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You folks must be fortunate to sail in places with steady windspeed with no gusts or lulls and no wind shifts and no current and very little traffic.   If you are looking at instruments where I sail,

Look at the most popular and best selling multi-hull sailboats of all time - none are over 18 feet in length. Boats that can be set up by one person, in less than about 30 minutes, and sell for less t

Top down will take longer (S'OK, though, you aren't racing) but will still need to have the halyard loosened some after furling before heading back upwind to keep the forestay loaded.  Be sure to clea

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Flying the main hull with a main hull rudder system is not safe sailing. It's called out of control and actually quite frightening at speed. Remember this boat is being marketed as a family day sailing craft. ------ The more I see of this boat and all the issues its had the more I respect the Motive 25 guys for pulling the plug on their craft. -- No Limits (using sane reasoning).

 

 

So are you saying almost every production Tri out there is dangerous and out of control as they almost all have a central rudder ?

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Flying the main hull with a main hull rudder system is not safe sailing. It's called out of control and actually quite frightening at speed. Remember this boat is being marketed as a family day sailing craft. ------ The more I see of this boat and all the issues its had the more I respect the Motive 25 guys for pulling the plug on their craft. -- No Limits (using sane reasoning).

 

It does look risky, and one would not want any kids on board. But it was floating low at Annapolis, and will no doubt need a big rig to get it going. However, is it going to be insurable with that power, or will insurance last?

 

 

I have bought my Pulse 600 primarily as a family boat. The reason I bought it was that it was small enough to single hand, which means the kids and wife can sit and enjoy the ride, but also, simple enough that they can get involved even at the age of 6 & 7 years old. There is no winches and only three sails, all on furlers. In light to moderate winds the kids can get involved and I bet they will have a lot of fun.

 

Everything in life is risky but to say the Pulse 600 is not a boat for kids is a complete joke. In fact in my opinion this is very much an ideal boat for kids and the family.

 

If it gets a bit windy:

1) Reef

2) Furl the jib and sail main sail only.

3) Furl the main sail and return home under motor.

 

There is very few beach cats that can do that (i.e. reef or motor) and bigger boats have higher sheet loads and need winches.

 

As for sailing on one hull, the pictures were clearly a stunt. Sailing like that would be slow as the floats would be pressed down due to the heel of the vessel and therefore subject to far greater drag than if less heeled. If racing, the best idea is to hike just enough and get the main hull skimming. Rudder still well in the water and mast is more vertical. If you really want to sail on one hull buy a cat and save weight, especially for this size boat.

 

As for insurance, I got this without any questions. I have a clean record and the price is pretty competitive. If I capsize the boat, I have a fairly big deductible, but it was probably my fault anyway.

 

 

This may sound kinda odd - but I've found that I can actually sail quite well in my similarly sized trimaran with just the small jib sail. I would not have thought it would work well, but it is surprisingly balanced under a small jib alone on most points of sail. I was out in winds into the 30's a couple months ago and my main sail failed at the reef point and ripped in half. So I just dropped the rest of the main. to get back to the marina required a close reach to clear a rock outcrop and then mostly a downwind run back. I was able to sail much closer to the wind than I ever would have thought. Something I don't think I ever would have even contemplated on a mono and never really had an option to reef on a beach cat. I actually thought as we were heading around the rocks, that on my last keel boat it would have taken one tack upwind to clear the same spot due to how I'd need to be reefed so small to keep from getting knocked down in the gusts, where I could maintain 5-7kts boat speed with just the jib sail and make pretty good VMG considering the conditions in the trimaran.

 

I also agree that it's a perfect family boat. Even in high winds the beam of the trimaran makes it feel a lot safer. And there's no reason you can't have smaller sails for taking the kids out. You can find cheap 2nd hand beach cat sails on ebay that would be perfect for teaching kids to sail with less power available. Since these boats are so easily driven, it'll still perform pretty well with less sail area. For example you can buy hobie wave aftermarket sails new for $300. They're probably 50% of the sail area, loose foot, and if the traveler is close enough to the right location they'd be about ideal for a younger kid to sail with. It would be almost impossible to capsize, and probably still move pretty well.

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None of the performance details matter. Its just too much money for the intended niche. Not enough buyers at that price - end of story.

 

Unfortunately, I totally agree with that assessment as I am in that situation.

