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Of course to have a boom gallows that's lower, you'd have to drop the Bimini

 

Indeed! (and we wouldn't want to do THAT, now would we?)

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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

A cool boat: Our dinghy. I had to replace the canvas rub rail this spring. This is the second one. It costs $150 to go around the boat with this stuff. Seems the last time I did it, it was less than $

Available as a sloop or yawl.

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I admire this stern design. Plain vanilla race cockpits are functionally beautiful but this really holds the eye. The cockpit sole seems to complement the look.

http://www.paolobua.com/mt-8-leggero-l8/

 

 

 

That's impressive design.

 

Very functional, very elegant, and very light -- apart from the teak, which is nicely low.

 

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I admire this stern design. Plain vanilla race cockpits are functionally beautiful but this really holds the eye. The cockpit sole seems to complement the look.

http://www.paolobua.com/mt-8-leggero-l8/

 

 

I like the look of that boat, and the huge cockpit (all that teak helps--a lot), and the rig is very cool and admirable. But when you're pushing it on a broad reach and broach, and you will wipe out eventually, that's a huge slug of water to take on, even briefly. I would have to test it and see what happens on a nice warm day in southern Italy.

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Just looks unfinished to me.

 

"Deconstruction". The Italians probably started that trend in fashion wear also. Like fashion wear it won't last, hopefully.

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I dont know if she is " to admire " but it's very unusual to see this kind of boat . Sh's called " Oberion II " . Do you know something about this boat ?

 

d57419518481935.jpg c4006a518482021.jpg 29102d518482121.jpg

 

 

 

Thanks everybody for all the precisions . I have learned a lot of things

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/youtu.be/v6qZ4qXUeW0

I remember reading "adventure in depth"...in another time...

he was a submarine commander during the war so is unlikely to scare easily... a man larger than life doubtful that they make them like that any more...

 

I am adding that to my reading list. My uncle was a submarine commander in the Navy of Norway. All kids serve and he just stayed on.

I'm sure Ajax has some stories, too.

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

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Norse:

I feel you may be taking me way out of context with that comment.

I view each boat project individually. Some are elegant and some are crude. Simple as that. The one in your pic looks very nice.

Maybe we need to have a little chat on the definition of "cruse". I see nothing at all "crude" with the boat in your pic. A simple shape does not mean a "crude" shape.

 

You don't see any similar Perry designs because no one has ever asked for one. My designs all come from client requests.

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Norse:

I feel you may be taking me way out of context with that comment.

I view each boat project individually. Some are elegant and some are crude. Simple as that. The one in your pic looks very nice.

Maybe we need to have a little chat on the definition of "cruse". I see nothing at all "crude" with the boat in your pic. A simple shape does not mean a "crude" shape.

 

You don't see any similar Perry designs because no one has ever asked for one. My designs all come from client requests.

The quote I read was short, with no context. What other small designs draw your eye after a lifetime of drawing?

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Norse:

I really do not follow what is available in small, home builder projects. I have been rather busy with my own work.

My favorite dinghy is the TASAR. I owned one for a few years and I found it a lot of fun. Great performance for a boat with no chute. Good racing in Seattle.

When I go to the Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend I look at the kit boats offered but only in passing. There are some very beautiful examples. Some day, maybe but with so many nice ones available I doubt I would design my own.

 

For now I am tied up in several new bigger boat projects. Maybe when things slow down I can look harder at small boats. "Small" for me now is 42.27'. That's what the client wants.

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

 

Yes, small boats are fun, you don't get the same connection to wind and water on a big boat even a racing one.

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

 

Yes, small boats are fun, you don't get the same connection to wind and water on a big boat even a racing one.

 

I saw this boat up close several years ago in Maryland while at a woodenboat regatta. It was a great example of a lot of ideas executed without much in the way of knowledge both from a design standpoint, and also from a practical sailors standpoint. The fellow that designed and built the boat was super nice, but definitely disappointed in how dreadful the performance was. My friend of mine and I were not!.... so many things wrong with this boat. That picture is probably the best possible angle. A transom view would demonstrate what I'm talking about clearly.

