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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

10 minutes of boat building magic. If this has been posted before, I apologize.  

Posted Images

  • 3 weeks later...
On 5/6/2014 at 8:43 AM, QBF said:
On 5/6/2014 at 2:18 AM, fng said:

It's a Goat island skiff by Michael Storer

 

 

Here is the official link to his plans

http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/storer/index.htm

OK, so I'm digging up an ancient post as an excuse to post a plug, but the GIS is a coolboat and the Charlotte Harbor Community Sailing Center has one. This one:

GoatIslandSkiff.JPG

OK, so it has a bamboom. It's still a cool boat and nothing good will happen to it at the Sailing Center. It needs a home if anyone knows someone who wants one.

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11 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

OK, so I'm digging up an ancient post as an excuse to post a plug, but the GIS is a coolboat and the Charlotte Harbor Community Sailing Center has one. This one:

GoatIslandSkiff.JPG

OK, so it has a bamboom. It's still a cool boat and nothing good will happen to it at the Sailing Center. It needs a home if anyone knows someone who wants one.

I'm wondering shouldn't there be knees or something to reinforce the hull at the point of the oarlocks? Is that thwart close enough to do the job?

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3 hours ago, kinardly said:

I'm wondering shouldn't there be knees or something to reinforce the hull at the point of the oarlocks? Is that thwart close enough to do the job?

I don't know but Michael Storer designed the boat and is on FB and has even taken the time to share this boat with the GIS FB group. He answers all kinds of questions like that for people, so I'd suggest asking him there.

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1 hour ago, F'g Dinosaur said:

very nice........is that free hand / free brush or from pencil sketch or photo ?

I like Monet's method, but in this case, I worked from a photo.

monet-painting-in-his-studio-boat.thumb.jpg.967940b146c72d266e002021d05e54fb.jpg

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On 2/11/2018 at 2:35 AM, Presuming Ed said:

 

No.  F73DE48D-6E78-4294-8240-BF4A889F68E6.thumb.jpeg.a0120d467d6542579d52a8701affea47.jpeg

 

 

I think they forgot to lower the traveller after the tack. Or perhaps the boats have a lot of lee helm.

There is no possible way that is fast.

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On 2/1/2018 at 4:32 AM, Kris Cringle said:

I don't seem to have that one - Second Wind - rigged. There are quite a few around here at launch time, although, I don't see them in season, out on the water.

Once launched, I suspect they are hidden somewhere in the reeds and backwaters, cunningly gunk-holing,... as they were designed.  

40020009961_17b8c58c3e_h.jpg

40020146331_4f0e8dde66_b.jpg

40020144051_40a492fabe_h.jpg

There are no ugly boats in Maine!

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4 hours ago, F'g Dinosaur said:

Damn,  but those are nice......do you sell them ?  ( Don't worry about Ed and adverts....taste of a goat anyway).......

Dino, even though your SA "Community Reputation" is "Total Douchebag," I will respond. Yes, I do sell a few. If you're interested, please send me a PM.

BTW, I am a "Kiss-ass."

Cheers.

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23 minutes ago, carcrash said:

There are no ugly boats in Maine!

Amen. Several years ago, my wife and I went on a Windjammer cruise out of Camden. It was a blast. We were fortunate enough to sail through Eggemoggin Reach on the day of the famous regatta. It was spectacular. My camera almost exploded. A couple of paintings (both sold):

Spinnakers.thumb.jpg.f976cc9ae1e8e64ac7c42c4522d710ce.jpg5aa33f27ed0bc_WindwardDuel.thumb.jpg.dce726d80e4537d37cd51357cb019b3f.jpg

 

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14 hours ago, Bull City said:

Dino, even though your SA "Community Reputation" is "Total Douchebag," I will respond. Yes, I do sell a few. If you're interested, please send me a PM.

BTW, I am a "Kiss-ass."

Cheers.

