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Corsair Pulse 600


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7 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

Scroll to the bottom of the excel rating sheet, Sshhhh.....

http://www.mycq.org.au/omr/omr-ratings

The weta rating was faster compared to the Pulse than I expected.  However, the weta compared to a Hobie Getaway was spot on (inverse of OMR would be comparable to SCHRS) since we sailed on the same bit of water and Getaway was a tiny bit faster that day (weta and Getaway were both two up) since it was moderate breeze and some chop.  Taking the inverse of the Pulse rating shown you get 1.183 which would be the comparable SCHRS.  (SCHRS and Texel give a time divisor factor; OMR gives a time multiplication factor).  

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You folks must be fortunate to sail in places with steady windspeed with no gusts or lulls and no wind shifts and no current and very little traffic.   If you are looking at instruments where I sail,

Look at the most popular and best selling multi-hull sailboats of all time - none are over 18 feet in length. Boats that can be set up by one person, in less than about 30 minutes, and sell for less t

Top down will take longer (S'OK, though, you aren't racing) but will still need to have the halyard loosened some after furling before heading back upwind to keep the forestay loaded.  Be sure to clea

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Don't place too much cred on that OMR rating, I was just doodling one night and put rough data in from a scaled diagram. With crew weight of 1 85 kg bloke the Weta goes to .681 and with 2 blokes adding to 150 kg the Pulse goes to .775. A bit more realistic but still not valid. 

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9 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

Don't place too much cred on that OMR rating, I was just doodling one night and put rough data in from a scaled diagram. With crew weight of 1 85 kg bloke the Weta goes to .681 and with 2 blokes adding to 150 kg the Pulse goes to .775. A bit more realistic but still not valid. 

I don't place any credit on ratings, period.  A single number will never be anywhere close to accurate on all points of sail or wind and wave conditions.  However, unless you are competing in one design...you gotta have a number-regardless of how ridiculous it is.  Racing non one design is at best a social event.  

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41 minutes ago, mundt said:

the sailing sure looks fun but that music is like a chain saw in the brain. 

What, you don't like tuba and strings?  Sorry bout that.  

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There's being more talk about SeaRail's and Weta's in here lately..... so back on topic.

Had a successful trial of the tweaker setup and also running a new 42sq metre kite. It felt extremely odd having a kite reach right across the front (bloody hard to see too) but we were able to dead run with good speed.

IMG_7178.jpg

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  • 1 month later...
On 9/29/2019 at 9:43 AM, SpearHead said:

There's being more talk about SeaRail's and Weta's in here lately..... so back on topic.

Had a successful trial of the tweaker setup and also running a new 42sq metre kite. It felt extremely odd having a kite reach right across the front (bloody hard to see too) but we were able to dead run with good speed.

IMG_7178.jpg

Spear, what would you estimate the speed was when ddw? And the true wind?

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The real question about the used Pulse market is:  What prices are the used Pulses SELLING for? Owners can ask anything  -  what do they receive? Beautiful but expensive tri. 

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From the Yachthub listing one sold for under $39k AU about a year after the owner purchased it. They seem to change owners regularly, not sure why as they appear to be a fun yacht to own. Will have to catch up with a current owner for more info.

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On 11/3/2019 at 8:40 AM, sail(plane) said:

Spear, what would you estimate the speed was when ddw? And the true wind?

We were doing wind speed or slightly greater.

 

So there were two Pulses's for-sale here in Australia and the last one just sold yesterday so we will now have three of the four - actively racing and living on the east coast. It's unknown if the 4th one which sold a couple of weeks will be racing but the three are committed to racing Bay to Bay, Surf to City and afew others.

All sales seem to ask around half the original purchase price here in Aus but eventually end up dropping an average of 5-10k. Absolutely its all about supply and demand but very hard too when those who were tasked in promoting these great boats did little with them. Next year we'll see plenty of Pulse race action!!!!

 

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On 11/2/2019 at 7:40 PM, sail(plane) said:

Spear, what would you estimate the speed was when ddw? And the true wind?

 

7 hours ago, SpearHead said:

We were doing wind speed or slightly greater.

 

 

SpearHead, faster than the wind ddw, then? There are whole threads about that, you know :o

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On 9/29/2019 at 5:43 AM, SpearHead said:

There's being more talk about SeaRail's and Weta's in here lately..... so back on topic.

Had a successful trial of the tweaker setup and also running a new 42sq metre kite. It felt extremely odd having a kite reach right across the front (bloody hard to see too) but we were able to dead run with good speed.

