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...lets see just 3 ping's going due S or E before midnight UTC and I'll cough-up.....literally!

.

 

....close but no cigar....3 pings going SSW midday y'day,,,and even one due south when he was sending a 'transmission',but he often has a higher heading when sending a message for some reason :mellow:

 

...how easy can I make it for him to show he can sail above beam?

 

==========================

 

...a bit of gratitude....or a projected expectation??

. .....to me it rings of that guy who's always out front of the 7-11 <_<

 

Rimas Meleshyus
Sat Nov 22nd, 20149:41:45 am

Good morning guys how are you !. I have met all kinds of great people who have helped me rain gear and food for my extraordinary journey which is greatly apprec
Speed: 1.24 mph Heading: WSW Elevation: 21.00 ft Batt: Normal Lat: -6.453610 Lon: -165.443738
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If you have never seen it watch Alone on the Wall. Alex Honnold is a badass!

 

no life raft is the deal breaker as far as admiration goes. Impressive? yep. Just like guy's who climb without a rope. Eventually though, it ends badly. I don't admire that. It's just stupid.

Personally, I like to let competent adults choose their own risk calculus. Whether you opt to climb ropeless or not is about as profound and individual a decision as can be made. The rewards can be astonishing. When you are several hundred feet up and fully aware a single mistake is certain death, there is a focus and intensity that exceeds anything I've ever known. No hiding behind gear, or rescue assets, or Plan B. You make the moves, or you die. :)

 

You can climb your whole life and never solo hard, but no genuine climber would deny complete respect to these men and women:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrX0ohmu1zw

 

They are the best of the best. Only two of the soloists shown are dead, btw, and only one of those (Bachar) died climbing. I've known people who've soloed for decades. It doesn't always 'end badly', and you can't go that hard that long if you haven't learned blistering self-honesty.

 

Likewise, Webb Chiles has sailed w/out liferaft or rescue signal devices his entire career; he recognizes the danger and selfishness inherent in solo ocean sailing and prefers to take the risks & consequences unto himself. He isn't 'stupid.' He has made a conscious decision to live a certain way, and it's frankly no skin off your nose if he dies in the pursuit.

 

Now Rimas is a special case. ;) It's not entirely clear Rimas is making informed choices. But he is an adult, his life is his own to dispose of, and only insofar as he solicits outside help (for gear, money, or rescue) that we have standing to criticise. I think Dr. Paris' attempt is similarly misguided and doomed, but it's his concern until something happens to make it ours. Then -- I'm looking at you, Rebel Heart -- let the Shit Jumping begin.

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go the rimas! t shirts need to be made. perhaps a trip to the salvation army and buy some used white t's. preferably stained. with 'go the rimas' scrawled, misspelled on back with a marker. all proceeds to be donated.

.

...sounds like quite the step up from the original t-shirts back ~page 3.

 

 

Rimas Meleshyus
Sat Nov 22nd, 201411:40 am

 

I used main sail in full and huge genoa. In 2013 i visited olympia washington and i have met captain shawn manger the great guy i want to say hello to him.
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go the rimas! t shirts need to be made. perhaps a trip to the salvation army and buy some used white t's. preferably stained. with 'go the rimas' scrawled, misspelled on back with a marker. all proceeds to be donated.

.

...sounds like quite the step up from the original t-shirts back ~page 3.

 

 

Rimas Meleshyus
Sat Nov 22nd, 201411:40 am

 

I used main sail in full and huge genoa. In 2013 i visited olympia washington and i have met captain shawn manger the great guy i want to say hello to him.

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LoL

 

He dared use the numbers 666

 

"I made it today only two miles zero wind almost inposible to sailing. To pago pago samoa island 666 miles still very far to go if was the wind already in samoa" at -6.3011,-165.0723 [/size]

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Rimas messages this aft. Fatalist or realist ?

 

  • 0.6 hours ago: "Whether the whale was aggressive or also surprised is difficult to tell. The bailey s survived an incredible 118 days in a liferaft before being rescued by ship" at -6.5553,-165.6195 (0.5nm NE)
  • 3.5 hours ago: "Other yachtsmen have been less lucky. The bailey were sunk by a whale near the galapagos islands their wooden yacht sank quite quickly after collision. " at -6.5029,-165.5427 (6.1nm NE)

post-105471-0-38407400-1416704064_thumb.jpg

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Rimas messages this aft. Fatalist or realist ?

 

  • 0.6 hours ago: "Whether the whale was aggressive or also surprised is difficult to tell. The bailey s survived an incredible 118 days in a liferaft before being rescued by ship" at -6.5553,-165.6195 (0.5nm NE)
  • 3.5 hours ago: "Other yachtsmen have been less lucky. The bailey were sunk by a whale near the galapagos islands their wooden yacht sank quite quickly after collision. " at -6.5029,-165.5427 (6.1nm NE)

 

Is Rimas suddenly learning to spell and type as well as sail?

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Rimas messages this aft. Fatalist or realist ?

 

  • 0.6 hours ago: "Whether the whale was aggressive or also surprised is difficult to tell. The bailey s survived an incredible 118 days in a liferaft before being rescued by ship" at -6.5553,-165.6195 (0.5nm NE)
  • 3.5 hours ago: "Other yachtsmen have been less lucky. The bailey were sunk by a whale near the galapagos islands their wooden yacht sank quite quickly after collision. " at -6.5029,-165.5427 (6.1nm NE)

 

Is Rimas suddenly learning to spell and type as well as sail?

 

Could be his handlers are now doing his writing, so all he has to do is cut and paste?

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Wow, looking at the fortuitious chart why doesn't Rimas just continue on to one of those BIG islands like Australia, it doesn't look like it is that far on my computer screen.

el capitano

.

.....you can expect to see an announcement to that effect at the point that it's clear Rimas has drifted beyond his current destination.

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Rimas messages this aft. Fatalist or realist ?

 

  • 0.6 hours ago: "Whether the whale was aggressive or also surprised is difficult to tell. The bailey s survived an incredible 118 days in a liferaft before being rescued by ship" at -6.5553,-165.6195 (0.5nm NE)
  • 3.5 hours ago: "Other yachtsmen have been less lucky. The bailey were sunk by a whale near the galapagos islands their wooden yacht sank quite quickly after collision. " at -6.5029,-165.5427 (6.1nm NE)

 

Is Rimas suddenly learning to spell and type as well as sail?

 

Could be his handlers are now doing his writing, so all he has to do is cut and paste?

.

 

......or maybe he cam across an article in nationalG <_<

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Rimas messages this aft. Fatalist or realist ?

 

  • 0.6 hours ago: "Whether the whale was aggressive or also surprised is difficult to tell. The bailey s survived an incredible 118 days in a liferaft before being rescued by ship" at -6.5553,-165.6195 (0.5nm NE)
  • 3.5 hours ago: "Other yachtsmen have been less lucky. The bailey were sunk by a whale near the galapagos islands their wooden yacht sank quite quickly after collision. " at -6.5029,-165.5427 (6.1nm NE)

 

Is Rimas suddenly learning to spell and type as well as sail?

 

Good call. Those comments were not written by Go the Rimas!

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Tropical Disturbance 01F is moving slowly towards Pago Pago. No Warnings posted. You can see Rimas position on the wind map. http://www.prh.noaa.gov/samoa/

 

COASTAL WATERS FORECAST FOR AMERICAN SAMOA
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PAGO PAGO AS
324 PM SST SAT NOV 22 2014

AMERICAN SAMOA COASTAL WATERS OUT TO 40 NAUTICAL MILES INCLUDING
THE FAGATELE BAY NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY

PSZ100-231445-
324 PM SST SAT NOV 22 2014

.SYNOPSIS FOR AMERICAN SAMOA COASTAL WATERS...TROPICAL DISTURBANCE
01F WAS CENTERED NEAR LATITUDE 11.2S LONGITUDE 174.8W OR ABOUT 300 NM
NORTHWEST OF TUTUILA MOVING SOUTHEAST SLOWLY. THIS SYSTEM IS FORECAST
TO MOVE SOUTHEASTWARD THROUGH NEXT WEEK.

$

PSZ150>152-231445-
TUTUILA-AUNUU-MANUA-SWAINS-
324 PM SST SAT NOV 22 2014

...THERE ARE NO WARNINGS...

.TONIGHT...SOUTHEAST WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 5 TO 7 FT. SCATTERED SHOWERS.
.SUNDAY AND SUNDAY NIGHT...EAST WINDS 10 TO 15 KT TURNING NORTHEAST
SUNDAY NIGHT. SEAS 5 TO 7 FT. NUMEROUS SHOWERS.
.MONDAY AND MONDAY NIGHT...NORTH WINDS 10 TO 20 KT TURNING NORTHWEST
MONDAY NIGHT. SEAS 6 TO 8 FT. NUMEROUS SHOWERS.
.TUESDAY AND TUESDAY NIGHT...NORTHWEST WINDS 10 TO 20 KT. SEAS 6 TO
8 FT. NUMEROUS SHOWERS.
.WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY...NORTHWEST WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 5 TO 7 FT.
SCATTERED SHOWERS.

