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8 hours ago, Tom Kirkman said:

I don't believe the $16.2K price includes a road trailer, just the dolly.

Agreed. And the point I made when comparing prices between Australia and the US in my previous post, is that pricing is very similar excluding the trailer. Which is a better comparison as Weta don’t supply trailers.

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Hi guys,newbie here but a long time monohull sailor/ racer. I have been away from the sailing scene for a little while whilst I finished raising my boy and further advanced my career. I bore you with

New Weta model Chris Kitchen and his family came up with this new Weta model.  Brought a smile to my face.

I've sailed mine in big breeze / lumpy seas, and it never went over when flying the screecher. The big sail lifts the bows (and in absolutely insane conditions 25+) and miraculously the boat digs in -

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20 hours ago, bourdidn said:

Wire or Dyneema shrouds?

One of my shrouds has a kink, so I am looking at either buying a new set, having the local shipchandler crimp one for me, or making a set out of 3mm Dyneema. 

What is the advantage of dyneema over regular wire, other that the fact that they do not kink? I sail in a lake, so salt is not an issue.

 

For me, the main advantage is another min off the assembly/breakup time by not having to properly coil them. As you accumulate time saving tricks, you can get it down to 15-20 min

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  • 4 weeks later...
58 minutes ago, βhyde said:

 

Quick question. You all using the fattop mains? I'm thinking of going that way.

Yup, would not go back (especially for racing). Cruising/camping might go back to pin, but haven't had time to play with that lately

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Yes he did - although I think I could have luffed him away from the next mark (not in video) as he was windward boat and then turned into the zone so he had no overlap- but it was a very short leg and it wouldn’t have been polite.

We’ve standardised on the SQ sail for Class events and it’s quicker upwind because of better air flow  off the top of the mast and faster downwind - especially in marginal planing conditions.

The only time it’s a problem is in winds over 25 knots and waves where the pressure on the top of the mast helps to bury the nose - the solution is to get your weight right back early and don’t eaee the main in the gusts - just bear away to spill the wind.
 

Our class rules allow you to use either sail without a change in handicap but you can’t swap between them during an event (although I think it would be better for lightweights if you could).

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Please note - @Pewit he was not in the lead at that turning mark. The first place boat was a good 30-45 secs ahead of our pack. 
Paul was 2nd, then I rolled him (c/o some ill-advised depth checking with his bow pole). 

Could catch that young Richo person

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2 minutes ago, Pewit said:

Yes he did - although I think I could have luffed him away from the next mark (not in video) as he was windward boat and then turned into the zone so he had no overlap- but it was a very short leg and it wouldn’t have been polite.

 

+ very difficult to luff someone with your bow pole 6ft under :D

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26 minutes ago, Chidz said:

+ very difficult to luff someone with your bow pole 6ft under :D

You were overtaking boat as we approached the next mark as I had sailed a faster angle after gybing later.

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30 minutes ago, Chidz said:

Please note - @Pewit he was not in the lead at that turning mark. The first place boat was a good 30-45 secs ahead of our pack. 
Paul was 2nd, then I rolled him (c/o some ill-advised depth checking with his bow pole). 

Could catch that young Richo person

I now think I had the main on too much for the conditions - would have been better to spill some wind in the main and get less healing motion.

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3 hours ago, Pewit said:

Yes he did - although I think I could have luffed him away from the next mark (not in video) as he was windward boat and then turned into the zone so he had no overlap- but it was a very short leg and it wouldn’t have been polite.

We’ve standardised on the SQ sail for Class events and it’s quicker upwind because of better air flow  off the top of the mast and faster downwind - especially in marginal planing conditions.

The only time it’s a problem is in winds over 25 knots and waves where the pressure on the top of the mast helps to bury the nose - the solution is to get your weight right back early and don’t eaee the main in the gusts - just bear away to spill the wind.
 

Our class rules allow you to use either sail without a change in handicap but you can’t swap between them during an event (although I think it would be better for lightweights if you could).

Good to know. We typically get 15-20kts with some steep chop, but I find myself always looking for more power. Well, until it gets fucking crazy. We've carried the pinhead in well over 30kts sustained without much trouble, so I'm thinking the fatty might be fun. I've rigged the downhaul so that I can put a massive amount of bend in the mast to open the upper leech, so I'm pretty sure the fattop can be throttled back when the wind gets fresh. Worst case scenario, I go for a swim. I need a bath anyway.

I would have luffed @Chidz:)

 

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5 minutes ago, βhyde said:

.... so I'm thinking the fatty might be fun. I've rigged the downhaul so that I can put a massive amount of bend in the mast to open the upper leech, so I'm pretty sure the fattop can be throttled back when the wind gets fresh. Worst case scenario, I go for a swim. I need a bath anyway.

I would have luffed @Chidz:)

 

do it, you know you want to ....