 

Cheers,

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Flying the main hull with a main hull rudder system is not safe sailing. It's called out of control and actually quite frightening at speed. Remember this boat is being marketed as a family day sailing craft. ------ The more I see of this boat and all the issues its had the more I respect the Motive 25 guys for pulling the plug on their craft. -- No Limits (using sane reasoning).

 

 

So are you saying almost every production Tri out there is dangerous and out of control as they almost all have a central rudder ?

 

 

 

Most Tris with central rudders won't fly the center hull. It would seem, I think, to be part of the design consideration.

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I would imagine you would not fly that high often, best to keep the centre hull skimming. Looks like the crew are trying hard to lift the hull for the photo..... They aren't exactly hiking out.

Mmmm I have never yet seen any piccies or film of small tris with crew out on the Ama's in rough weather, I am not sure why but I think it maybe a safety / self preservation visual thing, yes on bigger tri's it's the norm but on the smaller tri's I'm not so sure we'll see it quite so much. Certainly when playing around designing the TC601 it was something that was discussed and we eventually went down the route of just accepting that most people will stay inboard and we widened the main hull to compensate.

 

You can expect to see some hull flying and some hiking when I get my hands on one in late January....... Perhaps even some video ;

Now you have B)

post-35821-0-02102100-1448318758_thumb.jpg

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BTW: All this talk about flying the main hull or skimming it etc. Unless a trimaran has been specifically designed to sail on one hull, like BORzilla or Happylocalypse or a Cart 26 or 30, the fastest way to sail a trimaran is as flat as possible. Let the main hull take all the weight and have the amas only skim. That is how to optimize your speed.

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unShirley, Great shot of the WETA ( an old one at that ) in action. One tough little TRI ! I wouldn't be out but the boat can clearly take it. Plenty of thrills for 1/3 the cost of a Pulse ( new v.s. new ). Maybe predictions of high cost dooming the Pulse are to be considered.

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I had been waiting for a Weta photograph to appear showing someone on the Ama's. The Weta's handicap rating would sort of say it needs to be sailed in a blow to get it up and going and I would guess you would have to sail in a blow to be able to get out there :unsure: , now if Weta came out with a 16fter with a proper F16 style sail area and decent higher bouyancy hulls, which Chris ( one of the owners ) has discussed openly about to me, then I might just consider giving one a go :mellow: Now a 20 foot Weta that would be really cool, oh thats the Tim Clissold designed TC601 :)

 

We are talking about two quite different boats here, one is a 14ft racing dinghy with training wheels and the other a small Tri capable of coastal racing. So come on guys out there, lets have a few photographs of you sitting out regularly in rough windy conditions, on the edge of the floats. My guess is that once sailors get used to the power of these little hotrods they will eventually learn about needing to be out on the Amas and once you have done it a few times then you get more confident and it becomes the norm. Certainly right at the start in the F16 class the power and skill needed to manage all the sails and sail the boat as a solo sailor was pretty daunting, now we all do it as a norm without really thinking about it.

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Nice shots but still bigger boats where we often see the crew out, I'm sure that once the 20fters get sailing on a regular basis we'll see the good crews hiking out and to be honest does it really matter that crew stay in during the rougher periods, you can always reef down and you probably won't be much slower. The hardest time to get the boats moving quickly is in mid range and lighter airs and yes in those times we will see crew begin to get out on the Amas.

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This is where I like to drive from when the wind is up enough to start getting interesting. Especially if I'm single handing it. It's a great position for view of everything including the bow of the windward float and the main hull to get a feel for how deep I'm pushing it. And with the two shroud lower lines, I've got a pretty safe place to stand with something to hang on to. If it's really choppy though and I'm not in a wetsuit - then I'll be back in the cockpit where it's dry and I'll reef the sails and keep it flat. I find that the max speed is when I'm pretty flat and probably sharing about 50% of the weight on the float and 50% on the center hull. My rudder isn't deep enough to feel comfortable flying the main hull much or at all. I don't know that I've ever got it completely clear of the water. OTOH my boat is built using donor cat hulls and I left the daggerboard slots open and they still have the gudgeons, so it'd be really easy to drop in some daggers and put the rudders out on the floats and let it fly. I'm not convinced I'd see meaningfully faster speeds though.

