Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 15.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

Posted Images

Kim: I totally understand. But the boat, with large amounts of money, can be corrected. Me? I suspect not.

Yes! I was looking at Adventuress anchored in Blakely Harbor last weekend and I noticed that Haven Boatworks' restoration work over the last couple years seem to have corrected the racking of her stern. She looks pretty good now (and she is past 100, I think she is circa 1913.)

 

So half mil or so into Red Jacket would do her well.

 

In any event she is a lovely vessel as is.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If any PNW deserves the full resto it's Red Jacket. I spent a fair bit of time "looking/dreaming/wife convincing" at her and Barlo, just too much boat for two people to comfortably handle. Barlo is on her way back at Jespersens, would be a shame is red jacket leaves the PNW but they are more than capable of making her right in the Bay area. Don't you need a new project Mr. Bottles.........

Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^ Bob, Thank you for the offer but I couldn't possibly break up your prized 80's pop collection. 😄

On a side note - not to drift the thread too badly - but our 70's era Technics turntable was stolen along with a great set of speakers and amp. So many options. And then there is hi-res streaming. Recommendations with a reasonable budget?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Southern:

There are lot of new turntables available for under $1,000 and a god selection for under $500. Most come with a decent cartridge and you can upgrade the cartridge later if you like. The more you spend on the table the more you will spend on the cartridge. For a table under $1,000 I'd go with a MM ( moving magnet) cartridge. If you go near $1,000 then you can consider a MC (moving coil) cartridge. MC will give you better sound but you need to check to see if the phono board in your amp is compatible with the output of the MC cartridge. Or you can buy a stand alone phono stage,Some pre amps do not come with phono boards. Some phono stages are as cheap as $200 (check out the Rega), and most of them will give you the option of MC or MM output. If you don;t pick up all the music at the cartridge nothing in your system will be able to restore it. It's all about the source! I use a NAIM phono stage with independent power supply. My turntable is a Linn Sondek LP12 and I use a Lyra Scala MC cartridge.

 

Look at the Pro Ject tables. They have a good range under $500 and they are quite good. I'd start there.

 

Check out Jerry Raskin the Needle Doctor web site for more turntable ideas. They have some good sales people there.

 

Lots of refurbished used tables available too. But you would want a new cartridge. Cartridges can age and lose their vitality.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Red jacket is right here in Foss Harbor. We've been aboard a couple times and the people are very very nice and the boat is actually in really good shape. The nice thing about that Helm enclosure is that it looks like it could be removed very quickly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ish,

 

I think that boat is a LeCompte 35. Designed by Bill Tripp so it is very similar to the Columbia's of that era. A friend of mine had the 38 and it was a fine boat. I like the flush foredeck of the 35 better though.

 

http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=1647

 

 

5840620_20160614173501522_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

 

 

I like it, but what is it? I didn't find a match on sailboatdata.com, pretty sure it's a Columbia of some sort.

 

colum.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Red jacket is right here in Foss Harbor. We've been aboard a couple times and the people are very very nice and the boat is actually in really good shape. The nice thing about that Helm enclosure is that it looks like it could be removed very quickly.

Yeah, it looks portable. Maybe just for transits.

Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ Bob, thanks for the info on turntables. The plethora of choices on consumer products is maddening. And I thought choosing a boat was difficult. By the way how do these tables work tipped at 15 - 25 degrees with a rolling motion?

Link to post
Share on other sites

If any PNW deserves the full resto it's Red Jacket. I spent a fair bit of time "looking/dreaming/wife convincing" at her and Barlo, just too much boat for two people to comfortably handle. Barlo is on her way back at Jespersens, would be a shame is red jacket leaves the PNW but they are more than capable of making her right in the Bay area. Don't you need a new project Mr. Bottles.........

The thought has crossed my mind.......

Link to post
Share on other sites

Southern:

There are lot of new turntables available for under $1,000 and a god selection for under $500. Most come with a decent cartridge and you can upgrade the cartridge later if you like. The more you spend on the table the more you will spend on the cartridge. For a table under $1,000 I'd go with a MM ( moving magnet) cartridge. If you go near $1,000 then you can consider a MC (moving coil) cartridge. MC will give you better sound but you need to check to see if the phono board in your amp is compatible with the output of the MC cartridge. Or you can buy a stand alone phono stage,Some pre amps do not come with phono boards. Some phono stages are as cheap as $200 (check out the Rega), and most of them will give you the option of MC or MM output. If you don;t pick up all the music at the cartridge nothing in your system will be able to restore it. It's all about the source! I use a NAIM phono stage with independent power supply. My turntable is a Linn Sondek LP12 and I use a Lyra Scala MC cartridge.

