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14 hours ago, RedTuna said:

The Ritchie XP-98W tactical compass is pretty good if you don't want a digital compass.  Has 45 degree lubber lines with floating numerals that help detect lifts and headers.  Inexpensive.  Mounted mine with 3m Dual Lock right behind the mast base; visible from anywhere on the Weta.

https://www.ritchienavigation.com/product/tactician-sailing-compass/

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/dual-lock-reclosable-fasteners-us/

The Speedpuck, if you can find one, is superior even when locked in racing mode.

Good compass, I had one on my Force 5. 
BTW the Weta I have sailed before was Dave Ks Pupzilla. He came to PC for vacation several years ago and we traded boats for a couple of days. I had a blast on it. 

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Hi guys,newbie here but a long time monohull sailor/ racer. I have been away from the sailing scene for a little while whilst I finished raising my boy and further advanced my career. I bore you with

I've sailed mine in big breeze / lumpy seas, and it never went over when flying the screecher. The big sail lifts the bows (and in absolutely insane conditions 25+) and miraculously the boat digs in -

New Weta model Chris Kitchen and his family came up with this new Weta model.  Brought a smile to my face.

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2 hours ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

Good compass, I had one on my Force 5. 
BTW the Weta I have sailed before was Dave Ks Pupzilla. He came to PC for vacation several years ago and we traded boats for a couple of days. I had a blast on it. 

DaveK is a great guy.  We got our Wetas at about the same time ten or eleven years ago.  We almost took a road trip together to Duck NC to pick up our boats, but Customs damaged the one intended for me pulling them out of the container.  Jon Britt at Nor'Banks had a red demo boat at KO Sailing in Houston, so I bought that one instead. 

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On 6/2/2021 at 10:52 PM, Raz'r said:

My dry spot at RYC next to the crazy man (2 14s and a moth) - grey cover. blue el toro sharing the spot. Don't grab the white one, but there's another in a bag.

Well I found the kite and set the boat up to take a look. I'll save everyone the gory details, the 29er kite's luff is about three feet too long. Using the existing screacher halyard sheave won't work, the kite luff would be insanely loose. However, a sheave at the masthead would work. The distance is about right. I was going to modify the mast on my boat with a new block at the masthead to check it out, but then I realized I had better things to do and went home. 

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15 minutes ago, bhyde said:

Well I found the kite and set the boat up to take a look. I'll save everyone the gory details, the 29er kite's luff is about three feet too long. Using the existing screacher halyard sheave won't work, the kite luff would be insanely loose. However, a sheave at the masthead would work. The distance is about right. I was going to modify the mast on my boat with a new block at the masthead to check it out, but then I realized I had better things to do and went home. 

Well, of course it has to be masthead. What were ya thinkin?  Running backs?

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1 minute ago, Raz'r said:

Well, of course it has to be masthead. What were ya thinkin?  Running backs?

Not sure what I was originally thinking, probably something stupid, but when I looked at the distance from the headstay partner to the masthead, I thought maybe this is a bad idea. In any breeze the mast is going to end up looking like a fishing pole. Not sure how much it could take without extra support.

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27 minutes ago, bhyde said:

Not sure what I was originally thinking, probably something stupid, but when I looked at the distance from the headstay partner to the masthead, I thought maybe this is a bad idea. In any breeze the mast is going to end up looking like a fishing pole. Not sure how much it could take without extra support.

Damn Weta designers definitely had some thoughts about how to not be crazy...

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8 hours ago, bhyde said:

Well I found the kite and set the boat up to take a look. I'll save everyone the gory details, the 29er kite's luff is about three feet too long. Using the existing screacher halyard sheave won't work, the kite luff would be insanely loose. However, a sheave at the masthead would work. The distance is about right. I was going to modify the mast on my boat with a new block at the masthead to check it out, but then I realized I had better things to do and went home. 

This explains why I’ve had difficulty keeping up with the 29er on downwind legs but they are a good sparring partner in mixed fleet racing as the Weta is as fast or faster upwind.

There is the optional 16.9SqM Weta Gennaker available but unless you’re on a long course or have a crew member it’s a PITA sailing solo as you have to drop it after furling.

Paul #1300

 

 

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24 minutes ago, Pewit said:

This explains why I’ve had difficulty keeping up with the 29er on downwind legs but they are a good sparring partner in mixed fleet racing as the Weta is as fast or faster upwind.