 

:D

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3 hours ago, Pewit said:

I now think I had the main on too much for the conditions - would have been better to spill some wind in the main and get less healing motion.

or eat more donuts

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Most impressive thing I saw in the video was that lunge from out on the ama back up onto the trampoline. Oh how I wish I had the core strength to do that.  I can’t get my ass off the ama without the help of the handle on the shroud. So I have to stay on the trampoline when gennaker reaching like that.

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The square top main has a ton of built-in luff curve so once the sail is raised the mast is automatically heavily bent at the top, spilling air without any cunningham pulled on at all. I think this is why I found the square top sail so weak compared to the pin head. It's a little better in light air, but runs out of power quickly. I'm not sure you could capsize the Weta with the square top - it just doesn't make good power. I used mine a half dozen times and sold it. 

For those that have one and can't get the top of the sail to pop over easily when tacking, that top (angled) batten is cut from the same stock as the rest and because it is so much shorter it is effectively very stiff and tends not to pop over easily when you bring the sail across in light air. You can replace it with a common Hobie 16 batten which is much more flexible. It's more than stiff enough for use on that short angled section but just soft enough to easily pop over when you tack.

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34 minutes ago, Tom Kirkman said:

For those that have one and can't get the top of the sail to pop over easily when tacking, that top (angled) batten is cut from the same stock as the rest and because it is so much shorter it is effectively very stiff and tends not to pop over easily when you bring the sail across in light air. You can replace it with a common Hobie 16 batten which is much more flexible. It's more than stiff enough for use on that short angled section but just soft enough to easily pop over when you tack.

The top batten was replaced with a thinner section a few months after the first batch of sails was released and dealers were supplied with additional battens for customer who had already bought the sail.

Sure there is more luff curve than the Pinhead but I don’t find it excessive and it is possible to capsize in waves in a blow as the head of the sail acts as a lever to push the bow down.

The solution is to get your weight well back and not let the main out bear away to spill some wind.

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16 hours ago, unShirley said:

Most impressive thing I saw in the video was that lunge from out on the ama back up onto the trampoline. Oh how I wish I had the core strength to do that.  I can’t get my ass off the ama without the help of the handle on the shroud. So I have to stay on the trampoline when gennaker reaching like that.

You realize you can just stand on the ama, right? :0

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Not according to the class rules

2 hours ago, βhyde said:

You realize you can just stand on the ama, right? :0

 

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5 minutes ago, Pewit said:

Not according to the class rules

 

Unfortunately, we don't have any class racing on the west coast of the US. Been dead for years. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ordered this back in early April and she was finally delivered today thanks to Richard at Starboard Tack sailing. Had great conditions for the shake down sail with gust to 15knts, so I had a spirited sail. 
Much to learn, many questions to the gurus forthcoming.

ps;
Cant figure out why the picture is sideways.

CBE31AB0-2F72-4AAE-9A52-3651FFC11F2A.jpeg

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19 minutes ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

Ordered this back in early April and she was finally delivered today thanks to Richard at Starboard Tack sailing. Had great conditions for the shake down sail with gust to 15knts, so I had a spirited sail. 
Much to learn, many questions to the gurus forthcoming.

Nice  - If you haven't already found it, the revised manual may help you. tinyurl.com/wetamanual2021

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5 hours ago, RedTuna said:

 

First thing is to raise your main all the way.

What number is it? Also, I'm curious, it has the self-tacker, but it also looks like there are jib sheet cleats mounted on the deck. Is this correct?

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11 hours ago, RedTuna said:

CBE31AB0-2F72-4AAE-9A52-3651FFC11F2A.thumb.jpeg.53b1a81d7dc2dcefc46b1bc09c64c71e.jpeg

First thing is to raise your main all the way.

Ok. The main halyard has a knot that secures into a bracket at the top of the mast. Is it possible the knot is in the wrong place on the halyard? 

Also, when I rigged the boat with Richard he instructed me to put the gennaker turning blocks mid way up the almas behind the shrouds instead of on the aft alma beam the way it’s shown in the rigging guide. This set up puts the sheet at only about a 90* angle instead of almost a 180* angle. Which way seems to be the consensus? 

There will be many more questions to come, thanks in advance.

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6 hours ago, Go Bananas! said:

What number is it? Also, I'm curious, it has the self-tacker, but it also looks like there are jib sheet cleats mounted on the deck. Is this correct?

It hull #1338.

Yes it does have the jib sheet cleats as well. There is some sort of bridle I still have to rig, which consist of a eye loop that attaches to the base of the mast. The rigging guide shows I have to attach a small line to the jib car and run it through the eye up to the halyard cleat. I assume this is so I can adjust the car to bring the foot of the jib closer to centerline. 

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44 minutes ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

Ok. The main halyard has a knot that secures into a bracket at the top of the mast. Is it possible the knot is in the wrong place on the halyard? 