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Those other boats at the dock seem worth talking about too. Any information?

THUNDERHEAD is the far large boat. Smaller boats are a Herreshoff 12 1/2 and a Herreshoff Rozinante' yawl.

 

The blue hull is a Fontaine design. Like a few boats around here this season, it hit a ledge.

 

That required pulling the keel, which was easiest done by rolling the boat upside down. I think it's going back together now.

 

It seems like once they have all the boats launched in the spring, a few start coming back in(if they were lucky and didn't sink), for rock collision repairs. I bet all the crashes will be ready by spring.

 

I like this boat but it's not a good one for hitting ledges. I own a ledge crusher, I l know myself. :)

 

23548018891_9c4d9f6e61_b.jpg

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Here's ARABESQUE just out of the building sheds. Nice boat, she's pretty to look at and photograph. I like them all, new old, good design is good design.

 

30684632313_b9f61f3452_h.jpg

 

Still, it's hard to find the best angle to take a photograph of a boat. I found ARABESQUE looked best to my eye from the stern quarter, going away (as in the slings with a blue hull).

 

The men and women at Rockport Marine are amazing craftsmen. It's a treat to see these builds come out, year after year. This was the second Fontaine daysailer built at RM. Arabesque is a 50'er. The last Fontaine was a 36'er.

 

I love the cockpits in both the Fontaine boats. I don't care about the daysailer debate (not my thing), I just like seeing these big cockpits, wide decks, and the fine craftsmanship. ARABESQUE is deceiving in size(and my 10mm lens doesn't help...).

 

Because it's a low freeboard boat, it seems smaller. These boat builders show the scale. This is push button boat: PUSH button - sails raise. PUSH button again - sails lower. Something breaks, call the builder...

 

31456053826_f9028e9e33_h.jpg

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

 

Yes, small boats are fun, you don't get the same connection to wind and water on a big boat even a racing one.

 

I saw this boat up close several years ago in Maryland while at a woodenboat regatta. It was a great example of a lot of ideas executed without much in the way of knowledge both from a design standpoint, and also from a practical sailors standpoint. The fellow that designed and built the boat was super nice, but definitely disappointed in how dreadful the performance was. My friend of mine and I were not!.... so many things wrong with this boat. That picture is probably the best possible angle. A transom view would demonstrate what I'm talking about clearly.

 

 

What is so wrong with it? Is it slow, dangerous, badly mannered, impractical?

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

 

Yes, small boats are fun, you don't get the same connection to wind and water on a big boat even a racing one.

 

I saw this boat up close several years ago in Maryland while at a woodenboat regatta. It was a great example of a lot of ideas executed without much in the way of knowledge both from a design standpoint, and also from a practical sailors standpoint. The fellow that designed and built the boat was super nice, but definitely disappointed in how dreadful the performance was. My friend of mine and I were not!.... so many things wrong with this boat. That picture is probably the best possible angle. A transom view would demonstrate what I'm talking about clearly.

 

 

What is so wrong with it? Is it slow, dangerous, badly mannered, impractical?

 

I admire that the guy tried something himself and will likely try again.

 

Also I admire the east coast boatbuilding spirit and tradition. We only have that in some small pockets out here. The popularity of sea kayaking, snowboarding, windsurfing, kiting or other sports have filled the recreational void.

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

 

Yes, small boats are fun, you don't get the same connection to wind and water on a big boat even a racing one.

 

I saw this boat up close several years ago in Maryland while at a woodenboat regatta. It was a great example of a lot of ideas executed without much in the way of knowledge both from a design standpoint, and also from a practical sailors standpoint. The fellow that designed and built the boat was super nice, but definitely disappointed in how dreadful the performance was. My friend of mine and I were not!.... so many things wrong with this boat. That picture is probably the best possible angle. A transom view would demonstrate what I'm talking about clearly.

