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Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

Posted Images

This vessel is not so cool at the moment, but it' very cool that there is a gov't out there willing to build it.

http://youtu.be/qPuB92yr7J4

 

This? http://www.remontowa-rsb.pl/newss/view/zaproszenie-na-wodowanie-zaglowca

 

photo.jpg

 

Spectacular launching frigates to the Algerian navy

http://www.tvn24.pl/pomorze,42/wodowanie-fregaty-el-mellah-bedzie-szkolnym-zaglowcem-dla-algierii,592617.html

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07a35f58c5d0c6e20f56413360e7987a.jpg

 

I really like how her sheer line matches the trough between her bow wave and quarter wave.

beauty and the beast

 

 

http://www.setsail.com/s_logs-dashew-dashew46/

 

The End (Bermuda to Newport): http://www.setsail.com/s_logs-dashew-dashew51/

 

Beowulf won the race! She arrived in Newport five hours before Rebecca.

78-foot-KETCH-BEOWULF200.jpg

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Very nice, but always thought that Rebecca's bow profile was neither one thing nor the other, especially compared to the counter. More spoon or more vertical needed, IMHO.

 

I see this. It's not something we see a lot of.

 

It's a bold design that's not in the bland and impractical "spirit of tradition" genre. A more vertical bow would be especially bold, to me, given the sheer spring and low freeboard.

 

Smaller boat, but I think Bob's Quail design evokes similar thoughts.

 

O131_zps16075be6.png

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... Frers is no fool when it comes to sheer lines. ... He could teach me a thing or two.

 

People have told me of Bob Perry's legendary humility. Now I see for myself that it's all true.

 

 

Boy, one lousy compliment and you get a reputation!

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Elegua My good friend.

 

I think the sheer spring in the hands of a skilled designer, such as Freres Is a thing of true beauty.

 

My dog just barked at me. I was going to post something really profound. But Noooooo.

 

My dog Ruby went to the boat yard today. She was amazing.

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I'm a bit in love - lust has returned to my aged bones.

 

5151555_20150713083123062_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

 

A Tiffany Jayne, by Paul Kotzebue - never heard of her or him. What a poppet, and yours for $10,000. Does anyone know of these? Californian built apparently.

 

I sometimes think you Americans are very lucky, the number of sweet boats at bargain prices. I'd end up with even more boats if I lived there!

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1981/C-%26-B-Marine-Boatbuilders-Tiffany-Jayne-2862902/Thomaston/ME/United-States#.VkSx8tLhCHs

 

5151555_20150713083121576_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

 

5151555_20150713083122165_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

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A couple friends bought a Tiffany Jane for dirt cheap as a project boat, sold it after fixing it up. Lovely boat. If it's in reasonably good condition, $10K is a good price. Not much interior room, but a sweet sailing boat.

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I have spoken with Paul K. several times. He did a 60' double ender some time back. Heavier displacement than FRANCIS, but a very interesting boat. I don't think any were ever built. I first saw the design in Boat Design Quarterly. Paul is a good guy.

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Here's an unexpected bit of thread miscegenation. While stalking Mr. K on the webs, I came across a motorsailer/sportfishing boat designed by him in the late 1980s. Did it get built, I wonder. I like that he's kept his enthusiasm for flush foredecks

 

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=InheK-WGcAcC&pg=RA5-PA87&lpg=RA5-PA87&dq=paul+kotzebue+boat+design&source=bl&ots=8VijGzRDQ7&sig=xYSq-t5SBhhDx94XFyM4tkuOV_0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CF0Q6AEwDGoVChMI7tupoPuMyQIVi3AaCh2JlwQK#v=onepage&q=paul%20kotzebue%20boat%20design&f=false

 

Ah, and here's the big boat Kim mentioned

 

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=TL6O6R4pzeYC&pg=PA61&lpg=PA61&dq=paul+kotzebue+boat+design&source=bl&ots=MY4g8HKUFM&sig=f-3f2RMQgRKP4MmZQEKoR7EKbjM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CB8Q6AEwADgKahUKEwip3unR_ozJAhVM0hoKHVjOCj8#v=onepage&q=paul%20kotzebue%20boat%20design&f=false

 

I see what you mean about displacement Kim - their light is 30,000 lbs - yours is 18,000 or so isn't it?