There is the optional 16.9SqM Weta Gennaker available but unless you’re on a long course or have a crew member it’s a PITA sailing solo as you have to drop it after furling.

Paul #1300

 

 

I dunno where you'd put it, but has anyone put a snuffer on a weta?

 

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52 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

I dunno where you'd put it, but has anyone put a snuffer on a weta?

 

Not that I’m aware of. But if you snuffed without furling or dropping the kite you’d end up with a big bag of laundry hanging on the bow which wouldn’t do much for wind flow. 

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16 hours ago, Pewit said:

This explains why I’ve had difficulty keeping up with the 29er on downwind legs but they are a good sparring partner in mixed fleet racing as the Weta is as fast or faster upwind.

There is the optional 16.9SqM Weta Gennaker available but unless you’re on a long course or have a crew member it’s a PITA sailing solo as you have to drop it after furling.

Paul #1300

 

 

Guys I had a 75% spinnaker made from the 29er molds, of which only the upper part was used and the lower part modified. VMG improved A LOT. I can now stay powered up down to 130 AWA in light winds and much deeper in higher winds. It furls almost perfectly with just a bit of bag at the top but still need removing some material from the top reinforcement. It stays UP all the time, I've tried it up to 20kt winds. You do have to tighten (for furling) and slack (to fly it) the halyard everytime, for which I installed a cleat at deck level.

This photo is the first time I installed the sail, after some use that bag at the top has almost dissapeared.

 

20201006_194834.jpg

weta spi.jpg

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I have the larger spinnaker that Weta offers. It's a bit of a one trick pony in my opinion, but it pulls deep. The problem is that as the sail shape deepens, it's hard to get it to furl properly. If you don't take it down it'll bag in the upper 1/3rd and in a good blow you will not overcome that additional windage with the main and jib. I've been there and I can tell you it's bad.

So the answer is a top down furler, if you want to single hand, but few such small boat units exist and even if you make one (I did) you have to install a torsion cable to transfer the movement from the furler to the top of the sail. This entails a lot of extra weight and stuff that small boat sailors really don't want to fuss with.

So you're back to snuffing the deeper cut headsails, but that's not always efficient for the single handed sailor.

There is something new, however, and it's going to revolutionize the use of deep cut headsails on sailboats, even small sailboats. No idea how long it'll take to trickle down, but this is a big, big deal -

 

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I always thought on the Weta it needed a F18 bag. 1 line up/down. Fuck that furling thing. Better kite shape.

 

But it's OD, so who cares? Dr Jekyll sails in a high-wind locale so he's got plenty of ponies from the standard kite.   

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The sail shape is in the sail, not the retrieval or deployment system. But I'm with you on the snuffer allowing a deeper cut headsail. But the furler is FAST. And single handed it's the best means of getting the headsail in neatly. No muss no fuss. Quick to set up. But the IFS system by 1Sails is going to top anything else out there. It's a game changer for everybody. Any bottom-up furler will work. Neat tidy, no need to take the sail down. No bags, no sags, no luff wires or ropes, no torsion cables, one handed operation. Any sail, any condition.

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In a mixed fleet having a kite that allows sailing deeper and faster downwind would be a game changer, particularly for those of us who sail 2 up. The trade-off would be tight reaching on triangle courses, but it's a worthwhile trade-off, in my opinion. We might even get to race to our yardstick competitively.

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6 hours ago, sail(plane) said:

Guys I had a 75% spinnaker made from the 29er molds, of which only the upper part was used and the lower part modified.

Is the outline shape the same as a Weta standard kite (with a larger luff round) or is it larger in area as well?

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15 minutes ago, Go Bananas! said:

In a mixed fleet having a kite that allows sailing deeper and faster downwind would be a game changer, particularly for those of us who sail 2 up. The trade-off would be tight reaching on triangle courses, but it's a worthwhile trade-off, in my opinion. We might even get to race to our yardstick competitively.

Exactly. Regarding the outline question, yes it is the same. More area comes from the curved luff and depth. Of course it is sheeted outboard, from the tramp aft corner. Had to add a couple of tweakers to prevent the sheet rubbing the shrouds.

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1 hour ago, Go Bananas! said:

In a mixed fleet having a kite that allows sailing deeper and faster downwind would be a game changer, particularly for those of us who sail 2 up. The trade-off would be tight reaching on triangle courses, but it's a worthwhile trade-off, in my opinion. We might even get to race to our yardstick competitively.