 

 

What is so wrong with it? Is it slow, dangerous, badly mannered, impractical?

 

Yes.

 

I would guess that it looks like a triangle in plan view. Not enough volume forward to get it to plane easily, and the deep forefoot, low volume forward and the LCF way aft probably makes it dig the bow in and difficult to steer.

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Arabesque has a bow thruster?

Yeah. Tricky that one.

 

Bow thrusters on smaller boats are a pet hate of mine.... people should just learn to handle their boats.

 

I reckon if a boat is under 50 feet and 30,000lbs then the complexity and ugliness of a bow thruster is uneccessary.

 

Arabesque is just over those numbers.

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

 

 

You can design quite the same shape just with a paper sheet and two staples . LOL

 

07b0cd519182157.jpg 55c9f6519182178.jpg

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I watched as a kid Bill back and fill Tlingit between the docks at Canoe Cove. He had her loaded with timber, he took 20 shots at it and ten minutes. Coming inches from crashing. When he finally makes the last turn for sea he gives me that look...no problem, that's how its done son, I'll never forget it.

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Arabesque has a bow thruster?

The Fontaine 36' had a bow thruster, too.

 

31389846491_0b5f1c8f50_h.jpg

 

Fontaine designed and sold these boats to owners before building got started. They were packed with state of the art kit. The 36 design was draft driven for an owner with a shallow water home. Has a centerboard of course.

 

Despite being quite beamy, it looked nice in the water.

 

23271012829_b6d3526aab_b.jpg

 

Another Fontaine cockpit.

 

23531551502_74ef136bce_b.jpg

 

Now that I think of it, I was inspired by this cockpit. The design team at RM worked on it and the craftsmen built it off the boat. They just lowered it in place. My old boat, stored outside, needed a new cockpit so I did the same thing(sort of-built at home and lowered in place this past spring).

 

I'm the one that needs a bow thruster...

 

30648593311_745ce2cb35_h.jpg

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Very salty looking cockpit on your boat, Kris. Nice job.

 

Fontaine designs are sexy and beautiful. That 36er is lustworthy. Also love this catboat.

 

SetWidth700-Wooden-Boat-Original2.jpg

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Arabesque has a bow thruster?

The Fontaine 36' had a bow thruster, too.

 

31389846491_0b5f1c8f50_h.jpg

 

Fontaine designed and sold these boats to owners before building got started. They were packed with state of the art kit. The 36 design was draft driven for an owner with a shallow water home. Has a centerboard of course.

 

Despite being quite beamy, it looked nice in the water.

 

23271012829_b6d3526aab_b.jpg

 

Another Fontaine cockpit.

 

23531551502_74ef136bce_b.jpg

 

Now that I think of it, I was inspired by this cockpit. The design team at RM worked on it and the craftsmen built it off the boat. They just lowered it in place. My old boat, stored outside, needed a new cockpit so I did the same thing(sort of-built at home and lowered in place this past spring).

 

I'm the one that needs a bow thruster...

 

30648593311_745ce2cb35_h.jpg

I like this boat. I'm very familiar with the hull shape, as I put many miles on a Morgan-designed CB One-ton with a similar shape, plus did a long delivery on a Hood-designed 52' yawl of that shape. Very kindly sea boats, with a very steady and comfortable motion. The bow thruster may be a 'necessity'. While the Morgan turned reasonably well with the board up, the Hood def required a little board down to turn. If your dock had shallow water and tight turns, a bow thruster would be a huge help.
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Arabesque has a bow thruster?

The Fontaine 36' had a bow thruster, too.

 

31389846491_0b5f1c8f50_h.jpg

 

Fontaine designed and sold these boats to owners before building got started. They were packed with state of the art kit. The 36 design was draft driven for an owner with a shallow water home. Has a centerboard of course.