I shall do .... thx ....  btw my rating is from Basketcase who went negative on my every post retroactively when i caught him in a post admitting to stalking my house and my daughter when he posted details of her car  parked in my driveway .......  that's why its Anarchy ......  I got a warning from Scooter for protesting that post ......  I feel sorry for that fellow.....cheers

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Bull, as I'm sure you can tell from that last post. Dino's rating is well earned and a truly accurate description of him.

Under one of his numerous previous handles he once put a cash bounty on my real identity. :lol:

Didn't work so well for him - he got nuthin' but within a short time several members provided me with all his personal details - name, picture, business, yacht club etc. etc.

 

If you sell him one of your wonderful paintings, be sure to charge him double. Also,  get the cash up front - his financial and investment skills are rather dubious.

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51 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Bull, as I'm sure you can tell from that last post. Dino's rating is well earned and a truly accurate description of him.

Under one of his numerous previous handles he once put a cash bounty on my real identity. :lol:

Didn't work so well for him - he got nuthin' but within a short time several members provided me with all his personal details - name, picture, business, yacht club etc. etc.

 

If you sell him one of your wonderful paintings, be sure to charge him double. Also,  get the cash up front - his financial and investment skills are rather dubious.

its kinda funny that the major was the one who first mentioned his daughter.

 

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17 hours ago, Bull City said:

Dino, even though your SA "Community Reputation" is "Total Douchebag," I will respond. Yes, I do sell a few. If you're interested, please send me a PM.

BTW, I am a "Kiss-ass."

Cheers.

be careful in any business dealings with the major. i wouldn't use the term shyster, but others may.

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2 hours ago, F'g Dinosaur said:

Sloop and Basketcase........ QED........empty shells that love to hate someone they don't even know........

mate, i could be the guy in the line behind you at the metro. i could be the guy that bought the property down the street from you. i could be the guy on the neighbourhood watch that you complain to. or i could live in new mexico. doesn't change the fact you are a shyster and a twat. im pretty sure dianne would agree. 

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On 3/10/2018 at 5:11 AM, Bull City said:

I did. Thank you.

Excellent work, BC. Your 'sort of' impressionist style reminds me a little of famous works by Victorian artist, Henry Scott Tuke. 

640px-H._S._Tuke_Four_Masted_Barque_1914.jpg

Henry_20Scott_20Tuke_20-_20A_20full_20rigged_20three_20master.jpg

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5 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Excellent work, BC. Your 'sort of' impressionist style reminds me a little of famous works by Victorian artist, Henry Scott Tuke. 

640px-H._S._Tuke_Four_Masted_Barque_1914.jpg

Henry_20Scott_20Tuke_20-_20A_20full_20rigged_20three_20master.jpg

Those are beautiful - almost monochromatic. In the lower one, do you think that's the pilot's sloop leaving?

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

Those are beautiful - almost monochromatic. In the lower one, do you think that's the pilot's sloop leaving?

My thoughts too, BC - although Tuke could have cleared up any doubt, if he'd painted an "H" flag on the pilot cutter. :P

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Check this painting of Tuke's out.

Amazing treatment of the water in shadow beneath the fisherman's dinghy - and the fine detail of his handline.

The_Fisherman_1889_3598.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/31/2018 at 3:47 AM, Trickypig said:

Not here much lately but photographed this on Pittwater (Sydney) last week in a classic Nor Easter. Lion Island in the background

Tricky, your photo inspired me to pick up my brush:

roz2.thumb.jpg.3404ece3bbda75ad1d259aed860b7fbb.jpg

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19 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Tuke is amazing but it is too bad he didn't like girls bathing.

   Bull, check out the brush work in this one.

Henry_Scott_Tuke_-_Gaily_coloured_fishing_vessels_at_anchor.jpg

Yes, you've, err, put your finger on the Problem with Tuke. 

morning-splendour-henry-scott-tuke.jpg

 

I particularly like this one, which Tuke re-branded as a portrait of the young T.E. Lawrence. Which it isn't.