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talking about sheer lines...

 

stephens also knew something about it... Though, i must admit, she is a bit bow-up. but for an ocean racer it looked quite good.

 

 

Film is in dutch, deals from construction to the first 4000 miles of racing directly from the yard. (newport-bermuda, bermuda-cuxhaven, cuxhaven-ijmuiden)

 

Bruynzeel had Stephens design zeearend on the updated lines of Stormy Weather after he offered Ohlin a tow going up river when they were in the marina together in the Netherlands. Ohlin refused and tacked his way up the river. Bruynzeel with his engine couldn't keep up.

 

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talking about sheer lines...

 

stephens also knew something about it... Though, i must admit, she is a bit bow-up. but for an ocean racer it looked quite good.

 

 

Film is in dutch, deals from construction to the first 4000 miles of racing directly from the yard. (newport-bermuda, bermuda-cuxhaven, cuxhaven-ijmuiden)

 

Bruynzeel had Stephens design zeearend on the updated lines of Stormy Weather after he offered Ohlin a tow going up river when they were in the marina together in the Netherlands. Ohlin refused and tacked his way up the river. Bruynzeel with his engine couldn't keep up.

 

 

 

Great footage! Many thanks.

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Here's an unexpected bit of thread miscegenation. While stalking Mr. K on the webs, I came across a motorsailer/sportfishing boat designed by him in the late 1980s. Did it get built, I wonder. I like that he's kept his enthusiasm for flush foredecks

 

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=InheK-WGcAcC&pg=RA5-PA87&lpg=RA5-PA87&dq=paul+kotzebue+boat+design&source=bl&ots=8VijGzRDQ7&sig=xYSq-t5SBhhDx94XFyM4tkuOV_0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CF0Q6AEwDGoVChMI7tupoPuMyQIVi3AaCh2JlwQK#v=onepage&q=paul%20kotzebue%20boat%20design&f=false

 

Ah, and here's the big boat Kim mentioned

 

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=TL6O6R4pzeYC&pg=PA61&lpg=PA61&dq=paul+kotzebue+boat+design&source=bl&ots=MY4g8HKUFM&sig=f-3f2RMQgRKP4MmZQEKoR7EKbjM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CB8Q6AEwADgKahUKEwip3unR_ozJAhVM0hoKHVjOCj8#v=onepage&q=paul%20kotzebue%20boat%20design&f=false

 

I see what you mean about displacement Kim - their light is 30,000 lbs - yours is 18,000 or so isn't it?

The twin engine motorsailor did get built, lives at SDYC. Looks good for what it is.

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I like this video. Chock full of old boats and history. Fine narration and story telling. And come to find out at the very end, it was made right here in my town, Pacific Palisades, CA.

 

Great footage! What was with the guns? My sound was off, and it was a bit of a disconnect, (the sound was off to listen to news from Paris).

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Ed:

Yes I do understand. Allow me to explain.

 

With the boat in the water your eye looking at that boat will be close to level with the sheer. Your probably looking from another boat. So you see the sheer essentially in 2D.

 

Now haul the boat and sit it on the hard. The sheer is now 10 or 12' in the air, maybe more and well above your eye level, i.e. 5'6" above the hard.

So looking up you are now seeing the sheer in 3D. This means that the linear length of the sheer is now visually longer. There is visually more length of sheer for the same amount of spring thus exaggerating the spring.

 

For a 72'er of the era in question the sheer length in 2D profile is 72'

But in plan view the length of the sheer may be 1.125% of LOA or 81'. (I just made that 12.5% up. I think it's probably close.)

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Ed:

Yes I do understand. Allow me to explain.

 

With the boat in the water your eye looking at that boat will be close to level with the sheer. Your probably looking from another boat. So you see the sheer essentially in 2D.

 

Now haul the boat and sit it on the hard. The sheer is now 10 or 12' in the air, maybe more and well above your eye level, i.e. 5'6" above the hard.

So looking up you are now seeing the sheer in 3D. This means that the linear length of the sheer is now visually longer. There is visually more length of sheer for the same amount of spring thus exaggerating the spring.

 

For a 72'er of the era in question the sheer length in 2D profile is 72'

But in plan view the length of the sheer may be 1.125% of LOA or 81'. (I just made that 12.5% up. I think it's probably close.)