IMG_7178.jpg

Thanks for this photo.  Lots of nice things to look at that show some good architecture.  For example, the mast rotation limiter seems to be attached to the boom--that's a good idea since you are trying to smooth the wind entry over the mainsail.  I also like it that that foredeck cone is removeable so if needed, you could just go forward and fix something that needs fixing.  I don't like the jib setup, though.  with the sheeting angle so close to the mast you have to be awful careful not to oversheet the jib.  Looks like the spinny is set up for standard hoist and takedown--ie, no roller furling-which makes sense going downwind unless you are single handing; but in the photo, the spin appears oversheeted (but that was a 30th of a second view, so I expect it didn't stay that way for long).  

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5 hours ago, sail(plane) said:

 

SpearHead, faster than the wind ddw, then? There are whole threads about that, you know :o

Hahaha!!! Seriously thou look at the photo, we were lucky during this time to have 3-5kts of wind. Not hard to move with, especially when we have the tide pushing us too. Keen to try this setup again but with move winds.

My measurements too are with the Navionics ap so certainly not gospel

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  • 3 months later...

I’m just in the process of buying a Pulse and wondered what everyone does for instruments? I usually sail with a Garmin handheld but was also thinking of getting a Velocitek Prostart (assuming I can find somewhere to mount it).

Ideally I’d like a small set of wind instruments but the complexity and need for a small battery will probably see me living with a windex and guessing wind strength.

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I have had a Velocitec Speedpuck for over five years. It does not leak and has spent plenty of time under water on my F-16 and Weta. Works perfectly. Excellent product.

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Thanks @fastsailor600 & @xonk1. 100% chance a Speedpuck or Prostart will be onboard very soon.

What I'm really missing though is VMG which, while I can get it from my handheld, I can't see on a bigger screen in my line of sight.

I could use a cheap phone in a water proof case, but haven't found an app that gives me both the ability to plot a course and see VMG in large figures. The Navionics app covers the course plotting but has no 'data field view' and the Sailmon app does nice big data fields but no course entry.... That said, Sailracer seems to have had an upgrade so I might try that again, but always keen to hear of other apps you may know of.

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Usually on a boat this small, most sail seat of the pants.  Boatpeed you can tell by wake, windspeed you can tell by looking for whitecaps, wind direction doesn't matter since you are sailing apparent wind most of the time and you look at the shroud teltales.  SO, I suggest you hold off on electronics until you have sailed it a season.  

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18 hours ago, MultiThom said:

Usually on a boat this small, most sail seat of the pants.  Boatpeed you can tell by wake, windspeed you can tell by looking for whitecaps, wind direction doesn't matter since you are sailing apparent wind most of the time and you look at the shroud teltales.  SO, I suggest you hold off on electronics until you have sailed it a season.  

That's old school MultiThom, yes you maybe right but in this case I beg to disagree. Yes that's the case for a very experienced helm and crew, but 95% of all owners are just not that savy and need a bit of help from electronics.

Certainly the one day I had on the Pulse gave the impression of a much bigger boat than its 20ft and even though I would call myself an experienced beach cat sailor, I think you would need some electronics on board to get the best out of it, as it was quite difficult to initially read what actually made good VMG. I would guess you would learn the boat over a season, but with electronics on board, that learning curve would be far faster and if the more normal crew could learn to keep their heads out of the boat and use the electronics to back up their gut feelings, then I'm pretty sure they would be up to speed much faster than just trying to learn the boat from the seat of their pants.

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39 minutes ago, Waynemarlow said:

I think you would need some electronics on board to get the best out of it, as it was quite difficult to initially read what actually made good VMG.

oh lord, I hear the VMG calculation thread coming again :)

 

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1 hour ago, Waynemarlow said:

with electronics on board, that learning curve would be far faster and if the more normal crew could learn to keep their heads out of the boat and use the electronics to back up their gut feelings, then I'm pretty sure they would be up to speed much faster than just trying to learn the boat from the seat of their pants.

^this.

I'm coming off the back of a decade of owning symmetric spi monohulls and the last three years with a Hobie Tiger. The Tiger was too quick to focus on instruments, and the courses too short, but I will be using the Pulse for longer races in lots of tide so the ability to monitor VMG is very useful. I can do a lot via feel and basic instruments but nothing quite matches cold hard data.

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On our pulse we have a pro start which gives a count down and the speed and heading. We use a hand held plotter strapped to the crews arm and we also have Garmin watches for speed and heading. Having sailed the boat for 2 seasons now we have made a polar diagram so based on estimated wind speed and conditions we know the numbers we should be hitting. 

Having said all that. It’s very much like a beach cat to sail and you know when you are in the groove or not. 

 

Great little boats.  