 

1466px-Henry_Scott_Tuke_-_T._E._Lawrence

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Just think if he had painted young women swimming in a state of undress. They would have flown off the gallery walls.

On a more artistic note, thef water and rocks reminds me of the American painter Childe Hassam (1859-1935) in particular, his "Isles of Shoals" series of paintings. Here is one. I saw the series a couple of years ago, and they were fascinating, mesmerizing when you looked closely at the brush strokes.

 5ab99074dcca2_ChildeHassam.IslesofShoalsBroadCove1911.png.a16a993ad2051deba7b8b261dba777be.png

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Why carbon @Bob Perry?  I get it will be a stiffer, marginally better performing boat, with higher ballast to displacement, but is that a primary concern of most cruisers (assuming its not for a racer)?  In terms of practical attributes for a cruising boat, what do we get (at that size would there be an increase tankage that would be meaningful relative to range under power?) that we could not get if using traditional monohull cruising hull materials/build?  And at what cost ($s)?  Am kinda curious as maybe the $ difference sing carbon is actually not much on % basis of total cost at that size and that level of fit-out... curious if you costed the cutters you did both in carbon and more traditional materials and how big a difference there was if you know.

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Why Carbon? Because I like the weight advantage it offers, i.e. more ballast. And, this is important,,,,,the client wanted to build in carbon. Having this experience with the carbon cutters, building and sailing,  I would work hard to build this 61'er also in carbon. No question.

The carbon cutters would cost around $50,000 less done in grp and epoxy. We did look at comparisons but not too carefully as the plan from the beginning to go carbon. Rasper and I did some comparisons just for our own curiosity.

Tankage: We have 300 gals of fuel on the cutters. I think that should do it.

I do not expect everyone to "get it" with these boats. They were never intended to appeal to everyone. That's the nature of the custom boat project.

You can see more detail on the pdf.

don 61 sp.pdf

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Ah client.  Thought it was just your musing from the comments you made when posting... "I drew this as an exercise in just what I would want today. If I had the dough."  I am certainly not opposed.  Just trying to understand the cost benefit of carbon in a larger cruising monohull.  I am guessing from your comment about $50K extra for the cutters in carbon that its only somewhere around a 10% cost difference?  And likely less as % on a 60 footer??  I remember a similar discussion about metal boats.  The material cost was not the huge factor (on % basis) I might have expected.

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No, Wess. You were right the first time. The 61'er is my dream boat, I am the "client". The client I was referring to is the client for the four carbon cutters.

I don't have the numbers on the 61 to make a more accurate guess. I'd have to know more about the structure and scantlings before guessing.

Yes, interior cost is a cubic function. Shell cost is a square function. Simplistically speaking.

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Regarding carbon, I work in at a facility that periodically performs drop tests of aircraft fuselages.  A couple of years ago, the facility performed impact tests on components from a carbon fiber helicopter airframe. The carbon shattered like glass.  Under static loads, the carbon probably would have been stronger than conventional GRP,  but it failed in a brittle manner under impact loads.

 

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One of the interesting things I found in researching for a Titanium boat project was that bicycle racers put more faith in steel frames on hairy downhill courses than they do in carbon frames. Titanium has made inroads into bike frames and it is even more forgiving and damage tolerant. I'll look for some links that I hope I bookmarked.

   Impact on CF components can be catastrophic, something you don't want whether in a helicopter or going downhill at 60 mph on a skinny tired bike!

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1 hour ago, Bob Perry said:

Why Carbon? Because I like the weight advantage it offers, i.e. more ballast. And, this is important,,,,,the client wanted to build in carbon. Having this experience with the carbon cutters, building and sailing,  I would work hard to build this 61'er also in carbon. No question.

The carbon cutters would cost around $50,000 less done in grp and epoxy. We did look at comparisons but not too carefully as the plan from the beginning to go carbon. Rasper and I did some comparisons just for our own curiosity.

Tankage: We have 300 gals of fuel on the cutters. I think that should do it.