 

With some lifting foils... ?? Maybe next season I'll give it a go.

post-29576-0-94713700-1448376160_thumb.jpg

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Nice shots but still bigger boats where we often see the crew out, I'm sure that once the 20fters get sailing on a regular basis we'll see the good crews hiking out and to be honest does it really matter that crew stay in during the rougher periods, you can always reef down and you probably won't be much slower. The hardest time to get the boats moving quickly is in mid range and lighter airs and yes in those times we will see crew begin to get out on the Amas.

Mate..... It is a Multi 23, not much bigger than a Pulse and probably the closest boat on the market to compare with. I don't understand why you would believe it to be any different with the Pulse.

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Nice shots but still bigger boats where we often see the crew out, I'm sure that once the 20fters get sailing on a regular basis we'll see the good crews hiking out and to be honest does it really matter that crew stay in during the rougher periods, you can always reef down and you probably won't be much slower. The hardest time to get the boats moving quickly is in mid range and lighter airs and yes in those times we will see crew begin to get out on the Amas.

Mate..... It is a Multi 23, not much bigger than a Pulse and probably the closest boat on the market to compare with. I don't understand why you would believe it to be any different with the Pulse.

 

Absolutely it matters that the crew hikes. It's HUGE.

 

On the Multi23, with a crew of 2-3, you're talking about the difference of between 2400-2600 pounds of righting moment differential centerline to hiked out. That's power. That's speed. The difference between going to weather at a tight angle or not. It also holds the boat down and makes it more comfortable. I didn't like the very high dihedral on the multi 23. You feel like you're 8+ feet off the water - cause you are! I think the Pulse will "feel" a bit tamer due to that. Oh, and the fact that it weighs the same as the Mult 23 will de-tune it even more.

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I had been waiting for a Weta photograph to appear showing someone on the Ama's. The Weta's handicap rating would sort of say it needs to be sailed in a blow to get it up and going and I would guess you would have to sail in a blow to be able to get out there :unsure: , now if Weta came out with a 16fter with a proper F16 style sail area and decent higher bouyancy hulls, which Chris ( one of the owners ) has discussed openly about to me, then I might just consider giving one a go :mellow: Now a 20 foot Weta that would be really cool, oh thats the Tim Clissold designed TC601 :)

 

We are talking about two quite different boats here, one is a 14ft racing dinghy with training wheels and the other a small Tri capable of coastal racing. So come on guys out there, lets have a few photographs of you sitting out regularly in rough windy conditions, on the edge of the floats. My guess is that once sailors get used to the power of these little hotrods they will eventually learn about needing to be out on the Amas and once you have done it a few times then you get more confident and it becomes the norm. Certainly right at the start in the F16 class the power and skill needed to manage all the sails and sail the boat as a solo sailor was pretty daunting, now we all do it as a norm without really thinking about it.

 

A 14 foot tri that can top 20MPH is a lot more than a racing dinghy with training wheels, at least in my opinion. Of course, I own one so take that for what it's worth. When the wind gets over about 14MPH or so, you want your ass hanging out over the ama rail by as much as you can and still have your feet under the hiking straps - if you don't, those "training wheels" will fail you and you'll be upside down in a hurry. It'll go like mad, particularly for a little 14 footer, if you do it right. The boat warrants a lot more respect than many want to give it. I do wish a bona fide 2 person Weta was available (Sea Rail 19?).

 

But back to the subject at hand - the Pulse 600 appears to be a very nice boat, training wheels and all. I'm sure it'll move in the right conditions. The price is going to be the sticking point for many, myself included. I understand why they may have to go to that price point but I think a boat of that size and ability will be hard pressed to catch on. Of course, I may be wrong and it wouldn't be the first time that happened.

 

I would like to see some objective comments/results for how the Pulse 600 and Multi 23 compare.

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Seriously have any of you guys freaked out about flying the main hull ever been on a multi other than a Weta? With its big buoyant hulls the Pulse will be fastest with the main hull just flying and the crew fully hiked, there wont be any loss of control. If you want to win races this is what you will have to do. If you want to cruise just get rid of the jib or reef, its not that hard.

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Seriously have any of you guys freaked out about flying the main hull ever been on a multi other than a Weta? With its big buoyant hulls the Pulse will be fastest with the main hull just flying and the crew fully hiked, there wont be any loss of control. If you want to win races this is what you will have to do. If you want to cruise just get rid of the jib or reef, its not that hard.

Not freaked out, just want to go fast.