 

Look at the Pro Ject tables. They have a good range under $500 and they are quite good. I'd start there.

 

Check out Jerry Raskin the Needle Doctor web site for more turntable ideas. They have some good sales people there.

 

Lots of refurbished used tables available too. But you would want a new cartridge. Cartridges can age and lose their vitality.

I'll second The Needle Doctor. Good selection, fast service. I have an ancient Tecnics direct-drive turntable that's held up well for 40 years. You can spend more of course. Ortefon cartridge that still sounds great.

I've been very happy with my JBL 4311 studio monitors. Expensive when new 40 years ago, but they're cheap on eBay now. They do require a pretty powerful amp though..

Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ Bob, thanks for the info on turntables. The plethora of choices on consumer products is maddening. And I thought choosing a boat was difficult. By the way how do these tables work tipped at 15 - 25 degrees with a rolling motion?

Many many years ago we ran a sound system float in the Notting Hill carnival with a Garrard 301 slung on shock cord between the legs of an upturned table. No, it didn't work very well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

If any PNW deserves the full resto it's Red Jacket. I spent a fair bit of time "looking/dreaming/wife convincing" at her and Barlo, just too much boat for two people to comfortably handle. Barlo is on her way back at Jespersens, would be a shame is red jacket leaves the PNW but they are more than capable of making her right in the Bay area. Don't you need a new project Mr. Bottles.........

The thought has crossed my mind.......

 

All tuned up...west coast campaign for her 100th... clean house in cali...right conditions she might catch Sir Isaac.....definately be toe to toe with Barlo...

the gears gotta be turning....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Southern:

I feel your pain. I feel the same way about a new kitchen faucet.

 

Monsoon:

Exactly. Maybe they thought is would help because it looked more IOR-ish.

I think at one time Dick Carter owned a Medalist. Pure Tripp at his best.

 

Ed:

Maybe that was a shot at trying to replicate what Linn was doing with their turntable. My Linn has the "plinth" suspended on springs inside the wooden case. The idea is to isolate the platter from any unwanted vibrations. The Linn is still the turntable to beat. But there is a Dutch turntable that costs $100,000. They come to your house to set it up for you. Bruce King has a Rockport, I think, which uses a vacuum pump, located in another room, to suck the record down onto the platter. I'm afraid I'd sit there trying to hear the pump. It becomes an illness when you spend your listening time listening to your gear rather than the music,

" My name is Bob and I am an audiophile."

Link to post
Share on other sites

^^never quite understood the new build replicas. I can certainly sympythise with the irrational idiocy in owning and maintaining a wooden boat, but to spend a million dollars re-creating something like Bounty I don't. If you have the money a boat like Gannon and Benjiman's Rebbeca yes that makes wood boat crazy person sense but not sure about Bounty.

 

Some people are just history buffs.

 

20141019193131_h5.jpg

 

When they rebuilt the Hermione, they decided to be follow the ancient way, they had to do all kind of research, carpenters had to relearn old techniques etc... Might seem pointless but if you don't do pointless, you don't go sailing your boat on a Saturday afternoon!

 

When I was living in Bristol, one of my small pleasures was going to the Underfall Yard and have a chat about the boats there. A pilot cutter replica was being built there in the late noughties, it is amazing to see the design considering the technology of the time especially the limits on shape of traditional "heavy planking". If pilot cutters were still built today for business IMHO they would be super fast deep draft fin keelers or multihulls.

 

staryachts_aboutus_main_image.jpg

 

I don't think that I would finance one even if I had the funds but I understand where those people come from. And they make the sea a more interesting place to be...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Southern:

I feel your pain. I feel the same way about a new kitchen faucet.

 

Monsoon:

Exactly. Maybe they thought is would help because it looked more IOR-ish.

I think at one time Dick Carter owned a Medalist. Pure Tripp at his best.

 

Ed:

Maybe that was a shot at trying to replicate what Linn was doing with their turntable. My Linn has the "plinth" suspended on springs inside the wooden case. The idea is to isolate the platter from any unwanted vibrations. The Linn is still the turntable to beat. But there is a Dutch turntable that costs $100,000. They come to your house to set it up for you. Bruce King has a Rockport, I think, which uses a vacuum pump, located in another room, to suck the record down onto the platter. I'm afraid I'd sit there trying to hear the pump. It becomes an illness when you spend your listening time listening to your gear rather than the music,

" My name is Bob and I am an audiophile."

