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I could sell mine and get another. That has always been my fleet building plan.  Send me a text or email and we can discuss condition, associated goodies, and price. 

Aero Sailing Week happening now in Jensen Beach, FL. 28 Aeros were registered but some have dropped out due to COVID concerns. This pas weekend was Aero Florida State Champs and this upcomin

I wonder how long that guy has been stuck

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From an outsider looking in - with so many good classes to pick from in the UK, why the laser didn't die 5+ years ago is beyond me!

 

Critical mass, there are far too many of them available at very cheap prices so a very easy way in to the sport. Not many other classes can offer a boat that is capable of winning races at club level for around £500.

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I'll reply from the US consumer standpoint.

... ... As a result, if you are going to race, you are more likely to be racing one design. And lasers are where the one design racing is.

 

....

 

Yep most US class racing is done in boats that are old & clunky and a royal PITA. Which is why it is shrinking so rapidly, while the existing classes struggle to make sure that any sailor entering the sport -only- sails one of their PITA clunkers, which in turn produces a high rate of people saying "fuck this, it's fun but it's not -THAT- much fun."

 

Meanwhile technology has given us boats that are much less of a PITA but they are ruthlessly suppressed by the one-design class organizations.

 

Laser sailors- glad you like your boats. However, bear in mind that nothing lasts forever.

 

Maybe when we are down to the last 3 or 4 sailors, we can agree on a newer better boat and sailing can grow.

 

FB- Doug

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Agreed but that's a bit different to saying that people buying Aeros would otherwise be buying Lasers. Laser sailing in the UK - especially standard rig - was in decline long before the Aero came along. Standard rig nationals attendances have been dropping for a decade.

 

 

If you look at the two most prolific early adopter clubs in the UK, neither appear to have much of a laser backbone.

 

Lymington - people coming from all walks of sailing life.... it's a bit like a back-to-basics ethos springing out the back of economic recovery. A few people made the sensible decision to give one design a go, and this is what has rolled out. They could well have all bought Blazes, but they choose a superior option. I hope it maintains momentum and they get a fair summer.... if the weather's shite then the temptation to fall back into 'fun boats' rather than racing one design might kick in.

 

Bowmoor - mainly ex-doublehander, Solo and Phantom sailors AIUI - again coming together to put the handicap racing thing back in its box.

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Hi Guys in Australia

 

Many apologies, although Sailing Anarchy is a great medium I am not an expert at using it.

 

Here are the facts:-

 

There are 20 Aeros with a full selection of rigs, arriving with us in Melbourne in the next three weeks, plus a further 20 scheduled before Easter, so there will be plenty to go around.

 

We are currently appointing demonstration agents for the Aero in each State, with ourselves covering Victoria.

 

Of the four boats we received mid December there is one in Sydney, and we currently have three here in Victoria, with two being demonstrated at the Bic National Championships at Sandringham and one at Geelong Festival of Sails.

Our long term agent in Sydney will be delighted to arrange a demonstration just for you. Contact them either by phone 0405 979 730 or Email chris@sydneysailingschool.com.au, Any enquiries for trial sails or other information don't hesitate to contact me direct on 0487 780 706 or Email Tom@SailingRaceboats.com.au and I will be able to help.

 

Rainbow Spirit - as above. I think they are test sailing on the 7th, if not before.

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I've been a bit surprised / impressed with the takeup by kids into the Aero 5 so far.

 

Granted, it's the UK and many of these kids are likely growing up in Teras / Fevas.

So I guess it makes sense.

 

But, it's happened pretty much right out of the box. I'm not a coach so perhaps the power/weight work better than some other available options??

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I've been a bit surprised / impressed with the takeup by kids into the Aero 5 so far.

 

Granted, it's the UK and many of these kids are likely growing up in Teras / Fevas.

So I guess it makes sense.

 

But, it's happened pretty much right out of the box. I'm not a coach so perhaps the power/weight work better than some other available options??

 

...it'll be interesting to see how it works for lighter sailors with the lighter hulls and therefore less inherent stability. I know the hullshape's meant to help but perhaps they'll be onto smaller sails sooner. :huh:

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I've been a bit surprised / impressed with the takeup by kids into the Aero 5 so far.

 

Granted, it's the UK and many of these kids are likely growing up in Teras / Fevas.

So I guess it makes sense.

 

But, it's happened pretty much right out of the box. I'm not a coach so perhaps the power/weight work better than some other available options??

 

Because the only other real option on that route (in the UK at least) is the Laser 4.7 and I think we all agree it is a terrible compromise (or maybe the Byte CII). They might consider a Topper but the Tera is the RS equivalent of the Topper IIRC so that would be a sideways move at best.