Geoff Waldon has one of the Weta 16.9 kites which I’m sure you could borrow to try it out. He finds it too much effort sailing solo but it might work for you two-up.

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The larger Weta headsail is 12.9 square meters, not 16.9. Unless they've come up with a 3rd one that I was unaware of.

It is possible that the 16.9 is some sort of aftermarket headsail.

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1 hour ago, Tom Kirkman said:

The larger Weta headsail is 12.9 square meters, not 16.9. Unless they've come up with a 3rd one that I was unaware of.

It is possible that the 16.9 is some sort of aftermarket headsail.

Oops my mistake. You are correct and I should have checked.

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Snuffers on small boats make a lot of sense unless single handing.  Snuffing takes practice both boat driving and retrieval speed/wind direction--and something goes wrong often and shrimp.  Furling top down takes longer than furling from the bottom up (have to build torque to move top swivel), but you can furl top down with a fatter spinnaker.  Furling bottom up usually requires a skinny spinnaker and an internal luff torque rope.  Those torque ropes are often poor at transmitting torque up the rope to the top swivel--the fatter the torque rope, the better it does, but that's also makes the sail entry not as nice as we'd like.  I currently have been using an external torque rope on a fat spinnaker (82% SMG) but furl bottom up.  Spin entry is perfect, and the torque rope hanging down provides some windage, but in the belly, not entry (like top down furling). The package, however, is not something you want to leave up when not in use, just too much windage.  The advantage, however, is it is cheap and works very well even for single handing.  

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8 hours ago, MultiThom said:

 Spin entry is perfect, and the torque rope hanging down provides some windage, but in the belly, not entry (like top down furling).

Sorry, meant (like bottom up furling with torque rope built into spin luff).  

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^^^

I recognize it, bhyde.  It was in the same container as our first Wetas.  I enjoyed that day we spent unpacking that container and going on the first sail of my new Weta.  A fond memory.

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5 hours ago, unShirley said:

^^^

I recognize it, bhyde.  It was in the same container as our first Wetas.  I enjoyed that day we spent unpacking that container and going on the first sail of my new Weta.  A fond memory.

That was what? 12 - 13 years ago? Seems like yesterday. Still sail the shit out of my Weta. Spent 6 hours yesterday knocking about the bay in perfectly flat water and a warm, steady breeze.

The green boat is in there somewhere.

DSC01482.JPG

BTW: Is that your Weta in the SA classified?

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No.  That is Gordon Lyon's old boat.  A friend of mine bought it several weeks ago.  But, his circumstances have taken a sudden turn and now he is selling it.

I have Davo's old boat, #1025 which I bought 2 years ago.  I , too, have been sailing the shit out of it.  Did some practicing yesterday for Frenchy's Rum Run this Saturday.  Out to Anacapa and back, about 30 miles total.  We are going to have 5 Wetas, you should come on down and join the fun.

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4 hours ago, unShirley said:

No.  That is Gordon Lyon's old boat.  A friend of mine bought it several weeks ago.  But, his circumstances have taken a sudden turn and now he is selling it.

I have Davo's old boat, #1025 which I bought 2 years ago.  I , too, have been sailing the shit out of it.  Did some practicing yesterday for Frenchy's Rum Run this Saturday.  Out to Anacapa and back, about 30 miles total.  We are going to have 5 Wetas, you should come on down and join the fun.

Mother-in-Law is visiting. I'm not going anywhere:D

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  • 2 weeks later...
56 minutes ago, thethickofit said:

For those that have modified the tiller by extending it and adding aross mainsheet bridle with traveller does anybody have pictures of their setup?  Thanks

should read cross not aross but i cannot edit my own post!!

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9 hours ago, thethickofit said:

For those that have modified the tiller by extending it and adding aross mainsheet bridle with traveller does anybody have pictures of their setup?  Thanks