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You folks must be fortunate to sail in places with steady windspeed with no gusts or lulls and no wind shifts and no current and very little traffic.   If you are looking at instruments where I sail, you are going to be left behind.  S'OK, yah, I'm old school and am definitely not interested in electronics other than gps data logger so I can see after the sail what happened and a countdown timer to make the start on time.

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1 hour ago, sealion said:

 Having sailed the boat for 2 seasons now we have made a polar diagram so based on estimated wind speed and conditions we know the numbers we should be hitting. 

Great little boats.  

Take a photo of the polars and share.  Let me play Kreskin....in light (2-7 true wind) best  VMG is to foot upwind with tack angles around 100 or more.  In heavy (above 15) best VMG is to pinch so tack angles are 90 or less.  In between 7-15 you do 90 degree tacks.  Downwind VMG is better to drive deep in heavy wind, gybe 90 degrees in medium and gybe more than 90 in the lighter stuff.  With a flat cut spin (less than 75% smg) you may have to gybe more than 90 in the medium stuff.

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Don’t worry about MultiThom, he always chimes in on threads he has little experience with. Just wait for the SeaRail/Weta comparison to come.

 

Very interested to hear views of the Velocitec Speedpuck vrs Navionics live data. Both use GPS? so I’m guessing both can be delayed/inaccurate? Navionics certainly can be at times.

My own story; I come from a Hobie background so never used nor relied on electronics. I sail (and race) the Pulse in a similar manner and whilst it is certainly larger to what your used to it still feels and handles extremely close to a beach cat (compared to larger Fboats)

I currently use watch for start line timings and Navionics for speed and mapping/course plotting on an iPad. It either hangs off the mast raising bracket or around my neck.

If I was to add anything it would be a hull installed transducer for accurate speed and depth but I can’t justify costs and issues associated with them. I.e correct installation would be infront of centreboard requiring modifications to trailer, power source etc etc

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3 hours ago, SpearHead said:

Very interested to hear views of the Velocitec Speedpuck vrs Navionics live data. Both use GPS? so I’m guessing both can be delayed/inaccurate? Navionics certainly can be at times.

I currently use watch for start line timings and Navionics for speed and mapping/course plotting on an iPad. It either hangs off the mast raising bracket or around my neck.

If I was to add anything it would be a hull installed transducer for accurate speed and depth but I can’t justify costs and issues associated with them. I.e correct installation would be infront of centreboard requiring modifications to trailer, power source etc etc

Yes, both use GPS so have their foibles. That said, there’s enough accuracy there for passage racing.

I’ve been looking for mounting locations and think I’ll sling the Prostart under the top section of the reinforcing carbon ring/hoop, using a very shallow macrolon weatherboard at the top of the hoop. My Garmin hangs off my life jacket or a belt loop.

I would also love to install a triducer but the battery and other components all smack of trouble to me. I think Aimar do one that wouldn’t mess with the trailer but the reality is that, at the speeds we should be maintaining in a tri, the impact of current is less of an issue than in a 4ksb, so GPS should be enough in 95% of situations.

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Look at the statement of VELOCITEC concerning VMG: The reason why we decided to drop VMG as a feature on the ProStart is that we couldn't find any professional sailors who used this feature while racing. The main reason the pros don't like to look at VMG when they are racing is that the boat's momentum makes it difficult to use these measurements to find an optimal heading.

I totaly agree!

Enjoy your boats!

Velocitec.PNG

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We've gone through this before but when I have found vmg somewhat useful is when going to weather trying to decide if and when I've overstood, watching the vmg take a dramatic turn for the worse makes me want to tack, also perhaps to know which board might be favored...  How wrong is that and why?

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53 minutes ago, mundt said:

We've gone through this before but when I have found vmg somewhat useful is when going to weather trying to decide if and when I've overstood, watching the vmg take a dramatic turn for the worse makes me want to tack, also perhaps to know which board might be favored...  How wrong is that and why?

Do you stay in the center and zig zag toward the mark or do you favor one leyline having done your homework and knowing whether or not a shift is likely to favor one leyline over the other?  

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well, that's the age olde question, isn't it?  It's always a matter of if and when a shift will arrive and from where...then we need to calculate the time required to complete a tack and associated costs.  Often, in our local waters, the answers to these questions are highly variable, one guy looking like Albert Einstein while another looks like Alfred E. Newman.  Should we stay on this board hoping for a lift?  Should we short tack up the middle?  I've seen either work and/or fail miserably, sometimes even during the course of one leg.  If your "strategy" pays off you can mock your opponents and feel high on the hog.  When it fails you blame the gods for their cruelty!   