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Tera to aero is a good step.... The lighter weights do struggle a little to Start... I think getting back in the boat after capsize can be a problem... But one thing that gets them all... Falling out the back when a gust hits and the boat accelerates off unbelievably quickly.

I would suggest that kids make the move from the tera to the aero at about 50kg

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Our twenty Aero's arrive in Melbourne Docks tomorrow

 

The first Australian National Championship for the Aero class will be held in conjunction with the RS100 and RS200 championships at Black Rock YC on 18th &19th April

This will obviously be a small event, but we have to start somewhere.

 

Should there be any Aero owners in Melbourne from overseas at that time we will endeavor to provide a demo boat for the event.

 

For more details http://www.bryc.yachting.org.au/assoc_page.cgi?c=0-9932-0-0-0&sID=308798

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I'll reply from the US consumer standpoint.

... ... As a result, if you are going to race, you are more likely to be racing one design. And lasers are where the one design racing is.

 

....

 

Yep most US class racing is done in boats that are old & clunky and a royal PITA. Which is why it is shrinking so rapidly, while the existing classes struggle to make sure that any sailor entering the sport -only- sails one of their PITA clunkers, which in turn produces a high rate of people saying "fuck this, it's fun but it's not -THAT- much fun."

 

Meanwhile technology has given us boats that are much less of a PITA but they are ruthlessly suppressed by the one-design class organizations.

 

Laser sailors- glad you like your boats. However, bear in mind that nothing lasts forever.

 

Maybe when we are down to the last 3 or 4 sailors, we can agree on a newer better boat and sailing can grow.

 

FB- Doug

+1

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Just interested, does the Aero stay upright if left alone, or does it capsize? How about the D–Zero?

 

I am guessing you mean at launch and recovery time? The D-Zero is pretty well behaved in that respects as long as you make sure the main loose and the controls are all off (same as any boat).

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Just interested, does the Aero stay upright if left alone, or does it capsize? How about the D–Zero?

 

North American customers are going to think it's a bit tippy stationary at the dock. It sits up ok, but I'm expecting some customers to have to get used to it a bit, mostly due simply to light weight.

 

European and maybe AUS customers will probably think it's totally stable and normal at rest.

 

 

--

I got to hang out with Jo Richards on Monday, sail a new design of his, and see all the Aeros @ Lymington already.

RS is cranking these out as fast as they can, that's a fact.

 

Can they sell 1,000 in the first 12 months? That would be, in about any terms for a new dinghy in the modern era, quite the success.

We will see, but momentum is building and they are now past 700 sold.

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Not an aero, but a vid of RS's finest creation to date, the 400.

 

Fastest hiking dinghy on the planet that isn't a B14!

 

not trying to sound negative but that's a very bold statement to say it's the fastest hiker. Do you know how it would stack up against an Ns14 or something similar?

Cheers

rob

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Not an aero, but a vid of RS's finest creation to date, the 400.

 

Fastest hiking dinghy on the planet that isn't a B14!

 

not trying to sound negative but that's a very bold statement to say it's the fastest hiker. Do you know how it would stack up against an Ns14 or something similar?

Cheers

rob

Or a development canoe ;-)

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Not an aero, but a vid of RS's finest creation to date, the 400.

 

Fastest hiking dinghy on the planet that isn't a B14!

 

not trying to sound negative but that's a very bold statement to say it's the fastest hiker. Do you know how it would stack up against an Ns14 or something similar?

Cheers

rob

Py is considerably faster than the ns- 946 vs 1028.

 

Would like to mention its the fastest doiblehandes hiker bar the b14!

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The RS400 is a nice boat and I've sailed them a lot, but I would hesitate to claim that top speed is its starring virtue. The trade off for excellent moderate wind performance is that it trails a sternwave big enough to surf off at any speed, with the matching consequences. This isn't right or wrong, just the design choices made, but reaching in serious breeze at sea I'd expect the NS, and maybe even a Tasar, to have the legs. In lighter stuff inland, on the other hand the boot would be comprehensively on the other foot.

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You're probably right JimC. I think their handicap stems from their speed inedium air.

That said though, they'll convincingly beat a fireball in all conditions so they're far from slow

 

I know several fireball people who would disagree with that statement. Remember a 400 is more optimised for windward/leeward courses. Get them on a normal 'round the cans' club course with varying reach angles and I would say the Fireball has the upper hand given how high they can effectively carry their kite.

