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1 hour ago, SpearHead said:

Chris this wasn't an overly windy day but gives you a good idea how it can be pushed on a reach with only two persons onboard - main and jib only!

 

First time I see a convincing video of well driven  Pulse 600 with only two person on board. However, unfortunatly,  it lacks GPS data, should use a Garmin VIRB X camera instead of a GO PRO !

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You folks must be fortunate to sail in places with steady windspeed with no gusts or lulls and no wind shifts and no current and very little traffic.   If you are looking at instruments where I sail,

Look at the most popular and best selling multi-hull sailboats of all time - none are over 18 feet in length. Boats that can be set up by one person, in less than about 30 minutes, and sell for less t

Top down will take longer (S'OK, though, you aren't racing) but will still need to have the halyard loosened some after furling before heading back upwind to keep the forestay loaded.  Be sure to clea

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1 hour ago, patzefran said:

First time I see a convincing video of well driven  Pulse 600 with only two person on board. However, unfortunatly,  it lacks GPS data, should use a Garmin VIRB X camera instead of a GO PRO !

Chris I have the entire race tracked on Navionics but i would never rely on this data (as its GPS) as gospel.

I messaged you last year about your Garmin VIRB X on Youtube as i'm keen to try one myself but not for the data, more for the 360 recording.

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5 hours ago, SpearHead said:

Chris I have the entire race tracked on Navionics but i would never rely on this data (as its GPS) as gospel.

I messaged you last year about your Garmin VIRB X on Youtube as i'm keen to try one myself but not for the data, more for the 360 recording.

Nice video, thanks and congrats on the bubbly!  Fun watching you reel the folks in.  

I carry a separate Canmore dongle to capture GPS for video overlays.  More reliable than having them built into camcorders in my experience.  Happens to be less expensive as well.  

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On 6/9/2020 at 7:54 AM, SpearHead said:

Chris this wasn't an overly windy day but gives you a good idea how it can be pushed on a reach with only two persons onboard - main and jib only!

 

Really cool film, you are doing great! I will subscribe to your channel. Dont know why I have not done it before :) Looks easy. And you also blasting by those monohulls. You seems to handle the boat great with two persons.

Yesterday was our last club race for the sprint. Nearly identical condition and wind like last two race. I did change my trim to the jib, straighen it up some more, change so it did not twisted that much. Yesterday I could point higher than before, with the same speed. The same boring track as always, but this time I was the first boat already the last upwind. Then I messed up a bit downwind, but was doing very good.

Will upload some video later this week, but here is something else I did as a preview :)

 

 

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Chris, as you know - there is nothing better than overtaking boats, even if they are just monohulls. Your videos have inspired me to get a 360 recorder especially for the few passage racers i do as one of them the multihulls are last to start which means you have to overtake an entire fleet (20-30+) monos which makes for some great video using it as you have.

I have always wondered if you have considered running a kite? Your downwind legs seem to be your weakest at times.

 

Thanks mundt

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20 hours ago, SpearHead said:

Chris, as you know - there is nothing better than overtaking boats, even if they are just monohulls. Your videos have inspired me to get a 360 recorder especially for the few passage racers i do as one of them the multihulls are last to start which means you have to overtake an entire fleet (20-30+) monos which makes for some great video using it as you have.

I have always wondered if you have considered running a kite? Your downwind legs seem to be your weakest at times.

 

Thanks mundt

Glad you got inspire! and passing mono-hulls is even better. The 360 action-cam is amazing. Its difficult to understand how usable it is until you tried it a couple of times. It catches everything, and you can later decide what to see. I love tech, and did some smaller "innovations". Last week I built a micro-floating island, to film from water. TRied it out for 5 min before the start of the race. Could be cool videos. Then also, added some powerbanks in tubes, that gives the cam power for several of hours. Will write something about it at my blog.

FloatingIsland.jpg

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On 6/9/2020 at 11:08 AM, SpearHead said:

Chris I have the entire race tracked on Navionics but i would never rely on this data (as its GPS) as gospel.

I messaged you last year about your Garmin VIRB X on Youtube as i'm keen to try one myself but not for the data, more for the 360 recording.

I am not Chris , but Patrick, and to my knowledge, my Garmin VIRB X doesn't record 360° ! Why don't you rely on Navionics GPS, you can use GPS action replay (free) software and run velocity stat which are reliable, e.g. 10 second mean, or 100 m runs !