I do not expect everyone to "get it" with these boats. They were never intended to appeal to everyone. That's the nature of the custom boat project.

You can see more detail on the pdf.

don 61 sp.pdf

Bob, I doubt there are many people those boats don't appeal to at least to one degree or another. They are exceptionally cool

As you point out though - they are probably unique in the choice of materials VS style of boat and that ramps up the curiosity in the cheap seats about the thought process behind then and the benefits derived.

Correct me if I'm wrong but that fuel tankage would allow motoring from here to Hawaii wouldn't it?

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Jon:

 

I have gone over and over the reasons we went with carbon. You CA guys were in on that from the beginning.  The reasons have not changed. I do understand that's a bit hard for some to understand the choice. People like what they know. I think those of you who are experienced sailors wit a background in racing would be very impressed with the way no. 1 sails and feels.

I'll repeat myself again for the naysayers: Hull no. 2 will be the 18th carbon boat Jim Betts has built without any problems associated with the carbon build. Jim is still waiting for one to "shatter".

Keep in mind that this boat has no propane system so all cooking will be electric and the demand on the big battery banks and keeping them charged will be considerable. To that end as I have said before, we have gone to an all lithium battery system for no. 2.  Lots of variables in how far you could motor. 300 gals of fuel would be excessive in most boats this size but that's what the client wanted. The engine will burn 2 gals per hour giving 7 knots. I suppose you could throttle back and extend the range. But even if you were conservative with the engine I doubt you could mtor to Hawaii. That's 2,500 miles! Maybe half way at the most.

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On 3/26/2018 at 8:20 AM, Bull City said:

Tricky, your photo inspired me to pick up my brush:

roz2.thumb.jpg.3404ece3bbda75ad1d259aed860b7fbb.jpg

That’s wonderful Bull! This fellow is moored in the next bay from me. I’ll save it to my phone and show him when I see him next

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3 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

One of the interesting things I found in researching for a Titanium boat project was that bicycle racers put more faith in steel frames on hairy downhill courses than they do in carbon frames. Titanium has made inroads into bike frames and it is even more forgiving and damage tolerant. I'll look for some links that I hope I bookmarked.

   Impact on CF components can be catastrophic, something you don't want whether in a helicopter or going downhill at 60 mph on a skinny tired bike!

Carbon has tensile strength, Kevlar has abrasion strength and combining them in the layup, the Kevlar can reduce the tendencies of the carbon shattering and the carbon gives the Kevlar more stiffness. One thing that needs to be watched with carbon is if there is significant damage that is not repaired, the damage can worsen over time depending on the loads. Titanium is a amazing metal and well suited to the marine environment but who ever is welding better be good cuz you need to purge all joints, when welding, with argon gas to prevent exposure and blueing of the joint.

On the bike pic below, the back gold part of the body is Kevlar and the black is carbon. The frame and fork are titanium. An entire boat built with these materials would be off the charts cool,Dean.Coyote.wheeltape.jpg.6803c1d8024d43d520ea61256d4b6958.jpg strong, light and expensive.

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5 hours ago, Trickypig said:

That’s wonderful Bull! This fellow is moored in the next bay from me. I’ll save it to my phone and show him when I see him next

 

4 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

That's great Bull.

Thanks. Nothing like a handsome boat and a good breeze.

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Carbon is electrically conductive

A carbon boat must be very carefully constructed and maintained to prevent galvanic action, electrolisis .

i wouldnt choose it for a  cruiser with complex systems 

that boat must be two pole, electrically isolated  with all filling insulated  from the substrate in the same way a metal boat is constructed 

i would imagime that the  skins would have a top layer of eglass as an insulator 

Carbon will add substantial  life time cost   

IMG_8399.PNG

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13 hours ago, olsurfer said:

Carbon has tensile strength, Kevlar has abrasion strength and combining them in the layup, the Kevlar can reduce the tendencies of the carbon shattering and the carbon gives the Kevlar more stiffness. ...