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From personal experience if I reached the ww mark with (or near enough) the club's only 400 - that was benig sailed by no slouches - I could usually get to the bottom before him either going DDW in the light or gybing the angles to get my crew on the wire. One time we got it seriously wrong was when we went the same way as the assy boat - Doh! On old-style Olympic triangle-sausage courses they just don't work.

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You're probably right JimC. I think their handicap stems from their speed inedium air.

That said though, they'll convincingly beat a fireball in all conditions so they're far from slow

 

I know several fireball people who would disagree with that statement. Remember a 400 is more optimised for windward/leeward courses. Get them on a normal 'round the cans' club course with varying reach angles and I would say the Fireball has the upper hand given how high they can effectively carry their kite.

 

For the winter RS400s here race fireballs on Trapezoidal course all winter- wide ranges all the way to national champions in both classes, and the Fireballs are very rarely quicker.

 

But it's horse for courses, and on tighter reaches the Fireballs have the upper hand, a 400 is built for WW-LW work more than anything

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400 kite is far too small to be optimal for W/L tracks, I would say that Rs/Morrison got it about right for general mixed course racing. And in any case, because of the top speed issue, it's not that great an apparent wind boat. But on the other hand, because of that it can stay much nearer to the rhumb line in a gust than a true skiff type which would be forced an awful lot lower. So it's a lot more flexible than an apparent wind boat which might explain why it's still one of the biggest racing classes in the UK and the Iso and 4tonner are dead. Or of course it might be just that the other two were lousy boats...

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5 Aeros sold to Seattle now, working on next shipment of 10 + 8 boats for spring to west coast.

 

US Aero Nationals will likely be in the gorge THIS summer in July.

Details pending, but it looks like it's happening a year early due to demand.

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That is really good to hear George. A great start for the Aero on this coast. I'm just to the north of you in Vancouver and I should have my Aero by then. Maybe, I'll throw it on the top of the car and come and participate.

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We put 10 Aero's out of the door this week in Oz, 3 New South Wales, 3 Queensland, 3 Victoria, and one South Australia. It is a large area to cover!

 

There is an Aero demo day this week end at Geelong, Next week end 28th Feb - 1st March Mornington Peninsular, Labour Day week end 7th 8th 9th March Adelaide SC

 

Try an Aero at any time by appointment at Black Rock YC Melbourne, or at various locations to suit in Sydney. Contact us with your preferred location and date.

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How much is an Aero sail?

Thanks

E

 

Hi Emillio-

 

RS hasn't finalized spare Aero parts pricing for the US.

For a guide though, I figure a new sail will cost $50 or so more than a rolled hyde Laser sail.

 

Currently, when you buy a rig (lower section and sail) with your boat, it's ~$1450.

 

If you break that down in rough terms, you could probably call it $700 sail, $750 lower section.

Again, just a ballpark.

 

 

Already a couple Aeros sold in the Bay.

We'll be doing demos all day every day during Strictly Sail in April, and hope to invite a lot of the regional dinghy gang down to check it out.

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The Laser cheapskates will soil themselves over this. And I note a new Solo sail from North in the UK is about 1200 Pounds - or USD 2000. Mind you it is a real sail and the Solo (although slower and older) is way more boat than either the Laser or the Aero. You can even, gasp, choose your boatbuilder and sailmaker! And - wait - some of the fast ones even use this weird shit called "wood"! Regardless, the Aero looks a great option for the slippery US market. Here's hoping for 100 boat fleets at the Nats!

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There's an awful lot of technology and R&D in that North Solo sail. I've not used one personally but their results speak volumes. On my Solo I had a proper local option - HD Sails - and it was hands down the nicest sail I have ever used on any waterborne craft I've ever owned or had the privilege to sail.

 

Although the D-zero Mylar sail from North is pretty nice too- a notable cut above a lot of other sails I've used in the past 15 years or so.

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North sails always look great and are great quality bits of kit, whether or not they're worth the premium price only a better sailor than me could judge.

 

On a personal note I am a great fan of Banks,HD and Dynamic sail makers

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The Laser cheapskates will soil themselves over this. And I note a new Solo sail from North in the UK is about 1200 Pounds - or USD 2000. Mind you it is a real sail and the Solo (although slower and older) is way more boat than either the Laser or the Aero. You can even, gasp, choose your boatbuilder and sailmaker! And - wait - some of the fast ones even use this weird shit called "wood"! Regardless, the Aero looks a great option for the slippery US market. Here's hoping for 100 boat fleets at the Nats!