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3 hours ago, fastsailor600 said:

 The reason why we decided to drop VMG as a feature on the ProStart is that we couldn't find any professional sailors who used this feature while racing. The main reason the pros don't like to look at VMG when they are racing is that the boat's momentum makes it difficult to use these measurements to find an optimal heading.

I've certainly won a few races using VMG to select the favoured tack where there are current variations across the course, but maybe it's because we're just amateurs and not professionals...

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The truth in Velocitek’s statement is all in the last para. It’s complex to add VMG to any instrument as it requires a means of inputting course and waypoints, and their brief was simple & usable (something I wholly agree with!).

As for not using it racing, that depends entirely on the kind of racing and the conditions. They are patently talking about RTC racing, not ex-dinghy sailors, who know how scallop without falling off the plane, on passage races. Even then, I lost count of the number of times I heard the term ‘VMG mode’ used on the AC72s when they were battling it out (and yes, they may have only been talking about it as a mode but I’m guessing their arm-mounted displays all had VMG on there somewhere). An exercise in post-rationalisation if ever I saw one...

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39 minutes ago, bissona said:

The truth in Velocitek’s statement is all in the last para. It’s complex to add VMG to any instrument as it requires a means of inputting course and waypoints, and their brief was simple & usable (something I wholly agree with!).

As for not using it racing, that depends entirely on the kind of racing and the conditions. They are patently talking about RTC racing, not ex-dinghy sailors, who know how scallop without falling off the plane, on passage races. Even then, I lost count of the number of times I heard the term ‘VMG mode’ used on the AC72s when they were battling it out (and yes, they may have only been talking about it as a mode but I’m guessing their arm-mounted displays all had VMG on there somewhere). An exercise in post-rationalisation if ever I saw one...

Yes, my success with VMG is entirely on longer distance courses with several miles between waypoints - I can't imagine using it successfully for RTC racing so if that's their target market it makes more sense for them to discontinue it...

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I sail on a lake so the wind and water are always changing. My tremolino (with a Viper Assym) needs to be sailed seat of the pants downwind. I am either heating it up or soaking the speed down in a cycle following apparent wind. My experience tells me there is not a steady state "VMG" angle or speed in any condition I sail in . Chasing the apparent wind angle gives better VMG than any fixed VMG. An instrument VMG would be all over the place the way I sail it. Probably the best video of this style I have ever seen is Oracle's Big Tri beating the Cat for the Americas Cup. I don't know if you can still find full videos of those races. Upwind the tiller is much more sensitive to performance than any instrument. Maybe it is just my boat that has a definite groove where I can feel if I am pinching/stalling or footing too much right through the tiller. It is very apparent where the VMG sweet spot is especially when you need to tactically sail tight or loose for boat on boat situations. Much better against the fleet to get some space and clear air and sail for good boat speed. 

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way back when, the high-level intellectuals indicated that to get an accurate vmg reading you should put a waypoint far, far away (upwind or down) from your actual mark.  They mentioned a figure of 100 miles.  Me having the intelligence of a chimp I'm guessing that moving the waypoint away from the actual target increases the accuracy?  The only reason I would use the vmg is, as mentioned, to determine a reasonable layline and to decide which board might be favored (assuming nothing else changes) which is almost never.  It's helpful info but can't take the place of an experienced simian. 

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Thanks for all of the input. I'll probably stick with VMG on the Garmin for the foreseeable, it's served me well enough for the last decade, and go with one of the Velocitek's for the cockpit.

Has anyone tried a Torqeedo 1103 with a Pulse? I could be tempted, despite the price...

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23 hours ago, Floating Duck said:

And despite the range? If you race a lot of races have requirements where you are stuck with a gasser unfortunately

It would really only be for round the cans, so no more than 1nm each time. Even cruising with the family will probably be <4nm, and I'm keeping the Mercury 4hp that came with it for longer passage races. I just have a deep-seated loathing of small four-stroke outboards, they're just 'orrible....

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On 3/4/2020 at 10:50 PM, fastsailor600 said:

Look at the statement of VELOCITEC concerning VMG: The reason why we decided to drop VMG as a feature on the ProStart is that we couldn't find any professional sailors who used this feature while racing. The main reason the pros don't like to look at VMG when they are racing is that the boat's momentum makes it difficult to use these measurements to find an optimal heading.

I totaly agree!

Enjoy your boats!

Velocitec.PNG

pros dont sail in py fleets its either one design or boats with expedition

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On 3/8/2020 at 1:25 PM, bissona said:

Has anyone tried a Torqeedo 1103 with a Pulse? I could be tempted, despite the price...

