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My balls have never been bigger than my brains

Don't sell yourself short Ultra, your brain is plenty small! ;-)

 

Sorry, you set yourself up for that one JJ, I couldn't resist! See you this week in Houston brother. I've got my Yankee passport and the Republic of Texas visa is stamped...

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That makes 26 entries for the VX One Nationals in Australia at The Festival of Sails (festivalofsails.com.au)  in Geelong....this will be epic! 

Meanwhile in Australia.....6 more VX Ones landed this weekend:

Update from the Newport fleet... 11 days until Winter Series #1!  

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I land at 3 pm on tuesday rock. Monkey will be in town a bit earlier

 

Prepare yourself. Hydrate and hit an ATM

 

 

 

 

My balls have never been bigger than my brains

Don't sell yourself short Ultra, your brain is plenty small! ;-)

 

Sorry, you set yourself up for that one JJ, I couldn't resist! See you this week in Houston brother. I've got my Yankee passport and the Republic of Texas visa is stamped...

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Yeah, Steph and I are going to play on Brad's boat Saturday. We may have to make trip down sometime later in the year if we get some decent weather.

 

I may make an appearance at the NA's if I can work a day off during them. Won't be sailing but will come down and say hi and drool over some boats.

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Don't feel bad Vernon - it looks like I wont make it either - work conflict has me tied up during the week.

 

On that note - boat's up for charter. I will make sure it's on the starting line. And i'll most likely show up Saturday and stay through Sunday. Maybe i'll try and find a run-about, fill a cooler and supply the fleet with beverages between races.

 

very sad

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Don't feel bad Vernon - it looks like I wont make it either - work conflict has me tied up during the week.

 

On that note - boat's up for charter. I will make sure it's on the starting line. And i'll most likely show up Saturday and stay through Sunday. Maybe i'll try and find a run-about, fill a cooler and supply the fleet with beverages between races.

 

very sad

J,

 

Make it on Saturday and Sunday....you'll have at least 1 DNC thrown out. You'll make up on the other 6 races.

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VX One single handed in 20 knots with jib and kite up!

 

 

Why not include the video of the maneuvers (tacks, jibes, mark roundings)?

 

VX1, Viper, K6... Nice!

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Don't feel bad Vernon - it looks like I wont make it either - work conflict has me tied up during the week.

 

On that note - boat's up for charter. I will make sure it's on the starting line. And i'll most likely show up Saturday and stay through Sunday. Maybe i'll try and find a run-about, fill a cooler and supply the fleet with beverages between races.

 

very sad

J,

Make it on Saturday and Sunday....you'll have at least 1 DNC thrown out. You'll make up on the other 6 races.

JJ,

Lets talk about this.

GvH

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Where is this? There any of these on the SF Bay?

Nope, but there is one up in Seattle. Not sure of the guys contact info though. Try 'em all before you buy. We'll have Viper, K6 and J70 out for demo this Sunday in SF.

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Ok but don't tell mambo, he would split a vein if he knew you were thinking about stepping foot on a Vx

 

 

 

 

 

Don't feel bad Vernon - it looks like I wont make it either - work conflict has me tied up during the week.

 

On that note - boat's up for charter. I will make sure it's on the starting line. And i'll most likely show up Saturday and stay through Sunday. Maybe i'll try and find a run-about, fill a cooler and supply the fleet with beverages between races.

 

very sad

J,

Make it on Saturday and Sunday....you'll have at least 1 DNC thrown out. You'll make up on the other 6 races.

JJ,

Lets talk about this.

GvH

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Where is this? There any of these on the SF Bay?

Nope, but there is one up in Seattle. Not sure of the guys contact info though. Try 'em all before you buy. We'll have Viper, K6 and J70 out for demo this Sunday in SF.

The Seattle boat raced with us last fall and I can look up their contact info for you if needed.
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Hmm, if I didn't know any better I'd say your trying to start a shitfight.

 

Right on Vernon. Hey, your cruiser have a tow- hitch? Be pretty cool to show up to an event Vx in tow, lights flashing.

 

 

 

 

Awesome ! What are some of the things u like with it compared to a Viper?

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Nope, Sadly no tow hitch. Chief might look down on the extra mileage on the car....

 

I think there is some real potential to get another 2-3 boats here at OCBC. There are a few more people interested that I believe might move on it once they see the boats here.