Also, when I rigged the boat with Richard he instructed me to put the gennaker turning blocks mid way up the almas behind the shrouds instead of on the aft alma beam the way it’s shown in the rigging guide. This set up puts the sheet at only about a 90* angle instead of almost a 180* angle. Which way seems to be the consensus? 

There will be many more questions to come, thanks in advance.

The main halyard ends in a loop for the shackle which you use to attach the eye at the head of the mainsail. The knot should be 25cm from the end. Pull the mainsail it all the way up with the halyard alongside the front of the mast then grab the foot of the mainsail and pull it down to check the knot has caught in the V-cleat on the mast. I suspect it hasn't done so in your photo which is why the mainsail has slipped down the mast. Refer to the manual for more info and photos. https://tinyurl.com/wetamanual2021

The US rules allow modification to the running rigging whereas the rules in most other regions require them as per the factory setup which is to position the gennaker blocks at the rear of the tramp. Setting them next to the shrouds has the benefit that you are less likely to sit on the sheet or catch it with the tiller extension. And if sailing with a crew, the sheet is more accessible.

A popular mod for those sailing solo with the rear mounted gennaker blocks is to tie additional blocks to the forward ama arms either side of the cockpit which keeps the gennaker sheet in front of you and away from your feet. See the manual for more information. 

6 hours ago, Go Bananas! said:

I'm curious, it has the self-tacker, but it also looks like there are jib sheet cleats mounted on the deck. Is this correct?

All boats with the self tacker still need the Jib sheet cleats to be able to sheet the jib in and out - for example when going upwind (beating) you have it taught and then ease it when sailing downwind. You can feed both jib sheet tails sheet through one of the slots under the track support but I think it's better to have each sheet tail fed through separately and then crossed over the cockpit and tied to the tramp edge to make them accessible. Refer to the manual for more information https://tinyurl.com/wetamanual2021

38 minutes ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

It hull #1338.

Yes it does have the jib sheet cleats as well. There is some sort of bridle I still have to rig, which consist of a eye loop that attaches to the base of the mast. The rigging guide shows I have to attach a small line to the jib car and run it through the eye up to the halyard cleat. I assume this is so I can adjust the car to bring the foot of the jib closer to centerline. 

We have found that the jib car adjustment makes little difference except possibly in really light winds. And because you can't adjust the jib angle with the standard jib, we have disallowed it while racing - but your rules may vary.

It looks as if you have the attached the jib tension shackle to the rear holes on the jib clew. We've found that the holes are set too far back for the track location and you're better to use the second hole from the front for most conditions - moving to the front hole for winds over 20 knots. See the Manual for more info.

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3 hours ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

Also, when I rigged the boat with Richard he instructed me to put the gennaker turning blocks mid way up the almas behind the shrouds instead of on the aft alma beam the way it’s shown in the rigging guide. This set up puts the sheet at only about a 90* angle instead of almost a 180* angle. Which way seems to be the consensus?

This could potentially make for a good discussion.  I have never tried leading the gennaker to the shrouds, but many sailors around here have, including successful racers.  I have found that I don't have a problem with the tiller extension getting caught in the gennaker sheets if I simply let off the furler a little bit so the sheets sag down.  However,  getting the sheets caught under my posterior is a problem that I have to occasionally deal with.  The main reason I haven't tried the modified leads is because I am a bit of a purist, figuring that the sail is cut and designed for the standard leads.  But, as I mentioned before, some very successful racers use the modified leads.  The one time that I have empirical evidence that the standard leads might be faster, though, is last June, in the Frenchy's Rum Run which includes a reaching leg about 12 nm long,  I seem to be much faster than one of my competitors who is 50 pounds lighter than me and usually horizons me on reaches because he is a very fast sailor. But, he had the gennaker leads at the shrouds.  That is only one instance, but, for now, based on that experience, I am sticking with the stock set up.

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Went on a sail today with the wife, she really enjoyed the boat and laid out on the tramps to get some sun and relaxation while I worked on upwind and down wind angles. Coming from monohulls I find myself trying to point too high and conversely driving too deep down wind. 
How do you know what angles to sail? Especially down wind, where is the right balance between heating up for speed and VMG? 

I will try to make a regatta near here in two weeks, I know of at least one other Weta entering, so I guess it’s time to start learning how to make this boat fast.

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Upwind, generally go for speed over height - especially in waves.

Downwind come up for speed and then bear away for VMG and repeat in a series of S-bends while also trying to use the waves.

If you don't have access to a Speedpuck, try running RaceQs on the phone or watch (you can also upload a GPS track) which allows you to analyse your performance. It's free - for best results set it going (it has a timer) and then put the phone below deck in a waterproof case and/or dry bag.

You may need to create a fake "course" from your track in order to be able to view the analytics so RaceQs can algorithm can recognise the wind direction (you can set manually), tacks and gybes. 

https://raceqs.com/race-analytics/ 

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13 hours ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

Went on a sail today with the wife, she really enjoyed the boat and laid out on the tramps to get some sun and relaxation while I worked on upwind and down wind angles. Coming from monohulls I find myself trying to point too high and conversely driving too deep down wind. 
How do you know what angles to sail? Especially down wind, where is the right balance between heating up for speed and VMG? 