See if you can test drive one before committing.  I had one very briefly on a former boat.  You cannot switch quickly between forward and reverse (as in docking with wind), the thing locks out for a couple minutes while it resets---with some experience you might be able to overcome that.  The biggest reason I sent it back, though, was the noise.  The transmission squealed in a high pitch which was, if not louder, at least as noisy as a gas outboard.  Again, might have been the unit I had bought.  YMMV.

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3 hours ago, MultiThom said:

See if you can test drive one before committing.  

Thanks, I've asked for a test but they only have a 1003. Its only 10% less powerful but apparently quite a lot louder than the 1103. Will test it anyway as it's a chunk of change down the can if it ain't suitable...

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I use the 1003 with the big battery (916 Wh) plus a spare battery (532Wh). I am happy with that. No problems at all, very silent, very efficient and very easy to remove partially or complete. No gastank, no smell and enough power. No problems manouvering or switch reverse gear. 

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As a data point I found the Torqeedo whine very annoying on a friends boat, (bigger tri, not a Pulse).  It was probably around a 2016 or 7 vintage and don't know the model so not too helpful (FWIW).  Anyway do evaluate whether you can stand that whine before committing.  I'm not sure, but I might prefer the noise of a ~2 hp gasser.  I often use earplugs motoring anyway.

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Tried a brand new 1003 yesterday and really didn't get on with it.

Power seemed very limited even on WOT, range terrifyingly short, noticeable high-pitched whine (which I understand is better on the 1103), massive gap between forward and reverse, and the handle fell out when tilting the engine up. I did like the fact that it's very controllable at low speeds, but everything else was a major turn-off.

If it was half the price of a normal outboard then I'd be interested in trying it again, but it's nearly three times the price of the Tohatsu 3.5 2-stroke that I'm ordering instead, which really rules it out.  

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On 3/15/2020 at 6:48 PM, bissona said:

Tried a brand new 1003 yesterday and really didn't get on with it.

Power seemed very limited even on WOT, range terrifyingly short, noticeable high-pitched whine (which I understand is better on the 1103), massive gap between forward and reverse, and the handle fell out when tilting the engine up. I did like the fact that it's very controllable at low speeds, but everything else was a major turn-off.

If it was half the price of a normal outboard then I'd be interested in trying it again, but it's nearly three times the price of the Tohatsu 3.5 2-stroke that I'm ordering instead, which really rules it out.  

Thanks for the first hand info. I ve been following torqeedo reviews for years and they are all over the place, there is no trend. Strange.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Morning all, could anyone please supply standard line lengths for spi and jib sheets?

Mine are set up 2:1 at the moment (endless) and, while I'll keep those for racing in heavy air, I'd like a set of 1:1 soft-handling sheets for lighter weather. The 2:1s are just crazy long and take ages to set up.

Would also love to know who uses the furler for the spi and, if so, whether it's worth the extra kit up front.

Thanks.

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bissona,

It wasn't until I began using a screecher that I moved the asym kite off the furler. I now launch it from the trampoline with a retrieval line out to a single block in the place of the furler. I have heard stories of people having difficulties furling the asym kite and agree its not a flat cut like a screecher but i never had any issues furling it up nice and tight. As long as you get that anti torsion line super stiff the furler and swivel will do the job.

Line guide:

Main halyard

17252

Rope Double Braid Dyneema spectra 6mm GREEN SK62

M

23

 

Spinnaker halyard

17251

Rope Double Braid Dyneema spectra 6mm RED SK62

M

21

 

Jib halyard

15349

ROPE - 5MM (5/32) DYNEEMA CORED SOLID GREY POLYESTERED COVERED B/S 786kg DB6205-25

M

9

 

Messenger line for Jib halyard

16346

ROPE SPECTRA 2MM BLACK W/RED FLECK (Falcon 62 DB UHMWPE Core)

M

9

 

headstay wire

16893

HEADSTAY 4MM WIRE (1 set/boat) - PULSE

EACH

1

L=8880mm (completed with furler and bow shackle on top) - Wire = 8560mm (safe bury)

Diamond wire

16991

RIGGING DIAMONDS WIRE (ALUM RIG) (1 set/boat) - PULSE

SET

 1

L=7180mm (safe bury)

Cap shroud

18249

CAP SHROUD (1 SET/BOAT) - PULSE

SET

L=8820mm total (» 8270 dux line ring to ring + 550 for lashing)