 

Hmm, if I didn't know any better I'd say your trying to start a shitfight.

Right on Vernon. Hey, your cruiser have a tow- hitch? Be pretty cool to show up to an event Vx in tow, lights flashing.



Awesome ! What are some of the things u like with it compared to a Viper?

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I did not drink both of those bottles... I was set-up... :blink:

 

Vernon, how old we're you?





Wow! next thing you'll ask is how old they are... :ph34r:


How heavy were you sailing this past weekend?

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Rod we were sailing at 315, light for sure but it will likely be how we sail most of the time.

How heavy were you sailing this past weekend?

 

Yes, a bit on the light side, however big gains on the downwind compared to a heavier crew. As a reference, we sailed the George Griffith regatta at 270 lbs total crew weight. Started depowering quite soon during the upwind legs and it was hard to hold pace with the other boat, but hiked hard and stayed with the pack. However, after rounding the weather mark, we had very nice and consistent speed and were able to jump on a plane quite soon. Luckily for us, conditions were marginal (between 8 to 12 knots of TWS) and that allowed us to sail really fast on the runs.

 

315 lbs is light, but will certainly have an advantage on the runs. We are sailing NA's at around 370 total and that should give us good overall weight on the rail.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So what's the deal with the rudders? No more cassette style drop the blade in rudders I see. I kinda liked that when the boats first came out.

 

Has the idea of traps for the crew been brought up? I think the boat would benefit greatly from the crew on a wire.

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There were some problems with the cassette rudder so the boats currently all come with a fixed rudder.

 

The one design version doesn't allow any trapping. The mast actually has slots for traps and mast head supports and mast head spinnakers. At some point they have talked about a Super Sport version but the one design is set up so that anyone can go sail it at a competitive level.

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Finally got a close look at the VX One and talked to Brian about a few features. Like the way the boat is put together and how easy it is to rig and launch.

 

Looks like the mast can be stepped easily and without drama. Two up is appealing, all things considered.

 

So what's right and what's wrong with the boat? How long for two crew to get it into the water and under way? It looks like a well designed piece of kit, easy to deal with across the board.

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I shared a parking lot and ramp with another Viper 640, a VX One, and a couple of J/70s. Everyone took about the same time to launch and retrieve. The VX has a little extra time for the jib with the zipper and battens in/out. The Viper is probably a tiny bit slower with attaching the boom and gnav, and the J/70's slowest item is dealing with the keel. Realistically, no one ever looked at the boat in front of them and thought they would have to wait less or more because of the type. It was all about the same.

 

I think the VX One has terrific ergonomics, and is just very smartly rigged. I didn't see anything I would change and I enjoyed my night racing it.

 

Cheers

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that sounds accurate.

 

on the course, one bad tack could mean several places across the finish line

 

on land, one beer, pee-break, chatty fellow sailor or dropped ring-ding will cost you the same on the launch ramp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I shared a parking lot and ramp with another Viper 640, a VX One, and a couple of J/70s. Everyone took about the same time to launch and retrieve. The VX has a little extra time for the jib with the zipper and battens in/out. The Viper is probably a tiny bit slower with attaching the boom and gnav, and the J/70's slowest item is dealing with the keel. Realistically, no one ever looked at the boat in front of them and thought they would have to wait less or more because of the type. It was all about the same.

 

I think the VX One has terrific ergonomics, and is just very smartly rigged. I didn't see anything I would change and I enjoyed my night racing it.

 

Cheers

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Thanks, the J70 mast has got to be more challenging than the VX One. It's the one thing that bothers me about rigging the boat, you just have to be careful in the middle part of the arc to keep the lateral displacement under control. There is a little more height to how the boat its on the trailer that makes getting on to the J70 a little more of an effort.

 

Interesting that Brian told me the VX One stick weighed 37 lbs, the J70 mast is 45 lbs. Yet I picked the VX One mast up with one hand and it felt like a feather.

 

J70 also has a zippered jib and battens to install as well.

 

There has to be a better solution to ring dings. I use push pins for the rudder pintles, but am looking for something quicker than cotter rings for the other rigging pins.

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Snapper95, I was only referring to mast-up in-season launch and retrieval of all three boats. I helped step the mast of the first J/70 at our club, but I couldn't stick around for the rest of the process, so I can't offer a fair comparison of the full travel prep times.