Yes, folks at the facility where I work have been experimenting with Carbon-Kevlar weaves to obtain a good compromise between strength and impact resistance.

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iirc Kim fixed a mishap on FL with Carbon.

i haven't heared any reports of FL shattering yet.

check the New Project thread for pictures of the build, this is composite construction where one component was replaced with CF due to CF having superior qualities in what that component is responsible for in the composition.

jfc, people.

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sz, I beg to differ: all carbonfibers are completely encased in non-conductive resin.

& having had an aluminium boat for 10 years & 2rtws I don't see where a conductive hull-material would add substantially to the cost just because of its conductivity. carbon less so as it is, as you rightly state, very noble (the trouble, if there is any  of all the other conductive hull materials is more that they are not so noble

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16 minutes ago, tane said:

sz, I beg to differ: all carbonfibers are completely encased in non-conductive resin.

& having had an aluminium boat for 10 years & 2rtws I don't see where a conductive hull-material would add substantially to the cost just because of its conductivity. carbon less so as it is, as you rightly state, very noble (the trouble, if there is any  of all the other conductive hull materials is more that they are not so noble

https://www.corrosionpedia.com/galvanic-corrosion-of-metals-connected-to-carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymers/2/1556

 

 

IMG_8407.PNG

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1 hour ago, slug zitski said:

This failure was caused by the reaction between carbon and aluminium 

 

 

IMG_8110.JPG

Thus causing the front to fall off... There, I said it.

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2 hours ago, slug zitski said:

This failure was caused by the reaction between carbon and aluminium 

 

 

IMG_8110.JPG

It was caused by the failure of the core material. Read the quote by Juan K where he says sections of the core were like puree.

How long has PlayStation lasted with an aluminium cored carbon hull?

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7 minutes ago, Ozzy said:

Yes it was, so are lots of boats. How long do you expect any boat to to stay together when the core is saturated with water?

Wake up goof ball.  

 

i said 

 

" Carbon is electrically conductive

A carbon boat must be very carefully constructed and maintained to prevent galvanic action, electrolisis .

i wouldnt choose it for a  cruiser with complex systems 

that boat must be two pole, electrically isolated  with all fiitings   insulated  from the substrate in the same way a metal boat is constructed " 

 

 

I  stand by my statement 

is this clear 

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 A cursory glance around the top boatbuilders in the world would indicate that many yards are building carbon boats. 

Carbon has its idiosyncrasies just like every other material.  A good yard knows these idiosyncrasies well. I think my carbon cutters will still be sailing long after the naysayers have gone quiet.

 

Just back from the yard. There are different carbon projects goog on all over the yard. Some for commercial boats.

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Some years ago my son did a science fair project building model helmets of epoxy/e-glass, s-glass, Kevlar, and carbon, then dropping lawn darts (greatest banned toy EVER) on each from different heights. The carbon was stiff, but presented no problem for the lawn dart. We couldn't get a ladder high enough to penetrate the Kevlar. Obviously, for light weight and stiffness (i.e. speed) carbon is the way to go. Seems like some combination of carbon/Kevlar would do it for cruising.  

For my boat, cold molded wood from Brooklin BY, please.

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When I worked for Bill Seemann in his boatshop/R&D lab in 1979 he was getting interested in the exotic weaves such as Carbon Fiber and Kevlar. He was going to buy his own looms and start weaving his own custom hybrid laminates and the Carbon/Kevlar mixes were very attractive for boatbuilding and aerospace. Fairly common now but imaging how cool it was to be using stuff like this in those days!

Image result for kevlar carbon fiber hybrid material

Image result for kevlar carbon fiber hybrid material

Bill had us doing testing much like you see in this photo. 

     Kevlar really made for a tough laminate when combined with CF but it will absorb water much worse and is a pain to work with. 

