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I could sell mine and get another. That has always been my fleet building plan.  Send me a text or email and we can discuss condition, associated goodies, and price. 

Aero Sailing Week happening now in Jensen Beach, FL. 28 Aeros were registered but some have dropped out due to COVID concerns. This pas weekend was Aero Florida State Champs and this upcomin

I have lost count but I have sailed the boat almost every day but Wednesday and missed only a couple evenings.  Maybe the number of two to three hour rides is ten i finally found some lightw

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How did it compare to the D-Zero? (this for Crashed Again)

 

 

according to the banner at the top of this forum, the official answer is better, thanks for sponsoring.

 

I understand at the recent demo day at Grafham, 3 D-Zeros were ordered. RS were demoing the Aero at the same time.

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I'm not too surprised by that. To my eye, the two boats are sufficiently different that they would appeal to the aesthetics and tastes of two different groups.

In my case, I'm drawn to the Aero more than the D Zero, but not because I necessarily think it's "better".....it just appeals to me more, for reasons that would be difficult to articulate. Entirely subjective......(like the sound of different guitars)

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I think most people are excited that both the Zero and Aero came out at the exact same time. (It's a bit strange from an industry standpoint, but still good to see new product)

 

Aero entered full production last week, 4 a week at first, ramping to 6 a week next month.

Packaging is like opening an Apple product, jeez.

aero%20packaging.jpeg?_subject_uid=23714

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Hey, west coast, that image or url isn't clickable.

 

I keep thinking it is weird that Aero and Zero differ only by the first letter, A vs. Z. Coincidence? Which one was named first?

 

The boats are different? Sure, a little. But both are designed to be quality mainstream single-handed dinghys.

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And... The 3 rigs differ only in the sail, correct? And the sails only differ in the chord, no? Seems like the 9 would be significantly less efficient than the 5, with the 7 in between. So I am guessing it is more faster downwind than upwind.

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And... The 3 rigs differ only in the sail, correct? And the sails only differ in the chord, no? Seems like the 9 would be significantly less efficient than the 5, with the 7 in between. So I am guessing it is more faster downwind than upwind.

No different partsvof masts
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With boom height it occurs to me that the aero would be easier to gybe in higher wind since the boom is less likely to plough a furrow whereas the d0 has one that will catch the water easier.

But with some additional LWL and a lot more volume fwd of the mast, it's a bit swings and roundabouts....

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And... The 3 rigs differ only in the sail, correct?

 

Not correct. IIRC masts are different, boom is the same.

OK. Thanks. More expensive, and better for performance...

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Emilio is right, it looks very ugly/stupid.

 

It might not be effictive having sail area in the lower corner but having no sail at all is even more less effective.

 

The same for the hull form in the front, there they missed an aesthetical chance too, this boat had to have a bow treatment like that NZ Fraser dinghy. Then it would be a 21 century one. Now it looks like an old OK dinghy.

 

Just a personal view.

 

But it is good to see new boats coming.

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There are some folks who believe in an end plate effect so they like to seal the lower edge of sails against the deck.

 

Which only works if the sail is actually touching the deck. If there's 30 cm clearance, might just as well make it 90.

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Handicap performance is irrelevant at this stage, its the elapsed times that ought to be interesting, preferably including the spread with different sailors.

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There are some folks who believe in an end plate effect so they like to seal the lower edge of sails against the deck.

 

Which only works if the sail is actually touching the deck. If there's 30 cm clearance, might just as well make it 90.

Agree re: endplate effectiveness, but there is also the consideration of the distribution of area in a type of boat that is very RM limited - nice and low and you have plenty of drive with minimal RM penalty.

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Yes what about elapsed times, on the photo I see the Laser in front of the aeros.

It is difficult to understand how this race worked and how it went

Antony and Dave Lynall sailing their prototype RS Aero 9 were in the lead after the first hour followed by Mike Tustin and Ross Harvey in the second RS Aero 9, Marcia and Simon Lynall in the RS Aero 7, Paul and Ryan Scott in their Topaz Uno and Neil and Ian Crosby in their Laser. While the 2 RS Aero 9s swapped places at the front of the fleet the Laser of Neil and Ian worked their way into third place only to be piped at the end of the race by the RS Aero 7 of Doug Roberts and John Beresford.