I will try to make a regatta near here in two weeks, I know of at least one other Weta entering, so I guess it’s time to start learning how to make this boat fast.

To put some numbers on it, and I expect some differing opinions here, upwind you will tack over 105-110 degrees (gps tracks, not compass headings) and downwind you will end up gybing over 110-120 degrees in order to keep the boat planing. This is a lot of fun. Playing the waves is absolutely critical downwind, even very small ones. Do know that it will be hard to beat your own dead downwing vmg, that is the price we pay in order to have a flat screecher that lets you beam reach with it.

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Man, what a beautiful blue boat.

Put a tell tale on each shroud to improve downwind performance.  Keep apparent wind abeam or forward of abeam.  Put them at a level that's easy to quickly see what they're doing as you heat up and soak your S's, but not so high that it distracts you from what's happening on the water.  IE, keep your head out of the boat.

If you intend to race, pick up a tactical compass.  Lots of good ones.  The inexpensive Ritchie X-Port Tactician has some nice features and can be mounted (just barely) on deck just behind your down haul.  I attached mine with 3M Dual lock tape to make it removable; strong stuff.  I also used Dual lock on my Speedpuck but sadly, they are no longer available.

https://www.ritchienavigation.com/product/tactician-sailing-compass/

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/dual-lock-reclosable-fasteners-us/

 

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I agree about having your head out of the boat and having telltales on the shrouds - I use flagging tape available from hardware stores for marking out building sites.

I have 2x Ritchie X-Port analogue compasses which I used at the World Masters Games when digital instruments weren't allowed (go figure - we are in the 21st centaury!). I had one mounted on each ama for hiking days, and Dual Lock to mount one on the bow for light wind days. 
IMG_2293.thumb.JPG.6876c157cad6d375b2edd60d4248fdc7.JPG
However, given that your head is going to be at least 2m from the base of the mast if you are hiking from the amas, instead of squinting to read the numbers* and having your head in the boat for long periods,  I highly recommend using a digital compass with twin screens mounted on the mast - which leaves a choice between the Raymarine Tacktick and the Velocitek Prism.

The Prism is a bit cheaper and doesn't have the tacktical (windshift) indicator of the Tacktick or countdown timer but OTOH, you can just remember the bearing number and have a wrist timer (which I prefer) as it's easier than having to sit by the mast when you need to press the start timer or sync button.

* I now wear different strength contact lenses- one for reading and one for distance (as recommended by my Ophthalmologist) with Gill Marker sun specs to keep out the spray.

image.png.c46c3c435b63d2d914016ce20375f902.pngprism-compass_300x.jpg?v=1513890001

 

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I have a (fairly old now) Tacktick which still works perfectly. For mine, the tactical mode is most important because you don't have to remember the bearing of the last tack, but it does require some trial and error to get the tacking angle right (mine is set at 110 degrees for strong wind and waves, or 105 for flatter water and less breeze, bearing in mind I sail 2 up which adds about 5 degrees to the tacking angle). The Tacktick sits on a bracket at the base of the mast. The next most useful device is a wind indicator (orange Laser mast-mount type) on the end of the pole. 

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On 11/23/2021 at 10:53 PM, Pewit said:

* I now wear different strength contact lenses- one for reading and one for distance (as recommended by my Ophthalmologist) with Gill Marker sun specs to keep out the spray.

 

Amazing how your brain sorts that out, isn't it? Mono-Vision is the term.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Tom Kirkman said:

Amazing how your brain sorts that out, isn't it? Mono-Vision is the term.

Yes but it does give some eye strain and it’s always a relief to take them out after sailing - although it has improved with time.

But it’s certainly much better than trying to wear multi-focal glasses which just fog up and aren’t as effective.

The Gill Marker sun specs float, have a hydrophobic coating on the lens and have a gap in the frame which lets air circulate (possibly by creating a Venturi) that stops them fogging up downwind. You can DIY with a cheap pair of specs by cutting off the corner of the lens.

07107F29-329D-4B6B-8ED9-332EBE2774D9.jpeg.0444ac36c9b6cf69f8d6431d5c89d1c5.jpeg

 

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Ok Weta gurus, I have a few questions if you will be so kind as to indulge me. :)

 

I went for a sail today, NOAA had the forecast at at steady 15knts with gusts to 18knts+. 
This was the first time I rigged the boat solo, with no expert help. Thank Gawd for smartphones and internet connections, I had to refer to pictures to rig the self tacker, and I swapped the jib halyard for the genniker, but I realized that before I stepped the mast. :rolleyes:
I struggled to keep the shrouds in the mast until I used a little sail tape to keep them in the damn mast. Now I have two sets of shrouds, one is synthetic, today I rigged the stainless wire because it was a fun sail.