 

Despite being quite beamy, it looked nice in the water.

 

23271012829_b6d3526aab_b.jpg

 

Another Fontaine cockpit.

 

23531551502_74ef136bce_b.jpg

 

Now that I think of it, I was inspired by this cockpit. The design team at RM worked on it and the craftsmen built it off the boat. They just lowered it in place. My old boat, stored outside, needed a new cockpit so I did the same thing(sort of-built at home and lowered in place this past spring).

 

I'm the one that needs a bow thruster...

 

30648593311_745ce2cb35_h.jpg

I like this boat. I'm very familiar with the hull shape, as I put many miles on a Morgan-designed CB One-ton with a similar shape, plus did a long delivery on a Hood-designed 52' yawl of that shape. Very kindly sea boats, with a very steady and comfortable motion. The bow thruster may be a 'necessity'. While the Morgan turned reasonably well with the board up, the Hood def required a little board down to turn. If your dock had shallow water and tight turns, a bow thruster would be a huge help.

 

 

 

Oo, I want that throttle control!

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

Yes, small boats are fun, you don't get the same connection to wind and water on a big boat even a racing one.

I saw this boat up close several years ago in Maryland while at a woodenboat regatta. It was a great example of a lot of ideas executed without much in the way of knowledge both from a design standpoint, and also from a practical sailors standpoint. The fellow that designed and built the boat was super nice, but definitely disappointed in how dreadful the performance was. My friend of mine and I were not!.... so many things wrong with this boat. That picture is probably the best possible angle. A transom view would demonstrate what I'm talking about clearly.

What is so wrong with it? Is it slow, dangerous, badly mannered, impractical?

Yes.

 

I would guess that it looks like a triangle in plan view. Not enough volume forward to get it to plane easily, and the deep forefoot, low volume forward and the LCF way aft probably makes it dig the bow in and difficult to steer.

The Merlin rocket has a similar bow. AFAIK they don't suffer from all these issues.

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Note: Original posts removed to satisfy quote level restrictions.

 

 

 

 

 

I saw this boat up close several years ago in Maryland while at a woodenboat regatta. It was a great example of a lot of ideas executed without much in the way of knowledge both from a design standpoint, and also from a practical sailors standpoint. The fellow that designed and built the boat was super nice, but definitely disappointed in how dreadful the performance was. My friend of mine and I were not!.... so many things wrong with this boat. That picture is probably the best possible angle. A transom view would demonstrate what I'm talking about clearly.

What is so wrong with it? Is it slow, dangerous, badly mannered, impractical?
Yes.

I would guess that it looks like a triangle in plan view. Not enough volume forward to get it to plane easily, and the deep forefoot, low volume forward and the LCF way aft probably makes it dig the bow in and difficult to steer.

The Merlin rocket has a similar bow. AFAIK they don't suffer from all these issues.

 

 

Merlin Rocket:

 

maiden_voyage.jpg

 

s_payne_after2.jpg

 

Far, far more volume forward. Nothing like a big triangle in plan view.

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I can. It's a rounder kind of beauty, kinda like Megyn Price:

 

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/4e/07/76/4e0776f2b4a214e075fb42437959d4b7.jpg

 

My wife calls her "a woman made of circles".

Does she also comment on her thick ankles? ;)

I refrain from lengthy discussions with my wife about the physical characteristics of other women. No good can come of it.

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I can. It's a rounder kind of beauty, kinda like Megyn Price:

 

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/4e/07/76/4e0776f2b4a214e075fb42437959d4b7.jpg

 

My wife calls her "a woman made of circles".

Does she also comment on her thick ankles? ;)

I refrain from lengthy discussions with my wife about the physical characteristics of other women. No good can come of it.

 

A rounder kind of beauty?

 

54cad2e2cdea1_-_scarlettjohansson10.jpg

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

jayshomebuilt.jpg

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

Yes, small boats are fun, you don't get the same connection to wind and water on a big boat even a racing one.