I now use the twin tillers but was one of the first (I think) to develop a bridle which the Aussie team used at the World Masters Games although Martin Cross developed the yacht-style version.
Pic shows my original version which involves tying the tails of the bridle to the Dyneema  loop under the mainsheet block either side with a bowline, but it was difficult to get the line in the same place each time. You'll need around 4m of 4 or 5mm rope - any thinner and it won't hold in the cleat.
However, Weta now use a version of the block with a pivoting spigot under at the base to which a (rather small and weak) shackle is attached. So I removed the shackle and lashed a large Ronstan shock to the block with Dyneema.
For the World Masters, Martin developed a yacht-style traveller which allowed you to adjust the position of the traveller block on the bridle. I used a bridle line fixed across the tiller with the Shock threaded through it and used the line tied to the Shock above to control the position of the Shock on the bridle. This setup was disallowed after the WMG but your rules may vary. More in the WMG mods here.
My final class legal non-adjustable solution was to create a small loop in the centre of the traveller bridle and pass the loop through the the Shock. Then pass the tails of the rope through the loop, take one of the tails around the ama arm twice starting under from the stern side and then through the trolley cleat on the same side (you may need to reverse the cleats depending on your setup). Once you have tightened it so the tiller just passes under, mark where it exists the cleats either side.
The advantage of this setup is it's easy to tie and untie on the water (especially if you've made a mistake) and to adjust the tension on the bridle as you use the same marks in the cleats each time.
I should add that I used 33cm of carbon tube (bought online in 1m length) slid over the tiller so the tiller was extended around 15cm and then attached the tiller extension to the tube using the original universal joint. You could try experimenting with a broom handle or dowling inserted in the tiller to get the length right.
Hope this helps
Paul (#1300), Sydney

traveller.jpg

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Sadly, the world map isn't very up to date. Not Weta's fault as I suspect most Weta owners haven't bothered sending their information in. There's an easy 20+ of these things here in NC, USA, and the world map shows only 3. I'd think the rest of the map is similarly outdated.

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On 6/28/2021 at 6:05 PM, Pewit said:

I now use the twin tillers but was one of the first (I think) to develop a bridle which the Aussie team used at the World Masters Games although Martin Cross developed the yacht-style version.
Pic shows my original version which involves tying the tails of the bridle to the Dyneema  loop under the mainsheet block either side with a bowline, but it was difficult to get the line in the same place each time. You'll need around 4m of 4 or 5mm rope - any thinner and it won't hold in the cleat.
However, Weta now use a version of the block with a pivoting spigot under at the base to which a (rather small and weak) shackle is attached. So I removed the shackle and lashed a large Ronstan shock to the block with Dyneema.
For the World Masters, Martin developed a yacht-style traveller which allowed you to adjust the position of the traveller block on the bridle. I used a bridle line fixed across the tiller with the Shock threaded through it and used the line tied to the Shock above to control the position of the Shock on the bridle. This setup was disallowed after the WMG but your rules may vary. More in the WMG mods here.
My final class legal non-adjustable solution was to create a small loop in the centre of the traveller bridle and pass the loop through the the Shock. Then pass the tails of the rope through the loop, take one of the tails around the ama arm twice starting under from the stern side and then through the trolley cleat on the same side (you may need to reverse the cleats depending on your setup). Once you have tightened it so the tiller just passes under, mark where it exists the cleats either side.
The advantage of this setup is it's easy to tie and untie on the water (especially if you've made a mistake) and to adjust the tension on the bridle as you use the same marks in the cleats each time.
I should add that I used 33cm of carbon tube (bought online in 1m length) slid over the tiller so the tiller was extended around 15cm and then attached the tiller extension to the tube using the original universal joint. You could try experimenting with a broom handle or dowling inserted in the tiller to get the length right.
Hope this helps
Paul (#1300), Sydney

traveller.jpg

Thanks for the info I will share my progress towards this setup.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well I got some disappointing news the other day.  The shipments of new Wetas from Indonesia will be delayed until mid or end of September. Looks like I won’t be doing the NAs in Muskegon. 
 

In the mean time I will keep watching and sailing Wetas vicariously through YouTube videos. :(

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/29/2021 at 4:33 PM, Tom Kirkman said:

Sadly, the world map isn't very up to date. Not Weta's fault as I suspect most Weta owners haven't bothered sending their information in. There's an easy 20+ of these things here in NC, USA, and the world map shows only 3. I'd think the rest of the map is similarly outdated.

Good news. There is a new dot on the map. #517 in Hamilton ON. All it needs is a little scrubbing before it hits the water. 

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3 minutes ago, RedTuna said:

@Wetabehindtheears I understand you're disappointed that new Wetas won't be arriving when you'd like, but is that any reason to downvote news of @bourdidn's good fortune?  Sheesh.  Hoping it's just that you're new and fucked up the like.

I am jealous! <_< Kidding!
 