Q1: is there a trick other then sail tape to keep the shrouds in the mast?
 

The beach I launched from had really soft sand and I had push the dolly way out to get to deep enough water to push the boat off the dolly. 

Q2:Should I look for slightly fatter and taller tiers for the dolly? I realize I might have to walk the boat deeper to get tit float, but the tires I got seem to bog down in the soft stuff.

I tried like hell to get out board on the almas to keep the boat flat but when the tramp got wet it was slippery and I couldn’t seem to get out far enough to use the hiking straps. I was wearing nylon shorts so that might be some of the issue.

Q3: What seems to be the best shorts for grip on the tramp?

I buried the leeward alma a few times while screaming down wind. I did try to hike out on the main hull using the hiking strap. It seem to work ok most of the time.

Q3: What other things can I do to depower slightly to keep from burying the leeward alma and slowing the boat down?

As I was hauling ass upwind and down wind the spray coming off the main hull was just plowing me in the face. I realized upwind if I was all the way out on the alma hiking like I should be I probably wound be having this issue, but downwind, when hiking on the main hull I was getting facefulls of seawater. I do wear sunglasses.

Final question (for now): Are there any tricks to keeping as much spray off you as possible so I’m not so blinded when hauling ass downwind?

Thanks in advance.

 

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A1:  Yes.  I use a cheap rubber band that breaks when you raise the main.  You can get a bag of 1000 from an office supply store for just a coupe of bucks.  Or, I have seen other Weta sailors use ear plugs wedged into the hole with the top of the stay to keep it in place.

A2: there are a couple of brands of fatter, bigger wheels and tires that fit onto the weta trolley, I have a pair myself (although I don't remember the brand).  They definitely make getting across a beach much easier.  But,  they also float the trolley and boat much higher in the water making it a bit more difficult to get the boat off the trolley.

A3:  slippery should be good so you can easily slide in or out on the tramp. I guess I don't understand how you are trying to get out across the tramp.  I use my feet and legs to push myself out and just slide in.

A4: While reaching, when the leeward bow starts to bury, drive down hard (pull the tiller towards you) to keep the boat under the mast.  Think of balancing a broom on your palm.  That is what you want to do with the boat.  The mast is the broom and boat is your palm.

A5:  Other than installing a tramp type skirt between the forward aka and at the vaka, which is available....no.  I wear contacts instead of glasses.  It was named a WETa for a reason :-)

 

YMMV

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If you haven’t already found it, you may find the rigging video helpful.

https://youtu.be/HEb-Dl73iWU

Also read the section on speeding up rigging in the manual as it can save you time.

Q1 The trick with the stays falling out of the mast is to loop the excess shroud wire in front of the forward ama arm (as shown in the video). So when you lift the mast the you can lift while holding the side stays to start and then keep hold of the forestay with the lower hand.

Once the mast is upright in the mast step, look up to check the t-balls are properly located (with the tangs hanging down) before tensioning the forestay - if not, tie the forestay loosely and pull on the side stay to get it located properly. 

Q2 The wheels you want are made by Wheeleez and you want the 16.5” diameter wheel with 1” bore. Beware of cheaper wheels that are the same size but lack the stainless steel bearing of the Wheeleez products. The Weta is too heavy to roll easily on a wide plastic bearing.

You will need to replace the 1” stainless steel axle stubs with longer tube (the Wheeleez bearings are 7.8”wide) which are inserted into the aluminium axle held by two bolts. Around 15” tube will allow enough to be inserted in the axle, the wheel bearing and to drill a hole for the retaining pin/bolt.

Wheeleez supply 1” tube but you can also find it at steel suppliers.

They do make the trolley more bouyant but I’ve found the trick to get the boat off is to walk into the water so the boat is floating. Then lift the bow of the boat using the bowsprit and push it down quickly to get water onto the rubber of the trolley supports and break the seal with the hull so you can slide it off.

Q3 I wear a skiff wetsuit and wear nylon shorts over because they allow you to slide easily down the tramp and over the edge onto the ama - and they are cheaper to replace than the wetsuit.

I also wear neoprene dinghy boots which have very grippy rubber soles and help you to push yourself back out on the tramps using the gunwale.

If your water is warm enough, try reef shoes as a cheaper alternative.

Q.4 You need to get your weight onto the ama to counter the heel burying the ama and/or bear away when overpowered. Have a look at this video of mine (OK it was a very tight reach and I couldn’t bear away because of the location of the next mark).

https://youtu.be/9mmpDPExaWo

Q.5 Wear a cap with a retaining cord as the peak helps to deflect some of the spray.

Avoid sitting in the middle of the tramp if possible- sitting on the tramp edge or on the ama is better.

