About as elegant as well, but it's pretty muscular

 

Reminds me a little bit of Laurent Giles' bows - they just sort of keep going up. Not elegant, but sort of manly, and purposeful

 

ISMANAnewmain.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed:

Yeah, that's an old and very effective trick. Works best if bulwark height is reduce amidships and raised in both ends but more in the bow That use to be a standard detail. Look at S&S boats.

 

Think of it this way:

Starting with the bootstripe and ending with the top of the toe rail, all those lines can be considered arcs radiating from a common center point. As the radius is reduced the arc depth is increased.

 

THIS IS NOT A RULE. It is simply one way to do it. Should all boats adhere to this rule? As Jon Eisberg likes to say, "It depends". This approach is more suited to classic or traditional looking designs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed:

Yeah, that's an old and very effective trick. Works best if bulwark height is reduce amidships and raised in both ends but more in the bow That use to be a standard detail. Look at S&S boats.

 

Think of it this way:

Starting with the bootstripe and ending with the top of the toe rail, all those lines can be considered arcs radiating from a common center point. As the radius is reduced the arc depth is increased.

 

THIS IS NOT A RULE. It is simply one way to do it. Should all boats adhere to this rule? As Jon Eisberg likes to say, "It depends". This approach is more suited to classic or traditional looking designs.

 

Nicely explained. Thank you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember a boatbuilder I worked with bought a lidgard one tonner, which had a pronounced bow down look, and added a bulwark/toe rail the length of the boat, starting at about 4" high at the bow and tapering to about 1/2" at the trans am. He faired the outside face to match the hull topsides perfectly, then the best trick, he added a chrome belting running parallel to the top of the bulwark. It changed the whole sheer line in profile very nicely.

Link to post
Share on other sites

From that angle I'd say that looks pretty damn good to my eye kdh.

If I were really to nit pick I might like to see the cove stripe NOT parallel the sheer. You can play a bit with the cove stripe spring and I like the classic way of giving it just a skosh less spring than the actual sheer.

 

Frers is the mat of sheers in my opinion.

 

I was quoting you, Bob. You must have been a touch cantankerous that day:

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=167640&p=5035725

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

From that angle I'd say that looks pretty damn good to my eye kdh.

If I were really to nit pick I might like to see the cove stripe NOT parallel the sheer. You can play a bit with the cove stripe spring and I like the classic way of giving it just a skosh less spring than the actual sheer.

 

Frers is the mat of sheers in my opinion.

 

I was quoting you, Bob. You must have been a touch cantankerous that day:

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=167640&p=5035725

But the picture you show KDH is not an 82er, it is DRAGONERA a 74' Joel White design. Are you sure you have the right boat?

 

I was trading letters with Joel (or Joe, as his friends called him) while he was designing her. He sent me some drawings of her I think I still have around here somewhere. I quite like her.

 

http://brooklinboatyard.com/dragonera/

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

From that angle I'd say that looks pretty damn good to my eye kdh.

If I were really to nit pick I might like to see the cove stripe NOT parallel the sheer. You can play a bit with the cove stripe spring and I like the classic way of giving it just a skosh less spring than the actual sheer.

 

Frers is the mat of sheers in my opinion.

I was quoting you, Bob. You must have been a touch cantankerous that day:

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=167640&p=5035725

But the picture you show KDH is not an 82er, it is DRAGONERA a 74' Joel White design. Are you sure you have the right boat?

 

I was trading letters with Joel (or Joe, as his friends called him) while he was designing her. He sent me some drawings of her I think I still have around here somewhere. I quite like her.

 

http://brooklinboatyard.com/dragonera/

 

 

I got the pic from this page, Kim, which is what Ajax linked.

 

http://brooklinboatyard.com/82-spirit-of-tradition-sloop/

 

Sorry, I see now. My mistake. Inspired by Dragonera. Here's the 82'er.

 

82ft-Sailboat-Profile-Gray-R03.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

From that angle I'd say that looks pretty damn good to my eye kdh.

If I were really to nit pick I might like to see the cove stripe NOT parallel the sheer. You can play a bit with the cove stripe spring and I like the classic way of giving it just a skosh less spring than the actual sheer.

 

Frers is the mat of sheers in my opinion.

I was quoting you, Bob. You must have been a touch cantankerous that day:

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=167640&p=5035725

But the picture you show KDH is not an 82er, it is DRAGONERA a 74' Joel White design. Are you sure you have the right boat?