Actually I didn’t know you could down vote. Sorry, can I remove it ?

Ok just figured out how to remove it.

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4 minutes ago, RedTuna said:

Looks like you figured it out. 

No need to be jealous.  Any reason why you don't want one of the used boats that are available?

Yes, when I decided to get back into sailing and the Weta was my boat of choice there were no preowned ones that I could find anywhere. Of course the minute I put a deposit on one, two became available. Just my luck.

On the other hand I get the color of my choice and I get to be the first person to scratch it. :D

I am eagerly awaiting my boat. Having been a monohull sailor all my life I am looking forward to the multihull thing. I know when it comes to racing there is a huge difference in the way sail a tri vs a monohull. Hopefully I will break old habits and learn some new tricks. If I enjoy it well enough I will move up to a bigger trimaran. 

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10 hours ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

Yes, when I decided to get back into sailing and the Weta was my boat of choice there were no preowned ones that I could find anywhere. Of course the minute I put a deposit on one, two became available. Just my luck.

On the other hand I get the color of my choice and I get to be the first person to scratch it. :D

I am eagerly awaiting my boat. Having been a monohull sailor all my life I am looking forward to the multihull thing. I know when it comes to racing there is a huge difference in the way sail a tri vs a monohull. Hopefully I will break old habits and learn some new tricks. If I enjoy it well enough I will move up to a bigger trimaran. 

Took me a week to get my first scratch and another week to get over it. They are rather wide!

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My usual trick is pickle forking a moored boat of which there are many near my sailing club. My golden rule is NEVER put your head in the boat unless you’re hove too in clear water. Oh and fit the carbon ama protectors - you’ll need them.

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I forgot how to winter!

 

Seriously, after 20 years in Louisiana, I have lost all common sense about snow and ice.

My weta will have to spend the Ontario winter outside. I remember reading stories of water freezing in the wing wells of hobie 17 and 21, causing major damage. I assume that I will need to do something to prevent the same from happening. I will also need to keep the snow cover under control to avoid damage to the hulls. How do the Northerners deal with wintering their wetas?

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3 hours ago, bourdidn said:

I forgot how to winter!

 

Seriously, after 20 years in Louisiana, I have lost all common sense about snow and ice.

My weta will have to spend the Ontario winter outside. I remember reading stories of water freezing in the wing wells of hobie 17 and 21, causing major damage. I assume that I will need to do something to prevent the same from happening. I will also need to keep the snow cover under control to avoid damage to the hulls. How do the Northerners deal with wintering their wetas?

They winterize them by moving to Florida or Texas. :P

Speaking of that, because of delay after delay of shipping my Weta it looks like it may be winter before I get mine. Anyone have a link to someone who makes removable ice boat skids so I can practice sailing this winter?

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2 hours ago, Wetabehindtheears said:

They winterize them by moving to Florida or Texas. :P

Speaking of that, because of delay after delay of shipping my Weta it looks like it may be winter before I get mine. Anyone have a link to someone who makes removable ice boat skids so I can practice sailing this winter?

You may be onto something here… 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think that something is wrong with my rudder lockdown rod: from the manual pictures, it looks like the stainless steel fitting on the blade side is supposed to be bent along a vertical plane. Mine is bent sideways. I tried to heat it up with a  heat gun to see if I could soften the glue between the fiberglass rod and stainless steel fitting, but got nowhere.

The problem is that with the rudder down, the fitting pushes against the head and has damaged it already.

Does anybody else have this problem? Any suggestion on how to disassemble the rod non-destructively?

Untitled.png

Untitled 3.png

Untitled.png

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Loosen the nut and simply turn it so that you the bend is on top. If the bend is not in line with the rod locking pin, then it may be glued on incorrectly. Try sitting the hardware end in a pan of boiling water for a few minutes. That may be enough heat to break the bond without damaging the rod itself.

To adjust, do this:

 

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6 minutes ago, Tom Kirkman said:

Loosen the nut and simply turn it so that you the bend is on top. If the bend is not in line with the rod locking pin, then it may be glued on incorrectly. Try sitting the hardware end in a pan of boiling water for a few minutes. That may be enough heat to break the bond without damaging the rod itself.

that is the problem. The rod had been glued incorrectly. I will try the boiling water trick.

 

 

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To avoid damaging the stock, dispense with the lockdown rod system and use the Bungee Auto Kickup system instead. No damage when you hit something and it allows you to keep on sailing after an impact - instead of having to try to lockdown the rod and keep steering at the same time.