 

It's good to be smart even if it's only at one obscure thing.

 

Interesting, thank you. So the key thing is the position from which you view it.

 

Such a sad fuck am I, and so keen am I on not working, here's an experiment. It's raining, so I'm doing this from things I have indoors!

 

Here's a boat from a bridge, or low flying helicopter

 

IMG_0682-1024x768.jpg

 

 

Here's the same boat from the bridge of a passing fishing boat

 

IMG_0683-1024x768.jpg

 

 

From the deck of a slightly smaller boat:

 

IMG_0684-1024x768.jpg

 

 

And seen by a short person while laid up.

 

IMG_0685-1024x768.jpg

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Ed:

Great experiment and it shows exactly what I was trying to explain.

 

Now, take each photo and measure the length of the sheer you see. Don;t worry about scale if you don't know the scale of the model. We are just after relative numbers.

 

Looks like we have similar record collections.

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"measure the sheer"? You mean the apparent length of the hull deck join?

 

To my eye the springiest view of that is from no. 3, from just below deck level. From the very low one you can't sort of see the curve, though it's clearly higher at one end.

 

Wish I had time to listen to music these days - it's something I don't make time for in the same way I did once. Life will slow down one day

 

Must be because I spend too much time chatting about boats.

 

Now, I'm going to try and finish something and I'm not going to look at or think about boats for, let's say, a full hour. I'm scared of what I'm trying to avoid doing. Time to man up!

 

 

E

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Ed, please also provide a view which makes the sheer as straight as possible, so we know whether it's "planar" or not. That's fun for me.

 

I think it's the overhangs that mess with my mind. Look at the bow shape on Zwerver. With the volume forward the overhang is clearly there to extend sailing length when heeled. The rest of the boat is designed around that cheat. To me that's ugly.

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I mean the actual length along the cap rail in each photo.

It should be greatest in straight on plan veiw, waterplane parallel to eye plane

 

There are no "tricks" here, just geometry.

 

The length should be longest in plan view, looking straight down on the sheer, and get progressively shorter as you go towards true profile view.

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Camden-Maine-2012-405.jpg

 

Rebecca summers in Northeast Harbor, ME. A Google image search is worth the time.

 

The company I recently retired from did the new decks on Rebecca 2-3 years ago @ Pendennis Shipyards....decks were built in panels in Sarasota shipped and installed in Falmouth....all trimless....no room for error

 

 

That's a boat I'd be proud to own. I'll hire a bunch of enthusiastic young women to care for her.

 

Pendennis-superyacht-Rebecca-under-sail.

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Camden-Maine-2012-405.jpg

 

Rebecca summers in Northeast Harbor, ME. A Google image search is worth the time.

 

The company I recently retired from did the new decks on Rebecca 2-3 years ago @ Pendennis Shipyards....decks were built in panels in Sarasota shipped and installed in Falmouth....all trimless....no room for error

 

 

I was thinking about "no room for error" and the precision of building with regard to Bob's CF cutters. The deck is built separately from the hull, and the hull is not even built exactly to the final sheer line. I'm sure it will all fit together perfectly, which is pretty freaking amazing to a clumsy workman like me. A hundred years ago (or even less), building in wood, a yacht might come out a foot longer than shown on the plan. It's the difference between analog and digital methods.

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Ed, please also provide a view which makes the sheer as straight as possible, so we know whether it's "planar" or not. That's fun for me.

 

I think it's the overhangs that mess with my mind. Look at the bow shape on Zwerver. With the volume forward the overhang is clearly there to extend sailing length when heeled. The rest of the boat is designed around that cheat. To me that's ugly.

 

Well it looks quite straight to my eye in the bottom picture. Go on, explain planar to me again. I tried and failed to understand last time. But I promise to pay attention now.

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OK Ed:

Here we go again.

I thought you had my book. Planar sheers are explained very thoroughly with an illustration in my book.

 

Let's take a very simple and graphic approach.

 

Imagine a half hull with a lot of freeboard, maybe 24" more than you want. It has a dead flat, horizontal sheer. No spring.

You want lower freeboard and a nice spring.