 

The only way to settle this debate is to match race two Pulses: one being sailed flat, the other flying or skimming the main hull. My money is on the boat sailed flat. The Pulse has no foils nor rudders on those big amas. It obviously is not meant to be a main hull flyer, regardless of how bouyant the amas may be.

 

BTW: I have raced on many different types of tris. And, I hike out on all of them regardless of size.

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The M23 is a slightly larger boat. I suspect is it marginally faster than the Pulse 600. On the other hand, the Pulse 600's folding amas give it a leg up in convenience which is, no doubt, a serious sales consideration. I look forward to reports that compare the two under similar conditions on the same course at the same time.

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Sail(plane) wrote: You want to round up only when close hauled, in high winds, and pro-actively, not because you lost rudder grip. In most other points of sail you will want to actively go down and loosing grip then is just as bad as in a cat.

 

Hmmm, maybe I’ve done too many windward/leewards and have those points of sail too deeply on the mind. ^_^ Still, when close-hauled having some kind of “automatic” depowering mechanism seems better than none, especially when a gust with wind shift surprises and the cam cleat doesn’t release as expected, or otherwise simply when someone’s not paying enough attention (likelier to happen with a family boat). In the case c) above with high volume floats and outboard rudders you’re likelier to go over under those circumstances, similar to a cat, right?

 

Driving deep in multis has been, in my experience, more of an issue of keeping the bows up than rounding up. I have more experience with rounding up in Express 27s, but I’ll blame that on the back of the boat. <_<

 

For the reaching angles, though, case c) as you point out does sound better given that losing rudder grip then really doesn’t help you align the boat with the wind to regain control. I don’t know that having tender amas would be any more helpful at reaching angles, either.

 

So, what would you propose is a superior = safer design overall?

 

Honestjohn, the Pulse 600 has a fractional rig for both jib and spinnaker. Maybe I’m missing it, but could you explain to me how rounding up with the kite up means you’re likely to blow the top of your mast off? Further, after years of racing in the SF Bay Area--including having/witnessing my share of wipeouts in up to/over 30 knots--I’ve yet to see anyone lose the top of their rig, including those with masthead kites. I like your description of recovering from rudder grip loss through sail balance, though. Carefully relaxing into it can be a very good thing indeed.

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Dayneger, I went back and checked the pics, in the original small rig form I concede it is unlikely to lose the mast, wasn't the new big kite going up higher?

I have seen the topmast taken out in this instance,from a little too close actually(my boat) admittedly a 3/4 rig with a BIG masthead kite(much bigger than designed), the mast inverted,snapped at the spreaders,didn't get the bearaway in before the rudder let go rounded up,got messy,quick!

RE Rudder grip, i'll try to edit out some footage of go pro pointing out the rear in a blow, you can see the rooster tail and foam as the rudder lets go,(2 handed) then hear me let the crew know he effectively has the helm, then the wake turn as I get control again,after that wave, it repeats for quite a while,was much less stressful and faster, when we stopped trying to fight it.

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Sail(plane) wrote: You want to round up only when close hauled, in high winds, and pro-actively, not because you lost rudder grip. In most other points of sail you will want to actively go down and loosing grip then is just as bad as in a cat.

 

Hmmm, maybe Ive done too many windward/leewards and have those points of sail too deeply on the mind. ^_^ Still, when close-hauled having some kind of automatic depowering mechanism seems better than none, especially when a gust with wind shift surprises and the cam cleat doesnt release as expected, or otherwise simply when someones not paying enough attention (likelier to happen with a family boat). In the case c) above with high volume floats and outboard rudders youre likelier to go over under those circumstances, similar to a cat, right?

 

Driving deep in multis has been, in my experience, more of an issue of keeping the bows up than rounding up. I have more experience with rounding up in Express 27s, but Ill blame that on the back of the boat. <_<

 

For the reaching angles, though, case c) as you point out does sound better given that losing rudder grip then really doesnt help you align the boat with the wind to regain control. I dont know that having tender amas would be any more helpful at reaching angles, either.

 

So, what would you propose is a superior = safer design overall?

 

Honestjohn, the Pulse 600 has a fractional rig for both jib and spinnaker. Maybe Im missing it, but could you explain to me how rounding up with the kite up means youre likely to blow the top of your mast off? Further, after years of racing in the SF Bay Area--including having/witnessing my share of wipeouts in up to/over 30 knots--Ive yet to see anyone lose the top of their rig, including those with masthead kites. I like your description of recovering from rudder grip loss through sail balance, though. Carefully relaxing into it can be a very good thing indeed.