There are spray guards which fill the v between the bow and the inner and outer ama  arm.

guard-tight-front.jpg.79b43ac328b5d235f485318828e0d1cd.jpg

They are available from the UK or you can DIY. More info here http://wetaforum.com/forums/topic/spray-guards-2/

Paul

#1300

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On 11/26/2021 at 7:58 PM, Wetabehindtheears said:

It appears I need to get out on that alma! 
Much to learn but I will have fun in the interim.

Yes. For max speed and minimum spray, put your ass on the ama. Wearing the harness (highly recommended) will support your back while you are out there allowing you to hike for hours with minimum fatigue. Like this:

yysw271946.jpg

It's actually quite comfy. Some people put a rubber pad on the ama for extra comfort. Upwind your goal it to have the weather ama just above the water. The boat in the picture looks a little over powered, but as long as the leeward rack/trampoline isn't underwater all the time, you're ok. If you find you are having to constantly easy the main to keep the boat flat, add downhaul to twist off the top of the main. My personal rule-of-thumb is when the top of leeward ama is spending more time underwater than above, add downhaul.

Downwind in any real breeze you're going to get wet. Real wet. Be thankful you are in Florida :)

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2 hours ago, βhyde said:

Wearing the harness (highly recommended) will support your back while you are out there allowing you to hike for hours with minimum fatigue.

The harness is no longer available from Weta due to liability issues if someone became trapped in a capsize.

However, putting a hand hood on the side stay can help you to get back on the tramp.

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Fast is wet, I don't care what boat you are on!

It is a shame that the tether and harness are no longer supplied with the Weta. As bHyde pointed out, it really does make hiking with your butt on the ama very comfortable.  My tether and harness may have saved my life one time (see page 7).

Quote

Some people put a rubber pad on the ama for extra comfort.

Actually, the rubber pad or yoga mat gets wrapped around the fore and aft crossbar under the trampoline to provide some padding for your thigh, knee and calf, and for your butt if it isn't windy enough to get out on the ama but is windy enough to sit out to windward on the tramp.

 Also, as Pewit suggested, a T-handle on the stay, about 3' or 4' up from the ama, really makes getting back up on the tramp much easier.  I didn't need one until about 3 years ago, but I have to have it now.  This whole aging thing sure takes its toll.

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14 minutes ago, unShirley said:

Fast is wet, I don't care what boat you are on!

It is a shame that the tether and harness are no longer supplied with the Weta. As bHyde pointed out, it really does make hiking with your butt on the ama very comfortable.  My tether and harness may have saved my life one time (see page 7).

Actually, the rubber pad or yoga mat gets wrapped around the fore and aft crossbar under the trampoline to provide some padding for your thigh, knee and calf, and for your butt if it isn't windy enough to get out on the ama but is windy enough to sit out to windward on the tramp.

 Also, as Pewit suggested, a T-handle on the stay, about 3' or 4' up from the ama, really makes getting back up on the tramp much easier.  I didn't need one until about 3 years ago, but I have to have it now.  This whole aging thing sure takes its toll.

I got two sets of shrouds with the boat. The synthetic has a handle already. 
Of course this multihull thing is entirely new to me and the acceleration is something I’m not used to so I have work on a routine to get out after a tack or jibe. When I sailed on Friday I did underdress and after a hour I was starting to feel the affects of the cold water so not wanting to risk doing something stupid and ending up in the drink with no other boats in site, I sailed more conservatively.
The weather and wind look decent on Tuesday for some practice. I will dress appropriate and endeavor to get my but out. 

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7 hours ago, Pewit said:

The harness is no longer available from Weta due to liability issues if someone became trapped in a capsize.

However, putting a hand hood on the side stay can help you to get back on the tramp.

Yeah I know. I think that is a bad call on their part. Understandably the harness is kind of a double-edged sword. On one hand you could get trapped under the boat in a capsize and drown. On the other hand if you fall off the boat, you could find yourself in a very big ocean/bay watching your weta sail away, and then drown.

I think if racing, or in a very protected area, with plenty of other boats around to help should you become separated, wearing the harness is probably optional. If you are sailing solo in open water or large bays where swimming to shore is not possible or help is not immediately available, then wearing a harness is a pretty good idea. I'm not big fan of relying on other boats for help when you get in trouble.

Where @unShirley and I sail, getting separated from the boat is simply not an option. I've capsized the weta five times and never had a problem getting trapped under the trampolines, but to mitigate the possibility, I always carry a knife in my PFD should I need to cut the harness or anything hanging me up. Like @unShirley, I've had several situation where the harness probably saved my ass.

My money is always staying with the boat.

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I think the problem with the harness for Weta is the cost of liability insurance for the US market.

I have one and use it for sailing offshore solo or on long distance events.

But if I sailed offshore solo regularly, I’d get a PLB attached to the PFD for rescue. Much better to have a single button to push than trying to get a signal on a VHF radio while in the water.

You could DIY your own harness using a climbers chest harness (eg Black Diamond Vario) and and elasticated safety strap with quick release - although you might need to replace the snap hook on the inboard end with a soft shackle or lashing to adjust the length and  to keep the hook from damaging the deck or your feet.