You cant really just plug exchange rates in to convert UK to US market prices of items on a shelf. (though obviously it matters for import/export)

UK prices compared to US on stuff can be shocking even without VAT. A car that is 20k dollars in US may be 18k GBP. Never done a proper study of prices/exchange rates myself, just casually looked a few times when I saw a price and looked at exchange rates.

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Noted, Dex, but if you order shit from the UK, it will be dear. Regardless, Laser sails are still inexpensive compared to others (quality notwithstanding). Even if they build them out of Kevlar, the fast guys will replace them annually - like every other boat. If you buy an Aero and want to win the Nationals, you should bank on one or two sails per year. No matter how you slice it, racing a sailboat of any kind at a high level ain't cheap.

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The difference is that for boats like the Solo, Phantom, Fireball et all there is constant R&D going on so this has to be taken in to account in the sail price.

 

For the Laser there has been no R&D for many years so it is material and labour costs (and markup and royalties of court).

 

I don't mind paying for a sail where I can see where my money is going but I did balk at the price of a new Laser sail because it was expensive and shit, simple as!

 

When the D-Zero sail looks like it needs a refresh I will happily pay the price.

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I've found the RS site to be a bit silly with weights for the 5 / 7 / 9. I am told they are updating that to be easier to understand.

As more boats hit the water, data is coming in to fine tune that as well.

 

--

First Aero sold outside of the main Western States. Aero 7 going to Park City, Utah.

 

(Park City Sailing Association has a vibrant Laser fleet and learn to sail program, killer spot in the mountains)

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Crossover for 7 versus 9 around 75kg I believe. Don't know the 5 to 7 crossover. Not sure I'm seeing much evidence the 9 is that much quicker.

It'll probably come into its own inland in an evening series... A little extra in the can is always welcome on those nights.

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I've found the RS site to be a bit silly with weights for the 5 / 7 / 9. I am told they are updating that to be easier to understand.

As more boats hit the water, data is coming in to fine tune that as well.

 

--

First Aero sold outside of the main Western States. Aero 7 going to Park City, Utah.

 

(Park City Sailing Association has a vibrant Laser fleet and learn to sail program, killer spot in the mountains)

We're excite to have this Aero join our area to be able to check it out. It will be fun to have this Aero and the demo Aero to see how they go against the Lasers. Make sure to bring the 9 rig for the demo boat though!

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Two more Aero events soon in Victoria Australia: Demonstration day from 10am Sunday 22nd March Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron .

Racing, Coaching, Demonstration, and Fun week end with the RS100's and RS200's at Black Rock Yacht Club 18th 19th April.

The first Australian Aero Class Association general meeting will be held after racing on the Saturday.

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OK, a practical question - with the Aero and the standard cover, can you leave the boom (with sail still attached and rolled up) on when you put the cover on? Or do you have to drop the boom? If so, how many lines do you need to detach?

 

(I'm assuming you can leave the mast up - otherwise, I'll just keep my stupid laser that takes 15 minutes to put together...).

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beats the queue and the list price apparently...

http://www.apolloduck.co.uk/display.phtml?aid=406301

 

another one here too, slightly cheaper without the road base, but different end of the country:

 

http://www.apolloduck.co.uk/display.phtml?aid=404285

 

In return for the free advertising, please could explain why you feel it's not the boat for you? It would be helpful for other potential buyers to understand everything that folks love about the Aero, as well as comments from those who didn't get on so well.

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So I sailed an RS Aero 9 last night in Seattle with wind light but a few decent puffs for a range of around 5-10 knots. Todd the owner of the Aero sailed my laser around to keep an eye on me and as a useful bench mark. Todd is likely a few pounds less than I am, I am around 190 LBS/ 87Kg. I was a lot faster on all points of sail but we all expected that.

 

The RS Aero is very light, likely the lightest boat I have sailed yet more sail area than a Laser, Dyer 10, El Toro, Sunfish, Etc Etc Etc I have sailed a lot of boats. The rig is also more efficient. I was warned the boat was tippy but I did not think it was, just that with a such a light boat your body mass becomes a very big dynamic on the boat, it is the heaviest thing about the boat.

 

Right off the dock I had a bit of a bother to get flow going on the blades to sail away from the leeward dock as the foils stalled and sideways I went when I first sheeted in, but as soon as I got some speed that issue went away and I did not experience this again for the rest of the sail.

 

The nonskid is more aggressive than I like, it was hard to slid around on the boat and will likely wear on my gear faster than a laser does, I would use shorts over my wet suit for sure.