A techie cousin invited me round once to "listen to his hi-fi". I made an excuse.

 

So embarrassed am I by my covert enthusiasm for these sort of things that I furtively researched and bought a relatively exotic CD player to replace our old one and installed it without telling Mrs Ed. Her first comment on coming in was "the music sounds good", which warmed the heart of my inner anorak.

 

On the subject of suspension Mrs E s a neuroscientist, and when they're doing their experiments measuring pico-amps they use air tables where the bench is suspended on air to isolate it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I stopped churning my electronics once I tried some Naim gear. I've been running the same "chrome bumper" pre/amp/supply for 20 years and it still impresses me. I've had my KEF 101 speakers for 30 years and will be buried with them. It's hard to beat the UK for hifi gear, at least to my ears.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I stopped churning my electronics once I tried some Naim gear. I've been running the same "chrome bumper" pre/amp/supply for 20 years and it still impresses me. I've had my KEF 101 speakers for 30 years and will be buried with them. It's hard to beat the UK for hifi gear, at least to my ears.

I have a very soft spot for old tannoy speakers. When I was young and music-struck a sound engineer explained why they didn't use the tannoy Lancaster speakers for the final mix because they made everything sound good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty much with Sassy on this "replica" thing. I don't want to replicate anything another designer did. I want to do my own stuff, my way. Brahms admired Beethoven and composed Symphonies i the LVB style but they were different. I have worked in what you could call the LFH stye but I did it with my own twist. I want people to look at my work and see my eye and not a replica of what another designer has done. FT!

Ct65_zpsceb7579f.jpg

 

LFH would shudder at that reference.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have Tannoys in the master bedroom.

 

I have a similar story Ed:

I started my NAIM adventure with a NAIM pre amp and a NAIM cd player. I brought them home and installed them without my wife seeing me. I picked out a Gordon Ligfhtfoot cd ( Gord was "our" singer) and put it on. A few seconds into the song my wife came into the living room with tears in her eyes and hugged me. I've been a NAIM guy ever since.

 

The beauty of NAIM was/is the black boxes seldom changed as you upgraded. So you could go out on a Saturday, drop a couple thousand or more on a new piece, bring it home and install it and the wifey would never even notice! I once called NAIM and I talked to Julian Veriker, the founder. I knew he was a sailor. We had a nice long chat. I'll stick with NAIM but I do really love my new Tag McClaren tuner.

 

My office system is AudioNote UK tube integrated amp with NAIM CDX and AudioNote speakers with a Carver tuner.

 

If I ever feel guilty about my hi-fi illness all I have to do is go take a look at Kim's Ham radio setup. It's like the space shuttle in that room.

 

Global:

I think you are right. Sorry LFH.

In fact that design has far more to do with the work of Bill Garden than it does LFH.

The trailboards are similar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

If any PNW deserves the full resto it's Red Jacket. I spent a fair bit of time "looking/dreaming/wife convincing" at her and Barlo, just too much boat for two people to comfortably handle. Barlo is on her way back at Jespersens, would be a shame is red jacket leaves the PNW but they are more than capable of making her right in the Bay area. Don't you need a new project Mr. Bottles.........

 

The thought has crossed my mind.......

All tuned up...west coast campaign for her 100th... clean house in cali...right conditions she might catch Sir Isaac.....definately be toe to toe with Barlo...

the gears gotta be turning....

Speaking of Barlo.........Ish and I visited Eric a few weeks back.

 

Full on restoration underway!!

post-8115-0-96659100-1474918280_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-24962100-1474918314_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-93777400-1474918344_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I stopped churning my electronics once I tried some Naim gear. I've been running the same "chrome bumper" pre/amp/supply for 20 years and it still impresses me. I've had my KEF 101 speakers for 30 years and will be buried with them. It's hard to beat the UK for hifi gear, at least to my ears.

Speaking of British, Andrew Jones, former Pioneer speaker guru went to Elac and I've read the new speakers are amazing for $500 +.

Link to post
Share on other sites

also went with Naim. Got a superuniti and some Neat Momentum 4i speakers. Turntable is a michell gyrodec. pretty happy so far. used to have the Musical fidelity KW250s, which also was a great piece of kit. but needed something where the kids weren't tempted to put a peanut butter sandwich in the cd drawer.... Speakers back then were the Anthony Gallo 3.1's. All in all a very good set as well

Link to post
Share on other sites

JMOD:

Those Gallo's look very interesting. I have never heard them. I am very limited in the shack's living room for what I can do with speakers. I use Epos 12's with a sub.. Looking for something better for the last eight years. Maybe something with a ribbon tweater. Has to be under 18" tall. What cartridge on the Gyrodeck?