Remove the rod mechanism entirely. Wrap thick (8mm) bungee cord three times tightly around the stock and blade between the gudgeons. Slide the bungee to the top gudgeon to raise the rudder when it pulls against the "horn" on top of the rudder blade. Slide it to the bottom gudgeon after launching to keep the foil down.

If you need to sail in shallow water with the rudder part down, or pull the rudder up from the cockpit there are mods for that too http://wetaforum.com/forums/topic/bungee-rudder-kickup-system/ 

bungee1.jpg

bungee2.jpg

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9 hours ago, Pewit said:

To avoid damaging the stock, dispense with the lockdown rod system and use the Bungee Auto Kickup system instead. No damage when you hit something and it allows you to keep on sailing after an impact - instead of having to try to lockdown the rod and keep steering at the same time.

Remove the rod mechanism entirely. Wrap thick (8mm) bungee cord three times tightly around the stock and blade between the gudgeons. Slide the bungee to the top gudgeon to raise the rudder when it pulls against the "horn" on top of the rudder blade. Slide it to the bottom gudgeon after launching to keep the foil down.

If you need to sail in shallow water with the rudder part down, or pull the rudder up from the cockpit there are mods for that too http://wetaforum.com/forums/topic/bungee-rudder-kickup-system/ 

 

Thanks, I’ll try. 
i would still prefer fixing my rod, though. I tried boiling water and it didn’t bulge. Fiberglass solid rods don’t like torsional loads, so I am wary of twisting it too hard. 
It looks like spare parts are a bit hard to get right now, so I am looking at re-lacing the fiberglass component only. It’s going to be a pain…

 

any source for a 16” piece of 3/8” rod in Southern Ontario?

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I gave up on the rod after sailing through a school of big jellyfish going downwind at speed - trying to steer and put the rod down for the fifth time was no fun.

Bungee system just gives a thunk if you hit something and you can carry on sailing.

9 minutes ago, bourdidn said:

any source for a 16” piece of 3/8” rod in Southern Ontario?

Try these links
https://www.kiteguys.ca/gwk-fiberglass-round-rod-assorted-sizes/
https://www.thomasnet.com/ontario/fiberglass-reinforced-plastic-frp-rods-68700608-1.html
http://www.mapleleafcom.com/fiberglass_products.shtml
https://www.grainger.ca/en/category/Fiberglass-Rod-Stock/Fiberglass/c/21123
https://www.rayplex.ca/pultursions.html

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On 8/22/2021 at 9:18 AM, Pewit said:

I gave up on the rod after sailing through a school of big jellyfish going downwind at speed - trying to steer and put the rod down for the fifth time was no fun.

Bungee system just gives a thunk if you hit something and you can carry on sailing.

Try these links
https://www.kiteguys.ca/gwk-fiberglass-round-rod-assorted-sizes/
https://www.thomasnet.com/ontario/fiberglass-reinforced-plastic-frp-rods-68700608-1.html
http://www.mapleleafcom.com/fiberglass_products.shtml
https://www.grainger.ca/en/category/Fiberglass-Rod-Stock/Fiberglass/c/21123
https://www.rayplex.ca/pultursions.html

It turned out that a local sail loft has some in stock. I should have started there.

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2 hours ago, bourdidn said:

It turned out that a local sail loft has some in stock. I should have started there.

Standard rod is a PITA. We've broken or bent 3 (about one per year?). So we are back to the bungee cord. Less elegant but more practical. 

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I can't figure out how people manage to break them, other than not having them adjusted property. Mine is 10 years old and has about 4000 hours on it now. I've hit numerous things, hard, and it always pops up, ready to go again. There has got to be tension on the rod when its inserted and locked down. It should show a slight upward bend when locked down. If not, it will indeed break if you hit something.

 

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4 hours ago, Tom Kirkman said:

I can't figure out how people manage to break them, other than not having them adjusted property. Mine is 10 years old and has about 4000 hours on it now. I've hit numerous things, hard, and it always pops up, ready to go again. There has got to be tension on the rod when its inserted and locked down. It should show a slight upward bend when locked down. If not, it will indeed break if you hit something.

 

Ours seems to have too much tension if anything. Fully screwed in, it's a battle to get the pin in. Ends up slightly bowed. Maybe I shouldn't insert it fully?