Good story here

https://www.compositesworld.com/articles/composites-take-the-hit-in-us-navy-patrol-boat

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Excerpt from Bill Lee's review of the Bieker Riptide 55...it's interesting that the absorption ability of Kevlar is what they found contributed to structural integrity during testing. This was back in 1994...I don't know if this specific carbon/Kevlar combo has become more widespread.

"Structural Integrity – In order to be a truly seaworthy yacht the Riptide
55 had to be able to endure years of ocean abuse and be able to sustain
hull integrity in the case of hitting a log or container at 14 knots or
hitting a rock with the keel at 12 plus knots. In order to accomplish
these requirements true base line engineering was used that combined
finite element analysis along with a panel testing program that field
tested the computer assumptions.
What was apparent from the polar predictions was the extreme speeds that a
yacht like the Riptide 55 can generate. For this reason it was decided not
to use the ABS guidelines for yachts, those standards did not adequately
address the speed potential of today’s modern craft. Instead the standards
selected were ABS slamming standards for high speed military craft and Det
Norske Veritas standards for high speed offshore motor craft. Using these
standards a loading of 7.5 PSI was arrived at, approximately double ABS
standards. To put this number into perspective, the RT55 could slam on an
area of a little over a square meter in front of the keel for the life of
the boat. These are extreme conditions found when flying off of waves in
the worst conditions. In order to keep the panel from flexing and to
provide fatigue resistance the panel specification was set at 40 PSI so
that the maximum loading was not to exceed 20% of the panels specified
breaking strength. A laminate schedule was modeled in the computer and
then panels were made by the builder and tested by Gugeon Brothers to see
if they met the specifications. The panel for the hull bottom has a core
of 1″ Baltec Duracore and skins of carbon fiber and unidirectional glass.
Upon testing of these panels a breaking strength of 54 PSI was found, well
in excess of the 40 PSI specification and a number realized only in high
speed power craft. Even more important in a panel test of 400,000 flexing
cycles of 25 PSI ( half the panels breaking strength and over three times
the required extreme specification) no softening was found. This is
unprecedented. The next time a manufacturer makes claims about their
hull’s strength ask to see the documentation for the underlying
engineering assumptions, the finite element analysis and the panel testing
data to back up the assumptions in the finite element analysis.
The question becomes why make the panel so strong. The answer is that the
panel had not only to sustain the slamming conditions at sea but with all
the debris in the modern ocean it had to be able to sustain a collision
with a solid object such as a log or a cargo container that had been lost
off of a deck of a ship. Keep in mind that the RT55 is capable of speeds
over 20 knots. The deceleration from such a hit would be dangerous enough
without having to worry if the boat would disintegrate. As further
protection from such a catastrophic situation a kevlar crash barrier
laminate was added in the center 30 inches of the hull forward of the
keel. This laminate is next to the core on both sides underneath the
carbon fiber. This is counter to present conventional thinking which would
put the kevlar on the outer laminate because of its abrasion resistance.
What was found in the panel testing at Guegon was that the kevlar in a
catasrophic hit would shatter on the outside skin because of its
brittleness and the stiffness of the underlying core and laminates and
even potentially holed. Dropping heavy metal balls on the laminate it was
found that while the glass and carbon skins were breached that the
laminate hung together because the kevlar as the last line of defense
works in tension to absorb the energy of the of the object and while
delamination occurred the laminate was not breached. As a belt and
suspenders approach to hull integrity, integral sewage, fuel and water
tanks form a double bottom in the critical areas of the boat in case of a
grounding on a beach or a reef. The RT55 also has forward and aft semi
water tight compartments to increase survivability in the case of a
collision."

http://svrocketscience.com/technical-details/

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Good post there Fufkin.

    We built a Walter Greene designed Formula 40 trimaran in Boston out of Western Red Cedar strip planking and I found it odd that the Kevlar layups was on the inside of the hulls and the Carbon Fiber was on the outside. Exactly the sort of 'counter to conventional thinking' in your article above and the owner/builder explained it to me in the same way. Must have worked because that boat got put through the wringer in the worst ways over the years and may still be alive somewhere.