 

Now imagine a humongous pane of .25" glass, longer and wider than the boat, the mother of all glass panes. This is our "plane"

 

Now imagine dropping that pane of glass into our hull, higher in the bow, lower in the stern and tilted down towards centerline for a reverse sheer and higher towards centerline for a conventional sheer. This gives us three points to define our "plane"

Now roll that plane around while keeping the end points fixed, until you get a pleasant sheer.

 

As I have explained many times, the easiest way to do this is with a half model and a table top. Hold the half model upside down, sheer towards the table top. Place the sheer on the table and roll it around until the entire sheer touches the table top. The table top is out "plane".

 

If you cannot get the entire sheer to lay on the table top then the sheer is not planar!

You can play this way with your half model in the photos but I suspect it is not planar.

 

A planar sheer is not "correct" or 'right". A planar sheer is just one way to do it. LFH never used a planar sheer to my knowledge. He may not have even known what it was. I imagine if you explained it to him he would have said,

"Why the fuck would I want to do that when I have an eye?"

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Well it looks quite straight to my eye in the bottom picture. Go on, explain planar to me again. I tried and failed to understand last time. But I promise to pay attention now.

Any curve drawn with only three control points is planar because any three points will always define a plane.

 

Curves drawn with four or more control points may or may not be planar; it's possible that one of the points isn't in the same plane as the other three.

 

The edge of the gray planar surface below is a planar curve. The yellow curve is non-planar:

 

planar_2015Nov14a.png

 

planar_2015Nov14b.png

 

planar_2015Nov14c.png

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kdh:

Yeah, but you have that bridge thing

and that draft thing

 

Good point.

 

For now I do but I'm just dreaming about being an old guy spending a lot of money and effort on boat maintenance and crew management. I imagine we'd be in Maine. Not sure why.

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OK Ed:

Here we go again.

I thought you had my book. Planar sheers are explained very thoroughly with an illustration in my book.

 

Let's take a very simple and graphic approach.

 

Imagine a half hull with a lot of freeboard, maybe 24" more than you want. It has a dead flat, horizontal sheer. No spring.

You want lower freeboard and a nice spring.

 

Now imagine a humongous pane of .25" glass, longer and wider than the boat, the mother of all glass panes. This is our "plane"

 

Now imagine dropping that pane of glass into our hull, higher in the bow, lower in the stern and tilted down towards centerline for a reverse sheer and higher towards centerline for a conventional sheer. This gives us three points to define our "plane"

Now roll that plane around while keeping the end points fixed, until you get a pleasant sheer.

 

As I have explained many times, the easiest way to do this is with a half model and a table top. Hold the half model upside down, sheer towards the table top. Place the sheer on the table and roll it around until the entire sheer touches the table top. The table top is out "plane".

 

If you cannot get the entire sheer to lay on the table top then the sheer is not planar!

You can play this way with your half model in the photos but I suspect it is not planar.

 

A planar sheer is not "correct" or 'right". A planar sheer is just one way to do it. LFH never used a planar sheer to my knowledge. He may not have even known what it was. I imagine if you explained it to him he would have said,

"Why the fuck would I want to do that when I have an eye?"

 

I've heard this story many times.

 

On LFH's "eye." What if his eye looks for a perspective where the sheer is straight?

 

Ann & Adele are off to the "Equine Affair" at the Big E fairgrounds.

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kdh:

Yeah, but you have that bridge thing

and that draft thing

 

Good point.

 

For now I do but I'm just dreaming about being an old guy spending a lot of money and effort on boat maintenance and crew management. I imagine we'd be in Maine. Not sure why.

 

 

 

Well, maybe talk to Zeyang, he seems to get lots of young women to build a boat for him, or the Trimaran guys in Indo, who get young ladies to pay to come out on the boat....

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"On LFH's "eye." What if his eye looks for a perspective where the sheer is straight?"

 

kdh:

I suspect that may be the case with several designers. Without a computer or a half model it is very difficult to construct a planar sheer. I'm not sure I could do it in 2D. I'm going to have t think about that.

 

OK, I think I have it. It would be fun. Not too much work.

 

I need to think about it more. I could do it.

You would have to establish the plane in the sectional view, with stations on the plane, then drop the half breadths of the sheer, plan view, down onto the plane then transfer those intersecting points over to the profile.

For a drafting nerd this is some really juicy shit.

 

I'd bet kdh could do it mathematically.