 

Cheers,

 

jason

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I Eye was watching the haul out of the J70s and the Vipers at the Cedar Point One Design regatta this summer and there was really no comparison...the Viper was much the quicker boat to pull and park. A J70 took about the same time to pull and park as three Vipers. The biggest differences are that on the J70s we have to go get and attach a custom crane to pull up the keel which is operated by an electric drill and takes a bit of time to pull up. The Vipers have some kind of line that is already in place underneath their spreaders and simply pull the keel up on a block and tackle, which they almost seem to do as they sail into the dock. One person attaches their 3 point bridle, the other pulls up the keel in under 60 seconds, they go under the hoist and they're gone! It was quite impressive.

 

The Viper also seems to spend a little less time on the hoist. Maybe less weight so less maneuvering onto the trailer or maybe just more experience using the hoist.

 

One difference may be that the Viper owners have owned their boats for longer than the J70s and they have a smooth process. Another difference is that the Viper is much lower on its trailer, so it is easier for them to lean over the boat and put it away. the J70s have to climb up to get in the boat to put it away after we have put it on the trailer. If you left your T shirt or trash in the J70 forepeak, you have to climb up and get it. The Viper crew just leans over and picks it up.

 

Lots of different reasons to own different boats but the J70 is never going to claim that it is as fast to haul and put away as the Viper or the VX,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snapper95, I was only referring to mast-up in-season launch and retrieval of all three boats. I helped step the mast of the first J/70 at our club, but I couldn't stick around for the rest of the process, so I can't offer a fair comparison of the full travel prep times.

 

Cheers,

 

jason

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No owners manual when I got my VX earlier this year ( although Brian Bennett and my local VX One fleet captain helped me rig/learn the boat which was awesome.) Nevertheless, the following on-line is pretty useful and contains at least some of what you might be looking for?

 

Class rules PDF can be downloaded from this page:

http://vxone.org/na/organization-docs/

 

Brian wrote up a 2 page rig tuning guide that can be downloaded from this page (fifth post in the thread):

http://vxone.org/forum/index.php/topic,12.0.html

 

Harken shows most of the deck layout here:

http://www.harken.com/DeckLayout.aspx?id=38720

 

FWIW, as far as rigging goes, the only somewhat unique feature is correctly running the spin halyard, since the other end of the same line is the retrieval end and in-between it runs through blocks that also automatically extend/retract the sprit when you are hoisting/dousing. If headed to an out-of-town regatta, I can fully rig/de-rig the boat on my own apart from 2 tasks. First, stepping/lowering the mast is much easier with a spotter holding the base stationary while getting the mast vertical from horizontal, and then while I hop onto the deck to lift the mast up and down into the mast track - the mast will stay put while attaching the shrouds/forestay so the helper is only needed for about a minute here. Second, getting the bottom cover onto the boat without a hoist needs a second person - (no problem solo with a hoist, we just dont have a hoist at our club.)

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Thank you for the information and links, very helpful.

 

Talking to Brian, it looks like you could fashion a bracket or rig of some sort affixed to the trailer that would hold the mast vertical temporarily next to the hull.

 

That's how you step the mast, correct? Simply pick it up and insert the foot into the step while it rests against the hole in the foredeck? This is done with the standing rigging loose, and you simply attach and tension the shrouds and forestay at your leisure?

 

Do I have this right? Brian mentioned using a PVC cup to hold the base of the mast while getting it vertical.

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Thank you for the information and links, very helpful.

 

Talking to Brian, it looks like you could fashion a bracket or rig of some sort affixed to the trailer that would hold the mast vertical temporarily next to the hull.

 

That's how you step the mast, correct? Simply pick it up and insert the foot into the step while it rests against the hole in the foredeck? This is done with the standing rigging loose, and you simply attach and tension the shrouds and forestay at your leisure?

 

Do I have this right? Brian mentioned using a PVC cup to hold the base of the mast while getting it vertical.

 

That's right Snapper.

 

When rigging the VX between two people,we put the mast on the floor next to the boat; one press down with he foot as the other walks the mast up until vertical. One crew holds it, the other one gets on board and receives it and sits it on the mast base through the deck partners.the other crew pins the headstay and then the upper shrouds and you are good to go. All the stays must be disconnected to stand up and drop the mast.

 

With some sort of bracket on the side of the boat to help you hold the mast in place while you climb on the boat can make it a one man operation. I know Brian has done it singlehanded, but I have not tried it on our boat...at least not yet.