In any case I share the boat with 2 others. I don't think it ever broke on me. I seem to recall that one or two of the breakages were due to the rod being disengaged, rudder half down, rod dangling down, and then something turned the rudder blade. The rod then gets either wrapped up with line or against the cockpit side, vs the tiller, and snaps.

Does this make sense? I've made a short retainer line to keep it from dangling too low.

 

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If there is enough tension the lock rod will require that you bend it a little to get it to lock down. There should be a slight upward bend when it's property tensioned.

I've not heard of one breaking due to side loads on the rudder but if the rod isn't down I suppose that it could get tangled up like you mentioned and break that way

What I do know is that it seems that Weta owners either never have a problem with the rod, or break them constantly. Of the 5 local owners here, 4 of us have never broken one. But the other guy broke 3 or 4 in short order. So it's not a random thing.

Weta does offer a softer plastic rod that will take a lot more abuse but it's not quite as positive in how it locks down, but this might be an option for you to talk over with your dealer. In the meantime the bungee idea seems to work well for many people.

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For my two shillings worth, it's not that the rod system doesn't work, it's more a racing issue. If you sail in a location where there are lots of jellies and the rudder pops up, there's 10 or 15 valuable seconds (or more) wasted in trying to get it sorted and multiply that by 5 or 6 times a race. Paul's bungee system has been adopted by most of us on the east coast of Oz for that reason. Also, when the blade comes up there are large lateral forces put on the system which can result in blade cracking or failure. With the bungee, it pops up and then straight down again. Much more forgiving than the rod contraption.

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13 hours ago, Tom Kirkman said:

For that type use in your type waters, I would agree.

 

Exactly. I sail in shallow waters with no jellyfish. When I hit the sandbank, I need the rudder to pop up and stay up, not try to dig a rut in the sand.

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  • 2 weeks later...
3 hours ago, Roller Skates said:

Just dropping by to say I finally tried one. Thought you all were crazy. You still are, but great little boat. Grinning the whole way. Did 16 NM in 10-12 knts and loved every minute of it.

What do you normally sail?

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17 hours ago, Roller Skates said:

Just dropping by to say I finally tried one. Thought you all were crazy. You still are, but great little boat. Grinning the whole way. Did 16 NM in 10-12 knts and loved every minute of it.

Welcome to Weta World.  Grinning in 10 -12 knots is common around here.  Giggling and laughing out lout in 15 - 18 knots is too!

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On 9/4/2021 at 8:44 PM, Pewit said:

What do you normally sail?

J22, Laser, Windfoil, wingfoil.

Just had one donated to our sailing center and had to take it for an assessment. Trying to decide how it'll fair when kids are put in charge. :P Had a little moment when I saw filling the outrigger with water was standard righting protocol. That said, seems like its fairly tough to tip unless you're hauling with the screecher and go for a pitchpole. I didn't go over and I sure deserved to.
 

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2 hours ago, Roller Skates said:

That said, seems like its fairly tough to tip unless you're hauling with the screecher and go for a pitchpole. I didn't go over and I sure deserved to.

IMO your assessment is very accurate 

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3 hours ago, Roller Skates said:

J22, Laser, Windfoil, wingfoil.

Just had one donated to our sailing center and had to take it for an assessment. Trying to decide how it'll fair when kids are put in charge. :P Had a little moment when I saw filling the outrigger with water was standard righting protocol. That said, seems like its fairly tough to tip unless you're hauling with the screecher and go for a pitchpole. I didn't go over and I sure deserved to.
 

Where is the sailing center?

Yes they are very forgiving and hard to capsize even in strong winds. But you can still get caught out in gusty conditions- righting is easy solo without assistance - see the video here https://www.wetamarine.com/owners-locker/video/locker/30

If it’s an older boat it probably comes with the 8.3SqM Pinhead mainsail. The 9.3SqM Square Top main is available for higher performance and there’s a small 6.5SqM main for training or high winds.

There’s also a furling jib available for quickly reducing sail or you can just remove the jib entirely and sail on main alone for the kids.

Also there’s a self tacking jib kit available which can be retrofitted to existing boats and, when combined with the twin tiller kit, frees up your hands when tacking and gybing solo.

Be aware the boat is wide which can present problems around other boats (keep your head out of the boat until your in clear water) and on the start line if racing (Tip: Start late at the boat end so you don’t get caught up with other boats and can start at speed or tack away for clear air) .  You can get carbon bow protectors for the floats and main hull from Weta dealers which protects from impacts.