THE NEXT SCHEDULED FORECAST WILL BE ISSUED AT 1000 PM SST.
FOR THE OTHER FORECASTS AND MODEL DATA GO TO OUR WEB PAGE
HTTP://WWW.PRH.NOAA.GOV/SAMOA

 

post-105471-0-22518600-1416711255_thumb.jpg

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.

 

. ... :o:o

 

 

...and what actually is happening at 3:19 anyways? :mellow:

 

no life raft is the deal breaker as far as admiration goes. Impressive? yep. Just like guy's who climb without a rope. Eventually though, it ends badly. I don't admire that. It's just stupid.

Personally, I like to let competent adults choose their own risk calculus. Whether you opt to climb ropeless or not is about as profound and individual a decision as can be made. The rewards can be astonishing. When you are several hundred feet up and fully aware a single mistake is certain death, there is a focus and intensity that exceeds anything I've ever known. No hiding behind gear, or rescue assets, or Plan B. You make the moves, or you die. :)

 

You can climb your whole life and never solo hard, but no genuine climber would deny complete respect to these men and women:

 

 

 

They are the best of the best. Only two of the soloists shown are dead, btw, and only one of those (Bachar) died climbing. I've known people who've soloed for decades. It doesn't always 'end badly', and you can't go that hard that long if you haven't learned blistering self-honesty.

 

Likewise, Webb Chiles has sailed w/out liferaft or rescue signal devices his entire career; he recognizes the danger and selfishness inherent in solo ocean sailing and prefers to take the risks & consequences unto himself. He isn't 'stupid.' He has made a conscious decision to live a certain way, and it's frankly no skin off your nose if he dies in the pursuit.

 

Now Rimas is a special case. ;) It's not entirely clear Rimas is making informed choices. But he is an adult, his life is his own to dispose of, and only insofar as he solicits outside help (for gear, money, or rescue) that we have standing to criticise. I think Dr. Paris' attempt is similarly misguided and doomed, but it's his concern until something happens to make it ours. Then -- I'm looking at you, Rebel Heart -- let the Shit Jumping begin.

A quick google search will show you that your numbers are very wrong. While the guys/gals at the very top end lose it infrequently...it happens. And fatal falls are actually fairly common amongst us mere mortals.

 

I was driving past Tenaya Lake one afternoon when a blur of motion up and left caught my eye. Two seconds later I would have run over Rick Cashner who had made a gravity assissted descent from a roof above the road. Other than knocking out a couple of teeth, a few gaping head wounds, and road rash he was sort of unscathed.

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no life raft is the deal breaker as far as admiration goes. Impressive? yep. Just like guy's who climb without a rope. Eventually though, it ends badly. I don't admire that. It's just stupid.

Personally, I like to let competent adults choose their own risk calculus. Whether you opt to climb ropeless or not is about as profound and individual a decision as can be made. The rewards can be astonishing. When you are several hundred feet up and fully aware a single mistake is certain death, there is a focus and intensity that exceeds anything I've ever known. No hiding behind gear, or rescue assets, or Plan B. You make the moves, or you die. :)

 

You can climb your whole life and never solo hard, but no genuine climber would deny complete respect to these men and women:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrX0ohmu1zw

 

They are the best of the best. Only two of the soloists shown are dead, btw, and only one of those (Bachar) died climbing. I've known people who've soloed for decades. It doesn't always 'end badly', and you can't go that hard that long if you haven't learned blistering self-honesty.

 

Likewise, Webb Chiles has sailed w/out liferaft or rescue signal devices his entire career; he recognizes the danger and selfishness inherent in solo ocean sailing and prefers to take the risks & consequences unto himself. He isn't 'stupid.' He has made a conscious decision to live a certain way, and it's frankly no skin off your nose if he dies in the pursuit.

 

Now Rimas is a special case. ;) It's not entirely clear Rimas is making informed choices. But he is an adult, his life is his own to dispose of, and only insofar as he solicits outside help (for gear, money, or rescue) that we have standing to criticise. I think Dr. Paris' attempt is similarly misguided and doomed, but it's his concern until something happens to make it ours. Then -- I'm looking at you, Rebel Heart -- let the Shit Jumping begin.

I suppose I should clarify a bit.

 

Solo sailors or climber who choose not to carry life saving equipment are not stupid, if they are at the extreme top end of their sport. Foolish? Perhaps, but not stupid. That came out wrong.

 

However Rimas is not at the top end of his sport. He is barely hanging onto the low end. His abilities are so limited I do indeed doubt a life raft would even help. What makes his situation perhaps unique is that he has a multitude of equally inept people following his every move as if he is some sort of god. They worship the fact that so far he has defied the odds and seem to relish the fact that it seems easy to do so. Rimas has set the bar so inexplicably low in terms of offshore sailing expertise that he is attracting a crowd of wanna-be world cruisers to his exploits. This is foolish. He isn't saying,"this is difficult, prepare yourselves". Quiet the opposite, he makes it look easy and peaceful through shear ignorance. His minions follow his every word as gospel of the sea and defend him agains us "yacht Club" types to no end.

 

Most people I know won't climb a rock for god or money. The few that will won't do it without a rope. Doesn't matter what they see on T.V. But I have interacted with a few Rimas followers who are eager to follow him. I seems people are far ore afraid of falling than they are of drowning. In terms of adventure one seems quick and short, given the activity. The other appears unlikely and long drawn out. But if you are thousands of miles out........

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Well that should take care of the current glut in the SJ 24 market.

I have a personal stake in Rimas's success. If he lives, I can use that in my craigslist ad when the time comes to sell my SJ24. I bought a bay boat, but now it's a proven blue water boat.

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Well that should take care of the current glut in the SJ 24 market.

I have a personal stake in Rimas's success. If he lives, I can use that in my craigslist ad when the time comes to sell my SJ24. I bought a bay boat, but now it's a proven blue water boat vehicle for derelicts.

 

Fixed.

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no life raft is the deal breaker as far as admiration goes. Impressive? yep. Just like guy's who climb without a rope. Eventually though, it ends badly. I don't admire that. It's just stupid.

 

Personally, I like to let competent adults choose their own risk calculus. Whether you opt to climb ropeless or not is about as profound and individual a decision as can be made. The rewards can be astonishing. When you are several hundred feet up and fully aware a single mistake is certain death, there is a focus and intensity that exceeds anything I've ever known. No hiding behind gear, or rescue assets, or Plan B. You make the moves, or you die. :)

 

You can climb your whole life and never solo hard, but no genuine climber would deny complete respect to these men and women:

 

 

 

They are the best of the best. Only two of the soloists shown are dead, btw, and only one of those (Bachar) died climbing. I've known people who've soloed for decades. It doesn't always 'end badly', and you can't go that hard that long if you haven't learned blistering self-honesty.

 

Likewise, Webb Chiles has sailed w/out liferaft or rescue signal devices his entire career; he recognizes the danger and selfishness inherent in solo ocean sailing and prefers to take the risks & consequences unto himself. He isn't 'stupid.' He has made a conscious decision to live a certain way, and it's frankly no skin off your nose if he dies in the pursuit.

 

Now Rimas is a special case. ;) It's not entirely clear Rimas is making informed choices. But he is an adult, his life is his own to dispose of, and only insofar as he solicits outside help (for gear, money, or rescue) that we have standing to criticise. I think Dr. Paris' attempt is similarly misguided and doomed, but it's his concern until something happens to make it ours. Then -- I'm looking at you, Rebel Heart -- let the Shit Jumping begin.

I suppose I should clarify a bit.

 

Solo sailors or climber who choose not to carry life saving equipment are not stupid, if they are at the extreme top end of their sport. Foolish? Perhaps, but not stupid. That came out wrong.

 

However Rimas is not at the top end of his sport. He is barely hanging onto the low end. His abilities are so limited I do indeed doubt a life raft would even help. What makes his situation perhaps unique is that he has a multitude of equally inept people following his every move as if he is some sort of god. They worship the fact that so far he has defied the odds and seem to relish the fact that it seems easy to do so. Rimas has set the bar so inexplicably low in terms of offshore sailing expertise that he is attracting a crowd of wanna-be world cruisers to his exploits. This is foolish. He isn't saying,"this is difficult, prepare yourselves". Quiet the opposite, he makes it look easy and peaceful through shear ignorance. His minions follow his every word as gospel of the sea and defend him agains us "yacht Club" types to no end.