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when I step the mast myself

1) lay the mast across the boat, standing rigging and halyards affixed at boom level to keep them clean

2) get up on the boat, stand on the fordeck

3) grab the mast and stand it up so that the base is resting on the ground next to the boat (I usually put a lifejacket or something down)

4) pick it up, while vertical and stick it through the deck penetration and down into the mast step.

 

I wouldn't try it if it were real windy But it's pretty simple. The mast is captured at the deck level in all directions, so once you get it through that hole and on the step you can let it go and it wont fall down.

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for the information and links, very helpful.

 

Talking to Brian, it looks like you could fashion a bracket or rig of some sort affixed to the trailer that would hold the mast vertical temporarily next to the hull.

 

That's how you step the mast, correct? Simply pick it up and insert the foot into the step while it rests against the hole in the foredeck? This is done with the standing rigging loose, and you simply attach and tension the shrouds and forestay at your leisure?

 

Do I have this right? Brian mentioned using a PVC cup to hold the base of the mast while getting it vertical.


That's right Snapper.

When rigging the VX between two people,we put the mast on the floor next to the boat; one press down with he foot as the other walks the mast up until vertical. One crew holds it, the other one gets on board and receives it and sits it on the mast base through the deck partners.the other crew pins the headstay and then the upper shrouds and you are good to go. All the stays must be disconnected to stand up and drop the mast.

With some sort of bracket on the side of the boat to help you hold the mast in place while you climb on the boat can make it a one man operation. I know Brian has done it singlehanded, but I have not tried it on our boat...at least not yet.

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I routinely step the mast on my Viper by myself by simply laying it down in the cockpit (lengthwise) and then walking it to vertical, pivoting the base on the foredeck overhang (I put a pfd underneath to protect the mast & deck). Once vertical I shift it into the mast step and then secure the mast vertical with the 'mast puller' line. At this point, with everything in the partners I walk around the boat and attach all the stays. It should be possible to do the same in the VX right? I've done this in decent breeze as well, just make sure you're head to wind. This may be tougher to do if you are under 5'10" though--as height helps with leverage..

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You might be able to try that, but you would have to do one extra step on the VX if you were working from the cockpit. The Viper's mast slot in the foredeck is open towards the stern. On the VX it is not, so you would still have to lift straight up about 18", move it forward and then go straight down thru the slot. That is probably why Ultra would do this from the foredeck on the VX.

 

jason

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You might be able to try that, but you would have to do one extra step on the VX if you were working from the cockpit. The Viper's mast slot in the foredeck is open towards the stern. On the VX it is not, so you would still have to lift straight up about 18", move it forward and then go straight down thru the slot. That is probably why Ultra would do this from the foredeck on the VX.

 

jason

 

Ah that would explain things. Although, the VX mast is probably a bit lighter, so you might be able to get it vertical in the same manner and then shotgun it up and over the foredeck into the slot.

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Spot on Jason

 

Except I single hand step the mast on the viper and the Vx the same way. Man that beatch up from laying down off the side of the boat. I don't like working around the keel.

 

 

 

 

You might be able to try that, but you would have to do one extra step on the VX if you were working from the cockpit. The Viper's mast slot in the foredeck is open towards the stern. On the VX it is not, so you would still have to lift straight up about 18", move it forward and then go straight down thru the slot. That is probably why Ultra would do this from the foredeck on the VX.

 

jason

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Spot on Jason

 

Except I single hand step the mast on the viper and the Vx the same way. Man that beatch up from laying down off the side of the boat. I don't like working around the keel.

 

 

 

 

You might be able to try that, but you would have to do one extra step on the VX if you were working from the cockpit. The Viper's mast slot in the foredeck is open towards the stern. On the VX it is not, so you would still have to lift straight up about 18", move it forward and then go straight down thru the slot. That is probably why Ultra would do this from the foredeck on the VX.

 

jason

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Sounds pretty straightforward, less drama than the Mount Suribachi Sands of Iwo Jima routine on the J/70.

 

Is there any place for information on how the sprit/spin chute works? It's one line to hoist and simultaneously extend the pole? Where is the spin halyard line on the boat. The opposing cam cleats are the jib sheet/track limit lines right?

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Sounds pretty straightforward, less drama than the Mount Suribachi Sands of Iwo Jima routine on the J/70.