 

But it seems clear that it was fairly informal anyway. My take away is that everyone probably had fun, which I think is the point anyway.
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Looking at that, the Topper is considered to be very fast--much faster than the Aero. Except it doesn't sail up to that rating. Wonder what that is about?

WTF are you on about? The Topper has a rating of 1322 while the Aero 9 is 1025. The Topper did 7 laps less in more time and sailed to a handicap of 1588 if you take the winning Aero as the base figure.

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Looking at that, the Topper is considered to be very fast--much faster than the Aero. Except it doesn't sail up to that rating. Wonder what that is about?

WTF are you on about? The Topper has a rating of 1322 while the Aero 9 is 1025. The Topper did 7 laps less in more time and sailed to a handicap of 1588 if you take the winning Aero as the base figure.

 

I was looking at the results and the times. Maybe (or obviously) I misread the elapsed times? It didn't make any sense.

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Handicap performance is irrelevant at this stage, its the elapsed times that ought to be interesting, preferably including the spread with different sailors.

 

 

very true- and looking at those results, it's right to assume that the Laser convincingly beat two of the Aero 7s (equivalent rig size) across the water... considering that's run over 6 hours / 18 laps, that's quite an endorsement for the Laser sailors involved.

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Over-concluding much? How many times do you think any of those Aero sailors had sailed one before?

 

 

no, no conclusions at all.... just observation in progress about one event on a shifty puddle. FWIW- my words were 'Laser sailors' not Laser dinghy, you can probably appreciate the subtle, but important difference.

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Say WestCoast - who is buying the boats? Laser owners?

Sorry, chaos here.

 

Some Laser sailors who are wanting a second boat to have fun in.

 

Some are big boat sailors (one guy is putting his on the deck of his boat).

 

Some guys in the Bahamas who are launching off a beach and I don't think have any singlehanded boats now.

 

One is a multihull sailor just looking for something a lot easier to rig and sail by himself.

 

 

All types. Lots of interest from women and kids, but I am not sure how many of that group have pre-ordered in the US.

Boats will be arriving - in quantity - in North America, starting this fall it looks like.

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Say WestCoast - who is buying the boats? Laser owners?

Sorry, chaos here.

 

Some Laser sailors who are wanting a second boat to have fun in.

 

Some are big boat sailors (one guy is putting his on the deck of his boat).

 

Some guys in the Bahamas who are launching off a beach and I don't think have any singlehanded boats now.

 

One is a multihull sailor just looking for something a lot easier to rig and sail by himself.

 

 

All types. Lots of interest from women and kids, but I am not sure how many of that group have pre-ordered in the US.

Boats will be arriving - in quantity - in North America, starting this fall it looks like.

.

 

.....I was interested to learn from George recently that a vast majority of new laser sales have historically been to NON-racers--I had thought it was mostly racers!

 

.

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I would think for a non-racer the Aero would be a no-brainer. It might take a while to build racing fleets of Aeros, but my bet is the Aero will outsell the Laser to the recreational sailor by a wide margin once they get the distribution channels performing.

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There are some folks who believe in an end plate effect so they like to seal the lower edge of sails against the deck.

You get no more of an end plate if the boom is two feet away from the deck than if its four feet away from the deck... People have got used to drooping booms because all the old school classes sail with about a foot more mast rake than the rigs were designed for, but its a lousy way to rig a boat.

 

 

 

Handicap performance is irrelevant at this stage, its the elapsed times that ought to be interesting, preferably including the spread with different sailors.

very true- and looking at those results, it's right to assume that the Laser convincingly beat two of the Aero 7s (equivalent rig size) across the water... considering that's run over 6 hours / 18 laps, that's quite an endorsement for the Laser sailors involved.

 

 

No, there's nothing special about those results at all. Typically front of fleet to mid fleet is around 10% of elapsed, so you should always expect two classes within say 100 points of UK PY to be mixed up on the water.
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There are some folks who believe in an end plate effect so they like to seal the lower edge of sails against the deck.