 

As noted the boat is responsive to getting your mass in the correct spot be that forward or aft as speed builds. The bow is very fine so with mass forward it sinks the knuckle in quick. Roll tacking or Jibing is easy as you weigh so much more than the boat, but the sail powers up fast when flattening so important to get the sheet out when flattening. The boat has little mass so it will stop in the turn if not driven around with good helmsman-ship. It sails by the lee fine, reversed the flow on the sail and found it stable and fast. But I also found a little up turn out of jibes really got the boat back up to speed then I would drive down. So when by the lee jibe to a reach with no change in course get to speed then turn down and go by the lee other side appeared faster than turning in the jibe. The blades need flow before before dialing up pointing but when the flow is there one can really turn up the point. The Aero also appears to have less leeway than the laser as when matching angle the laser slid to leeward of the Aero.

 

Controls all worked fine, I am not sure I like the tails going to a bunggy under the deck as I like to uncleat and let go of the outhaul and cunningham to let out to a stopper knot when rounding a mark, these took management from my to get let off. It was easy to adjust everything when sailing up wind however. Sail looked good most of the time when adjusted.

 

Acceleration was very rewarding, it shoots out of tacks or even when making a little upturn on a run there is a sudden rush as the speed builds. The boat is highly responsive to kinetics - something the rules will need to look after but it is also easy to shake the rig so important to be smooth on the helm, moving in the boat, and sheeting the sail.

 

Overall I really liked the boat and will likely buy one this week making 7 in Seattle by this summer.

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Lovely movie here of RS Aeros in paradise at Nonsuch Bay, Antigua;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DumYgSdzz0g

Very nice shades of blue top and bottom with a pretty line of green in between!

 

​The UK Aero Website referred to above is actually the International Class Association website for the RS Aero, linked here; http://www.rsaerosailing.org/index.asp?p=news

As Steve says; 'Owner sidetracked by crewing X1 dinghy'.

I joked with Chris Ingram at the Dinghy Show recently that he reckoned the RS Aero 9 was a good singlehanded version of his X1 (well canvassed with a very light weight hull), an ideal weapon for light to medium winds when under powered - like all those summer evenings or sheltered locations. That was his take and I quite like it having also sailed his boat.

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OK, a practical question - with the Aero and the standard cover, can you leave the boom (with sail still attached and rolled up) on when you put the cover on? Or do you have to drop the boom? If so, how many lines do you need to detach?

 

(I'm assuming you can leave the mast up - otherwise, I'll just keep my stupid laser that takes 15 minutes to put together...).

 

Chuck,

Leaving the boom up has little merit as a water shed ridge as it does not reach the transom. Instead the cover has a central attachment point that the main halyard can be attached to to the raise the centre to aid drainage. However, with the cover straps pulled snuggly and the bow left raised I have never felt the need to hoist the centre like that as there is no water logging.

 

Detaching the boom and dropping it to the deck does not require any knots to be undone, just some slack to be pulled through in the vang and outhaul.

Likewise, with slack pulled through the vang and outhaul it is possible to drop the mast - without the need to untie any knots or unshackle the kicker!

The standard cover works with either the mast up or down (the slit is well sealed when down),

Personally I always choose to drop the carbon mast in the dinghy park as it only takes half a minute extra - the time taken to pull extra slack through the lines, drop the rig and separate the 2 sections.

After 15 minutes you should expect to be well into the 1st race!

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Oh interesting - I didn't think of that. Are you saying that the outhaul / kicker (vang to us yanks) are not attached to the bottom mast section? Followon question - does that imply that you similarly can change between rigs without detaching anything (other than pulling the boom off?).

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So I sailed an RS Aero 9 last night in Seattle with wind light but a few decent puffs for a range of around 5-10 knots. Todd the owner of the Aero sailed my laser around to keep an eye on me and as a useful bench mark. ... ...

 

DB thank you, that is one of the best sailing reviews ever- gives a good sense of what the boat sails like.

 

I'm a bit surprised to hear people describe it as "tippy" with the hull form looking like it has considerably more initial stability than a Laser hull.

 

FB- Doug

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@ Pete Barton post 891

Chris Ingram's X1 is a belter of a boat in light-medium winds. Sailing the X1, my sailing buddy and I have just won our fleet in the UK's largest open winter series. Mind you, the chap I crew for is a damned good sailor - but please don't tell him I said so.