More likely to blow the head out of the kite unless you blow the sheet big time.
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The M23 is a slightly larger boat. I suspect is it marginally faster than the Pulse 600. On the other hand, the Pulse 600's folding amas give it a leg up in convenience which is, no doubt, a serious sales consideration. I look forward to reports that compare the two under similar conditions on the same course at the same time.

The m23 is 3+feet longer and the same weight.....

 

Lack of folding on the M23 however means a limited market.

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Hi all,

 

So first time on this forum. For interest, that was me on the Pulse 600 on Sydney Harbour. I'm the fat guy on the main sheet with Mike Rees from Corsair on the tiller at that point, and my partner sitting up to windward. We did two races along side the big seawind cats.

 

From the outset, I would really like to thank Mike and the Multihull Central guys for the opporutnity to spend the day on the Pulse. It's been a long time since I've had so much fun sailing. This thing is a beast and will suit a wide range of sailors from your casual day sailors to the more experienced multihull sailor, coming from high performance OTB cats. You can definitely get the thing cranked up.

 

The boat pictured on Syney Harbour is I think the first prototype that was shipped to Australia. There were many things not working optimally on this boat, given its status as a demo boat, but most I believe have already been resolved on the boats that are now being shipped. We were not actually looking for more power, in fact in conditions around a steady 15 knots, gusting up to 20 knots, we really needed to depower. But the cunningham was bottomed out, still with wrinkles in the luff as you can see, and the jib was too big, and needed to be sheeted in a stack more. Lastly, the main sheet load was as heavy as hell and I was doing everything I could to pull the crap out of it.

 

All of the above aside, I'll repeat, it's been a long long time since I have had so much fun on a boat. We pushed it pretty hard, and were able to get the main hull out regularly. The bouyancy in the amas is amazing. Down wind we drove the nose under countless times, and the thing just kept popping up, shaking itself off and powering up again. I think the kite is not optimal in cut, and did not really give us much lift, thus driving the bows down in a gust. I understand the new kites are fuller and are providing much better lift. With the set up of this particular demo boat, it's not for the faint hearted in a gust off the wind, and on the long down wind run home I was on the tiller, and was well and truely on my toes in the puffs. The boat is stiff, responsive and bouyant.

 

For those of you who have ordered, or have them coming, or indeed already arrived, I very much doubt you will be disappointed. This is a great little machine with stacks of potential. It's got a lot of the OTB cat attributes in a bigger and slightly more comfortable package. Expect to get wet though!!!

 

Have fun.

 

Cheers,

 

Ross

 

Thanks for sharing your experience on the Pulse--sounds like quite a fun ride! Did you feel in control with the main hull out of the water? How high did you fly it?

 

Also, do you know what changes Corsair has in mind for the main sheet load? Should be easy to fix, but fighting with a main in only 15-20 knots wouldn't be a good thing.

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So is the Pulse all hype or is it what I hope will become the benchmark, in any forming Trimaran T20 class, sadly yes and no. It is a however a very very good start. The platform is really solid and those big, and I mean seriously big floats are never going to be over powered what ever rig you put on it. It sails far more sprightly than its weight should allow and that probably oversize, low aspect dagger board, means it tacks on a dime, the rudder has enough feel and only just enough size.......... Push the winds up a bit more and start to almost fly the central hull ( which I think it must be fairly close to doing ) and I think the central Ama rudder may just need a bit more length to offer good control all of the time.

 

The rig sorry is just not in the same league as the platform. The rig at present is reminscent of those early noughties Hobbie and Nacra beach cats. Stiff old spar thats taken too much Viagra, a main sail set up for roller reefing with little adjustment, big deep camber that makes tshe sail either a full on hooked up power monster or just a flapping mess in the breeze. Sorry guys here in Euro land we have sails that hook up gradually and almost seamlessly, we have great down haul systems which depower the sail and stops the need to reef constantly and loads of adjustment to nurture the best out of the sail. Don't get me wrong, the sail does its job and once in enough wind, develops a lot of grunt, its there but when you have been sailing with better sails, you sort of expect that on all boats. The jib is nice and sets well, roller reefs and is a keeper.