UP MY SLEEVE

Sailor`s Win Was David Vs. Goliath

July 15, 1992|By STEVE WATERS, Outdoors Writer

After sailing nearly 7,000 miles by himself without incident, Etienne Giroire was ``feeling invincible.`` So he decided to take a nap while on an inshore tack just 12 miles off Massachusetts` Nantucket Island. He woke up 50 yards from the beach, in danger not only of losing the Europe 1 Singlehanded Transatlantic Race (STAR), but also his 40-foot trimaran Up My Sleeve.

``I thought I`d wake up in 20 minutes, with five miles to go,`` said Giroire, a French citizen who lives in Fort Lauderdale. ``Either my alarm didn`t work or I didn`t hear it. I woke up and the beach was right there. It was a very close call.``

Otherwise, Giroire`s crossing of the Atlantic Ocean was rather dull. So dull, it wasn`t until he arrived in Newport, R.I., June 23 -- 16 days, 6 hours and 45 minutes after leaving Plymouth, England -- that Giroire discovered what a tremendous race he had sailed.

He won Class 4 (40-foot multihulls) in the world`s most prestigious singlehanded race, first sailed in 1960 and held every four years. He also set race records for Class 4 (by 11 hours), Class 3 (45-footers) and Class 2 (50- footers). Up My Sleeve was seventh to finish out of 69 boats and the first non-sponsored boat. Most of the other boats were new; Up My Sleeve is 6 years old.

``It`s like David beating Goliath,`` Giroire said, noting he was up against boats with Kevlar sails and carbon-fiber masts.

And to think Giroire was happy just to make it to the starting line.

``It had always been a dream of mine to do the race,`` said Giroire, 37, who grew up in a small inland town near LaRochelle, France.

He became a captain and skippered several boats, such as Formidable, a 60- year-old, 82-foot sloop. In 1984, Giroire, who has lived in the United States for the past 12 years, started racing offshore multihulls.

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``I like multihull racing because you have the feeling of being on a magic carpet,`` Giroire said. ``You really move.``

His racing led, in part, to the formation of his company, ATN (which is how Giroire`s first name is pronounced). ATN makes spinnaker sleeves, which take the fuss out of putting up spinnakers by ensuring that they go up correctly every time; sort of like a roller furler for a jib. Giroire fills custom orders for racers around the world, and also sells spinnaker sleeves to major sailmakers.

In the 1989-90 Whitbread Round the World Race, Giroire sailed the second leg, from Uruguay to Australia, aboard The Card, which used eight of his sleeves. The Whitbread led to some changes in sleeve design, and provided a painful experience: A week into the leg, Giroire`s forearm was shattered by a rope. He kept his arm immobilized for three weeks, until the boat reached Perth, where the arm was operated on and repaired with 18 screws.

``Altogether I was lucky,`` Giroire said, noting that the rope could`ve come up under his neck.

After that incident, Giroire borrowed money from friends and went to Newport to buy Up My Sleeve, a proven Walter Greene design that Giroire felt was ideal for the Europe 1 STAR.

Although Giroire had two years to prepare for the race, time and money were tight. The previous owner had used the boat for buoy races; Giroire had Greene stiffen the boat so it could handle the STAR, then he took it to Fort Lauderdale and sailed as often as he could. The boat was great, but money was still a question.

For the race, Giroire had to purchase a portable generator, solar panels, an auto pilot and the like. He also had to take off from his growing business for two months at a busy time of the year.

``I was bull-headed,`` said Giroire, who met the race requirement of 500 miles of solo sailing en route to England for the start.

On May 7, Giroire left Fort Lauderdale for Bermuda, a six-day, 1,000-mile trip. After making repairs, Giroire left for Plymouth, covering 3,000 miles in 16 days -- three days more than planned -- and arriving June 2. Five days later, the 2,810-mile race to Newport began.

``For me, victory was to get to Plymouth,`` Giroire said.