 

@jimmykneewrecker post 889

Before buying the Aero, I sailed a Solo for 10 years. I'm 58 years old and I weigh 79 Kgs. I'm pretty fit for my age and, although I say it myself, I'm a very experienced dinghy crew and helm - I've been to National and World champs in different classes. The Aero is a very different boat to the Solo and I found I was struggling to get to grips with the Aero's unstayed carbon rig - my problem, not the boat's. Downwind in breeze, the rig worked very well. However, for me, downwind in light winds was difficult to master - you need a reasonable amount of kicker to get a decent sail shape and, if you're not careful, you can easily hook the leach. Upwind takes concentration and quick reflexes to avoid a windward capsize. In a Solo you beat with the windward telltales just lifting. Sailing like this in the Aero in 20+ mph of breeze in a shifty inland breeze, I found I was pointing too high and, with lots of cunningham and kicker on, the boat would almost tack itself in a header. I should have freed off a little and hung my backside out a bit further but, as a pond sailor, I like to "sniff" a header and throw the boat into a tack rather than free off, hike harder and bang corners. Three windward capsizes made me realise I was doing something fundamentally wrong. Also, I found it quite hard to get back into the boat after a capsize. The boat is so light that as you try to haul yourself in over the windward side, it tends to roll back in on top of you. An alternative is to swim to the back and slide/drag yourself in over the transom, pulling hand-over-hand along the central toe-strap.

I'm afraid I have to say that I personally feel that that the sail controls are a little crude. The kicker is led to a swivel cleat on the centre-line and I found it difficult to reach it to let it off before a windward mark rounding. The daggerboard bungee always seemed to end up in the way of the kicker line.The outhaul and cunningham are led to tunnel cleats on the side decks. Unfortunately, if you pull on the windward line, the leeward line doesn't always fall into the cleat neatly. So, you end up pulling and pulling and pulling... Camcleats would have been better, in my opinion. I just wondered whether functionality had been somewhat sacrificed in the pursuit of simplicity.

If you're a Laser sailor, I reckon you'll love the Aero because the Aero has a very similar layout. I'm used to sailing a boat with a stayed mast, with rig controls all led to the side deck for ease of use, and I've found it too hard to unlearn that rig configuration. I also prefer a boat with a centreboard rather than a daggerboard. It's not a major concern, but that's my preference. Downwind and gybing, the Aero's easy to sail and very well-mannered. Upwind, I personally felt the hard-on cunningham and significant mast bend tended to make the boat round up into the wind very quickly if you weren't careful. Perhaps I should have experimented with lifting the daggerboard a little to counter some of that weather helm.

So, in summary, my own personal experience of the Aero has been; great hull, great foils, interesting rig that works well in a breeze but less well in light airs, awkward-to-use sail controls. I decided I was too set in my ways to unlearn and re-learn how to sail the boat. Too long in the tooth, and that's much more of a problem with me than with the boat. 25 years ago, maybe it would have been different for me.

Please remember these are just my own personal experiences. At my sailing club is a 32 year old who has come from the Europe class. He really likes his Aero and has had few, if any, of the problems I've had.

 

Steve

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Oh interesting - I didn't think of that. Are you saying that the outhaul / kicker (vang to us yanks) are not attached to the bottom mast section? Followon question - does that imply that you similarly can change between rigs without detaching anything (other than pulling the boom off?).

 

Chuck,

The outhaul and vang are led through a 90' turn on two pulleys integrated into the lower side of the bespoke gooseneck fitting.

Ease them a little and the boom will set flat on the deck.

Ease them a little further again and the mast can lift out and sit flat on the deck without any need to untie or unshackle.

If you want to change rigs you will have to unthread the outhaul and vang from the gooseneck and unshackle the vang base which is a pretty quick job.

Outhaul, vang and downhaul lengths do not need altering when swapping rigs so there is no complication there.

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@ Pete Barton post 891

Chris Ingram's X1 is a belter of a boat in light-medium winds. Sailing the X1, my sailing buddy and I have just won our fleet in the UK's largest open winter series. Mind you, the chap I crew for is a damned good sailor - but please don't tell him I said so.

 

@jimmykneewrecker post 889

Before buying the Aero, I sailed a Solo for 10 years. I'm 58 years old and I weigh 79 Kgs. I'm pretty fit for my age and, although I say it myself, I'm a very experienced dinghy crew and helm - I've been to National and World champs in different classes. The Aero is a very different boat to the Solo and I found I was struggling to get to grips with the Aero's unstayed carbon rig - my problem, not the boat's. Downwind in breeze, the rig worked very well. However, for me, downwind in light winds was difficult to master - you need a reasonable amount of kicker to get a decent sail shape and, if you're not careful, you can easily hook the leach. Upwind takes concentration and quick reflexes to avoid a windward capsize. In a Solo you beat with the windward telltales just lifting. Sailing like this in the Aero in 20+ mph of breeze in a shifty inland breeze, I found I was pointing too high and, with lots of cunningham and kicker on, the boat would almost tack itself in a header. I should have freed off a little and hung my backside out a bit further but, as a pond sailor, I like to "sniff" a header and throw the boat into a tack rather than free off, hike harder and bang corners. Three windward capsizes made me realise I was doing something fundamentally wrong. Also, I found it quite hard to get back into the boat after a capsize. The boat is so light that as you try to haul yourself in over the windward side, it tends to roll back in on top of you. An alternative is to swim to the back and slide/drag yourself in over the transom, pulling hand-over-hand along the central toe-strap.