 

Most people I know won't climb a rock for god or money. The few that will won't do it without a rope. Doesn't matter what they see on T.V. But I have interacted with a few Rimas followers who are eager to follow him. I seems people are far ore afraid of falling than they are of drowning. In terms of adventure one seems quick and short, given the activity. The other appears unlikely and long drawn out. But if you are thousands of miles out........

Well, he's had both a life raft and a rigid dinghy. He lost (jury is out on the dinghy...it might be a drogue) both of them. He might as well have had a 110v waffle iron for all the good either did him. I can give any two idiots a climbing rope. You'll find them both dead and only one will be tied into it.

 

My point is that you can't compare Rimas to anyone that is reasonably competent at anything, whether it be sailing, climbing, or full contact bocce ball. The man is STUBBORNLY INCOMPETENT...he insists upon it. Even Darwin Award winners are accidents. This is more on the order of sticking your dick in a meat slicer and daring it to do something different.

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The man is STUBBORNLY INCOMPETENT...he insists upon it. Even Darwin Award winners are accidents. This is more on the order of sticking your dick in a meat slicer and daring it to do something different.

 

There is a sport for the stubborn. It's called Ferret Legging.

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The man is STUBBORNLY INCOMPETENT...he insists upon it. Even Darwin Award winners are accidents. This is more on the order of sticking your dick in a meat slicer and daring it to do something different.

 

There is a sport for the stubborn. It's called Ferret Legging.

Sounds like something that Richard Gere might like.

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Here's Wikipedia on the subject of Ferret Legging, just so that everything on this thread remains clear:

 

Ferret-legging is an endurance test or stunt in which ferrets are trapped in trousers worn by a participant.[2] Also known as put 'em down[3] and ferret-down-trousers,[4][5] it is a sport that seems to have been popular among coal miners in Yorkshire, England.[6] Contestants put live ferrets inside their trousers; the winner is the one who is the last to release the animals. The world record is five hours and thirty minutes.

The sport may have originated during the time when only the relatively wealthy in England were allowed to keep animals used for hunting, forcing poachers to hide their illicit ferrets in their trousers. Following a brief resurgence in popularity during the 1970s, ferret-legging has been described as a "dying sport",[7] although a national ferret-legging event was held inRichmond, from 2003 to 2009.

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Here's Wikipedia on the subject of Ferret Legging, just so that everything on this thread remains clear:

 

Ferret-legging is an endurance test or stunt in which ferrets are trapped in trousers worn by a participant.[2] Also known as put 'em down[3] and ferret-down-trousers,[4][5] it is a sport that seems to have been popular among coal miners in Yorkshire, England.[6] Contestants put live ferrets inside their trousers; the winner is the one who is the last to release the animals. The world record is five hours and thirty minutes.

The sport may have originated during the time when only the relatively wealthy in England were allowed to keep animals used for hunting, forcing poachers to hide their illicit ferrets in their trousers. Following a brief resurgence in popularity during the 1970s, ferret-legging has been described as a "dying sport",[7] although a national ferret-legging event was held inRichmond, from 2003 to 2009.

I've already had one ex wife trapped between my ankles and my bank account. I'll pass.

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Here's Wikipedia on the subject of Ferret Legging, just so that everything on this thread remains clear:

 

Ferret-legging is an endurance test or stunt in which ferrets are trapped in trousers worn by a participant.[2] Also known as put 'em down[3] and ferret-down-trousers,[4][5] it is a sport that seems to have been popular among coal miners in Yorkshire, England.[6] Contestants put live ferrets inside their trousers; the winner is the one who is the last to release the animals. The world record is five hours and thirty minutes.

The sport may have originated during the time when only the relatively wealthy in England were allowed to keep animals used for hunting, forcing poachers to hide their illicit ferrets in their trousers. Following a brief resurgence in popularity during the 1970s, ferret-legging has been described as a "dying sport",[7] although a national ferret-legging event was held inRichmond, from 2003 to 2009.

I've already had one ex wife trapped between my ankles and my bank account. I'll pass.

You've only gotta beat 5 hours 30 minutes and you're world champion!!

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Here's Wikipedia on the subject of Ferret Legging, just so that everything on this thread remains clear:

 

Ferret-legging is an endurance test or stunt in which ferrets are trapped in trousers worn by a participant.[2] Also known as put 'em down[3] and ferret-down-trousers,[4][5] it is a sport that seems to have been popular among coal miners in Yorkshire, England.[6] Contestants put live ferrets inside their trousers; the winner is the one who is the last to release the animals. The world record is five hours and thirty minutes.

The sport may have originated during the time when only the relatively wealthy in England were allowed to keep animals used for hunting, forcing poachers to hide their illicit ferrets in their trousers. Following a brief resurgence in popularity during the 1970s, ferret-legging has been described as a "dying sport",[7] although a national ferret-legging event was held inRichmond, from 2003 to 2009.

I've already had one ex wife trapped between my ankles and my bank account. I'll pass.
You've only gotta beat 5 hours 30 minutes and you're world champion!!

If only Rimas had brought along a ferret.

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Here's Wikipedia on the subject of Ferret Legging, just so that everything on this thread remains clear:

 

Ferret-legging is an endurance test or stunt in which ferrets are trapped in trousers worn by a participant.[2] Also known as put 'em down[3] and ferret-down-trousers,[4][5] it is a sport that seems to have been popular among coal miners in Yorkshire, England.[6] Contestants put live ferrets inside their trousers; the winner is the one who is the last to release the animals. The world record is five hours and thirty minutes.

The sport may have originated during the time when only the relatively wealthy in England were allowed to keep animals used for hunting, forcing poachers to hide their illicit ferrets in their trousers. Following a brief resurgence in popularity during the 1970s, ferret-legging has been described as a "dying sport",[7] although a national ferret-legging event was held inRichmond, from 2003 to 2009.

I've already had one ex wife trapped between my ankles and my bank account. I'll pass.
You've only gotta beat 5 hours 30 minutes and you're world champion!!
If only Rimas had brought along a ferret.

Well…………… it WOULD be a legitimate world record.

 

No offense to the SJ24.

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no life raft is the deal breaker as far as admiration goes. Impressive? yep. Just like guy's who climb without a rope. Eventually though, it ends badly. I don't admire that. It's just stupid.

 

 

You should read Estar's thoughts on this matter over in CA. He points out that you never really know whether one will deploy, whether you can get aboard, or even whether you can keep it from flying away. Also, boats that have been abandoned are frequently found later, floating along happily. They can take more than the crew. Also, the lack of a raft is a significant motivator to save the ship. I don't wish to further speak for him and don't really agree with his conclusion, but it's not just stupid.

 

I don't agree with all of Estar's conclusions either, but he makes some rational arguments.

 

However, if there is no life raft you do in fact know with 100% certainty whether or not it will deploy automatically...

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Gotta put that one in the obscure trivia section of my brain....never know when I'll need it again. :)

 

Here's Wikipedia on the subject of Ferret Legging, just so that everything on this thread remains clear:

 

Ferret-legging is an endurance test or stunt in which ferrets are trapped in trousers worn by a participant.[2] Also known as put 'em down[3] and ferret-down-trousers,[4][5] it is a sport that seems to have been popular among coal miners in Yorkshire, England.[6] Contestants put live ferrets inside their trousers; the winner is the one who is the last to release the animals. The world record is five hours and thirty minutes.

The sport may have originated during the time when only the relatively wealthy in England were allowed to keep animals used for hunting, forcing poachers to hide their illicit ferrets in their trousers. Following a brief resurgence in popularity during the 1970s, ferret-legging has been described as a "dying sport",[7] although a national ferret-legging event was held inRichmond, from 2003 to 2009.

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Here is a compilation of RimaSpeak and quotes from reporters, readers and one from SJB, for your reading pleasure and comment. They are all from his Alaskan adventure and up to the first leg of Pier Pressure [his second SJ24] from the PNW.

 

 

if successful, the self-taught sailor from Port Townsend, Wash., said he would set a record for smallest boat to circumnavigate the globe.

“If I pass the Cape Horn I’ll be in the Guinness book 100 percent,” he said.

His outboard motor fell off the boat while passing San Francisco and he also lost some of the wires for his rigging off the coast of Mexico

Unable to sail against the wind northward to California, and preferring to make repairs in the United States, he said he decided to let the winds take him westward to Hawaii

From Hawaii, Meleshyus plans to sail to Tahiti and then to Cape Horn.

The same day on his website he wrote, "A solo captain, is no one else's commander."

By GPS, Meleshyus means a handheld Magellan from the early 2000s.

“On June 4, [20]12 Monday was big bang on my right side, near my seat and engine. It was extremely scary for me. I think when me hit, now boat sink. Already in life raft. Very calm and sunny and warm.

“So, almost upside down, my sail, riggings, mast, was almost underwater. I don’t know how they back. I was very surprised. I was inside, closed door everything, so water not coming in inside, you know.