You get no more of an end plate if the boom is two feet away from the deck than if its four feet away from the deck... People have got used to drooping booms because all the old school classes sail with about a foot more mast rake than the rigs were designed for, but its a lousy way to rig a boat.

 

>

Handicap performance is irrelevant at this stage, its the elapsed times that ought to be interesting, preferably including the spread with different sailors.

very true- and looking at those results, it's right to assume that the Laser convincingly beat two of the Aero 7s (equivalent rig size) across the water... considering that's run over 6 hours / 18 laps, that's quite an endorsement for the Laser sailors involved.
No, there's nothing special about those results at all. Typically front of fleet to mid fleet is around 10% of elapsed, so you should always expect two classes within say 100 points of UK PY to be mixed up on the water.

 

Really? Maybe over an hour or so, but I would think over 6 hours the fleet would sort itself into basic speed categories, with allowance for sailor's skills. As an example, if after 6 hours an average Fireball (PN 975) sailor can't find his way ahead of even a very good Lark (PN 1071) sailor, he/she needs a new boat...

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Time to wade into this discussion from an Australian Perspective

Facts

Four Aero's arriving for a demo road tour Melbourne Sydney and Brisbane mid September- mid October

 

40ft container load arriving Melbourne in time for start of Aussie sailing season early November

 

I have sailed one lifted one and generally kicked tyres but can add little more to what George has already written.

 

One major area in Australia that we see the Aero 5 really appealing, is as a 'pathway' for the youngsters graduating from Oppies Minnows etc who want a light, fast, fun boat, which can sail in the same race as their parents in the OK, Laser, Solo style boat rather than being left behind at the back of the fleet or in squads.

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Time to wade into this discussion from an Australian Perspective

 

 

…in time for start of Aussie sailing season early November

 

Plenty of clubs around here have been sailing for 2 to 3 months by then, not counting those that sail through winter.

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Looked pretty cold up Brisbane way last week, breaking ice out of boats!

 

Youth Week finished Friday, great success by all accounts despite the icy 17.4° water temperature. The South Pacific Laser Masters starts in a couple of weeks, there are plenty more opportunities coming but competition with southern state events might trump those up north.

 

Get those Aeros on the water!!

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Test sailed the Aero for a hour or so in Carnac, Brittany, France the other day.

Me: 62 years old, Laser sailor since 1970. 192 cm, 110 kg.

Aero: 7 m2 sail (9 not available due to missing lower mast for this sail size).

Conditions: 12 knts average with gusts to about 15. Small waves.

The boat was everything I had hoped it would be. Very fun to sail, both upwind and down.

Very different feel than a Laser. Great control with the deep rudder, very light helm upwind.

A bit hard to find a comfortable / familiar position, running downwind, perhaps due to the downward sloping faces of the inner side decks.

But this may simply require more time in the boat.

Upwind and reaching, the hiking position was very comfortable, with butt not dragging in the water!

The rig / sail combination de-powered nicely in the gusts, so overall it felt like much less work to sail upwind than the Laser.

Nice looking sail. I could definitely have used the 9 m2 sail, as I was never really fully hiked out with the 7.

If I were to make a sail for myself, I would probably make the leech a bit longer, simply because I am not used to the look of the high aft end of the boom. Maybe the 9 m2 sail is different.

I like it! :-))

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I predict that once people are sailing these competively in one design fleets, they will be sailed upwind with lots of vang and sheet tension. Then the boom will be horizontal. Anything beyond that is a waste. Look at open design classes and see how many of those have drooping booms.

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I agree. I'm thinking boom horizontal (not drooping) while fully sheeted on, going to weather. Then when you release the sheet slightly while tacking and jibing, the boom lifts a little.(limited by vang tension). My feeling when test sailing was that the clew of the (7m2) sail was significantly higher than horizontal, even when fully sheeted on, going to weather.