I'm afraid I have to say that I personally feel that that the sail controls are a little crude. The kicker is led to a swivel cleat on the centre-line and I found it difficult to reach it to let it off before a windward mark rounding. The daggerboard bungee always seemed to end up in the way of the kicker line.The outhaul and cunningham are led to tunnel cleats on the side decks. Unfortunately, if you pull on the windward line, the leeward line doesn't always fall into the cleat neatly. So, you end up pulling and pulling and pulling... Camcleats would have been better, in my opinion. I just wondered whether functionality had been somewhat sacrificed in the pursuit of simplicity.

If you're a Laser sailor, I reckon you'll love the Aero because the Aero has a very similar layout. I'm used to sailing a boat with a stayed mast, with rig controls all led to the side deck for ease of use, and I've found it too hard to unlearn that rig configuration. I also prefer a boat with a centreboard rather than a daggerboard. It's not a major concern, but that's my preference. Downwind and gybing, the Aero's easy to sail and very well-mannered. Upwind, I personally felt the hard-on cunningham and significant mast bend tended to make the boat round up into the wind very quickly if you weren't careful. Perhaps I should have experimented with lifting the daggerboard a little to counter some of that weather helm.

So, in summary, my own personal experience of the Aero has been; great hull, great foils, interesting rig that works well in a breeze but less well in light airs, awkward-to-use sail controls. I decided I was too set in my ways to unlearn and re-learn how to sail the boat. Too long in the tooth, and that's much more of a problem with me than with the boat. 25 years ago, maybe it would have been different for me.

Please remember these are just my own personal experiences. At my sailing club is a 32 year old who has come from the Europe class. He really likes his Aero and has had few, if any, of the problems I've had.

 

Steve

 

 

Thank you Steve- a well written bit of feedback. As a former Solo sailor I can understand your predicament, they are very nice boats to sail, sadly at 100kg (back then) I was just too damn heavy to be even vaguely competitive sailing inland.

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First Annual US Aero Nationals will be in The Columbia River Gorge July 25-26th, 2015.

 

Peter Barton will be flying out from the UK to do a clinic on Friday, and race with North American that weekend.

Details are starting to come together on that event.

 

--

Also, got a note from RS that they have passed 750 boats sold.

 

Out here on the west coast, we should have 40+ boats on the ground by June.

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That's more than new, isn't it?

List price of boat + carbon tiller extension + top cover + mainsheet cleats + foil bags + aluminium trolley is £6221. I did have it up for £5950, but I think that's too much. Yours for £5795, and you beat the build queue.

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@ Pete Barton post 891

Chris Ingram's X1 is a belter of a boat in light-medium winds. Sailing the X1, my sailing buddy and I have just won our fleet in the UK's largest open winter series. Mind you, the chap I crew for is a damned good sailor - but please don't tell him I said so.

 

@jimmykneewrecker post 889

Before buying the Aero, I sailed a Solo for 10 years. I'm 58 years old and I weigh 79 Kgs. I'm pretty fit for my age and, although I say it myself, I'm a very experienced dinghy crew and helm - I've been to National and World champs in different classes. The Aero is a very different boat to the Solo and I found I was struggling to get to grips with the Aero's unstayed carbon rig - my problem, not the boat's. Downwind in breeze, the rig worked very well. However, for me, downwind in light winds was difficult to master - you need a reasonable amount of kicker to get a decent sail shape and, if you're not careful, you can easily hook the leach. Upwind takes concentration and quick reflexes to avoid a windward capsize. In a Solo you beat with the windward telltales just lifting. Sailing like this in the Aero in 20+ mph of breeze in a shifty inland breeze, I found I was pointing too high and, with lots of cunningham and kicker on, the boat would almost tack itself in a header. I should have freed off a little and hung my backside out a bit further but, as a pond sailor, I like to "sniff" a header and throw the boat into a tack rather than free off, hike harder and bang corners. Three windward capsizes made me realise I was doing something fundamentally wrong. Also, I found it quite hard to get back into the boat after a capsize. The boat is so light that as you try to haul yourself in over the windward side, it tends to roll back in on top of you. An alternative is to swim to the back and slide/drag yourself in over the transom, pulling hand-over-hand along the central toe-strap.