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15 hours ago, patzefran said:

I am not Chris , but Patrick, and to my knowledge, my Garmin VIRB X doesn't record 360° ! Why don't you rely on Navionics GPS, you can use GPS action replay (free) software and run velocity stat which are reliable, e.g. 10 second mean, or 100 m runs !

Apologies Patrick, quoting you was a mistake. It was Chris - "cholsson" whom i was replying to as he has a Youtube channel and uses a Garmin VIRB to record his sailing and also the GPS tracking.

Patrick in response to your comment about Navionics GPS - I only rely on it for tracking my course. If i wanted a true measure of speed I would install a SOG system.

 

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On 6/13/2020 at 9:56 AM, SpearHead said:

Apologies Patrick, quoting you was a mistake. It was Chris - "cholsson" whom i was replying to as he has a Youtube channel and uses a Garmin VIRB to record his sailing and also the GPS tracking.

Patrick in response to your comment about Navionics GPS - I only rely on it for tracking my course. If i wanted a true measure of speed I would install a SOG system.

 

You are welcome !

GPS  (Garmin, Velocitek.....) are accurate Speed Over Ground (SOG) system

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While I have been looking to buy some flavor of an fboat for some time this is the first time I have considered a Pulse.  Was looking mostly at some version of a C24, and mostly the newer ones with big amas.  I have sailed on the C24 and C31 including putting them together and taking them apart.  I know the more times you do it the faster it gets.  So first question is how easy is it to get a Pulse from the trailer into the water compared to say a C24 MII or a C31.

Like a lot of folks I am not against crew but often wind up sailing alone.  Currently I have a Seawind and have sailed it single handed for literally thousands of miles.  But it has a self tacking jib and all lines lead to the steering stations.  I can deal with single handing the big screecher but it only goes up in less than probably 10-12 knots.  The working jib moves the boat well if the wind is stronger than that.  So how easy is it to single hand a Pulse.  I have also seen short (and to my mind incomplete) vids of a single person raising the mast; is this realistic.

Any other comments, including price point, welcome.

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3 hours ago, Tomfl said:So how easy is it to single hand a Pulse.  I have also seen short (and to my mind incomplete) vids of a single person raising the mast; is this realistic.

Tomfl if you have a fb account join this page;

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2913756942007111/?ref=share

A chap in the US just posted a complete time lapse video of a solo launch and sail. He used a crane too but trailering is just as easy.

I have setup my mast solo numerous times just using the trailer winch. it’s easy to do once you get the hang of it. 

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7 hours ago, Tomfl said:

While I have been looking to buy some flavor of an fboat for some time this is the first time I have considered a Pulse.  Was looking mostly at some version of a C24, and mostly the newer ones with big amas.  I have sailed on the C24 and C31 including putting them together and taking them apart.  I know the more times you do it the faster it gets.  So first question is how easy is it to get a Pulse from the trailer into the water compared to say a C24 MII or a C31.

Like a lot of folks I am not against crew but often wind up sailing alone.  Currently I have a Seawind and have sailed it single handed for literally thousands of miles.  But it has a self tacking jib and all lines lead to the steering stations.  I can deal with single handing the big screecher but it only goes up in less than probably 10-12 knots.  The working jib moves the boat well if the wind is stronger than that.  So how easy is it to single hand a Pulse.  I have also seen short (and to my mind incomplete) vids of a single person raising the mast; is this realistic.

Any other comments, including price point, welcome.

you can put all the corsair masts up and down by yourself

( not done a 37 so cant say for that)

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Corsair Pulse  vs Corsair 24--won't be a whole lot of difference sailing.  24 has higher top end, the pulse may be quicker in moderate breeze depending on which flavor of 24.  No winches on the Pulse.  No cabin on the Pulse (storage may be an issue for long distance cruises). My objection to the Pulse design is threefold, 1) Too expensive if purchased new; 2) no self tacking jib; 3) Has a boom (I prefer boomless designs for family safety reasons).  

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1 hour ago, MultiThom said:

Corsair Pulse  vs Corsair 24--won't be a whole lot of difference sailing.  24 has higher top end, the pulse may be quicker in moderate breeze depending on which flavor of 24.  No winches on the Pulse.  No cabin on the Pulse (storage may be an issue for long distance cruises). My objection to the Pulse design is threefold, 1) Too expensive if purchased new; 2) no self tacking jib; 3) Has a boom (I prefer boomless designs for family safety reasons).  