That wasn’t the end of Meleshyus’ trouble. As he got closer to the Aleutians and consequently the Great Circle shipping route, several cargo ships almost ran him down. He didn’t sleep for three days for fear of getting hit. That lack of sleep is how, a month into his journey, just 50 miles from Unalaska, Meleshyus hit a reef. He tried dislodging his boat for several hours before giving up and falling asleep. When he awoke, he was beached in Sarana Bay, on the south side of Akutan.

“I tried to do flares, but fog. I tried to use mirrors to planes. I tried climbing mountains and waving. But nobody can see me.”

“He went in there on probably a nine-foot swell,” Pelkey says.

Under normal conditions, the water depth in the bay is only 1-2 feet, not enough for another vessel to get in there and pull the boat out.

“I’m already in history [for] cross[ing] the Gulf of Alaska on [my] tiny 24 foot sailboat.”

IKenny

January 13, 2013 at 9:56 pm

Met Rimas today at my church in Anacortes, just thirty or so miles from Port Townsend as the crow flies. We gave him a small donation to stay overnight here and ferry & bus fare to Port T. Also connected him to my old friend Scott at Anacortes Yacht Club. Seems they have been trying to rid themselves of a S.J. 24 for some time. So hope this works out for everyone. I’ll be scanning the sailing rags for stories. Blessings Rimas.

Kenny H.
Anacortes

 

I know Rimas and if you ask me, he’s a little hustler. Tesa

This many months later, that’s where his boat remains. Retrieval in the shallow tidal waters would be expensive, dangerous, and maybe impossible. Rimas was flown out by Coast Guard helicopter.

He hopes to sail next from Port Townsend to Japan, then around Cape Horn on his way to the UK.

Meleshyus is bound first for Cape Horn, which he now estimates will take him seven months, non-stop, to complete.

“I’m very happy,” said Meleshyus, 61.

“There are a lot of people living vicariously through Rimas’s dream,” said Oak Harbor resident Mike Newhouse, repeating the words of another boat owner.

The 3,200-pound vessel sat well below her designed waterline, crammed with food, water and other supplies.

All of it was donated from Good Samaritans who wish Meleshyus well on what many say will be a passage rife with peril.

Buys, who owns a San Juan 24 of his own, accompanied Meleshyus through Deception Pass Monday morning. The idea was to give him some last minute instruction — it was the first time Meleshyus had actually sailed his new boat — and see him safely into the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

“No, I’m absolutely confident,” he said, when asked if he was having any second thoughts. “Not scared.”

Last year, a Russian immigrant in his 60s with iffy sailing/navigational skills, Rimas Meleshyus (pictured), stopped in Astoria on his way to complete what would likely have been suicidal trip around the world via the Cape Horn, South America, in a 24-foot San Juan sailboat.

Fortunately for him, he got blown off course and wound up in Hawaii.

Single handed sailing is one of the most rewarding experiences a person can have, but very it is dangerous all the time. The most at night, Whales, logs floating on the seas, ships can rock as well you sleeping.

Meleshyus even claims his boat was hit by a gray whale.

Weighing up to 36 tons, the massive mammal stuck the boat so hard that he was ejected from the cockpit.

“If not for safety harness, I would be dead,” Meleshyus said.

 

Fishermen, fellow sailors, just about everyone he talked to said he couldn’t do it, but Meleshyus refused to listen. After a few test sails he embarked on his ill-fated 34-day voyage.

“Why can’t I do it. Other people are doing it. I can do it too.”

His plans are the talk of the Oak Harbor sailing community, earning high-fives from some and head shaking from others.

“No matter what people think, crazy or not, I’m doing it,” he said.

Joiner said setting off on a nonstop, 10-month voyage without the necessary gear is dangerous.

doing the trip in a small, old boat is a risky venture, said Byron Skubi, chairman of the Oak Harbor Youth Sailing program.

One problem is a San Juan 24 may lack the space or buoyancy to safely store enough food and water for a 10-month passage. The boat is also not designed for blue-water cruising.

He said just he fell asleep and the boat went aground. And it was high and dry, sittin’ straight up and down on its keel, pointin’ out toward the water,” Seville said.

“He obviously doesn’t have a whole lot of money to do it and he’s just looking for donations as he’s going,” Seville said.

I thought he was foolhardy to the point of suicidal when he started out but trying to sail uphill to Cali in February just ratcheted it up several notches.

Rimas MeleshyusJune 26, 2014 at 5:55 PM

Webb Chiles one of the best sailor all the time, safety travels!

 

 

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A quick google search will show you that your numbers are very wrong. While the guys/gals at the very top end lose it infrequently...it happens. And fatal falls are actually fairly common amongst us mere mortals.

 

I was driving past Tenaya Lake one afternoon when a blur of motion up and left caught my eye. Two seconds later I would have run over Rick Cashner who had made a gravity assissted descent from a roof above the road. Other than knocking out a couple of teeth, a few gaping head wounds, and road rash he was sort of unscathed.

Highball boulder problems are another creature. ;) A quick Google search of anything will turn up everything, for all time. That's not an accurate statistical survey of outcomes, NoStrings. Off the top of my head, I've known ... probably a hundred climbers who solo quite regularly, many of them near the top of their lead grade. Which may be low 5.12 -- we're talking mostly 'mortals' here, rather than Peter Croft. Not all are still with us: three suicides (there is a correlation), couple car wrecks, two avalanches, a bergschrund fall, several rappelling or descent accidents, a roped lead fall, a falling rock, and one lightning strike. Only one of the hundred died in a soloing accident, a young woman (& sometimes climbing partner) on a route at Indian Creek. Scarpelli has been rutching up desperate shit around here for forty years.

 

Sort of the opposite of a Google search in that the sample size is limited and my experience anecdotal; yet it squares pretty well with what others report: Know lots of ropeless climbers; almost none who died that way. As John Long -- who knows a thing or two, yes? -- says, "That so few climbers have died soloing suggests that sober, calculated judgement prevails over the naive notion of the foolish adventurer going off half-cocked."

 

That last bit, unfortunately, describes Rimas quite well. When I called him a competent adult, I meant that in only the narrowest legal meaning of the phrase. If he committed a major crime (which he has not), any judge or court-appointed psychiatrist would deem him capable of discerning right from wrong and of controlling his own actions. Delusional, unskilled, impulsive ... all of that. But not so much to disqualify him as a consenting adult free to make his own life choices, including really stupid ones that might kill him.:) Fucker can't sail a lick, but he's now failed to sail most of the way across the Pacific Ocean -- twice.

 

Maybe that's why sailors are so annoyed with Rimas. He threatens to make the whole sailing business into farce.

 

"Sailing yachts across unforgiving oceans is a job for real men: serious, qualified, alpha males with suitable blue-water craft, wearing only the most advanced foul weather clothing."

 

*Rimas waves to us* "Most wind this day going 3.1kt am ohey without oats now. Miles 211 to harbor Pagepago."

 

You little shit! You're ruining the mystique. :lol:

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Here is a compilation of RimaSpeak and quotes from reporters, readers and one from SJB, for your reading pleasure and comment. They are all from his Alaskan adventure and up to the first leg of Pier Pressure [his second SJ24] from the PNW.

 

........

 

''I know Rimas and if you ask me, he’s a little hustler. Tesa

This many months later, that’s where his boat remains. ''

.

.......a nice backgrounder....good find!...there's 1000 gems in that piece :lol:

 

.

If only Rimas had brought along a ferret.

A ferret could probably sail that boat better than Rimas.

.

 

......Pier Pressure is like a box of chocolates....you never know what he'll find inside next :rolleyes:

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Maybe that's why sailors are so annoyed with Rimas. He threatens to make the whole sailing business into farce.

I'm just a guy who does some day sailing, but I think I can say pretty certainly that this isn't it. I mean, stuff from Japan washes up on Washington beaches fairly regularly, no captain required. I don't think sailors are threatened by this. I know you already know this, and your comment was tongue in cheek, but I think this is a fundamental premise for Rimas and followers, that all that planning, preparation and use of sea worthy vessels is just fluff, the accoutrements of the leisure class.

 

Edit:

Oops, forgot to finish my point. I meant to say that it is certainly possible to float across the ocean in a pool toy, if conditions happen to allow it, but doing so is a matter of luck, not great skill. As for solo climbers, my personal belief is that they are doing the same thing as climbers who are roped in. The only difference is that one falls if there is a mistake, one doesn't. I don't think the absence of the rope makes the solo climber better. I think a lot of people do think it makes the solo climber better.

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Latest transmission from Rimas. He is mixing up statue with nautical miles.

 

"Hello guys from the south pacific. Day 106 at sea. To pago pago samoa 590 natical miles not so far i using now full main sail and huge genoa from anacortes wa" at -7.0574,-166.0054

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Latest transmission from Rimas. He is mixing up statue with nautical miles.