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I agree. I'm thinking boom horizontal (not drooping) while fully sheeted on, going to weather. Then when you release the sheet slightly while tacking and jibing, the boom lifts a little.(limited by vang tension). My feeling when test sailing was that the clew of the (7m2) sail was significantly higher than horizontal, even when fully sheeted on, going to weather.

 

I sailed the 9 today at Grafham having sailed the 7 previously. With loads of downhaul / cunningham, kicker, plus sheeted in hard the boom does indeed become parallel to the boat. The mast is very bendy and with no downhaul the boom can appear to ride high at the clew end.

 

Anyway - long story short, I have ordered a 9 today, and benefitted from the 5+ fleet discount that was offered, so there must be at least 5 boats heading their way to Grafham sometime soon. According to RS delivery should be around mid October :)

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That's interesting news re the orders at Grafham. I'm a member there and had heard it said that there were orders following the last RS visit but up until now no one i know at the club (and i've talked about it with a lot of folk) has been able to establish who has ordered a boat! I know there are orders in for three D Zeros and a lot of folk down the club seem to know these guys. Kinda surprised that I'm not hearing a buzz! Be great if we do have a load of Aeros coming too. Nice to see some modern hiking single handers racing together!

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I just don't get the obsession with the horizontal boom. If you design the boom to a certain height in order to get your noggin comfortably underneath it, then why wouldn't you want to lower the tack of the sail to get more horsepower up front and down low, where it does the most good? Maybe people here are really just reacting to the boom looking like it's just too high.

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Good point - I think the 'horizontal boom' obsession is coming from old tech boat / Laser sailors ? If you look at many new performance boats (International Moth, RS100, RS Vareo, Musto Skiff) they all seem to have 'droopy' booms.

 

My point was (in reply to others) is that if you really want your boom horizontal, the Aero will let you do this by pulling everything on....however this is almost certainly not the most efficient way to sail it.

 

The rig is VERY responsive. Every control makes a discernible and also visible difference, compared to many other boats where the control lines seem to do bugger all.

 

Having already ordered an Aero 9, I still intend to try the D-Zero this weekend, just to convince myself I've made the right choice ;-)

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Be interesting to hear what you think of the D-Zero. Forecast looks promising for the weekend so you should have a good sail.

 

I tried both boats and went for the D-Zero.

 

So washy, what do you think are the main differences between the Aero and the D-Zero?

 

What features made you go for the D-Zero?

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I believe this is a new RS Aero spotlight video on sails...

 

 

I've ordered the Aero 9 being a chunky monkey at 17 stone. Are there any other chunky monkeys out there that have sailed with this rig and if so how comfortable was it to sail, can you sit out in light winds or is it a case of crouching/ kneeling to keep it stable?

 

When I try to climb back into a Streaker in light winds I often find the craft capsizes again due to its design, how easy is the Aero to get back into from the water when you weigh the top end of 220lbs?

 

All comments welcome.

 

 

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Be interesting to hear what you think of the D-Zero. Forecast looks promising for the weekend so you should have a good sail.

 

I tried both boats and went for the D-Zero.

So washy, what do you think are the main differences between the Aero and the D-Zero?

 

What features made you go for the D-Zero?

I have to say, for my taste, the Devoti boat had the walk up wow factor from the moment I approached them both on the shore.

 

We were lucky enough at our club to have both boats there on the same day. I sailed both back to back with a mate sailing the other boat and we swapped over on the water. I found the D-Zero instantly rewarding to sail on all points. The Aero just didnt seem so keen to track upwind or sail particularly nicely downwind. Others in our club have attempted to sail an Aero downwind, much as you would a Laser, and it doesnt seem to want to have it at all. Maybe itll come down to technique but the D-Zero felt like a natural, though very much nicer, home to a Laser sailor such as me. I think so far all the Laser sailors at our club have enjoyed the D-Zero (numbers of orders seem to be growing even this weekend, our second demo event) but Ive not come across one yet whos been as big a fan of the Aero. Admittedly its not all about us Laser sailors but we are a fairly large sample of the hiking single handed dinghy racers out there.