 

Is there any place for information on how the sprit/spin chute works? It's one line to hoist and simultaneously extend the pole? Where is the spin halyard line on the boat. The opposing cam cleats are the jib sheet/track limit lines right?

 

I'm not near the boat now, I'll try to get you some pictures of our boat's spinn halyard set up. Basically, the halyard exists at the mast base facing forward to a block fastened to the bow bulkhead. From the front goes to a block on the rear end of the sprit and from there goes forward again to another block fastened on the front bulkhead, describing a"M" having the last leg of the M going aft to a cam cleat and mid ships block all the way to the transom; takes a 180 degrees turn on a block and goes forward again through the snuffer, exits forward and goes trough the patch/grommet on the kite to finally tie to the upper patch/loop on the upper third of the sail.

 

You are right, the two opposed cam cleats on the swivel base are the jib sheet (upper cam) and traveler car inhauler on the lower cam.

 

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Where is the spin halyard line on the boat.

 

In the Harken link above...

http://www.harken.com/DeckLayout.aspx?id=38720

...the royal blue line running along the midline of the bottom of the boat is the spin hayard. FWIW, the harken drawing has the spinnaker sock on the wrong side of the boat - (the black bag (spinnaker sock) in the drawing should be on the port side and the place on the halyard you pull is on starboard just aft of the foredeck - basically right next to the crew during a normal port rounding.) Nevertheless, there is indeed only 1 line (which is pretty clever, in my humble opinion) and depending on which direction you pull, the same line is either hoisting kite/extending sprit -- or -- (once you pop the halyard cleat) retrieving the kite/ retracting the sprit.

 

Using the spin halyard is very straightforward while sailing - the line just needs to be routed correctly when rigging the first time - after that, if you are removing the mast the halyard stays with it. So, it's very easy to tie a messenger line to the retrieval end to maintain the correct routing inside the boat -- as you coil the halyard up at the base of the mast, the messenger line runs through all the various blocks until it gets to the mast base, and you can then tie it off and the halyard is free to remove with the mast. Rerouting the halyard after the mast is back on is just the same process in reverse (tie halyrd to messenger and pull on other end of messenger until halyard back through all blocks and ready to tie onto the kite-) works very well

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Thank you for the information. I noticed the spin back on the port side when I was nosing around the boats last week.

 

Now I understand the "W" referenced in some of the media. Might be worthwhile if Brian comes up with an owner's manual that shows the basic rigging and launch considerations, and a trick or two detailing things like your messenger line. Not essential, but it's good marketing in the end.

 

Where is the spin halyard cleated? Is it the cam cleat on the deck just below and even with the end of the foredeck?

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Great point. The audiovisual manual and that is already on the works and will come out soon.

The spinn halyard is cleated on a Harken 150 located about 2 ft.to the starboard side of the mast, right on the floor. About 3 ft. aft there is a 29mm stand up block that also guides the halyard towards the turning block on the stern. This is the key block for the hoists and douses: if you pull from the aft side of this block you'll be hoisting, If you pull from the front side of this block you'll douse the spinnaker.

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Thank you much. I took some reference photos and am trying to understand how the boat functions. How well does the spinnaker system work? No issues with hangups getting real big, real quick?

 

Looks like a damned fine boat, all things considered. I was surprised at the static stability too, just watching crew moving around the boat alongside the dock, or while barely underway.

 

Some people mock manuals and such as unneeded, but they do help people get up and running quickly, and lend a measure of professionalism to the class. The end message is that the boat is going to be around awhile.

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Thank you much. I took some reference photos and am trying to understand how the boat functions. How well does the spinnaker system work? No issues with hangups getting real big, real quick?

 

Looks like a damned fine boat, all things considered. I was surprised at the static stability too, just watching crew moving around the boat alongside the dock, or while barely underway.

 

Some people mock manuals and such as unneeded, but they do help people get up and running quickly, and lend a measure of professionalism to the class. The end message is that the boat is going to be around awhile.

 

 

Indeed, your observations are spot on. It has great balance, yet light enough to offer great rides.

 

The spinnaker system works very well; the opening on the front of the boat is very big and offers very little friction. No major hung ups with the jib tack, however it is easier to complete the hoist of the kite before easing too much jib sheet, just to reduce friction with the foot of the jib while the kite is coming up/out. On the douses, the faster you bring it down, the better like any other boat but the timing is the important thing here rather than strength pulling it in. Windward douses are very easy and not too much of a chance to go shrimping unless you blow the sheets and take too long to douse it in heavy wind.