I am a big fan of self tacking jibs and no boom; just not sure which fboat has both.  I have looked at lots of other small/medium tris.  I really like some of the small Dragonfly tris but they are as rare as hen's teeth.  That is the only other tri I have seen that has a folding system as good as the ones Ian came up with.  Still seems like the C27 is likely the best bang for the buck and the newer C24 designs with the big amas are likely the best sailors.  I get it that the Pulse seems to be very expensive, both new and used; but this is true for the newer Sprints and Dashes as well; not to mention the 760 or 880 which are really above my price point.

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Don't think any corsairs come without booms nor with self tackers.  F25C is boomless, but not a production boat-still one of the fastest tri's you can buy in that size.  If you are looking for a scuba platform, don't think either boat (24 or 600) will work; just too weighty of gear.  If you are just looking for some fun on the water without having to deal with ginormous seawind there are lotsa beach cats.  I'd suggest a searail except they are as hard to find as dragonfly--self tacker, boomless and lots less money than the 600 (which is why I have one). 

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17 hours ago, Tomfl said:

I am a big fan of self tacking jibs and no boom; just not sure which fboat has both.  I have looked at lots of other small/medium tris.  I really like some of the small Dragonfly tris but they are as rare as hen's teeth.  That is the only other tri I have seen that has a folding system as good as the ones Ian came up with.  Still seems like the C27 is likely the best bang for the buck and the newer C24 designs with the big amas are likely the best sailors.  I get it that the Pulse seems to be very expensive, both new and used; but this is true for the newer Sprints and Dashes as well; not to mention the 760 or 880 which are really above my price point.

The big ama' look good and give you bigger righting moment so more speed in big winds but for sure slower in light airs as more drag

Saying that not raced in a fleet with a 760 yet

Thats the story with the original ama's versus the MK1/2 Corsair 24 version

In Asia the average 28 sails with same handicap as an average 24 but clearly will get away in bigger seas

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6 hours ago, Sailabout said:

The big ama' look good and give you bigger righting moment so more speed in big winds but for sure slower in light airs as more drag

SNIP

Not doubting that but it is the first time I have seen the claim that big amas are slower in light airs.  I am far from an expert on this but I thought big amas came with a bigger sail plan than the fboats with smaller amas.

 

In any case has anyone had experience with boats with big and little amas competing in light airs.  Since I live and would be sailing the boat in Florida where the wind speed is normally less than ten knots and often less than five knots it may be a good idea for me to rethink how attractive fboats with little amas are.

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43 minutes ago, Tomfl said:

Not doubting that but it is the first time I have seen the claim that big amas are slower in light airs.  I am far from an expert on this but I thought big amas came with a bigger sail plan than the fboats with smaller amas.

 

In any case has anyone had experience with boats with big and little amas competing in light airs.  Since I live and would be sailing the boat in Florida where the wind speed is normally less than ten knots and often less than five knots it may be a good idea for me to rethink how attractive fboats with little amas are.

In under 5, it is about weight and skipper skill.  Some skippers are light wind masters, some just fire up the outboard and go home.  In 5 to 10 kt you can do as well with a monohull as most trimarans of the same length because you can put a ginormous headsail on the boat and they point 10 degrees higher in some cases.  If you are planning on racing, go crew for someone who is racing and observe.  Corsair doesn't make light boats for their size--so if buying a corsair, have the boat weighed prior to buying to avoid a dog for your winds.  F27s do better in lighter stuff than C24s or Pulse, you can actually fit a bigger genoa on the F27 which seems to do well on the boat in your wind range.

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12 hours ago, Sailabout said:

The big ama' look good and give you bigger righting moment so more speed in big winds but for sure slower in light airs as more drag

Saying that not raced in a fleet with a 760 yet

Thats the story with the original ama's versus the MK1/2 Corsair 24 version

In Asia the average 28 sails with same handicap as an average 24 but clearly will get away in bigger seas

Here is my 760, big fat amas and all, doing 5kts in 3 kts of wind:

So much for poor light air performance. Absolutely flat lake helps.

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You can talk about arma sizes and wind speeds all you want. The biggest contributing factor to performance in light airs for the Pulse is swell/waves when pointing. If sailing in a lake or well sheltered bay you won’t have this issue. The Pulse just lacks the weight/size and water line to punch through

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11 hours ago, Tomfl said:

Not doubting that but it is the first time I have seen the claim that big amas are slower in light airs.  I am far from an expert on this but I thought big amas came with a bigger sail plan than the fboats with smaller amas.