Mmmm nice to see the Pulse in a bit more wind, yup thought it might fly the main hull on those big floats and yup that big main is going to need a bit of looking after. Glad we stayed with float rudders on the TC601 just for the very reasons shown in the piccie with the rudder almost totally out of the water

 

 

So is the Pulse all hype or is it what I hope will become the benchmark, in any forming Trimaran T20 class, sadly yes and no. It is a however a very very good start. The platform is really solid and those big, and I mean seriously big floats are never going to be over powered what ever rig you put on it. It sails far more sprightly than its weight should allow and that probably oversize, low aspect dagger board, means it tacks on a dime, the rudder has enough feel and only just enough size.......... Push the winds up a bit more and start to almost fly the central hull ( which I think it must be fairly close to doing ) and I think the central Ama rudder may just need a bit more length to offer good control all of the time.

 

The rig sorry is just not in the same league as the platform. The rig at present is reminscent of those early noughties Hobbie and Nacra beach cats. Stiff old spar thats taken too much Viagra, a main sail set up for roller reefing with little adjustment, big deep camber that makes tshe sail either a full on hooked up power monster or just a flapping mess in jthe breeze. Sorry guys here in Euro land we have sails that hook up gradually and almost seamlessly, we have great down haul systems which depower the sail and stops the need to reef constantly and loads of adjustment to nurture the best out of the sail. Don't get me wrong, the sail does its job and once in enough wind, develops a lot of grunt, its there but when you have been sailing with better sails, you sort of expect that on all boats. The jib is nice and sets well, roller reefs and is a keeper.

Mmmm nice to see the Pulse in a bit more wind, yup thought it might fly the main hull on those big floats and yup that big main is going to need a bit of looking after. Glad we stayed with float rudders on the TC601 just for the very reasons shown in the piccie with the rudder almost totally out of the water
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With all the interest in the real sailing video that never comes ( the released videos show very little that would let us all get a true sense of how the Pulse sails ) I have to wonder just what Corsair may be hiding? Usually the arrival of a new boat is accompanied by TONS of beautiful video showcasing the performance and utility of the design. Corsair gives us almost nothing. Makes you wonder?

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Right. Every time I have boat money burning a hole in my pocket, I want an metric overload of information about it. So I felt very comfortable buying a Weta sight unseen five years ago. Had hoped for the same with the Pulse, but I'm content with the Sprint that I bought earlier this year instead.

 

Just cannot help wondering what is up with Corsair not marketing this boat as one might expect.

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Dido! I have a Weta now 4 years in, purchased based on YouTube video's ,sight unseen. Love it! Now I have followed the P600 build, saw the boat at the Annapolis boat show. Went to the Dealer in Florida and inspected the boat again!. So, what's the hold up you ask? I have not seen any video or anything stating its performance level. What it can or cannot do. I know what I have in my Weta and now I am thinking dollar for dollar, fun rate for fun rate. Looks like I will be sticking with my Weta for the foreseeable future... till we learn what the P600 can do. Guys... Its burning a hole in my pocket... .... come get the money... show us what this thing can do.......

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I actually got a good one on this.

 

I sailed the Weta at the dealer. Since the wind was low, I was not impressed. Went back home and watching the higher and high wind videos over and over convinced me to get it. So, you can say that for me the videos sold it, not the test sail. I love the boat.

 

That is the reason that I am in shock of the lack of videos in high wind. Like others, I am suspicious. I was very interested to upgrade with the Pulse to take my family out in more comfort, but I am priced out at $50K anyway.

 

Cheers,

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Now I have followed the P600 build, saw the boat at the Annapolis boat show. Went to the Dealer in Florida and inspected the boat again!.

 

How did you like the boat in person? I'd be interested in hearing your first-hand impressions of the build, layout, etc.

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I was very impressed with the fit and finish. Hulls looked good solid glass construction work. Hatches and hardware had good fitting. The layout looks good as well plenty of room in the cockpit and the bow peek looks like a sizable area for storage and securing weekend gear. The use of no winches looked bold to me as it looks like your carrying a sizable mainsail and big wind days might ask for some winch power. Disclosure, l sail a Weta and this looks like it could be a handful single handed in a blow. I'll post some pixs over the weekend for better eyes then I to review. Again it all looks good in real life tied to the dock and on a trailer. Lets see it really sail?

 

We are all waiting......

Regards, t

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Maybe they think SA is just full of pedantic tyre kicking key board sailors?

Word. Not many idiots spend $40-50K on a boat based on a video. If you want to see it sail go sail it. Good grief so many whiners in one place.