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"On LFH's "eye." What if his eye looks for a perspective where the sheer is straight?"

 

kdh:

I suspect that may be the case with several designers. Without a computer or a half model it is very difficult to construct a planar sheer. I'm not sure I could do it in 2D. I'm going to have t think about that.

 

OK, I think I have it. It would be fun. Not too much work.

 

I need to think about it more. I could do it.

You would have to establish the plane in the sectional view, with stations on the plane, then drop the half breadths of the sheer, plan view, down onto the plane then transfer those intersecting points over to the profile.

For a drafting nerd this is some really juicy shit.

 

I'd bet kdh could do it mathematically.

 

Mathematically plan and profile views are just projections.

 

Didn't LFH use half hulls when he designed a boat?

 

I can't imagine why the drafting nerd view would be different from the mathematical view.

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Zeearend near sistership Zwerver being redone at Rockport Marine right now

DCP_5.jpg

 

Maybe I haven't seen enough of these, but she evokes "banana" to my eye.

 

11710013_10153470258897179_4875388775170

 

thanks, i quite like these old racers. zwerver was also legendary in her days. Zeearend never fully lived up to it's potential though. but it is still my favorite yacht. offset companionways and all

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OK Ed:

Here we go again.

I thought you had my book. Planar sheers are explained very thoroughly with an illustration in my book.

 

Let's take a very simple and graphic approach.

 

Imagine a half hull with a lot of freeboard, maybe 24" more than you want. It has a dead flat, horizontal sheer. No spring.

You want lower freeboard and a nice spring.

 

Now imagine a humongous pane of .25" glass, longer and wider than the boat, the mother of all glass panes. This is our "plane"

 

Now imagine dropping that pane of glass into our hull, higher in the bow, lower in the stern and tilted down towards centerline for a reverse sheer and higher towards centerline for a conventional sheer. This gives us three points to define our "plane"

Now roll that plane around while keeping the end points fixed, until you get a pleasant sheer.

 

As I have explained many times, the easiest way to do this is with a half model and a table top. Hold the half model upside down, sheer towards the table top. Place the sheer on the table and roll it around until the entire sheer touches the table top. The table top is out "plane".

 

If you cannot get the entire sheer to lay on the table top then the sheer is not planar!

You can play this way with your half model in the photos but I suspect it is not planar.

 

A planar sheer is not "correct" or 'right". A planar sheer is just one way to do it. LFH never used a planar sheer to my knowledge. He may not have even known what it was. I imagine if you explained it to him he would have said,

"Why the fuck would I want to do that when I have an eye?"

I got it! Fucking brilliant explanation - well the table top part of it anyway. Thanks for your patience - some curmudgeon you turn out to be!

 

The chicken's alright - with baby turnips and grown up scallions. Our Japanese friend is bringing eel for starters.

 

Life is hell.

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"On LFH's "eye." What if his eye looks for a perspective where the sheer is straight?"

 

kdh:

I suspect that may be the case with several designers. Without a computer or a half model it is very difficult to construct a planar sheer. I'm not sure I could do it in 2D. I'm going to have t think about that.

 

OK, I think I have it. It would be fun. Not too much work.

 

I need to think about it more. I could do it.

You would have to establish the plane in the sectional view, with stations on the plane, then drop the half breadths of the sheer, plan view, down onto the plane then transfer those intersecting points over to the profile.

For a drafting nerd this is some really juicy shit.

 

I'd bet kdh could do it mathematically.

I don't think it's difficult to draw a planar sheer in 2D. Getting the exact planar sheer you want is a different story.

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"I don't think it's difficult to draw a planar sheer in 2D. Getting the exact planar sheer you want is a different story."

 

That's the whole point! It would be very time consuming construct different planes. I can do three a minute on the computer. Maybe more.

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Zeearend near sistership Zwerver being redone at Rockport Marine right now

DCP_5.jpg

 

Maybe I haven't seen enough of these, but she evokes "banana" to my eye.

 

11710013_10153470258897179_4875388775170

 

thanks, i quite like these old racers. zwerver was also legendary in her days. Zeearend never fully lived up to it's potential though. but it is still my favorite yacht. offset companionways and all

 

 

Those S&S boats from the 30's to the 50's with flush decks and the doghouse aft are just about the most beautiful sailboats ever IMO.