 

"Hello guys from the south pacific. Day 106 at sea. To pago pago samoa 590 natical miles not so far i using now full main sail and huge genoa from anacortes wa" at -7.0574,-166.0054

 

...and a bit of repetition perhaps.......it's hard to believe he's run out of new material :rolleyes:

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Just out of curiosity, what is the smallest boat to round the Horn? I've heard of a Mini doing it, and some French nutters on a beach cat...

Don't know about the smallest, but this guy : http://www.alessandrodibenedetto.net/ sailed non-stop around the world and Cape Horn with a mini. He was dismasted and rigged a jury rig while underway to complete his sail up the Atlantic.

 

Kind of blows away Rimas's claim to setting a record for the smallest boat to sail around Cape Horn, if he ever gets there.

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...What makes his situation perhaps unique is that he has a multitude of equally inept people following his every move as if he is some sort of god. They worship the fact that so far he has defied the odds and seem to relish the fact that it seems easy to do so.

Is this a general concern or are there some people genuinely impressed with Rimas?

 

When I see people talking about him they almost always seem to think he's incompetent, but that's almost all on sailing forums, which may not be a representative sample. I see one or two people saying "Aww, be nice, he's living the dream," but that usually gets appropriately steamrollered.

 

 

Regarding the record, I'm not that Rimas has ever articulated what record he's actually going for. It's not quite "smallest boat to circumnavigate." It's a hodgepodge of nonsense related to being American, sailing a San Juan 24, and having general historic impact.

 

 

Hello guys. The great distance from san francisc to samoa only 35 miles san juan from the equator the first american boat will be celebrates in history books.
November 4, 2014 17:28:30 GMT

 

12 days strait no wind the world record i moving the mostly by current push me to hawaii wow the big suprised guys the nature is incredible what can do .
September 12, 2014 00:14:15 GMT
Good morning everyone on facebok if i make it to san francisco will be 7000 miles total solo voyage definitely in the american history by san juan 24 foot
March 15, 2014 16:23:45 GMT
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Yeah, I can just hear the 1000 monkeys on 1000 typewriters updating all the history books. Can't wait till it goes to press so we can see what they came up with..LOL.

 

...What makes his situation perhaps unique is that he has a multitude of equally inept people following his every move as if he is some sort of god. They worship the fact that so far he has defied the odds and seem to relish the fact that it seems easy to do so.

Is this a general concern or are there some people genuinely impressed with Rimas?

 

When I see people talking about him they almost always seem to think he's incompetent, but that's almost all on sailing forums, which may not be a representative sample. I see one or two people saying "Aww, be nice, he's living the dream," but that usually gets appropriately steamrollered.

 

 

Regarding the record, I'm not that Rimas has ever articulated what record he's actually going for. It's not quite "smallest boat to circumnavigate." It's a hodgepodge of nonsense related to being American, sailing a San Juan 24, and having general historic impact.

 

 

Hello guys. The great distance from san francisc to samoa only 35 miles san juan from the equator the first american boat will be celebrates in history books.
November 4, 2014 17:28:30 GMT

 

12 days strait no wind the world record i moving the mostly by current push me to hawaii wow the big suprised guys the nature is incredible what can do .
September 12, 2014 00:14:15 GMT
Good morning everyone on facebok if i make it to san francisco will be 7000 miles total solo voyage definitely in the american history by san juan 24 foot
March 15, 2014 16:23:45 GMT
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I teach English/Language Arts and ESL for a living. I have had these two sentences rolling around in my head for a bit: "Happy friday guys. Extrelely calm its scary i do not make it to samoa island i am struggling almost everyday with calms on this trip." If a student turned this in I would be quick to think that it was composed by two different people. "Happy friday guys" is actually a phrase rather than a sentence, but it's an acceptable informal greeting, other than the missing comma. The second sentence, however, is problematic. The dependent clause is classic in terms of syntax errors. It does indeed sound like Rimas' voice. The independent clause, which starts out, "I am struggling every day..." utilizes well structured syntax, grammar, and spelling.

 

More and more, I am coming to the conclusion that someone other than Rimas is composing at least some of his messages. Is it possible that there is an unmanned SJ24 drifting around the Pacific (a San Juan drone?) while Rimas sits in a Salvation Army dormitory, eating soup and memorizing the twelve steps?

 

 

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I teach English/Language Arts and ESL for a living. I have had these two sentences rolling around in my head for a bit: "Happy friday guys. Extrelely calm its scary i do not make it to samoa island i am struggling almost everyday with calms on this trip." If a student turned this in I would be quick to think that it was composed by two different people. "Happy friday guys" is actually a phrase rather than a sentence, but it's an acceptable informal greeting, other than the missing comma. The second sentence, however, is problematic. The dependent clause is classic in terms of syntax errors. It does indeed sound like Rimas' voice. The independent clause, which starts out, "I am struggling every day..." utilizes well structured syntax, grammar, and spelling.

 

More and more, I am coming to the conclusion that someone other than Rimas is composing at least some of his messages. Is it possible that there is an unmanned SJ24 drifting around the Pacific (a San Juan drone?) while Rimas sits in a Salvation Army dormitory, eating soup and memorizing the twelve steps?

 

You realise you will go mad if you try to make sense of this?

 

As to your suggestion? I am convinced it is an unmanned SJ24 drone.

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Rimas latest message. Showing off with 2 sails AND sheet steering.

 

"Sheet tiller steering now. I would like to say hello to captain chris johnson from hilo ocean view hawaii i have met in captain cook hilo in december 2013 " at -7.2219,-166.0088

 

COASTAL WATERS FORECAST FOR AMERICAN SAMOA

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PAGO PAGO AS
626 AM SST SUN NOV 23 2014

AMERICAN SAMOA COASTAL WATERS OUT TO 40 NAUTICAL MILES INCLUDING
THE FAGATELE BAY NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY

PSZ100-240545-
626 AM SST SUN NOV 23 2014

.SYNOPSIS FOR AMERICAN SAMOA COASTAL WATERS...TROPICAL DISTURBANCE 01F
WAS CENTERED NEAR LATITUDE 11.6S LONGITUDE 172.8W OR ABOUT 200 NM
NORTHWEST OF TUTUILA. THIS SYSTEM IS FORECAST TO MOVE
SOUTHEASTWARD ON MONDAY.

$

PSZ150>152-240545-
TUTUILA-AUNUU-MANUA-SWAINS-
626 AM SST SUN NOV 23 2014

...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT...

.TODAY...EAST WINDS 10 TO 20 KT. SEAS 6 TO 8 FT. OCCASIONAL
SHOWERS WITH ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS.
.TONIGHT...NORTHEAST WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 5 TO 7 FT. NUMEROUS
SHOWERS.
.MONDAY AND MONDAY NIGHT...NORTH WINDS 10 TO 20 KT TURNING NORTHWEST
MONDAY NIGHT. SEAS 6 TO 8 FT. NUMEROUS SHOWERS.
.TUESDAY AND TUESDAY NIGHT...NORTHWEST WINDS 10 TO 20 KT. SEAS 6 TO
8 FT. NUMEROUS SHOWERS.
.WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY...NORTHWEST WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 5 TO 7 FT.
SCATTERED SHOWERS.

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I teach English/Language Arts and ESL for a living. I have had these two sentences rolling around in my head for a bit: "Happy friday guys. Extrelely calm its scary i do not make it to samoa island i am struggling almost everyday with calms on this trip." If a student turned this in I would be quick to think that it was composed by two different people. "Happy friday guys" is actually a phrase rather than a sentence, but it's an acceptable informal greeting, other than the missing comma. The second sentence, however, is problematic. The dependent clause is classic in terms of syntax errors. It does indeed sound like Rimas' voice. The independent clause, which starts out, "I am struggling every day..." utilizes well structured syntax, grammar, and spelling.

 

More and more, I am coming to the conclusion that someone other than Rimas is composing at least some of his messages. Is it possible that there is an unmanned SJ24 drifting around the Pacific (a San Juan drone?) while Rimas sits in a Salvation Army dormitory, eating soup and memorizing the twelve steps?

I feel like an apologist whenever I talk about this, but I don't see how it's technically possible to fake both the messages and the coordinates coming from his DeLorme.

 

Could it be that he's just much better at the informal greetings than when he tries to convey content? He defected in 1988, so it's not like he just arrived in the western world. I bet his chit chat skills (especially verbally) developed a lot more in in that time than his written skills (especially when trying to convey something more complicated). I also wonder if the interface on his DeLorme is doing him any favors...we all know what the text message has done for native speakers' grammar, and I doubt that I would use commas and proper capitalization if I was typing on something like a Nintendo controller.

 

These are just guesses though. Regardless of how it's being done, I continue to be fascinated by the occasional poetry in his mangled communications.