 

Of course I do have a friend that spent $300K or so on a boat without sailing it (or even putting it together) based only on video and it is a damn fine boat.

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Great video! Nice detail.

Thanks for making my morning sparkle.

 

Rig looks nice now, only mod I would make is jib tweaker or change of sheeting position as the cabin angle looks like it will only suit upwind in light winds and flat water?

 

Peter

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Beautiful! Looks like a hoot to sail, nice big cockpit, responsive. For some reason I hadn't previously noticed that the traveler's on a curved track, which is cool.

 

Also fun to see it roll the 30 footer as though it's a piling at about 8:30.

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Beautiful? YES!! But where are the shots of new buyers pushing wheelbarrows of cash to the dealer. Why does this really cool boat have to cost more than the SECOND house I could afford?

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Beautiful? YES!! But where are the shots of new buyers pushing wheelbarrows of cash to the dealer.

 

That's Corsair's problem/opportunity, not yours. Or am I mistaken? Shocking as it may sound, your and my opinions and expectations about Corsair's chance of hitting their business goals are pretty irrelevant. At least mine are. ^_^

 

Sure, I wish as well that this wonderful new toy could fit more easily into more pocketbooks, but there are many for whom the Pulse 600 represents an affordable choice in a very exciting sailing platform. Power to them! And over time we'll see what choices they actually do make.

 

 

Why does this really cool boat have to cost more than the SECOND house I could afford?

Dude, where do you live that you can pick up a house for $48k?? Anyway, some bigger boat racers pump those kinds of numbers into their sail inventory alone each year.
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I want to see the vid of hoisting the main in 20kts then taking mainsheet off the end fitting and putting it on the strop

That's easily done. Do it all the time on a Sprint in more wind than that. It's a good system.
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I rigged up a twin tiller type system for my Weta 2 years ago. It can be a time saver in some instances. You have to have some means of keeping the "lazy" side captured so that it doesn't go off the boat to some location where you can't retrieve it easily when you move across to that side. The attachment also, however, has to be free enough and provide enough movement so that when you have the active tiller in hand you can still move fore and aft to trim the boat without having to let go of the tiller due to not having any further range of motion.

 

My guess is that what you're seeing on the tiller sticks near the actual tiller itself is a cord or bungee that keeps things in place as described above.

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I want to see the vid of hoisting the main in 20kts then taking mainsheet off the end fitting and putting it on the strop

That's easily done. Do it all the time on a Sprint in more wind than that. It's a good system.
Why bother you can sail it on the end fitting like the designer intended?
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Anyone else curious about the apparent double hiking stick arrangement? It looks like they're captured by rings of some kind? Anyone know more details?

 

 

Thanks,

Dave

Tiller is in front of mainsheet and when its long enough to helm from arma its almost too long to get through under the boom so I can see why they do it
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Thinking about how the boat would work on inshore and large lake distance races (say 30-60 nautical miles), would it be possible to add an additional water-tight compartment or two in the cockpit? Something like what Melges 24s have. There is the one compartment up front which would be good for things like extra gear, but it would be good to separate out things like coolers and gas cans and keep that weight farther aft. Thoughts?

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I want to see the vid of hoisting the main in 20kts then taking mainsheet off the end fitting and putting it on the strop

That's easily done. Do it all the time on a Sprint in more wind than that. It's a good system.
Why bother you can sail it on the end fitting like the designer intended?
Yes you can do that and I do sometimes particularly if I feel I might have to reef later in the race. I can then roller reef on the boom which is just a little quicker than flake Reefing and tidying the excess sail with bungees. However in normal sailing the mainsheet angle to the clew is just a little better than to the end of the boom. It gives just the right boom end pressure for the best rotation.

Of course this is on my Sprint and may be different on other Sprints with different foot length. Also may be different on the Pulse. The point is though that changing between the clew and boom end is easy if you want to do it.

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I was watching that too. Seems to be a ring attached to a line that you can snug in some way- is this common on beach cats or others with twin sticks. Rotating the 8' stick on my F-31 can be a pain.

It's a great time saver in racing. I use it on the Sorint and it's commonly used on skiffs.
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I want to see the vid of hoisting the main in 20kts then taking mainsheet off the end fitting and putting it on the strop

That's easily done. Do it all the time on a Sprint in more wind than that. It's a good system.
Why bother you can sail it on the end fitting like the designer intended?
Yes you can do that and I do sometimes particularly if I feel I might have to reef later in the race. I can then roller reef on the boom which is just a little quicker than flake Reefing and tidying the excess sail with bungees. However in normal sailing the mainsheet angle to the clew is just a little better than to the end of the boom. It gives just the right boom end pressure for the best rotation.