 

I think the rig on the Devoti boat is bloody beautiful. No other way to put it. Really nicely made and just looks quality. Components bonded not drilled or riveted together, Harken bits everywhere you look and that North laminate sail sets well and I found it easy to read across the 5-15kts Ive thus far sailed it in. Regardless of anyone elses opinion, in 2014, Im not buying a new class of boat with a Dacron sail!

 

Both hulls look well made. Have to say though Im swung by the Devoti brand in terms of quality and reputation.

 

Initially I wouldve liked to have seen controls on the D-Zero led to the gunwale, as they are in the Aero but as it goes I couldnt get the Aero controls to work all that well anyway (my fault maybe but it was a test sail and I wanted it to come naturally) and found it easy enough to reach in and adjust the D- Zero.

 

In my opinion the Aero is a recreational fun dinghy for all the family (and sailing centres, schools etc...) that you could also race. I think the D-Zero only ever set out to be one thing, a sophisticated yet simple racing dinghy.

 

I would say anyone looking at either boat try both if at all possible. We all like different things at the end of the day and are not all Laser sailors looking for something to replace our aging class of boat.

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RS sent out a press release of 200 boats sold so far. 100 in the UK, 100 in rest of world.

 

 

Haven't sailed the DZero (although, have spent a decent amount of time in DOne and RS100, so understand on some level the design philosophies).

Think they are always very different boats for different markets, each will find a home at certain clubs and prices.

 

Fun times ahead!

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Had a great time sailing my aero 9 in GSC dinghy week. 5 a new aeros arrived on the Saturday.( 11 ordered so far in the club) RS came with a few others so most days we had 9ish on the water.

 

It's important of read the rigging instructions, of course, as a man I didn't so neither the downhaul or the vang worked in the first race and you really need them to balance the sail. When set up correctly the controls work well. You need to take care to get the right luff tension as I think this is the key to get good upwind performance. With the controls fully on the sail is so fat it looks like a windsurfer sail.

 

The last day was sailed in a strong force 4/5 with a typical Solent chop. up wind I set the vang so that the boom was horizontal and some some downhaul on, with the boom on the quarter the boat pushed through the chop but you need the hike hard and play the main some. Reaching in any sort of wind she just flies. Much faster than my laser. You need to move back in the boat and get into the back toe strap ( the toe strap is fixed to the deck at a point about 3/4 of its length). The foils work really well. Unlike the laser the rudder does not stall out so you can steer at high speed. This did cause me to capsize a few times when gybing when windy. My sloppy laser technique Is that I just imitate a gybe heal the boat flick the sail over whilst transferring my weight. With the aero I found that the boat stopped turning because I was still stealing straight. You don't need the do much with the daggerboard I did pull it up a bit but it's good to have enough down to work against.

 

We sailed of 1035 for the 9 and 1065 from the 7. I think these numbers will come down in time.

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I believe this is a new RS Aero spotlight video on sails...

 

Any insight into why the sail shown at 1:45 did not make it into production. That is the direction I am going, now back working on the project sail. Cross cut with depth in the foot. Narrow bottom panel no window straight shot from the tack to the clew - radial from the tack for that one panel.

 

The logo on the sail is just RS. I wonder if they ran different sail suppliers and then chose the best sail for all conditions. Not convinced you can't work that crosscut sail in a blow... maybe not as forgiving?

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I am considering both the RS aero and (though I doubt I can get one in the US) a D-zero. I have read all the conversation on this site, but have a question that has not really yet been discussed. It has to do with cockpit depth.

 

Yes, I am an aging 54 year old sailor who has hung out more in FDs and V15s than Lasers, recently, although I own a Laser. That said, when I sail the laser, I am reminded that the cockpit depth feels shallower each time I get in the boat. Even the several inches different from Laser to V15 (and the narrow form of the laser cockpit, I'm sure) make a difference in comfort.

 

Can anyone with access to a boat take a straightedge across the tanks and measure the drop to the cockpit bottom, and (if you're willing) also measure the cockpit (e.g. place your feet go) width? I'm interested in both RS Aero and D-zero measurements if anyone is so kind.