 

This is a video taken over a year ago doing some beer can racing in Lake ray Hubbard, blowing sustained 17 knots gusting to 23 or so (please ignore the weird motion of the mast as that is a courtesy of YouTube video's enhancer function). You can see that if you drive deep, gybe the kite to port you can drop it with no drama; the the most elegant clip, but you'll get the point:

 

 

The manual is a must in our opinion. Brian Bennett and Bennett Yachting are already working on it in order to make each step easier, starting on how to rig the boat and later on all the details.

 

There is never too much information.

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Look forward to seeing that, and thanks to all of you for answering my questions.



That chute drop is slick, I see how the halyard and retrieval rig work and how you perform a windward drop using the system.



I asked Brian about access to the backside of fasteners and he said there is no need, because the deck has G-10 reinforcements (or core?) that can be drilled and tapped. Has anyone tried this, or is there another repair option if you have a fitting pull out or go bad?



I assume the trailer works for a standard ramp launch as well?

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Snap- putting g10 blocks at fitting locations in a cores boat is pretty brilliant, actually.

 

When I rebuilt my viper I cut the outer skin and stuck g10 blocs in all the fitting locations with thickened epoxy.

 

It's pretty convenient being able to take a block off by just unscrewing it from the outside.

 

When you tighten down you don't compress the laminate / core sandwich. We've all seen dimples around fitting locations before?

 

If a fitting on a straight cored location leaks moisture will likely penetrate the core and make the boat heavier - or the deck soft. Balsa cored boats are famous for this. If it's a g10 block a leak will go directly into the hull and not into the boats core

 

I would suspect it is a more expensive way to build a boat. But so much better!

 

The Vx is probably one of the better though out platforms I've ever seen. From initial design to sailing.

 

 

Look forward to seeing that, and thanks to all of you for answering my questions.

That chute drop is slick, I see how the halyard and retrieval rig work and how you perform a windward drop using the system.

I asked Brian about access to the backside of fasteners and he said there is no need, because the deck has G-10 reinforcements (or core?) that can be drilled and tapped. Has anyone tried this, or is there another repair option if you have a fitting pull out or go bad?

I assume the trailer works for a standard ramp launch as well?

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Snap- putting g10 blocks at fitting locations in a cored boat is pretty brilliant, actually.

 

When I rebuilt my viper I cut the outer skin and stuck g10 blocs in all the fitting locations with thickened epoxy.

 

It's pretty convenient being able to take a block off by just unscrewing it from the outside.

 

When you tighten down you don't compress the laminate / core sandwich. We've all seen dimples around fitting locations before?

 

If a fitting on a straight cored location leaks moisture will likely penetrate the core and make the boat heavier - or the deck soft. Balsa cored boats are famous for this. If it's a g10 block a leak will go directly into the hull and not into the boats core

 

I would suspect it is a more expensive way to build a boat. But so much better!

 

The Vx is probably one of the better though out platforms I've ever seen. From initial design to sailing.

 

 

Look forward to seeing that, and thanks to all of you for answering my questions.

That chute drop is slick, I see how the halyard and retrieval rig work and how you perform a windward drop using the system.

I asked Brian about access to the backside of fasteners and he said there is no need, because the deck has G-10 reinforcements (or core?) that can be drilled and tapped. Has anyone tried this, or is there another repair option if you have a fitting pull out or go bad?

I assume the trailer works for a standard ramp launch as well?

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Snap- putting g10 blocks at fitting locations in a cored boat is pretty brilliant, actually.

When I rebuilt my viper I cut the outer skin and stuck g10 blocs in all the fitting locations with thickened epoxy.

It's pretty convenient being able to take a block off by just unscrewing it from the outside.

When you tighten down you don't compress the laminate / core sandwich. We've all seen dimples around fitting locations before?

If a fitting on a straight cored location leaks moisture will likely penetrate the core and make the boat heavier - or the deck soft. Balsa cored boats are famous for this. If it's a g10 block a leak will go directly into the hull and not into the boats core

I would suspect it is a more expensive way to build a boat. But so much better!

The Vx is probably one of the better though out platforms I've ever seen. From initial design to sailing.