I saw this boat up close several years ago in Maryland while at a woodenboat regatta. It was a great example of a lot of ideas executed without much in the way of knowledge both from a design standpoint, and also from a practical sailors standpoint. The fellow that designed and built the boat was super nice, but definitely disappointed in how dreadful the performance was. My friend of mine and I were not!.... so many things wrong with this boat. That picture is probably the best possible angle. A transom view would demonstrate what I'm talking about clearly.

What is so wrong with it? Is it slow, dangerous, badly mannered, impractical?

The rig I saw (looks like he did change it) had a set of spreaders very close to the mast head, and his rig would have almost certainly come down had it not been for some intervention by some people, myself included. If you look at the chine (there is a better profile picture from the gallery in the original link) it takes a weird nosedive at it continues forward. If you ever get really close, you would see that the chine isn't fair from almost any angle. When asked about his design objectives, the designer/builder said that he had basically made a mini VO70. That year I think was the same year of the first Volvo race with the 70's and ABN Amro. Now this thing has virtually no resemblance to a contemporary VO70, so that should give you an idea of how badly conceived this all is.

 

Having said all that, I do agree that it's great he designed and built his own boat, that it looks as if he still continues to enjoy. At the end of the day, that's admirable. As a designer/builder myself, it's easy to spot deficiencies, and this boat was one that I obviously haven't forgotten as going against my sensibilities! I wonder if he ever designed another boat after that?

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Sure, the chine is a bit weird. Not many amateurs can design and build their boat. I would be quite keen to sail it once just to understand the good and the bad.

 

Regarding the pizza slice shape, a dinghy is very different from an offshore boat as the crew represents a good part of the total weight longitudinal trim is actively managed and constraints are different.

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Another small boat design, by Jay Bliss. http://ftp.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos103.html

 

 

I know many people view small boat design as boring and B.P. wrote that they are even crude.

Fair comment, I thought. Perhaps that's why I don't see some lovely Perry mini 6.5 design, dinghy or trailer sailer on the interweb when I got curious and looked.

I have always been a fan of crude boats, boats with hard chines on, to be even more crude. :)

Dad had the chined Wayfarer copy in FG, called the CL16 and he built me an El Toro I sailed the snot out of.

The hard chines on the whitewater kayaks I have had, changed the sport. Wavesport's market share success is carried by it's wonderful chined design of the '90's. It is a different boat with a different job, but that's how chine fondness grows.

Cheers

Yes, small boats are fun, you don't get the same connection to wind and water on a big boat even a racing one.

I saw this boat up close several years ago in Maryland while at a woodenboat regatta. It was a great example of a lot of ideas executed without much in the way of knowledge both from a design standpoint, and also from a practical sailors standpoint. The fellow that designed and built the boat was super nice, but definitely disappointed in how dreadful the performance was. My friend of mine and I were not!.... so many things wrong with this boat. That picture is probably the best possible angle. A transom view would demonstrate what I'm talking about clearly.

What is so wrong with it? Is it slow, dangerous, badly mannered, impractical?

The rig I saw (looks like he did change it) had a set of spreaders very close to the mast head, and his rig would have almost certainly come down had it not been for some intervention by some people, myself included. If you look at the chine (there is a better profile picture from the gallery in the original link) it takes a weird nosedive at it continues forward. If you ever get really close, you would see that the chine isn't fair from almost any angle. When asked about his design objectives, the designer/builder said that he had basically made a mini VO70. That year I think was the same year of the first Volvo race with the 70's and ABN Amro. Now this thing has virtually no resemblance to a contemporary VO70, so that should give you an idea of how badly conceived this all is.

 

Having said all that, I do agree that it's great he designed and built his own boat, that it looks as if he still continues to enjoy. At the end of the day, that's admirable. As a designer/builder myself, it's easy to spot deficiencies, and this boat was one that I obviously haven't forgotten as going against my sensibilities! I wonder if he ever designed another boat after that?