Link to post
Share on other sites

JMOD:

Those Gallo's look very interesting. I have never heard them. I am very limited in the shack's living room for what I can do with speakers. I use Epos 12's with a sub.. Looking for something better for the last eight years. Maybe something with a ribbon tweater. Has to be under 18" tall. What cartridge on the Gyrodeck?

 

Thanks, the gallo's worked quite well in my living room, which was about 40m2. sound wise they are form follows function instead of a design speaker. they really were that good. There are loads of good small speakers. also look for the Guru speakers. they punch well above their weight!

 

The gyrodec has a dynavector 17D3 cartridge which is very good. I also upgraded it with the orbe clamp, but not the platter. great table all in all.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I might go back to this rig.

hi%20fi_zpsj9qooeq6.jpg

 

Those old Clairtones are collector's items now. Don't know how good they actually sounded, but they were built just up the road from me...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/stellarton-museum-of-industry-clairtone-stereos-factory-1.3758425

Link to post
Share on other sites

As a general rule for stereo gear BITD, the zoomier the packaging, the lower the sound quality. The only exception I can recall was B&O and even their stuff was individual components.

 

Every one of those "space age" or Jetsons stereos I ever heard had, at best, middling quality sound.

 

Some of them (like that one) sure looked cool though.

 

Check out some of these;

 

https://ca.images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTcda52OpXg.gAXlcXFwx.;_ylu=X3oDMTBsOXB2YTRjBHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2dxMQR2dGlkAw--?_adv_prop=image&fr=yhs-tightrope-tig4&sz=all&va=space+age+stereos&hspart=tightrope&hsimp=yhs-tig4

Link to post
Share on other sites

As a general rule for stereo gear BITD, the zoomier the packaging, the lower the sound quality. The only exception I can recall was B&O and even their stuff was individual components.

 

Every one of those "space age" or Jetsons stereos I ever heard had, at best, middling quality sound.

 

Some of them (like that one) sure looked cool though.

 

Check out some of these;

 

https://ca.images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTcda52OpXg.gAXlcXFwx.;_ylu=X3oDMTBsOXB2YTRjBHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2dxMQR2dGlkAw--?_adv_prop=image&fr=yhs-tightrope-tig4&sz=all&va=space+age+stereos&hspart=tightrope&hsimp=yhs-tig4

This is what happens when you do form over function.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't do churn. I used to, but once I set up my current gear, I just stopped. That was around 1984, I think. I couldn't afford new sails and new audio gear. My Celestion Ditton 551's still sound good, even if they take up a lot of space.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the highest I ever went was a nice set of four Paradigm bookcase speakers. But the polyurethane in the cones has all rotted and they're stacked up in the garage, waiting for me to source replacement parts, or someone who will repair them. Not sure if it's worth it. My parents had a classic Marantz console stereo in walnut. When some tube finally burned out, and replacements could no longer be had at the grocery store, Dad threw the whole thing on the burn pile. :blink:

 

But wait... why aren't we talking about designing sound systems for sailboats. I've never actually seen a boat with a decent sound system.

 

Never mind, I'll go start a thread...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't do churn. I used to, but once I set up my current gear, I just stopped. That was around 1984, I think. I couldn't afford new sails and new audio gear. My Celestion Ditton 551's still sound good, even if they take up a lot of space.

 

I stopped even earlier - around '77. Marantz 1150/120, Technics turntable and Altec Lansing 15's. Got a Sony CD rotisserie for my birthday a few years later. I never changed it because I never heard anything that sounded better - and I never will now that my hearing goes off a cliff at 1500 Hz. :angry:

 

Apparently it's all collectible now and worth about what I paid for it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As a general rule for stereo gear BITD, the zoomier the packaging, the lower the sound quality. The only exception I can recall was B&O and even their stuff was individual components.

 

Every one of those "space age" or Jetsons stereos I ever heard had, at best, middling quality sound.

 

Some of them (like that one) sure looked cool though.

 

Check out some of these;

 

https://ca.images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTcda52OpXg.gAXlcXFwx.;_ylu=X3oDMTBsOXB2YTRjBHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2dxMQR2dGlkAw--?_adv_prop=image&fr=yhs-tightrope-tig4&sz=all&va=space+age+stereos&hspart=tightrope&hsimp=yhs-tig4

Most of those look like BBQs to me.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been reading a biography of Raymond Hunt. This is one of his designs which he called the Shoaler. It was a deep-bodied centerboard boat, and was a successful racer. It was said to be fast (but all boats that make it into books are said to be fast).