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As for solo climbers, my personal belief is that they are doing the same thing as climbers who are roped in. The only difference is that one falls if there is a mistake, one doesn't. I don't think the absence of the rope makes the solo climber better. I think a lot of people do think it makes the solo climber better.

Dunno, Karluk. Any soloist will tell you they climb differently without a rope. Three points of contact at all times, test every hand & foot hold, work the crack instead of the face, slower & smoother movements, conscious breathing control.... First time I soloed a particular 9+ overhanging crack at our local crag -- a route I have absolutely wired -- I got to the exit moves & simply froze. When roped, most people step out of the corner & stem over the top via three small, slightly suspicious feldspar crystals. Without a rope, I really wasn't cool with that. But I hadn't actually done it any other way for six years. Panic time! So I wedged half my body into the offwidth crack & grovelled over the lip. No grace, no style, but better than trusting your life to one tiny foothold. Turns out most soloists do the same thing on that climb.;) Who knew? I've also fallen when leading a climb that I'd done ropeless only a week before. At first you are like, Whoa! I could have been dead! Then you realize: No, because I never would have moved off such a shitty-casual hand jam if unroped. There's no way I wouldn't have reset. Soloing doesn't magically make you a stronger or better climber, but it does make you more careful. :)

 

Not sure if people sail differently w/out liferaft, flares or epirbs; if they make different choices in routing, reefing, watch-keeping. It might create a slightly different mental experience, tho.

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I teach English/Language Arts and ESL for a living. I have had these two sentences rolling around in my head for a bit: "Happy friday guys. Extrelely calm its scary i do not make it to samoa island i am struggling almost everyday with calms on this trip." If a student turned this in I would be quick to think that it was composed by two different people. "Happy friday guys" is actually a phrase rather than a sentence, but it's an acceptable informal greeting, other than the missing comma. The second sentence, however, is problematic. The dependent clause is classic in terms of syntax errors. It does indeed sound like Rimas' voice. The independent clause, which starts out, "I am struggling every day..." utilizes well structured syntax, grammar, and spelling.

 

More and more, I am coming to the conclusion that someone other than Rimas is composing at least some of his messages. Is it possible that there is an unmanned SJ24 drifting around the Pacific (a San Juan drone?) while Rimas sits in a Salvation Army dormitory, eating soup and memorizing the twelve steps?

 

 

Well, there's possible, and then there's probable. Unmanned SJ24 hoax...possible, not probable. I used to tutor ESL students in college, and, to me, it seemed like the mixed up syntax would come and go. Some sentences were fine, others, not so much. And it wasn't just a matter of memorized colloquialisms vs original thought constructions. Having said that, allow me to contradict myself and suggest that he might be lifting some of those "original constructions" from his National Geographics. In other words, he reads an article in which the author says he is "struggling every day with" dengue fever, and Rimas decides to grab the delorme and post about his struggles. I think it is quite common for adults to learn foreign languages in phrases, and they sometimes confuse the syntax when they apply the phrases to new ideas. Frankly, this is the way I learned to recognize plagiarism in non ESL students, by noticing the shift. So I think it's possible we're have two or more people, but more probable that it's just Rimas using groups of words, sometimes correctly, sometimes not.

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As for solo climbers, my personal belief is that they are doing the same thing as climbers who are roped in. The only difference is that one falls if there is a mistake, one doesn't. I don't think the absence of the rope makes the solo climber better. I think a lot of people do think it makes the solo climber better.

Dunno, Karluk. Any soloist will tell you they climb differently without a rope. Three points of contact at all times, test every hand & foot hold, work the crack instead of the face, slower & smoother movements, conscious breathing control.... First time I soloed a particular 9+ overhanging crack at our local crag -- a route I have absolutely wired -- I got to the exit moves & simply froze. When roped, most people step out of the corner & stem over the top via three small, slightly suspicious feldspar crystals. Without a rope, I really wasn't cool with that. But I hadn't actually done it any other way for six years. Panic time! So I wedged half my body into the offwidth crack & grovelled over the lip. No grace, no style, but better than trusting your life to one tiny foothold. Turns out most soloists do the same thing on that climb.;) Who knew? I've also fallen when leading a climb that I'd done ropeless only a week before. At first you are like, Whoa! I could have been dead! Then you realize: No, because I never would have moved off such a shitty-casual hand jam if unroped. There's no way I wouldn't have reset. Soloing doesn't magically make you a stronger or better climber, but it does make you more careful. :)

 

Not sure if people sail differently w/out liferaft, flares or epirbs; if they make different choices in routing, reefing, watch-keeping. It might create a slightly different mental experience, tho.

That's a well reasoned point. I see what you mean. Perhaps I'm thinking of this in the wrong way. I was thinking that people observing the climber determine the climber is better because of the absence of the rope, which I think is false. I had not considered the impact on the climber himself. I'll have to think about this some more.

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The captain speaks again:

 

 

Rimas Meleshyus

Sun Nov 23rd, 20144:58:30 pm

Sheet tiller steering now. I would like to say hello to captain chris johnson from hilo ocean view hawaii i have met in captain cook hilo in december 2013
Speed: 3.11 mph Heading: S Elevation: 1.05 ft Batt: Normal Lat: -7.221933 Lon: -166.008825

 

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That's a well reasoned point. I see what you mean. Perhaps I'm thinking of this in the wrong way. I was thinking that people observing the climber determine the climber is better because of the absence of the rope, which I think is false. I had not considered the impact on the climber himself. I'll have to think about this some more.

Ah, that's kind of nasty territory, there -- people who solo with audience. Not because it's too likely to instigate similar behavior from newbs, any more than Rimas is apt to launch any Manifestly Unsafe Voyagers that weren't already so disposed. No, the person you worry about is the climber himself, cuz now the motives are suspect. I've sat below (not directly below, mind) people soloing climbs up to 5.11+. It's unnerving as hell, and most climbers turn their backs and fuss with their tape, or stare at the guidebook. My strong preference when soloing was to avoid watchers, cuz that's just not an additional thing I want on my mind. Tho Bachar liked to put on a show, and there have been a few other exhibitionists.

, Alain Roberts, a few more.
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Not sure if people sail differently w/out liferaft, flares or epirbs; if they make different choices in routing, reefing, watch-keeping. It might create a slightly different mental experience, tho.

 

If you want to compare solo sailing with solo climbing-- it's not technical routes. Compare solo blue water with big, back country mountaineering routes. The actual crux is probably not going to be the problem. A twisted ankle on the decent-- that could kill you.

 

A couple of similarities stood out when I transitioned from climbing to sailing--

 

The key becomes having a proper, dread respect for the mountain, realizing that you are a little prey animal and it is the predator. Same with the ocean.

Physical fitness, stamina only go so far.

Being comfortable in uncomfortable situations for long periods is key.

 

Either way-- Rimas belongs in no discussion of this sort.

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no life raft is the deal breaker as far as admiration goes. Impressive? yep. Just like guy's who climb without a rope. Eventually though, it ends badly. I don't admire that. It's just stupid.

Personally, I like to let competent adults choose their own risk calculus. Whether you opt to climb ropeless or not is about as profound and individual a decision as can be made. The rewards can be astonishing. When you are several hundred feet up and fully aware a single mistake is certain death, there is a focus and intensity that exceeds anything I've ever known. No hiding behind gear, or rescue assets, or Plan B. You make the moves, or you die. :)

 

You can climb your whole life and never solo hard, but no genuine climber would deny complete respect to these men and women:

 

 

 

They are the best of the best. Only two of the soloists shown are dead, btw, and only one of those (Bachar) died climbing. I've known people who've soloed for decades. It doesn't always 'end badly', and you can't go that hard that long if you haven't learned blistering self-honesty.

 

Likewise, Webb Chiles has sailed w/out liferaft or rescue signal devices his entire career; he recognizes the danger and selfishness inherent in solo ocean sailing and prefers to take the risks & consequences unto himself. He isn't 'stupid.' He has made a conscious decision to live a certain way, and it's frankly no skin off your nose if he dies in the pursuit.

 

Now Rimas is a special case. ;) It's not entirely clear Rimas is making informed choices. But he is an adult, his life is his own to dispose of, and only insofar as he solicits outside help (for gear, money, or rescue) that we have standing to criticise. I think Dr. Paris' attempt is similarly misguided and doomed, but it's his concern until something happens to make it ours. Then -- I'm looking at you, Rebel Heart -- let the Shit Jumping begin.

I suppose I should clarify a bit.

 

Solo sailors or climber who choose not to carry life saving equipment are not stupid, if they are at the extreme top end of their sport. Foolish? Perhaps, but not stupid. That came out wrong.