Outhaul line

2091-5

ROPE DOUBLE BRAID 6MM WHITE W/GREEN FLECK

M

2.6

Outhaul line

Outhaul purchase

2091-5

ROPE DOUBLE BRAID 6MM WHITE W/GREEN FLECK

M

4

Outhaul purchase

Furling line

15349

ROPE - 5MM (5/32) DYNEEMA CORED SOLID GREY POLYESTERED COVERED B/S 786kg DB6205-25

M

6

 

Topping lift

12437

ROPE SPECTRA 4MM  BLACK

M

9

 

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Roller Furling a fuller spinnaker requires a good torque rope.  Your sailmaker "may" have incorporated a good torque rope, but more likely than not, it is not that great.  You can add a separate torque rope and still use a bottom up spinnaker furler (I do).  Spearhead is correct, you must get the torque rope really tight and it helps to unload the spinnaker as much as possible (drive deep).  Then, after the top swivel has turned a few times, you can put tension on the sheet and continue furling-finish by wrapping a couple turns of sheets around the clew.   Since the spin is now taking the load off the forestay, you should release the tension off the spin halyard before heading to weather-since I'm not racing, I usually lower it out of the way.

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On 3/17/2020 at 8:03 AM, sail(plane) said:

Thanks for the first hand info. I ve been following torqeedo reviews for years and they are all over the place, there is no trend. Strange.

While I have been happy with mine in great part it is because of the way I use it.  Compared to a gas outboard it has less power and much less range.  But I knew this up front.  It is also much lighter and since you can take it apart while on an inflatable/whatever it gets even lighter.  I suspect those that bash it expect a Torqeedo to do what a gas outboard will do and only later find out it will not.

My major concerns were light weight and the ability to easily store the motor on my boat and then to put the light weight inflatable on deck; things that are not easily done with a gas engine.  Also no worries about upside down or is it on the right side.  I also do lots of what I call exploring on spring fed fresh water rivers and the Torqueedo is great for the somewhat short (hour out hour back) trips I take.

 

As an aside I do have a 9.9 Yahama on my main dinghy I use for heavy duty work.

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15 hours ago, fastsailor600 said:

I recently had these quick releases made

pulse_shrouds2.jpg

Interested to know more. I’ve considered something similar as well as the colligo setups but really concerned about this type of setup getting in the way and causing injury.

Are you measuring the stays each time to know what works?

Any noticeable difference with using different rig tension settings?

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On 4/6/2020 at 9:11 AM, bissona said:

Morning all, could anyone please supply standard line lengths for spi and jib sheets?

Mine are set up 2:1 at the moment (endless) and, while I'll keep those for racing in heavy air, I'd like a set of 1:1 soft-handling sheets for lighter weather. The 2:1s are just crazy long and take ages to set up.

Would also love to know who uses the furler for the spi and, if so, whether it's worth the extra kit up front.

Thanks.

We don’t have the kite on a furler. Similar to SpearHead we have put a block on the prodder as a tack line. Also means we can run with 2 kites if needed for a long race. A reacher heavier one and a bigger VMG one. 

 

We we also have a zero set off the inner fitting on the prodder which is perminately attached when we take it out and on a furler. We don’t use it that much only light winds under 8-10kts as a big jib. Anything over that wind speed the jib tends to work better. We haven’t tried it reaching too much as the flatter kite tends to work then. 

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57 minutes ago, SpearHead said:

Interested to know more. I’ve considered something similar as well as the colligo setups but really concerned about this type of setup getting in the way and causing injury.

Are you measuring the stays each time to know what works?

Any noticeable difference with using different rig tension settings?

We have the colligo set up. Much better then the standard stuff that came with the boat and it means your not having to nearly completely underdo it each time you fold/unfold as it doesn’t get trapped under itself. Is a little pricey mind. 

 

We thought about adjustable stays so you can crank the rig to windward on each tack but went for a fixed system to keep it simple as we would probably forget to do it and leave the rig canting to leeward and wondering why the boat felt a bit weird. 

We measure each time we go out to get even and we do tighten then tight to firm up the platform and reduce flex and rig slop. 

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2 hours ago, SpearHead said:

Interested to know more. I’ve considered something similar as well as the colligo setups but really concerned about this type of setup getting in the way and causing injury.

Are you measuring the stays each time to know what works?

Any noticeable difference with using different rig tension settings?

I did this to be able to adjust the rig tension (due to code 0 and folding system).
The black line has a fixed length and carries the shrouds without increased load. This is quasi zero tension and an additional security-line. If rig tension is needed, I adjust the winward side by a few cm. The whole thing then gets a cover to protect against injuries and pinching the tiller.