 

When I win the lottery I'm going to have Bob do me a small Night Runner version of one of them - maybe around 35' with less but still too much overhang and a way bigger rig.

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Jon: I am totally with you. Let's forget the custom Perry boat and go partners on one of those old beauties. I can enjoy a boat better when I don;t have to feel responsible for it. We can get some cool, vintage clothing. We will be styling. We'll be a floating time machine.

 

Just enjoyed my 39th wedding anniversary dinner with my ever patient wife. 39 years of marital bliss. Except for that one time when I cut her favorite branch off her favorite Japanese Maple.

Love you my dear.

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Puttin' on the Ritz. :D

 

If they'd been building with frozen snot in those days I'd say yeah but all those cubic yards of high grade wood to keep replacing? :o

 

Congrats on your 39th - we've only made it to 35 so far.

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Thanks kdh. Jill is a keeper. We have been through one very violent storm and come out battered but together. We can handle anything now.

Good on you, Bob & Jill. Congratulations. I've been married for 42 years and can confirm the first 42 are definitely the toughest. :)

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Jon: I am totally with you. Let's forget the custom Perry boat and go partners on one of those old beauties. I can enjoy a boat better when I don;t have to feel responsible for it. We can get some cool, vintage clothing. We will be styling. We'll be a floating time machine.

 

Just enjoyed my 39th wedding anniversary dinner with my ever patient wife. 39 years of marital bliss. Except for that one time when I cut her favorite branch off her favorite Japanese Maple.

Love you my dear.

 

I saw the remnants of that tree. You were lucky. Happy anniversary. :)

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Nice boat alert. I think.

 

Frers 44, built in Buenos Aires by Frers & Cibil, 1981. Interesting sheer perspective issues: - this looks very nearly flat to me

 

5385355_20150916063136608_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

 

but then you see it like this and it looks quite springy

 

5385355_20150916063345189_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

 

As does this (other example)

 

1981_fc_44_frers_cibils_ketch_sailboat_4

 

 

It looks beautifully finished super shiny wood interior. Odd access arrangements, with two companionways: the one from the cockpit going straight into what is described as the "master cabin", and the other, steeper and longer one over a bridge deck and into the main saloon.

 

Anyway I think it's cool. Don't think I'd heard of them before now, and I see there's quite a lot of them around the place.

 

http://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1981/F%26C-44-KETCH-2891226/United-Kingdom#.Vkj27LfhDgw

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Nice. Those Dorade boxes on the cabin look a bit chunky to my eye and I'm unsure about the obvious tumblehome amidships (is that to maybe keep the rail from burying?) but otherwise a sweet looking ketch. Very keen price too.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The boat is actually a 2008 build but the engine is a 1956 Johnson 10 hp.

 

The owner posted a video of it today on Woodenboat's FB page and said it went 21 mph. The boat is named Lil Tipsy.

 

It's a silly little boat with an engine that should be in a museum but he seemed to be having fun blasting around in it. I admire that, even if no sails are involved.

 

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The boat is actually a 2008 build but the engine is a 1956 Johnson 10 hp.

 

The owner posted a video of it today on Woodenboat's FB page and said it went 21 mph. The boat is named Lil Tipsy.

 

It's a silly little boat with an engine that should be in a museum but he seemed to be having fun blasting around in it. I admire that, even if no sails are involved.

 

12289757_10153207719181190_5289878096128

Nicely turned out. But that ensign staff is a bloody joke.

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The boat is actually a 2008 build but the engine is a 1956 Johnson 10 hp.

 

 

Nice project, the boat looks like it was build in 1956 too, and restored to many times. There is a lot wrong on it to my eyes..

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What is it?

It's been covered in this thread or the Uglyboat thread not too long ago. Tumblehome personified.

Saw it in Olympia Saturday morning. Kind of cool but kind of ugly also.

Designed and built by Scott Spraque for his own use. Actually a comfortable boat but weird looking. Scott is a very nice guy, he has sailed on FRANCIS with us. Good crew to have aboard.

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A motorboat, true. But a cool motorboat. (Not as cool as a C&N Gelyce class boat, but still cool).

 

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Long and narrow! I REALLY like that boat! If she were closer I might purchase and have that one restored! Do you have more information about her!?

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