 

However Rimas is not at the top end of his sport. He is barely hanging onto the low end. His abilities are so limited I do indeed doubt a life raft would even help. What makes his situation perhaps unique is that he has a multitude of equally inept people following his every move as if he is some sort of god. They worship the fact that so far he has defied the odds and seem to relish the fact that it seems easy to do so. Rimas has set the bar so inexplicably low in terms of offshore sailing expertise that he is attracting a crowd of wanna-be world cruisers to his exploits. This is foolish. He isn't saying,"this is difficult, prepare yourselves". Quiet the opposite, he makes it look easy and peaceful through shear ignorance. His minions follow his every word as gospel of the sea and defend him agains us "yacht Club" types to no end.

 

Most people I know won't climb a rock for god or money. The few that will won't do it without a rope. Doesn't matter what they see on T.V. But I have interacted with a few Rimas followers who are eager to follow him. I seems people are far ore afraid of falling than they are of drowning. In terms of adventure one seems quick and short, given the activity. The other appears unlikely and long drawn out. But if you are thousands of miles out........

Well, he's had both a life raft and a rigid dinghy. He lost (jury is out on the dinghy...it might be a drogue) both of them. He might as well have had a 110v waffle iron for all the good either did him. I can give any two idiots a climbing rope. You'll find them both dead and only one will be tied into it.

 

My point is that you can't compare Rimas to anyone that is reasonably competent at anything, whether it be sailing, climbing, or full contact bocce ball. The man is STUBBORNLY INCOMPETENT...he insists upon it. Even Darwin Award winners are accidents. This is more on the order of sticking your dick in a meat slicer and daring it to do something different.

my friend stuck his dick in the meat slicer. they both ended up getting fired.

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Maybe that's why sailors are so annoyed with Rimas. He threatens to make the whole sailing business into farce.

I meant to say that it is certainly possible to float across the ocean in a pool toy, if conditions happen to allow it, but doing so is a matter of luck, not great skill.

Can't cite the reference, but the best trope about long voyages in frail boats by people with less than stellar resumes is:

 

"Only record not yet broke is a Transatlantic on a bale of hay."

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The Bumfuzzles proved that you don't need to know shit to circumnavigate. They bought a boat and OJT'd. They also figured out pretty quickly how to sail. They also spent their own money. Oh, and they carried some pieces of papyrus called CHARTS. Even that idiot Eric Kaufman pretended to be competent.

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The Bumfuzzles proved that you don't need to know shit to circumnavigate. They bought a boat and OJT'd. They also figured out pretty quickly how to sail. They also spent their own money. Oh, and they carried some pieces of papyrus called CHARTS. Even that idiot Eric Kaufman pretended to be competent.

My recollection is that the Bumfuzzles carried redundant electronic charts, but no paper ones.

 

Learning that the winch had two speeds was pretty funny, but nowhere near as funny as Rimas discovering the Genoa and then putting up his storm jib in light air.

 

Like Reid, their sailing skills so far surpass Rimas' that they really don't even belong in this thread.

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Rimas less than 500 nm to go.

 

"I am really enjoying country music from australia i love it music. Now is cloudy become look like the rain coming soon. My top on the list robinson cruz island" at -7.4253,-165.9847

post-105471-0-65548600-1416799767_thumb.jpg

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Can't cite the reference, but the best trope about long voyages in frail boats by people with less than stellar resumes is:

 

"Only record not yet broke is a Transatlantic on a bale of hay."

 

Nope, that's been done too. Did you miss the Ra expedition. Sorry Ra sank. Ra II made it though. That was Heyerdahl by the way. Pretty much a big bundle of straw.

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Regarding the record, I'm not that Rimas has ever articulated what record he's actually going for. It's not quite "smallest boat to circumnavigate." It's a hodgepodge of nonsense related to being American, sailing a San Juan 24, and having general historic impact.

.

....the article in post 4586 has sooo many gems....it'd be great to get an actual link to it for posterior's sake ;)

 

“I’m already in history [for] cross[ing] the Gulf of Alaska on [my] tiny 24 foot sailboat.”

 

...the account of him blowing up onto the beach in the Aleutians is priceless in itself! :lol:

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Rimas less than 500 nm to go.

 

"I am really enjoying country music from australia i love it music. Now is cloudy become look like the rain coming soon. My top on the list robinson cruz island" at -7.4253,-165.9847

 

Methinks it will come on to a blow for old Rimas shortly.

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Rimas less than 500 nm to go.

 

"I am really enjoying country music from australia i love it music. Now is cloudy become look like the rain coming soon. My top on the list robinson cruz island" at -7.4253,-165.9847

 

Methinks it will come on to a blow for old Rimas shortly.

.

..straight into harbor no doubt. :mellow:

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....the article in post 4586 has sooo many gems....it'd be great to get an actual link to it for posterior's sake ;)

 

“I’m already in history [for] cross[ing] the Gulf of Alaska on [my] tiny 24 foot sailboat.”

 

...the account of him blowing up onto the beach in the Aleutians is priceless in itself! :lol:

I don't know if it's the same article, but when I did my writeup for my boat log I used that same quote, which I got from here:

 

http://kucb.org/news/article/solo-sailor-wrecks-on-akutan/

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....the article in post 4586 has sooo many gems....it'd be great to get an actual link to it for posterior's sake ;)

 

“I’m already in history [for] cross[ing] the Gulf of Alaska on [my] tiny 24 foot sailboat.”

 

...the account of him blowing up onto the beach in the Aleutians is priceless in itself! :lol:

I don't know if it's the same article, but when I did my writeup for my boat log I used that same quote, which I got from here:

 

http://kucb.org/news/article/solo-sailor-wrecks-on-akutan/

.

 

...different article,but interesting quote in the comments section......

 

 

kevin on Friday, August 03 2012:

I wish I didnt give him that broken gps. He made it farther than I thought he would.

South East Alaska.

PC170024.JPG

DECEMBER, 27 2013, HILO, HAWAII.

A" SOLO " CAPTAIN IS NO ONE ELSE' S COMMANDER.

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.

 

....got a linky Norse???

 

 

Here is a compilation of RimaSpeak and quotes from reporters, readers and one from SJB, for your reading pleasure and comment. They are all from his Alaskan adventure and up to the first leg of Pier Pressure [his second SJ24] from the PNW.

 

 

if successful, the self-taught sailor from Port Townsend, Wash., said he would set a record for smallest boat to circumnavigate the globe.

“If I pass the Cape Horn I’ll be in the Guinness book 100 percent,” he said.

His outboard motor fell off the boat while passing San Francisco and he also lost some of the wires for his rigging off the coast of Mexico

Unable to sail against the wind northward to California, and preferring to make repairs in the United States, he said he decided to let the winds take him westward to Hawaii

From Hawaii, Meleshyus plans to sail to Tahiti and then to Cape Horn.

The same day on his website he wrote, "A solo captain, is no one else's commander."

By GPS, Meleshyus means a handheld Magellan from the early 2000s.

“On June 4, [20]12 Monday was big bang on my right side, near my seat and engine. It was extremely scary for me. I think when me hit, now boat sink. Already in life raft. Very calm and sunny and warm.

“So, almost upside down, my sail, riggings, mast, was almost underwater. I don’t know how they back. I was very surprised. I was inside, closed door everything, so water not coming in inside, you know.

That wasn’t the end of Meleshyus’ trouble. As he got closer to the Aleutians and consequently the Great Circle shipping route, several cargo ships almost ran him down. He didn’t sleep for three days for fear of getting hit. That lack of sleep is how, a month into his journey, just 50 miles from Unalaska, Meleshyus hit a reef. He tried dislodging his boat for several hours before giving up and falling asleep. When he awoke, he was beached in Sarana Bay, on the south side of Akutan.

“I tried to do flares, but fog. I tried to use mirrors to planes. I tried climbing mountains and waving. But nobody can see me.”

“He went in there on probably a nine-foot swell,” Pelkey says.

Under normal conditions, the water depth in the bay is only 1-2 feet, not enough for another vessel to get in there and pull the boat out.

“I’m already in history [for] cross[ing] the Gulf of Alaska on [my] tiny 24 foot sailboat.”

IKenny

January 13, 2013 at 9:56 pm

Met Rimas today at my church in Anacortes, just thirty or so miles from Port Townsend as the crow flies. We gave him a small donation to stay overnight here and ferry & bus fare to Port T. Also connected him to my old friend Scott at Anacortes Yacht Club. Seems they have been trying to rid themselves of a S.J. 24 for some time. So hope this works out for everyone. I’ll be scanning the sailing rags for stories. Blessings Rimas.

Kenny H.
Anacortes

 

I know Rimas and if you ask me, he’s a little hustler. Tesa

This many months later, that’s where his boat remains. Retrieval in the shallow tidal waters would be expensive, dangerous, and maybe impossible. Rimas was flown out by Coast Guard helicopter.

He hopes to sail next from Port Townsend to Japan, then around Cape Horn on his way to the UK.