 

Can't argue with that.

That vor 70 race likely inspired a few new sailors and Bene's.

I better maintain the thread standards.

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15418328_1758088941181042_76592149422911

I like the boat, but I'm not sure what it is...looks like a long-liner converted to a cruising trawler? And why are there gorillas on the foredeck? LOL.

 

 

I think you're right about what it was/is.

 

Gorillas are cool and so is a festive rainbow umbrella, obviously!

 

I can't explain it. Just saw Tad Roberts posted it on FB and had to share.

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I am not sure they are gorillas. They may be lesser deck apes of the hylobatidae family.



Gorillas are herbivores, which mean they only eat plants, whereas apes are omnivores and have plants and animals in their diet. Most deck apes that I have met definitely prefer burgers and steaks, which suggests that they are not gorillas.



Of course, they may have evolved differently in Port Ludlow.


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Although home territory may be Port Ludlow, their range must include Point Hudson where they were photographed. I assume they were drawn to that location because of a primal need for mystic crystal shops and tie-dye t shirts. They must have traveled through the Port Townsend canal, perhaps an ancient primate migration route.

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Long ago, when I was young, I was with a sea scouts group in the south western province ("Zeeland") of the Netherlands.

Our group was friends with a sea scout group of east London called 4th Seven Kings sea scouts (see http://grahamdknight.wixsite.com/4skss). We visited them, they visited us.

During the sixties they built a beautiful ketch, the "Seven Kings":

IMAGE_1F1AF6CD-50BB-4BB5-951A-0FFB1521AD

The building started in 1963, launch was in 1969.

IMAGE_8ECC5D00-7D10-4AE1-8449-A7AE3AD399

 

IMAGE_90622BF5-6909-4C05-A703-50AB3494B5

 

IMAGE_9F05BD97-8485-45A3-9804-E857D1A2A7

 

IMG_0312.PNG

 

A movie of the build:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zlGJa8rGPbo

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Apr. 10, 1970 - April 10th, 1970 Sir Francis Chichester aboard the Seven Kings Aaa Sir Francis Chichester, the yachtsman, aboard the Seven Kings, an £18,000, 44½ ft. ketch, with boys of the 4th Seven Kings Sea Scouts who helped build her, at Tower Pier yesterday. It took 7 years to build the 16-ton, 8-berth ocean going yacht in a field near the home of the troopAaas scoutmaster, Mr. Derek Williams, 37, a Woodford, Essex, schoolmaster

IMAGE_163.jpg

 

I sailed quite a lot on her, for me it was a real big ship then. This is me at the wheel in 1973 on river Orwell on the east coast of England:IMAGE_D9801148-4EAD-4950-8E0C-90080B0CA5

IMAGE_164.jpg

 

Years later, around 1996, I visited river Orwell again and saw her in very bad shape in Woolverstone marina.

Later again I heard that some people on the south coast were in the proces of fixing her. Here some pictures during that:IMAGE_F45F42C8-769F-43D2-AF9A-4E45004BBE

 

IMAGE_0464AA7B-F173-45F7-8564-16B5105A80

 

Now I have lost all track of her. Is there someone here on SA who knows more?

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Apr. 10, 1970 - April 10th, 1970 Sir Francis Chichester aboard the Seven Kings Aaa Sir Francis Chichester, the yachtsman, aboard the Seven Kings, an £18,000, 44½ ft. ketch, with boys of the 4th Seven Kings Sea Scouts who helped build her, at Tower Pier yesterday. It took 7 years to build the 16-ton, 8-berth ocean going yacht in a field near the home of the troopAaas scoutmaster, Mr. Derek Williams, 37, a Woodford, Essex, schoolmaster

IMAGE_163.jpg

 

I sailed quite a lot on her, for me it was a real big ship then. This is me at the wheel in 1973 on river Orwell on the east coast of England:IMAGE_D9801148-4EAD-4950-8E0C-90080B0CA5

 

 

[...]