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On 4/6/2020 at 4:34 PM, MultiThom said:

Roller Furling a fuller spinnaker requires a good torque rope.  Your sailmaker "may" have incorporated a good torque rope, but more likely than not, it is not that great.  You can add a separate torque rope and still use a bottom up spinnaker furler (I do).  Spearhead is correct, you must get the torque rope really tight and it helps to unload the spinnaker as much as possible (drive deep).  Then, after the top swivel has turned a few times, you can put tension on the sheet and continue furling-finish by wrapping a couple turns of sheets around the clew.   Since the spin is now taking the load off the forestay, you should release the tension off the spin halyard before heading to weather-since I'm not racing, I usually lower it out of the way.

Thanks for the tips. The boat came with a Ronstan Series 80 top-down with a torsion line, and I'm told by the previous owner it works ok, but I haven't flown one off a furler before. Fitted it today and all looks good, and we won't be using it for racing, only for cruising with the kids. The aim is to get the prep time down to as little as possible so I'm getting a jib sock too (pull sock down, clip halyard to top of furler, attach tack, head out - at least that's the theory!).

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On 4/6/2020 at 12:41 PM, SpearHead said:

bissona,

It wasn't until I began using a screecher that I moved the asym kite off the furler. I now launch it from the trampoline with a retrieval line out to a single block in the place of the furler. I have heard stories of people having difficulties furling the asym kite and agree its not a flat cut like a screecher but i never had any issues furling it up nice and tight. As long as you get that anti torsion line super stiff the furler and swivel will do the job.

Thanks for the advice and line length table. Did you just tension the spi halyard as per normal, or did you have a 2:1 system up front? I can't see a neat / simple way of mounting the 2:1 but there's sure to be one out there.

I also need to order in some 7mm light sheets for the spi (continuous) but am having to guess at line length. Was thinking 28m (equivalent of (2 x forestay>spi block>turning block on front of tramp>centre of boat) + 3m slack to pull on). Any thoughts?

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29 minutes ago, bissona said:

Thanks for the tips. The boat came with a Ronstan Series 80 top-down with a torsion line, and I'm told by the previous owner it works ok, but I haven't flown one off a furler before. Fitted it today and all looks good, and we won't be using it for racing, only for cruising with the kids. The aim is to get the prep time down to as little as possible so I'm getting a jib sock too (pull sock down, clip halyard to top of furler, attach tack, head out - at least that's the theory!).

Top down will take longer (S'OK, though, you aren't racing) but will still need to have the halyard loosened some after furling before heading back upwind to keep the forestay loaded.  Be sure to cleat the furling lines with some tension on them or the spin may deploy by accident.  You should still tension the torque rope prior to furling but it isn't as critical to get it super tight.  You have to watch the furl because sometimes the bottom (or middle) starts furling the wrong way and then you can get a mess.  You also sometimes will have to gybe to get the spin completely unfurled for the same reasons.   Bye and large, though, top down furling works well on a full spinnaker and gives you full range of use (ie, good vmg since it is fuller cut).   You will be surprised by how many turns you have to take on the furling line before the top begins to furl.  Like everything else, the more you use it, the easier it will be.

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5 hours ago, bissona said:

Thanks for the advice and line length table. Did you just tension the spi halyard as per normal, or did you have a 2:1 system up front? I can't see a neat / simple way of mounting the 2:1 but there's sure to be one out there.

I also need to order in some 7mm light sheets for the spi (continuous) but am having to guess at line length. Was thinking 28m (equivalent of (2 x forestay>spi block>turning block on front of tramp>centre of boat) + 3m slack to pull on). Any thoughts?

I installed two cheek blocks on the mast to give myself some purchase for the halyard but I didn't find them overly useful so i've since being using a 6:1 (Harken 29mm from my Hobie 16 downhaul). This works especially well for my screecher which i need unbelievably tight but i wouldn't use this for the standard asym kite as its overkill.

Anything with the correct lengths will work for the spi sheets, i can't see myself changing them anytime soon as the supplied green lines work fine and easier to keep tidy and put away than having a single continuous line to keep moving around the boat.

 

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On 4/7/2020 at 11:41 PM, fastsailor600 said:

I did this to be able to adjust the rig tension (due to code 0 and folding system).
The black line has a fixed length and carries the shrouds without increased load. This is quasi zero tension and an additional security-line. If rig tension is needed, I adjust the winward side by a few cm. The whole thing then gets a cover to protect against injuries and pinching the tiller.

Interesting.

Totally agree - having the rig tension set underneath a furling jib forestay is pretty shit, especially too when you can only set it once the floats are out which tyically requires you to be on the water. I will keep pondering on an alternative but so far i'm liking a collego setup.

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  • 1 month later...