 

This means more to me than how flat the boom is... and that subthread was certainly good for a dozen posts.

 

Thanks,

Chuck

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I don't have my Aero 9 yet, so I can't measure, but during my test sail, I had that very issue in mind.

 

My impression was that if you measured vertically from level of the flat part of the Aero's deck , down to the cockpit floor, that measurement would be a bit longer (deeper) than the Laser.

 

BUT, in fact when sailing downwind, and sitting in towards the middle a bit, I ended up with my butt at least partly on the downward slanting inner part of the deck, which made me (my knees) "feel" as though the Aero's cockpit was NOT any deeper than the Laser's.

 

Actual measurements may not show this to be true...but that was the feeling I got.

 

Hiking upwind, the Aero was much more comfortable, for me, than my Laser (which I love, and intend to keep sailing, ... the two boats will be kept in different locations). It felt as though there was noticeably more freeboard, so I could droop hike a bit, without dragging my butt in the water, and it was not necessary to "straight leg" hike.

 

I should perhaps add that I'm 62, and 6'3" (190.5 cm).

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I remember chatting to young Holman a few years ago at the Dinghy Show when he displayed "Punk".... and now looking forward to having a go in a D-Zero at SailFest next week (I'm not in the market as I'm "well suited" to my D-One!)

 

Anyone else on here coming to SailFest at Calshot?

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Good point - I think the 'horizontal boom' obsession is coming from old tech boat / Laser sailors ? If you look at many new performance boats (International Moth, RS100, RS Vareo, Musto Skiff) they all seem to have 'droopy' booms.

 

My point was (in reply to others) is that if you really want your boom horizontal, the Aero will let you do this by pulling everything on....however this is almost certainly not the most efficient way to sail it.

 

The rig is VERY responsive. Every control makes a discernible and also visible difference, compared to many other boats where the control lines seem to do bugger all.

 

Having already ordered an Aero 9, I still intend to try the D-Zero this weekend, just to convince myself I've made the right choice ;-)

 

Hi Crashed again, what was the overall outcome? It seems that on the Zero facebook group they have 12 D-Zeros' now on order at Grafham, but no Aero's......Can you confirm thats the case?

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I can't speak for CrashedAgain though I suspect he may have moved on, as I understand he cancelled his Aero and ordered a D-Zero. I am reliably informed that 9 D-Zeros have been ordered by members of Grafham Water Sailing Club, including myself. Additionally I understand that 6 members of smaller clubs in the area are considering joining us for the Autumn / Winter Series, so expecting the possibility of 15 D-Zeros racing at GWSC over the coming winter.

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Well there is nothing wrong with the way this boat goes upwind. I was sailing the 9 a couple of weeks ago and a friend the 7 in circa 12 knots. We tagged on to an evening race and we found the boats pointed exceptionally well, noticeably higher and faster than the lasers that were out there. Off the wind the lack of weight really shows and when you can swap places with a well sailed contender it is not slow! The boat is very buoyant, so seemed immune to nose diving in some quite big waves. It needed concentration upwind, but drove well up and through waves showing no tendency to stall. No, the boat doesn't have momentum, but that has no real impact upwind in those conditions. I can only see a disadvantage in a real drifter if trying to squeak up to a mark. The lack of weight is a real positive elsewhere whether reaching or just dragging it up the slipway. Lots of detail has gone into the boat from the easy control lines to the solid wheeled ally dolly to ensure its not too buoyant. Rudder is generous enough to give lots of control and no laser style wipe outs and the custom stock was stiff so could handle the loads at speed. Its clear that a lot of work has gone into this over a considerable period.

 

The sail material and rig work very well delivering lots of power, but blading almost flat in a breeze. I was sceptical around the discussions of Mylar vs Dacron, but on this rig the extra stretch of the Dacron really seems to work. After we had peeled off from the race and come inshore where we had flat water, I was fully hiked out and powered up in the 9 and yes it will plane (or at least hum(!) upwind. I still doubt that it works on a VMG basis, but its impressive none the less.