Another tip is always put a foot under a toe strap after tacking/gybing so that if you do hit a wave or accelerate suddenly, you are still connected to the boat.

Theres a section in the new manual on what to wear but you soon realise the publicity shots of people sailing a Weta in shorts and T-shirts are just PR - unless it’s really hot with winds under 10 knots. You are very exposed on the Weta and if the wind is blowing 15 knots and you are moving upwind at 10, the apparent wind over the tramps will be around 18 knots, which is why you get chilled.

I have summer 2/3mm and winter 3/4mm skiff suits - mainly for warmth from the “fire hose” of spray but also to protect my legs from cuts and bruises and the sun - you can’t put sunscreen on your legs as it will soon turn the boat into an ice rink.

instead of padding the amas, I pad my butt with Zhik Deckbeater padded neoprene shorts. And also have foam padding under the tramp edge  (made from EVA foam interlocking floor tiles - cheaper and longer lasting than yoga mats in my experience).

I have various weights of rash vests and thermal tops and most importantly, over these, a Rooster Pro Light Aquafleece spray top which is the best spray top I’ve used - 100% waterproof, fleece lined, high lined neck, stretchy not baggy. Tip: Always take a spray top with you in a dry bag below deck.

Hope this helps 

Paul #1300

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I wear very similar gear as Paul, but, I think our water is a tad colder: 55-68 Fahrenheit .  Although, lately I have been wearing full foulies instead of the skiff suit during the Summer. Only on the hottest days can I get by with just board shorts and a splash top over a rash guard.

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5 hours ago, unShirley said:

I wear very similar gear as Paul, but, I think our water is a tad colder: 55-68 Fahrenheit .  Although, lately I have been wearing full foulies instead of the skiff suit during the Summer. Only on the hottest days can I get by with just board shorts and a splash top over a rash guard.

Yeah, I do about the same. The water temp here in SF is pretty much 54F +/- 3F most of the year. I just wear shorts with a Slam Long John over the top and a Gill long sleeve rash guard. Something like this:

image.png.5af5ae7e01171a42a920fd7778e32525.png

If the air temperature is below 50F, I usually go with a 3/4mm long sleeve top. Either way, I've come to the understanding that I'm just going to be cold and wet most of the time.  I've have a set of padded shorts like Paul uses, but they make my ass look huge, which violates the number one rule of sailing - Look Good.

image.png

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14 hours ago, Chidz said:

yeah, hang on Paul ... you are known as 'the sook' too ... the rest of us rarely have wetties on ...

Yes but *some* of you have extensive on board insulation permanently attached.

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Today I had a great practice day and I spent 4 hrs on the water. The winds were N to NE at 9knts gusting to 13knts. Wholly hell did I have fun when my boat took off like a rocket!  I wore my shorty wetsuit for the chilly water. Chose to rig the boat with the synthetic stays because they have the T-handle. 
 

There was almost a perfect windward/ leeward course using a Channel mark and a Air Force morning ball about a half mile down wind so I practiced going up to the windward mark then back downwind to the morning ball. My tacks and jibes seemed ok, most of the time, and I had to train myself to get out on the alma with mainsheet and/or the genniker sheet. I did with little to no issue, so that’s a good sign.

I still can’t seem to get a full main hoist even though the knot is locked into to retainer thing at the top of the mast, I almost bottomed out the Cunningham today flattening the main in the puffs. It was also hard to duck the main even thought I would ease some sheet during the tack. I suspect some of my issue with the main hoist is the bowline knot on the shackle headboard, it seems to be about an 1” and half long so next time I rig the boat I will make it smaller to see if that helps.

My only other issue is I didn’t seem to get the rig tension tight enough. The leeward Alma’s seemed to flex up and down in the waves and the leeward shroud would flop around a bit. I cranked on the forestay as hard as I could, then raised the genniker and tightened that pretty taught, then added more to the forestay. My stays are in the 5th hole up from the bottom. I’m wondering if I should go to the forth hole or will that give me too much mast rake?

Im really having fun with this boat so far and have no regrets purchasing it. The Weta is the right blend of performance that doesn’t require a ton of athleticism to get to go fast, which an old beat up chunky monkey like me needs. :D

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By all means, tighten the rig as much as possible. The Leeward Hull is going to have some play in it and the Leeward shroud be slack no matter how tight you get the rig. This is true on all trimarans that I have sailed on including F 27‘s and F 28s. In fact, it is probably true for most bendy stayed rigs regardless of how many hulls the boat has. So, don’t worry about it and don’t worry about the leeward hull having some play. Also, rake is good.  I don’t even use the adjuster on the stays, I shackle the stay directly to the AMA. If you zoom in on this photo you can see what I mean.