Of course this is on my Sprint and may be different on other Sprints with different foot length. Also may be different on the Pulse. The point is though that changing between the clew and boom end is easy if you want to do it.

Do you have a working rotation preventer, not much room on a sprint, I think it could be way better designed?
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I want to see the vid of hoisting the main in 20kts then taking mainsheet off the end fitting and putting it on the strop

That's easily done. Do it all the time on a Sprint in more wind than that. It's a good system.
Why bother you can sail it on the end fitting like the designer intended?
Yes you can do that and I do sometimes particularly if I feel I might have to reef later in the race. I can then roller reef on the boom which is just a little quicker than flake Reefing and tidying the excess sail with bungees. However in normal sailing the mainsheet angle to the clew is just a little better than to the end of the boom. It gives just the right boom end pressure for the best rotation.

Of course this is on my Sprint and may be different on other Sprints with different foot length. Also may be different on the Pulse. The point is though that changing between the clew and boom end is easy if you want to do it.

Do you have a working rotation preventer, not much room on a sprint, I think it could be way better designed?
Yes to a saddle on boom in most conditions and to the pad loop in the centre of cabin in front of the hatch when roller reefed. Works well.
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I'd appreciate seeing some pictures or a good description of how this is rigged. It seems like it could add some real flexibility on my 24-2.

TIA,

Dave

 

 

 

I was watching that too. Seems to be a ring attached to a line that you can snug in some way- is this common on beach cats or others with twin sticks. Rotating the 8' stick on my F-31 can be a pain.

It's a great time saver in racing. I use it on the Sorint and it's commonly used on skiffs.

 

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I'd appreciate seeing some pictures or a good description of how this is rigged. It seems like it could add some real flexibility on my 24-2.

TIA,

Dave

 

 

 

 

I was watching that too. Seems to be a ring attached to a line that you can snug in some way- is this common on beach cats or others with twin sticks. Rotating the 8' stick on my F-31 can be a pain.

It's a great time saver in racing. I use it on the Sorint and it's commonly used on skiffs.

Sorry no pictures as I won't be near my boat for a few weeks. However is simply rigged with a standard Ronstan universal on each side of the tiller arm. The tillers then extend out to about the inner gunwhale of the float. A piece of bungee a bit over a metre is clipped to the tramp lashing on one end then with a ring over the tiller so it doesn't fall over the rear beam. Duplicated on each side so a tillers is always at hand and never has to be tacked.
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I'd appreciate seeing some pictures or a good description of how this is rigged. It seems like it could add some real flexibility on my 24-2.

TIA,

Dave

 

 

 

I was watching that too. Seems to be a ring attached to a line that you can snug in some way- is this common on beach cats or others with twin sticks. Rotating the 8' stick on my F-31 can be a pain.

It's a great time saver in racing. I use it on the Sorint and it's commonly used on skiffs.

Sorry no pictures as I won't be near my boat for a few weeks. However is simply rigged with a standard Ronstan universal on each side of the tiller arm. The tillers then extend out to about the inner gunwhale of the float. A piece of bungee a bit over a metre is clipped to the tramp lashing on one end then with a ring over the tiller so it doesn't fall over the rear beam. Duplicated on each side so a tillers is always at hand and never has to be tacked.

 

Thanks, WetnWild. That's very helpful. I won't get a chance to do much with this until spring, but you've given me a good start on thinking about how I might implement it.

Dave

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See!!! Now we are talking!!!!

 

The videos are awesome. Although $50K is still too much for this boat, the videos made me go back and do the math again and again.

 

It does look like tons of fun.

 

Cheers,

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Folks,

 

I have finally got around to editing the video of our commissioning sail on Sydney Harbour on the 28th Nov.

 

We were sailing in about 10-15 kts from the North East. Our top speed was about 13.5 kts which was pretty cool given this was our first outing on the trimaran. It was a great learning experience and I am looking forward to more sailing and learning to trim the sail better.

 

The video was recorded on a Garmin VIRB XE Action Camera.

 

 

Regards

Glynn

Pulse 600 - V20 - KatRat II

 

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