Yes, I like the concept as long as it works. I'm familiar with dense foam, more like wood, being located within an FRP sandwich, to take compression loads in airplanes and sailplanes. The the ones I worked on all used blind nut plates to secure the fastener that get sealed when the wing or control surface is closed. No saltwater involved, however. This is the first I've seen something other than a metal insert or nut plate to carry the threads on a high load item.

 

What does the Viper use? It has fasteners that are unreachable on the backsides doesn't it? That was one of the aspects that gave me pause, and it prompted me to ask Brian about it.

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That is the gnav, the inverted vang and proxy backstay. It works very nicely in conjunction with the split-tail mainsheet with split bridle. Driver or crew can trim it one-handed from either side. On a Viper, you would be pulling a car on a track along the top of the boom and have purchase along the boom, and down the mast or along the floor. On the VX, you are pulling a curved piece of carbon that just slides along the top of the boom with no track, and purchase in the boom and then down the mast. It is held down with just a bungee but that is enough. Very smooth.

 

I believe it is closed and sealed between the floor and the hull, perhaps with just a drain plug in case water gets in thru a fitting. I don't think there are any lockers or inspection ports by default.

 

jason

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There are three inspection ports, two just forward of the mast on each side tank and one on the rudder support. There is also a drain plug at the stern. But yes the boat is sealed, so it has floatation.

My bad. I should have left that question to an owner. My Viper lives next a VX during the summer. I'm a big fan, but I guess I haven't memorized the boat yet!

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Close enough Jason

 

You guys frozen over up there yet?

 

 

 

There are three inspection ports, two just forward of the mast on each side tank and one on the rudder support. There is also a drain plug at the stern. But yes the boat is sealed, so it has floatation.

My bad. I should have left that question to an owner. My Viper lives next a VX during the summer. I'm a big fan, but I guess I haven't memorized the boat yet!
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Thank you, gentlemen.

 

Interesting setup for the Gnav track. Guess that's what all of that KY jelly ultra carries around is for, lubing the Gnav saddle?

 

I assume this means the Gnav can't serve to hold the boom up and that you still need a topping lift for that purpose, and that you can't rig the boom until the keel is extended.

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Snapper....the KY may do the trick...can't tell for how many cycles before you need to re-apply, though!...Ultra?

You are right: the GNAV does not hold the boom up and you can't install the boom until the keel is down; luckily is just a pin and ring and no lines need to be ran. To keep the boom up when not sailing we use the main halyard.

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Nice boys. Sounds like snap might fit in well. For some reason my KY stash always disappears when rod is around.

 

Still time to get an order in and have it delivered to Miami for Bacardi?

 

 

Edit: The entire rig is well done including this gnav. The boom wants to naturally roll a bit and the contoured pad type car system allows it to happen without stress. A car / track system tends to bind up a bit.

 

If I could afford to do it is have southern build a similar rig / boom setup for my viper.

 

Snapper....the KY may do the trick...can't tell for how many cycles before you need to re-apply, though!...Ultra?

 

You are right: the GNAV does not hold the boom up and you can't install the boom until the keel is down; luckily is just a pin and ring and no lines need to be ran. To keep the boom up when not sailing we use the main halyard.

 

 

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You doing Bacardi Ultra? I think a few guys from OCBC are going to go down there and meet their boats there for the first time. I can't pull it over between building a house and buying a boat in the same month but at least a few of us are going.

 

The Texas/Oklahoma fleet needs to start planning some type of series for next year.

 

Rod, I also heard that after nationals there was some serious interest at Rush Creek and there might be more coming that way, is that true?

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Seems like an awesome boat. How many expected in newport this summer? Is there another way to access the tuning guide? I was not able to load it through the VX forum.

Last I heard (back in August), VX Fleet 5 was figuring on 7 local boats in Newport for 2014. That was just before the Newport VX demo weekend though, so perhaps more now? Anyway, they usually race Monday nights out of Fort Adams. On Brian's tuning guide, I think you may need to register on the VX forum to be able to download the file. Hope that helps

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We need a fleet in the San Francisco Bay Area. Would be fun on Lake Tahoe, and the well loved Huntington Lake also.

Sounds like it is time to buy a boat if you think there needs to be a fleet!

 

We all thought there needed to be a fleet also so five of us joined the one guy who already had one and ordered them!