 

Its a new challenge, but seems like its come along at a good time and plenty in the club agree so we are heading for a double digit order - sounds like the waiting list is building, so getting our order in for the new year.

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I can't speak for CrashedAgain though I suspect he may have moved on, as I understand he cancelled his Aero and ordered a D-Zero. I am reliably informed that 9 D-Zeros have been ordered by members of Grafham Water Sailing Club, including myself. Additionally I understand that 6 members of smaller clubs in the area are considering joining us for the Autumn / Winter Series, so expecting the possibility of 15 D-Zeros racing at GWSC over the coming winter.

 

I hope the Dzero does well at Graftham and well done if you have got a fleet going, which is difficult nowadays. Whilst Dzero talk should be in its own thread, I would comment that there are plenty of people who had deposits down on both boats after the initial offers, and some which may have swapped. In our case the swaps have all been to RS aeros from Dzero's, for a number of good reasons. If I were at Graftham and a fleet of Dzero's turned up, it would sway me, but for our club the aero is the best choice. Its horses for courses and whichever boat gains momentum. We all liked the dzero and those involved in it, but at the end of the day you have to weigh up whats important to the sailors, the conditions and the consensus if you want a fleet.

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I can't speak for CrashedAgain though I suspect he may have moved on, as I understand he cancelled his Aero and ordered a D-Zero. I am reliably informed that 9 D-Zeros have been ordered by members of Grafham Water Sailing Club, including myself. Additionally I understand that 6 members of smaller clubs in the area are considering joining us for the Autumn / Winter Series, so expecting the possibility of 15 D-Zeros racing at GWSC over the coming winter.

I hope the Dzero does well at Graftham and well done if you have got a fleet going, which is difficult nowadays. Whilst Dzero talk should be in its own thread, I would comment that there are plenty of people who had deposits down on both boats after the initial offers, and some which may have swapped. In our case the swaps have all been to RS aeros from Dzero's, for a number of good reasons. If I were at Graftham and a fleet of Dzero's turned up, it would sway me, but for our club the aero is the best choice. Its horses for courses and whichever boat gains momentum. We all liked the dzero and those involved in it, but at the end of the day you have to weigh up whats important to the sailors, the conditions and the consensus if you want a fleet.

To give a politicians answer, both are nice boats but quite different despite appearing similar at first glance. I encourage anyone considering either to try both.

 

Part of my decision to swap was based on the fact that at my club I would have been the only lonely sailor (to the best of knowledge) in an Aero 9. Fleets are important for success. At GWSC the zero seems to have found favour and popularity, at other clubs it will be different. I wish both fleets well, safe in the knowledge that both are way better than the 40+ year old alternative!

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I can't speak for CrashedAgain though I suspect he may have moved on, as I understand he cancelled his Aero and ordered a D-Zero. I am reliably informed that 9 D-Zeros have been ordered by members of Grafham Water Sailing Club, including myself. Additionally I understand that 6 members of smaller clubs in the area are considering joining us for the Autumn / Winter Series, so expecting the possibility of 15 D-Zeros racing at GWSC over the coming winter.

 

I hope the Dzero does well at Graftham and well done if you have got a fleet going, which is difficult nowadays. Whilst Dzero talk should be in its own thread, I would comment that there are plenty of people who had deposits down on both boats after the initial offers, and some which may have swapped. In our case the swaps have all been to RS aeros from Dzero's, for a number of good reasons. If I were at Graftham and a fleet of Dzero's turned up, it would sway me, but for our club the aero is the best choice. Its horses for courses and whichever boat gains momentum. We all liked the dzero and those involved in it, but at the end of the day you have to weigh up whats important to the sailors, the conditions and the consensus if you want a fleet.

 

 

 

 

Which club are you a member of woodman???

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ahh, that would make sense- they were developed there I believe, did Ben Ainslie sail one out of the RYS and offer his endorsement (something like that on the PR anyway...)

 

I sailed out of Calshot last night - at low tide - what a shit hole, back to Hayling this weekend.

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aero a much better sea boat, so probably coastal.