The best was yet to come. Most of the fleet took a southern route, which usually offers warmer weather and better wind, although getting caught in the Gulf Stream can cost a boat 20 miles a day. Giroire took the more direct northern route, since he knew he didn`t have the fastest boat. He also didn`t have a land-based crew plotting his course from weather satellite photographs.

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Giroire zipped along, averaging 240 miles a day, his sails and his spirits high. Things went so smoothly, he wondered if he had made a mistake.

``I just went for the ride and I won,`` Giroire said. ``I knew I was going to be OK, but to finish that well never crossed my mind.``

 

 

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On 3/27/2018 at 12:16 PM, Bob Perry said:

61' version of the carbon cutter with modern underbody. I drew this as an exercise in just what I would want today. If I had the dough.

26182197047_7efc35ab91_b.jpgDon NK by robert perry, on Flickr

Very handsome. How many wheels?

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Years ago I saw a sample leading edge off a wing of an A-10 Warthog that had been dragged through a tree at typical flight speed. It had a big gash but looked to me to be essentially intact; no shattering, crazing or cracking anywhere. It was a combination layup of carbon and kevlar that I think was being proposed as an enhancement of the original version, submitted by a fabricator that was a tenant in a building I was leasing for a landlord client. I don't think the bidder won the contract but it sure looked strong as hell. 

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Rasputin,

Nice article about Up My Sleeve...so that's where the ATN sleeve comes from...

I like that Giroire was quoted as being just happy to make the start line and got a chuckle out of 'things went so smoothly I thought I made a mistake'

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Bob,

Where  you been man? I'm like a couple of the other guys around here...never been on facebook in my life...not about to start...but great to see your posting your stuff again. I'll take 4 of the 60 footers, just putting a few minor details together  on stamping out the financing part of it.

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Fuffer:

I check in on CA every morning. I chime in if I think I have something of value to add.

I'll post some pics from the yard today maybe tomorrow. Not sure where the best place is to post them here.

Dig deep. Jim Betts really wants to build the61'er!

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1 hour ago, kinardly said:

Years ago I saw a sample leading edge off a wing of an A-10 Warthog that had been dragged through a tree at typical flight speed. It had a big gash but looked to me to be essentially intact; no shattering, crazing or cracking anywhere. It was a combination layup of carbon and kevlar that I think was being proposed as an enhancement of the original version, submitted by a fabricator that was a tenant in a building I was leasing for a landlord client. I don't think the bidder won the contract but it sure looked strong as hell. 

I used layers of 8oz carbon and 8oz Kevlar to make the body of my bike. I got rear-ended by a truck going 35/40 mph when I was stopped by the side of the road. That composite body with those materials saved my life!

tt42.jpg

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3 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Some years ago my son did a science fair project building model helmets of epoxy/e-glass, s-glass, Kevlar, and carbon, then dropping lawn darts (greatest banned toy EVER) on each from different heights. The carbon was stiff, but presented no problem for the lawn dart. We couldn't get a ladder high enough to penetrate the Kevlar. Obviously, for light weight and stiffness (i.e. speed) carbon is the way to go. Seems like some combination of carbon/Kevlar would do it for cruising.  

For my boat, cold molded wood from Brooklin BY, please.

Do you have pics of the helmet testing?

 

2 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Good post there Fufkin.

    We built a Walter Greene designed Formula 40 trimaran in Boston out of Western Red Cedar strip planking and I found it odd that the Kevlar layups was on the inside of the hulls and the Carbon Fiber was on the outside. Exactly the sort of 'counter to conventional thinking' in your article above and the owner/builder explained it to me in the same way. Must have worked because that boat got put through the wringer in the worst ways over the years and may still be alive somewhere.

Yeah that is interesting about the Kevlar layer working better on the inside. Good story about Up My Sleeve.

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47 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Carbon cocoon on this salt flats motorcycle record attempt saves this gals ass! 343 MPH!

 

That was interesting, thanks. My wife was fascinated. That's a woman in there?

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