Hope this helps 

Paul #1300

Wetaforum.com - Everything you need to know in one place

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4 hours ago, unShirley said:

IMO your assessment is very accurate 

You just have to try a little harder.

BTW: Took your tri-curious buddy out for a demo sail last week. Once you have multi, you don't go back.

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22 hours ago, Roller Skates said:

J22, Laser, Windfoil, wingfoil.

Just had one donated to our sailing center and had to take it for an assessment. Trying to decide how it'll fair when kids are put in charge. :P Had a little moment when I saw filling the outrigger with water was standard righting protocol. That said, seems like its fairly tough to tip unless you're hauling with the screecher and go for a pitchpole. I didn't go over and I sure deserved to.
 

We sail ours real hard, and never ever capsized it. I sometimes put my kids on it (11 and 3), and let them sail on their own in mild conditions. 

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On 9/7/2021 at 10:44 AM, martin &#x27;hoff said:

We sail ours real hard, and never ever capsized it. I sometimes put my kids on it (11 and 3), and let them sail on their own in mild conditions. 

I've sailed mine in big breeze / lumpy seas, and it never went over when flying the screecher. The big sail lifts the bows (and in absolutely insane conditions 25+) and miraculously the boat digs in - plenty solid water across the decks - but it unburies itself and just keeps it going. However, one day I chickened out and followed the 'safety instructions', furled the screecher and sailed dead down with main and jib only. Big mistake. Bow buried, stopped the boat, gust caught the main - pinned it to the shrouds, and over she went. A relatively slow speed pitchpole in massive conditions.

Given my previous experience in dumping multi's was catamarans only, I was pretty concerned. however, the Weta is a much safer platform than a catamaran. The boat went completely turtle, yet you get so stand there high and dry on the upside down tramp in the lee of the main hull quite comfy and protected. Next, uncork the downhill float then work it a bit to get the air out. Finally the hull begins to slowly rotate up (the rig rotating down in the brine). On a cat when the boat comes up its high drama and you better get on quick, but in the Weta it was absolutely no drama as it all happens in slow motion and you simply step into the now dry main hull, from your perch on the submerged tramp. Also, the windward float is flooded so taking off (like a cat might) just doesn't happen.

Sheet in, get some speed, the windward float lifts and drains itself. They say you don't need to rush recapping the windward float and I can report this is true. Anyhow, hats off to the designers of this machine - what an incredible boat. lastly, moral of the story: speed and screecher are your friends in wild conditions. It kind of like many other sports - skiing comes to mind - try to slow down and take it easy is when the painful crashes happen..

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am still trying to figure out how to winterize my weta. It is going to be stored outside in my driveway. Any suggestion on how to prevent water from entering the beam and sprit holes and freeze? It is going to be under a cover, but I worry that condensation alone may be enough to bring water over time.

 

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9 minutes ago, bourdidn said:

I am still trying to figure out how to winterize my weta. It is going to be stored outside in my driveway. Any suggestion on how to prevent water from entering the beam and sprit holes and freeze? It is going to be under a cover, but I worry that condensation alone may be enough to bring water over time.

 

upside down?

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38 minutes ago, bourdidn said:

I thought about it. Shall I worry about water pooling in the gunwale and freezing?

We stored our Hobie Holder 12 (like a shorter laser) upside down in Northern Mn winters. No issue with ice in the gunwales as the water froze "up" and didn't seem to impact the gunwales at all. YMMV

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46 minutes ago, Raz&#x27;r said:

We stored our Hobie Holder 12 (like a shorter laser) upside down in Northern Mn winters. No issue with ice in the gunwales as the water froze "up" and didn't seem to impact the gunwales at all. YMMV

Thanks. I will work on adapting the dolly to upside down storage, then

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@bourdidn Maybe you could just plug the holes with some foam, and then throw the cover over it. A little water in the ama holes and bowsprit hole that freezes won't be a problem. As long as the entire cavity is not filled, you shouldn't have problems with cracking.

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7 hours ago, bourdidn said:

I am still trying to figure out how to winterize my weta. It is going to be stored outside in my driveway. Any suggestion on how to prevent water from entering the beam and sprit holes and freeze? It is going to be under a cover, but I worry that condensation alone may be enough to bring water over time.

 

You could try inserting solid foam pool noodles to keep the water out 

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