 

 

I would like to see that played out on a race course. And if history has anything to go by, then the initial RS100 fleet at another popular Solent club soon defected to D-Ones, including one chap who, let's just say, had a very close affinity to the RS infrastructure.

 

Personally I think the added waterline length of the D-Zero could be put to good use on the sea, and the bow would prove interesting in choppy conditions, giving options to foot off or stuff up. But what the fuck would I know... I didn't design it.... and I haven't sailed it on the sea.

 

http://vimeo.com/96983044

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A mate at a sea club had a go at their Dzero demo day a month or so back and said it was as nosey as f**** off wind in some decent puff it dived, stopped and chucked a few of them in including him.

 

Apparently they were a load of them all ready with the dosh and it shocked them all how bad it was. Perhaps thats what Woodman is on about? Should be OK for the pond floaters.

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A mate at a sea club had a go at their Dzero demo day a month or so back and said it was as nosey as f**** off wind in some decent puff it dived, stopped and chucked a few of them in including him.

 

Apparently they were a load of them all ready with the dosh and it shocked them all how bad it was. Perhaps thats what Woodman is on about? Should be OK for the pond floaters.

 

sounds like he needs to start smoking and join the cool kids.... at the back of the bus. :D

 

as I said, I've not sailed it on the salt, so it's just supposition, but I would love to give it go somewhere like Lyme Regis or something.

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Has anyone in Seattle/Puget Sound ordered an RS Aero yet? 7 meter or 9 meter?

 

I'm considering getting one, but it would be considerably more fun if there was someone else to chase around the buoys once in a while. It's an expensive toy to bring to Duck Dodge (but nice because I could roof top it and avoid the queue at the boat ramps), and that is about how I'd be able to use at the moment.

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Has anyone in Seattle/Puget Sound ordered an RS Aero yet? 7 meter or 9 meter?

 

I'm considering getting one, but it would be considerably more fun if there was someone else to chase around the buoys once in a while. It's an expensive toy to bring to Duck Dodge (but nice because I could roof top it and avoid the queue at the boat ramps), and that is about how I'd be able to use at the moment.

 

One boat already heading to Shilshole.

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This customer is getting both 7 & 9 rigs. I am recommending almost every adult male customer to start on the 7. Most people think they should start on the 9, but I think the 7 will be plenty to handle for the first season as people learn the boat.

The 9 is a lot of power for someone my size (165lbs, 5'8"). If you are 6'2" and 210lb, probably ok to go right to 9, but I think the 7 will be the most popular long term.

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A mate at a sea club had a go at their Dzero demo day a month or so back and said it was as nosey as f**** off wind in some decent puff it dived, stopped and chucked a few of them in including him.

 

Apparently they were a load of them all ready with the dosh and it shocked them all how bad it was. Perhaps thats what Woodman is on about? Should be OK for the pond floaters.

sounds like he needs to start smoking and join the cool kids.... at the back of the bus. :D

 

as I said, I've not sailed it on the salt, so it's just supposition, but I would love to give it go somewhere like Lyme Regis or something.

He said you could sit almost off the back of the dzero and it still went nose in! Good luck trying it at Lyme - you will be on your own after half a season. Oh and he is way cooler and better sailor than the cool kids :-/

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That's good to hear, I also keep my boats at Shilshole.

 

7m or 9m sail, or both?

Well, I have one on order a little north of you in Vancouver. Sail out of Jericho. Getting the 9 as I am a big boy (fat old guy). I'm about 210 lbs and find I don't hike much on a standard laser until its blowing 15 knots.

 

Looking forward to sailing something different than a Laser. If I get lonely, I can always come down and play.

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Big fleet starting at Bowmoor, Gurnard probably others.

Talks about 'conditions'.

aero a much better sea boat, so probably coastal.

What a load of tosh! Would love to know which sea club your "mate" sailed it at....perhaps he needs some sailing lessons and while you were at it you could possibly get some trolling lessons too.

 

I have a mate, that's sailed and the aero 9 and says it won't tack and won't go up wind.....the people with their head screwed on would try both before ordering. The morons just criticise from a distance and speculating what supposed "mates" say!

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