I'm afraid I have to say that I personally feel that that the sail controls are a little crude. The kicker is led to a swivel cleat on the centre-line and I found it difficult to reach it to let it off before a windward mark rounding. The daggerboard bungee always seemed to end up in the way of the kicker line.The outhaul and cunningham are led to tunnel cleats on the side decks. Unfortunately, if you pull on the windward line, the leeward line doesn't always fall into the cleat neatly. So, you end up pulling and pulling and pulling... Camcleats would have been better, in my opinion. I just wondered whether functionality had been somewhat sacrificed in the pursuit of simplicity.

If you're a Laser sailor, I reckon you'll love the Aero because the Aero has a very similar layout. I'm used to sailing a boat with a stayed mast, with rig controls all led to the side deck for ease of use, and I've found it too hard to unlearn that rig configuration. I also prefer a boat with a centreboard rather than a daggerboard. It's not a major concern, but that's my preference. Downwind and gybing, the Aero's easy to sail and very well-mannered. Upwind, I personally felt the hard-on cunningham and significant mast bend tended to make the boat round up into the wind very quickly if you weren't careful. Perhaps I should have experimented with lifting the daggerboard a little to counter some of that weather helm.

So, in summary, my own personal experience of the Aero has been; great hull, great foils, interesting rig that works well in a breeze but less well in light airs, awkward-to-use sail controls. I decided I was too set in my ways to unlearn and re-learn how to sail the boat. Too long in the tooth, and that's much more of a problem with me than with the boat. 25 years ago, maybe it would have been different for me.

Please remember these are just my own personal experiences. At my sailing club is a 32 year old who has come from the Europe class. He really likes his Aero and has had few, if any, of the problems I've had.

 

Steve

 

 

Thank you Steve- a well written bit of feedback. As a former Solo sailor I can understand your predicament, they are very nice boats to sail, sadly at 100kg (back then) I was just too damn heavy to be even vaguely competitive sailing inland.

 

Interesting review, but I would add one thing - time in the boat. The aero is very light and that manifests itself in a number of ways, virtually all of which are positive. The rig takes some practice, but works very well in most wind conditions. Once you have sailed these boast 10-12 times you get the measure of them, how they work and where you can and can't push. Ultimately they are a very easy boat to sail, certainly easier than a laser and yet like all boats need time on the water and fitness, competence to get the best out of them.

 

They are certainly more stable and controllable than a laser downwind. I personally would prefer clam cleats and a loop on the controls, but for the opposite reason as I feel the current cleats, recleat a bit too easily. That said you get used to it. I am not surprised that you prefer a boat that you have sailed for years, but of course its a boat the aero will run rings around on every point of sail and it does that because it is different so has to be sailed as such.

 

When the aero was launched I thought its an interesting boat, they will sell in decent numbers but is it an important boat for all levels of sailor? After sailing one for three months I personally (my opinion) think its going to be huge. We have occasional sailors enjoying them and we have some really top sailors buying them. Its the old SMOD thing, you can't hide behind a cheque book, they are simple, fun and the only difference boat on boat is the driver.

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First Annual US Aero Nationals will be in The Columbia River Gorge July 25-26th, 2015.

 

Peter Barton will be flying out from the UK to do a clinic on Friday, and race with North American that weekend.

Details are starting to come together on that event.

 

--

Also, got a note from RS that they have passed 750 boats sold.

 

Out here on the west coast, we should have 40+ boats on the ground by June.

 

Yes I am in! Many thanks to West Coast for the assistance and arrangements.

 

I am gigantically excited about my first visit to The Gorge, it has been on my 'venues to visit' list since watching the Moth Worlds videos in 2009 and before. Been re-watching this legendary Gorge vid by Mr Clean a few times recently; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9X5Fl_grOM

 

It will be great to meet up with all the new USAero sailors face to face (too much typing so far!), not just from the Pacific North West and California but hopefully some East Coasters and the mid areas too.

 

Four months countdown to wake those hiking muscles up into some sort of shape...I understand it might be windy!

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It will be great to meet up with all the new USAero sailors face to face (too much typing so far!), not just from the Pacific North West and California but hopefully some East Coasters and the mid areas too.

 

Four months countdown to wake those hiking muscles up into some sort of shape...I understand it might be windy!

 

 

I promise you that at least one East Coaster will be there. I don't even have delivery of my own Aero yet, but I will be there.

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