 

I was trading letters with Joel (or Joe, as his friends called him) while he was designing her. He sent me some drawings of her I think I still have around here somewhere. I quite like her.

 

http://brooklinboatyard.com/dragonera/

 

 

I got the pic from this page, Kim, which is what Ajax linked.

 

http://brooklinboatyard.com/82-spirit-of-tradition-sloop/

 

Sorry, I see now. My mistake. Inspired by Dragonera. Here's the 82'er.

 

82ft-Sailboat-Profile-Gray-R03.jpg

 

 

BP's insult makes much more sense. As flaccid as they come. .

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not necessarily and "insult".

 

I'll tell this story again:

 

It was very early in the morning. I was walking the docks at the Newport show. I spotted a dark blue hull about 100 yards away on another dock. I like it.

Another guy walked up and started to look at the same boat. I looked over. It was Ted Hood. I said hi and he said hi and we both stared at the boat. I finally asked, "Is that a Little Harbor?" Ted said yes. I said I like the sheer. It was a bit perkier aft than most Little Harbors. Ted said they had lengthened that particular boat 7' and he never warmed up to the sheer.

I liked the sheer.

Ted Hood did not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob will to that to you, Kim...

At first I though he was being overly picky, but after some time with him I started to see what he sees and the subtle little details that make for a pleasing look. But I am light years behind him, I will never catch up, he has a very refined eye!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Been out of town. In no particular order. Just my opinion- like looking at automobiles, there is more than one right.

 

The Boothbay Harbor/Christmas Cove etc. one-designs look great and sail as well as they look. There are small variations in the boats between harbors before fiberglass. Dragonera is also beautiful and by all accounts a great boat for her purpose. Having seen most all of the W boats and a lot of Joel White designs I almost always say "beautiful, but . . . . . ." Something about the hull proportions almost always leaves me saying "not as pretty as the boats she emulates" except the Center Harbor which is a mighty fine boat.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Her sheer is more like a workboat. The low point is too far forward for a sailboat. Looks like a swayback mare ;-)

 

There's something funky going on amidships that looks like tumblehome, and that really drags the middle down visually.

 

classic-sailing-yacht-ketch-20585-712266

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Her sheer is more like a workboat. The low point is too far forward for a sailboat. Looks like a swayback mare ;-)

 

Naah, she's just sinking.

 

I was wanting to say she is too low wooded. It's rare to think of a boat not having enough topsides.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought you meant this Rebecca, which is quite nice. A bit nicer really. Not quite my cup of tea to be honest, either of them. But nice, nonetheless.

 

01REBECCANewmain.jpg

 

That Rebecca is famous here in CA. A fatuous troll named reis123 claimed he was buying her and had placed a contract on the boat. Much hilarity ensued.

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=138925

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to argue with that boat but I'll give it a shot.

Just too much fucking spring. It should have been a lot flatter and more subtle.

That sheer leaps out at you and pokes you in the eye.

It should not be the focal point of a design that elegant.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the shot of Rebecca from abeam, the slight tumblehome mid-length makes a light dash along the rail which visually accentuates the sheer. I wonder if one sees the same effect in life. It would depend on the sky and the light of course.

 

She sure would raise the tone of our beer can races if she came to compete.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Her sheer is more like a workboat. The low point is too far forward for a sailboat. Looks like a swayback mare ;-)

 

There's something funky going on amidships that looks like tumblehome, and that really drags the middle down visually.

 

classic-sailing-yacht-ketch-20585-712266

 

I've seen that boat from all angles many times, and been aboard a few times... there is nothing wrong with Rebecca... such a hot boat in any harbor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Her sheer is more like a workboat. The low point is too far forward for a sailboat. Looks like a swayback mare ;-)

 

There's something funky going on amidships that looks like tumblehome, and that really drags the middle down visually.

 

classic-sailing-yacht-ketch-20585-712266

 

I've seen that boat from all angles many times, and been aboard a few times... there is nothing wrong with Rebecca... such a hot boat in any harbor.

 

 

Yes, I was trying to say that the "excess" sheer was largely the result of the light reflecting strangely off the midships in the profile view.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Camden-Maine-2012-405.jpg

 

Rebecca summers in Northeast Harbor, ME. A Google image search is worth the time.

 

It looks very fragile from this angle, as though a seriously pounding sea would break it half.

Link to post
Share on other sites