Meleshyus is bound first for Cape Horn, which he now estimates will take him seven months, non-stop, to complete.

“I’m very happy,” said Meleshyus, 61.

“There are a lot of people living vicariously through Rimas’s dream,” said Oak Harbor resident Mike Newhouse, repeating the words of another boat owner.

The 3,200-pound vessel sat well below her designed waterline, crammed with food, water and other supplies.

All of it was donated from Good Samaritans who wish Meleshyus well on what many say will be a passage rife with peril.

Buys, who owns a San Juan 24 of his own, accompanied Meleshyus through Deception Pass Monday morning. The idea was to give him some last minute instruction — it was the first time Meleshyus had actually sailed his new boat — and see him safely into the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

“No, I’m absolutely confident,” he said, when asked if he was having any second thoughts. “Not scared.”

Last year, a Russian immigrant in his 60s with iffy sailing/navigational skills, Rimas Meleshyus (pictured), stopped in Astoria on his way to complete what would likely have been suicidal trip around the world via the Cape Horn, South America, in a 24-foot San Juan sailboat.

Fortunately for him, he got blown off course and wound up in Hawaii.

Single handed sailing is one of the most rewarding experiences a person can have, but very it is dangerous all the time. The most at night, Whales, logs floating on the seas, ships can rock as well you sleeping.

Meleshyus even claims his boat was hit by a gray whale.

Weighing up to 36 tons, the massive mammal stuck the boat so hard that he was ejected from the cockpit.

“If not for safety harness, I would be dead,” Meleshyus said.

 

Fishermen, fellow sailors, just about everyone he talked to said he couldn’t do it, but Meleshyus refused to listen. After a few test sails he embarked on his ill-fated 34-day voyage.

“Why can’t I do it. Other people are doing it. I can do it too.”

His plans are the talk of the Oak Harbor sailing community, earning high-fives from some and head shaking from others.

“No matter what people think, crazy or not, I’m doing it,” he said.

Joiner said setting off on a nonstop, 10-month voyage without the necessary gear is dangerous.

doing the trip in a small, old boat is a risky venture, said Byron Skubi, chairman of the Oak Harbor Youth Sailing program.

One problem is a San Juan 24 may lack the space or buoyancy to safely store enough food and water for a 10-month passage. The boat is also not designed for blue-water cruising.

He said just he fell asleep and the boat went aground. And it was high and dry, sittin’ straight up and down on its keel, pointin’ out toward the water,” Seville said.

“He obviously doesn’t have a whole lot of money to do it and he’s just looking for donations as he’s going,” Seville said.

I thought he was foolhardy to the point of suicidal when he started out but trying to sail uphill to Cali in February just ratcheted it up several notches.

Rimas MeleshyusJune 26, 2014 at 5:55 PM

Webb Chiles one of the best sailor all the time, safety travels!

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Regarding the record, I'm not that Rimas has ever articulated what record he's actually going for. It's not quite "smallest boat to circumnavigate." It's a hodgepodge of nonsense related to being American, sailing a San Juan 24, and having general historic impact.

.

....the article in post 4586 has sooo many gems....it'd be great to get an actual link to it for posterior's sake ;)

 

“I’m already in history [for] cross[ing] the Gulf of Alaska on [my] tiny 24 foot sailboat.”

 

...the account of him blowing up onto the beach in the Aleutians is priceless in itself! :lol:

I cut and pasted during commercial breaks on TV to make up the list. Here are a couple of links for the record.The first one shows Rimas leaving Oak Harbor with Shannon on a short shakedown trip, before he heads out. This is Rimas first trip in Pier Pressure. Note the waterline on the boat. He lost this engine overboard. The people in the area liked him and wished him well for the most part. Rimas seems to strike up conversations with people everywhere,including posting comments online and he promotes his dream at every opportunity.

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/217660051.html

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/213584831.html?mobile=true

 

The Aleutian wreck story.

http://www.alaskapublic.org/2012/07/10/solo-sailor-wrecks-on-akutan/

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“I’m already in history [for] cross[ing] the Gulf of Alaska on [my] tiny 24 foot sailboat.”

 

...the account of him blowing up onto the beach in the Aleutians is priceless in itself! :lol:

I cut and pasted during commercial breaks on TV to make up the list. Here are a couple of links for the record.The first one shows Rimas leaving Oak Harbor with Shannon on a short shakedown trip, before he heads out. This is Rimas first trip in Pier Pressure. Note the waterline on the boat. He lost this engine overboard. The people in the area liked him and wished him well for the most part. Rimas seems to strike up conversations with people everywhere,including posting comments online and he promotes his dream at every opportunity.

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/217660051.html

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/213584831.html?mobile=true

 

The Aleutian wreck story.

http://www.alaskapublic.org/2012/07/10/solo-sailor-wrecks-on-akutan/

 

.

 

......quite a story on it's own!... http://www.alaskapublic.org/2012/07/10/solo-sailor-wrecks-on-akutan/

On day seven, a passing fishing vessel spotted Meleshyus’ smoke signals and sent a skiff to the beach, but the sailor refused to leave his boat, insisting he would get it refloated.

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Another article about Rimas and a tip of the hat to SA. Dated tomorrow. http://www.xssailing.com/new-from-around-the-world/

 

Sailing Anarchy Forums

  • "24 November 2014 00:42:03 Sailing around the world in a San Juan 24 Sailing Forums Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation?"

 

post-105471-0-15316900-1416810946_thumb.jpg

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Dead yet?

.

 

....what's the hurry? :mellow:

 

I just see the inevitable happening, and wish he'd just get on with it. I don't wish him dead, but at the same time this thread is like a crowd watching a suicide in slo-mo and chanting "jump, jump".

 

edit: ok, after a bit of contemplation..... I still don't wish him dead. But I think the thing that bugs me about this and other folks like him is that incredible stupidity seems to continually be rewarded and these people continue to breed while honestly good, intelligent, productive folk die prematurely all around us. God certainly has a sense of humor.

.

....yeh,,methinks these great great slooooow-mo train crashes are definitely 'god sends' to cheer up those ''honestly good, intelligent, productive folk who die prematurely all around us''.

 

...the meek shall inherit the traincrash videos :)

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Even then he was making history in his own head!

 

On his seventh day of being stuck on the beach in Akutan he wrote, “I’m already in history [for] cross[ing] the Gulf of Alaska on [my] tiny 24 foot sailboat.”

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Think about it in sailing terms:

You need to go forward to secure the anchor. It is July and you have a full crew. If you fall off the boat into the warm water either your crew will get you, one of the other 1000 boats nearby will pick you up, or you might swim home.

OR

It is December, you are alone, and you are the only boat out on a cold nasty day. Falling in is a death sentence. I suspect you will be moving much differently.

 

 

As for solo climbers, my personal belief is that they are doing the same thing as climbers who are roped in. The only difference is that one falls if there is a mistake, one doesn't. I don't think the absence of the rope makes the solo climber better. I think a lot of people do think it makes the solo climber better.

Dunno, Karluk. Any soloist will tell you they climb differently without a rope. Three points of contact at all times, test every hand & foot hold, work the crack instead of the face, slower & smoother movements, conscious breathing control.... First time I soloed a particular 9+ overhanging crack at our local crag -- a route I have absolutely wired -- I got to the exit moves & simply froze. When roped, most people step out of the corner & stem over the top via three small, slightly suspicious feldspar crystals. Without a rope, I really wasn't cool with that. But I hadn't actually done it any other way for six years. Panic time! So I wedged half my body into the offwidth crack & grovelled over the lip. No grace, no style, but better than trusting your life to one tiny foothold. Turns out most soloists do the same thing on that climb. ;) Who knew? I've also fallen when leading a climb that I'd done ropeless only a week before. At first you are like, Whoa! I could have been dead! Then you realize: No, because I never would have moved off such a shitty-casual hand jam if unroped. There's no way I wouldn't have reset. Soloing doesn't magically make you a stronger or better climber, but it does make you more careful. :)

Not sure if people sail differently w/out liferaft, flares or epirbs; if they make different choices in routing, reefing, watch-keeping. It might create a slightly different mental experience, tho.

That's a well reasoned point. I see what you mean. Perhaps I'm thinking of this in the wrong way. I was thinking that people observing the climber determine the climber is better because of the absence of the rope, which I think is false. I had not considered the impact on the climber himself. I'll have to think about this some more.
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On this climbing drift, can you use impact and climbing in the same sentence: "I had not considered the impact on the climber himself. I'll have to think about this some more."

 

I note too that Go the Rimas! is now spelling Pago Pago correctly whereas earlier it was Pango Pango, as pronounced apparently.

 

The question about the need for a real blue water vessel has been answered in the negative for years. A lot of folks have been around, and some even around the Horn, on boats without any of the modern refinements or size. Before all the electronics, it took actual seamanship. Now, money makes up for a lot of that.

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