 

 

Sandscraper.jpg

 

It's possible that this design was the seed for Ted Hood's centerboard boats. Hood was some years younger than Hunt, and crewed with Hunt on various racing boats while still a teenager. He would have known all about the Shoaler designs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

that's a cool set to look at. Don't know about sound quality

 

The sonndeck is absolutely a brilliant bit of kid and doesn't require a clamp. The michell gyrodec was designed with one. and changing from a simple clamp to the one that actually couples the record to the platter made a huge difference for that table.

I think I might go back to this rig.

hi%20fi_zpsj9qooeq6.jpg

 


good looking boat!

 

Spent all night looking at this one....oh if money were no object...

Serinisailplanlargeview.jpeg


Beauty.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Spent all night looking at this one....oh if money were no object...

Serinisailplanlargeview.jpeg

 

I like the pilot house Sloop version better, but SWMBO says I have enough sailboat already in FRANCIS LEE.

 

Kim,

 

Do you mean the 'Landau Roof' version?

5tuUPJC.png

Yeah! That is a very appealing vessel, I would have a very hard time deciding between that one and that mega cool motorsailer Bob designed a while back.

 

I have my Daysailer, now I have to convince my lovely wife that we need a cruising boat! (And a larger powerboat too, like that really cool 63' Nigel Irens designed Mollie Ban.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rass the S is a nice detail. Boat is definately BP signature. Where does the main sheet? Looks like it would have to go to the Pilot house top, would change the esthetic some. I like the modern take on the butterfly hatch, was thinking about doing something like that on our boat. It has some traditional feel with the hatch placments and round port placement in the hull. I still love the look of the other one better although probably without the center cockpit, the proportions are very pleasing. The sloop is certainly more efficiant but it looks like you could get away from any powered stuff on the smaller split rig.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Spent all night looking at this one....oh if money were no object...

Serinisailplanlargeview.jpeg

I like the pilot house Sloop version better, but SWMBO says I have enough sailboat already in FRANCIS LEE.

 

Kim,

 

Do you mean the 'Landau Roof' version?

5tuUPJC.png

Yeah! That is a very appealing vessel, I would have a very hard time deciding between that one and that mega cool motorsailer Bob designed a while back.

 

I have my Daysailer, now I have to convince my lovely wife that we need a cruising boat! (And a larger powerboat too, like that really cool 63' Nigel Irens designed Mollie Ban.)

 

I agree completely. I decided since I am fantasizing and money wouldn't be a consideration, I would take one of each.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been reading a biography of Raymond Hunt. This is one of his designs which he called the Shoaler. It was a deep-bodied centerboard boat, and was a successful racer. It was said to be fast (but all boats that make it into books are said to be fast).

 

 

Sandscraper.jpg

 

It's possible that this design was the seed for Ted Hood's centerboard boats. Hood was some years younger than Hunt, and crewed with Hunt on various racing boats while still a teenager. He would have known all about the Shoaler designs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, being a long time 110 sailor, I can attest that Ray Hunt knew how to design fast boats. Obviously these things are relative, particularly when considering modern designs. In the case of the 110, the hull shape and resulting speed potential was definitely far ahead of its time. Overall Ray Hunt seemed to have considerable intuition about what would be fast.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here you go. The lines at the tip of the bow are slightly distorted because the page was not lying flat on the scanner at the edge near the binding.


Shoaler LInes



Fenwick Williams worked for Hunt for many years. I think more Hunt plans were "drawn by FCW" than not. Williams was legally blind. Hunt was quite open about the fact that Williams was responsible for all the detail.



Shoaler Section

Link to post
Share on other sites

Design Elements of a Catboat by Fenwick Williams (1976)

 

Seems to be out of print, and, strangely, I don't have a copy myself.

 

Williams also designed this boat named Annie. There was a huge fuss made about it when she was launched.

 

bcad757087206087d86ee89965fbe72b.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Williams boats are traditional, but good looking. I like Annie. The shoaled is very Ted Hood looking, but I don't like the sheer...it looks like a banana.

I like Hunts designs, he wasn't afraid to be different, and usually pulled it off. Bertram 31 is a classic...still in demand today, they get big $ on the used market. Boston Whaler, iirc. He designed a 6 meter with mast in stern and one big jib. I think he also put a cat rig on a Concordia. Okay, maybe those last 2 weren't such good ideas, but he didn't hold back from trying them out.

Link to post
Share on other sites