Hello all. I’m looking into the Pulse 600’s at the moment (seems like I fit the category of sailor: 46 yrs, slow on the knees, hips, shoulders and elbows...but I still have a hankering for going fast):blink:

I’ll be towing the boat home rather than storing it at the club and I’ve been trying to get some specs on trailers for it. Can anyone help me with that info please?

thanks in advance B)

Brett

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On 4/7/2020 at 1:02 PM, SpearHead said:

Interested to know more. I’ve considered something similar as well as the colligo setups but really concerned about this type of setup getting in the way and causing injury.

Are you measuring the stays each time to know what works?

Any noticeable difference with using different rig tension settings?

Update: Now „undercover“

93EF65A3-90A8-4FEF-8ED5-BC30A245AC11.jpeg

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10 hours ago, SpearHead said:

Welcome Brett, we only have the 4 here in Australia. Where are you looking? I'm guessing majority of owners purchase with trailer already attached so you would need to contact Corsair for trailer specs.

Hello and thank you Spearhead. 
I’ve  been following your YouTube channel and am enjoying the ride!

I’m based in Adelaide...we did live in the Sunshine Coast for a brief moment in time and I can say that the water is a lot warmer up there

I’ve tried making contact with Corsair and the Aus dealer but I’m guessing that due to COVID, they’re not available(?)

There’s only one 2nd hand one on the market at the moment (shipping to Aus from Singapore) but I’m in no hurry...who knows, with what’s happening in the US at the moment maybe I wait and see if our dollar gets closer to parity.

I’ll keep trying Corsair direct

Specs on the cradle would be helpful too

Brett

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Glad you enjoy my videos, super bummed we haven't been able to do more sailing videos particularly the 2020 Bay2Bay.

Corsair in Vietnam will likely point you directly back to Brett Vaughan's dealership based in Sydney. That's who sold the existing Pulses here. I can't see why they wouldn't respond to you so try again.  https://www.multihullcentral.com/team-member/brent-vaughan/

Absolutely agree that the US market dollar hasn't helped any new purchasing of boats like these downunder. Would be great to see a fifth Pulse here 2nd hand or new, even if we are states apart. One of the red Pulses recently moved to the NSW south coast so that would be the closes one to you.

Absolutely you can launch from a beach and in some terms its easier to rig up on a beach than from a pontoon.

 

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Just checking if anyone has replaced their mainsail yet? Mine has a couple of tears (repaired) near the bolt rope and it's looking pretty shapeless. 

Default seems to be Doyle but I've also contacted Technique Voile to see what they can do.  Any other suggestions, particularly lofts with experience of the Pulse, welcome. 

 

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On 5/31/2020 at 3:39 PM, Liquid Illusion said:

Thanks Matt

You’ve been a great resource on this thread.

The 3 other Pulses are in QLD? Is that correct?

Cheers again

Brett

Matt has been motivated after too many years falling off Hobies lol. 

But seriously, he is getting the owners motivated and together to sail these cool boats that never got much airplay here in OZ. I would love to have one in the shed to fill the gap between my Weta and F31. 

Peter

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12 hours ago, bissona said:

Just checking if anyone has replaced their mainsail yet? Mine has a couple of tears (repaired) near the bolt rope and it's looking pretty shapeless. 

 

Throw a bigger main on and reclaim that performance of those HUGE volume ama's that are just begging to be pressed.

At least that's my plan this winter, the boat is way too underpowered in the light stuff as is (it's still fast and fun enough for most people... their target demographic let's call it).

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22 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

Matt has been motivated after too many years falling off Hobies lol. 

But seriously, he is getting the owners motivated and together to sail these cool boats that never got much airplay here in OZ. I would love to have one in the shed to fill the gap between my Weta and F31. 

Peter

Thanks Peter.

 

I'm just started a Facebook community page too for anyone who owns a Pulse or who just loves multihulls. Would be great to get Pulse owners on one platform to discuss repairs/modifications etc.

Page is here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2913756942007111/

 

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On 6/1/2020 at 6:54 PM, plywoodboy said:

. I would love to have one in the shed to fill the gap between my Weta and F31. 

Peter

I'll come and play with you ...

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hello Pulse sailors

I have just started sailing my boat, and the Pulse is probably the closest widespread design out there so I am looking for your pointers on sailing upwind.

So far I have sailed twice in winds gusting to maybe 10-12kts max, and what felt right upwind was boat speed 7 to 8 kts but then looking at my data, my tacking angles are around 100°. Bearing away just a touch I can easily touch 9 to 10kts boat speed but this feels more like a close reach than sailing upwind.

I am an experienced sportsboat sailor, but new to the world of multis, so interested in your experience.

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