7AF682C5-DE26-4F2C-B717-0357F82C0A97.jpeg

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43 minutes ago, unShirley said:

By all means, tighten the rig as much as possible. The Leeward Hull is going to have some play in it and the Leeward shroud be slack no matter how tight you get the rig. This is true on all trimarans that I have sailed on including F 27‘s and F 28s. In fact, it is probably true for most bendy stayed rigs regardless of how many hulls the boat has. So, don’t worry about it and don’t worry about the leeward hull having some play. Also, rake is good.  I don’t even use the adjuster on the stays, I shackle the stay directly to the AMA. If you zoom in on this photo you can see what I mean.

7AF682C5-DE26-4F2C-B717-0357F82C0A97.jpeg

Interesting :)thanks for the pic. 
Today I had neutral helm upwind, but Lee helm downwind. Perhaps I had the perfect rake?

By the way the Lee helm downwind almost had me fending off a large steel barnacle encrusted morning ball. I said almost…

Much to learn with this contraption!

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2 hours ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

Today I had a great practice day and I spent 4 hrs on the water. The winds were N to NE at 9knts gusting to 13knts. Wholly hell did I have fun when my boat took off like a rocket!  I wore my shorty wetsuit for the chilly water. Chose to rig the boat with the synthetic stays because they have the T-handle. 
 

There was almost a perfect windward/ leeward course using a Channel mark and a Air Force morning ball about a half mile down wind so I practiced going up to the windward mark then back downwind to the morning ball. My tacks and jibes seemed ok, most of the time, and I had to train myself to get out on the alma with mainsheet and/or the genniker sheet. I did with little to no issue, so that’s a good sign.

I still can’t seem to get a full main hoist even though the knot is locked into to retainer thing at the top of the mast, I almost bottomed out the Cunningham today flattening the main in the puffs. It was also hard to duck the main even thought I would ease some sheet during the tack. I suspect some of my issue with the main hoist is the bowline knot on the shackle headboard, it seems to be about an 1” and half long so next time I rig the boat I will make it smaller to see if that helps.

My only other issue is I didn’t seem to get the rig tension tight enough. The leeward Alma’s seemed to flex up and down in the waves and the leeward shroud would flop around a bit. I cranked on the forestay as hard as I could, then raised the genniker and tightened that pretty taught, then added more to the forestay. My stays are in the 5th hole up from the bottom. I’m wondering if I should go to the forth hole or will that give me too much mast rake?

Im really having fun with this boat so far and have no regrets purchasing it. The Weta is the right blend of performance that doesn’t require a ton of athleticism to get to go fast, which an old beat up chunky monkey like me needs. :D

Sounds like a great day.

As @unShirleysaid the leeward shroud will always be a little slack going upwind. If you think about how the rig is attached to the boat, any amount of side force from the mainsail will cause the mast to move to leeward and slightly forward. Without mast spreaders and cap shrouds, like on most keel boats, maintaining tension on the leeward shroud is next to impossible. It's completely normal. In fact, you'll probably notice that the leeward ama is moving up and down in waves. Disturbing, but normal. The other thing you will notice is that the headstay will go slack when to are reaching. That too, is normal and a result of the simple rig.

The amount of helm you are seeing is also normal. Upwind the weta's helm is very neutral. Too neutral in my opinion. You can use any pin on your shrouds you like, but you'll see little difference. When we first started sailing the weta's back when Jesus walked among us, we actually removed the shroud adjusters and pinned the shroud directly to the ama chainplate to force some helm into the boat. That would be below the lowest point you have on your boat. It made no difference in the upwind helm or performance. When you look at the sail plan and daggerboard position of the weta, you'll quickly see that rake changes are not going to be a factor in helm feel.

Downwind also sound about right. You should be feeling a little bit of lee helm most of the time. The exception is if you are running very deep because it's blowing really hard and you're really scared. In that case you will have a very neutral helm. If you feel you are getting a little too much lee helm downwind, add some main to balance it out. This is standard procedure for most high-performance dinghies and skiffs and completely opposite of lumbering keel boats. The main should be eased a bit with the top telltales just flowing (like upwind). I think @Pewit mentioned that downwind the apparent wind should be about 90 degrees. This is gospel. When going downwind adjust your course to that angle and then trim your sails to balance the helm. Until the wind gets over 15kts this is where you will live 95% of the time.

Another thing you may want to do to "dial in" the boat and not have to question what you are doing, is to mark your main sheet. For the mainsheet, rig the boat and hoist all the sails, including the screacher. Tension the mainsheet until the tip of the mast starts to bend aft an inch or two. Mark your mainsheet there. I use a Sharpie and mark the line just in front of the mainsheet cleat. Believe it or not, 90% of the time your mainsheet will be at that mark +/- 6".

You also need to get full hoist on the main as you have already figured out. Your downhaul (it's not a cunningham, bad boy) won't do much good if it's bottoming out all the time.

BTW: where in FLA are you? I have family in the Tampa and Clearwater area.

 

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