 

 

 

Now I have lost all track of her. Is there someone here on SA who knows more?

 

 

Here's what I found from a quick google search:

 

Over the period of Sea Scout ownership she covered thousands of miles teaching the young men of East London the rudiments of seamanship and navigation. Not a bad start in life by any standards. Whilst in the hands of the sea scouts she was maintained in excellent condition however needing some remedial work in the 90's as some rot was noticed in the areas of fresh water ingress on deck. She remained in the ownership of the Seven Kings Trust until after Derek Williams death in 1997 when she was passed to the Meridian Trust in Portsmouth for the purpose of continuing youth sail training.

Remedial work here culminated in another moving recommissioning ceremony in June 1999 which also served as a memorial service for those that had been involved in the construction and sailing of Seven Kings but sadly were no longer in a position to attend.

 

 

Quite a bit more info, including pictures of an on-going refit and a video from the build on the web site of the yard: http://woodenboatrepairs.com/work-in-progress.html

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Filthy animals. We had gorillas on our last boat, never again.

 

But man can they grind in that genoa sheet!

Many years ago we had a friend who sailed with us whose day job was as a defensive back/special teams player for the Seattle Seahawks.

 

That guy could GRIND! He wasn't all that big, but damn he was strong! (Don Dufek for you football fans. His wife Candy worked with my wife.)

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Apr. 10, 1970 - April 10th, 1970 Sir Francis Chichester aboard the Seven Kings Aaa Sir Francis Chichester, the yachtsman, aboard the Seven Kings, an £18,000, 44½ ft. ketch, with boys of the 4th Seven Kings Sea Scouts who helped build her, at Tower Pier yesterday. It took 7 years to build the 16-ton, 8-berth ocean going yacht in a field near the home of the troopAaas scoutmaster, Mr. Derek Williams, 37, a Woodford, Essex, schoolmaster

IMAGE_163.jpg

 

I sailed quite a lot on her, for me it was a real big ship then. This is me at the wheel in 1973 on river Orwell on the east coast of England:IMAGE_D9801148-4EAD-4950-8E0C-90080B0CA5

IMAGE_164.jpg

 

Years later, around 1996, I visited river Orwell again and saw her in very bad shape in Woolverstone marina.

Later again I heard that some people on the south coast were in the proces of fixing her. Here some pictures during that:IMAGE_F45F42C8-769F-43D2-AF9A-4E45004BBE

 

IMAGE_0464AA7B-F173-45F7-8564-16B5105A80

 

Now I have lost all track of her. Is there someone here on SA who knows more?

 

 

 

From a google search... http://woodenboatrepairs.com/work-in-progress.html

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We're wintering in a new yard this year, and in the shed is an unambiguously cool boat, kept in tip top Bristol shape.

 

Apparently the plug for Ron Holland's Swan 42, I love the paradox of the organic nature of the wood and the slight torture of flat forward sections, the bit of a bustle, and of course the lovely if strained backside

 

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post-38-0-37471600-1482165001_thumb.jpg

 

post-38-0-33255500-1482164971_thumb.jpg

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Once again from Tad Roberts on Facebook. This is a cool and admirable boat, though it's a motorboat.

 

15626030_1760502680939668_85120456750542

 

I admire the mast, and I'm not a fan of masts on motorboats. But that one has a job and doesn't pretend the job is propulsion. I like the honking flopper stoppers too. And the dry exhaust.

 

15578249_1760502780939658_39418763815288

 

And the light on the boom. And just the fact that a boat doesn't look like this unless someone is enjoying it.

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Really nice proportions and paint on that old salmon troller. Someone picked a nice one to cruiser-ify.

 

And, nice shot of the sloop near Savary Island. Only five sails on a light air day like that, come on.

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