It's not just about volume, but high volume floats usually mean it takes a bit more to get one out of the water, having 3 hulls in the water is slow but as long as you can lift one hull a lightly immersed high volume ama doesn't have to be draggy... The MK2 sprints have a flat spot on the hull from starting from the old F-24 floats moulds so that was probably not ideal in light airs...

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On 7/14/2020 at 6:23 AM, free2speed said:

Here is my 760, big fat amas and all, doing 5kts in 3 kts of wind:

So much for poor light air performance. Absolutely flat lake helps.

and that proves?...it sails in 3 kts

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It looks like there are currently 6 Pulses for sale in the US... and to my eye these have been the same exact ones that have been up for sale for a while.

Are the prices, in the mid $30's, still too high for this little model? Seems like trying to resale one of these might be a chore...

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats-for-sale/make-corsair/model-pulse-600/region-northamerica/sort-price:asc/?price=15000-38000

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1 hour ago, Floating Duck said:

Are the prices, in the mid $30's, still too high for this little model? Seems like trying to resale one of these might be a chore...

Seems the marketplace is making that statement.  Sure it is a nice day sailor for family fun, but so are beach cats and a weta at half the price.  When you are in the market for a toy you look for the most fun for your money.  

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1 hour ago, MultiThom said:

Seems the marketplace is making that statement.  Sure it is a nice day sailor for family fun, but so are beach cats and a weta at half the price.  When you are in the market for a toy you look for the most fun for your money.  

Not disputing the bang for the buck is a big consideration.  On the other hand there is little doubt a Pulse is a drier boat than a beach cat or a Weta; not to mention a  much safer option if you have rug rats tagging along (not that I think that is a good idea but I see it a lot).  Still it is not easy to choose a Pulse over say an older C24 that may go for around $US10,000 less.  One thing the Pulse does impresses me with is how easy it is to get from trailer to into the water.  I view it as a small niche boat that fits a few folks very well but not one that will ever have a big following.

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1 minute ago, Tomfl said:

 Still it is not easy to choose a Pulse over say an older C24 that may go for around $US10,000 less.  One thing the Pulse does impresses me with is how easy it is to get from trailer to into the water.  I view it as a small niche boat that fits a few folks very well but not one that will ever have a big following.

It is just as easy or even easier to get that C24 into the water than the Pulse.   Given the cabin on the C24 and a similar price point (albeit older), Pulse' will have a rough go on the resale market (as will my SeaRail--but mine is scarce as hens teeth while Pulse' abound).  Trimarans are toys.  You get one to play with.  You "hope" (forlornly for the most part) the family enjoys it which is why a cabin makes it a more attractive toy.  Mine is a PWC; just like my motorcycle is my fun ride.  

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On 7/16/2020 at 8:51 AM, Floating Duck said:

It looks like there are currently 6 Pulses for sale in the US... and to my eye these have been the same exact ones that have been up for sale for a while.

Are the prices, in the mid $30's, still too high for this little model? Seems like trying to resale one of these might be a chore...

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats-for-sale/make-corsair/model-pulse-600/region-northamerica/sort-price:asc/?price=15000-38000

3 days ago I spoke to a guy who made a low ball offer on the Oxnard Pulse (asking price is $39,500). He said the owner wouldn't budge. He would only come down $1000.

 

BTW:  I started talking to the young man at the ramp because he was helping his father launch Cat 2 Fold 2.  His father, the designer and builder of the original Cat 2 Fold has now made another one out of a MacGregor 36.  Free standing Bi-plane rig, center hard dodger, if it folds it is a different system than the original.

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Man, I sure think 39,500 is a lot of dough for a Pulse.  I'd love to sail one but I can think of so many other great boats that you could get for that money.  You could get a really well equipped F-boat and put some new sails on it to boot.  

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26 minutes ago, mundt said:

Man, I sure think 39,500 is a lot of dough for a Pulse.  

You are not alone--even if it were new, but that's 39.5K for a used Pulse.

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2 hours ago, mundt said:

Man, I sure think 39,500 is a lot of dough for a Pulse.  I'd love to sail one but I can think of so many other great boats that you could get for that money.  You could get a really well equipped F-boat and put some new sails on it to boot.  

Agreed. In Australia, we’re looking at over $70k for new (after exchange rate, shipping, compliance/certification, trailer, duties...). It puts it well out of touch to reality. Sure, there’s a lot of work in manufacturing one...it’s all the transfer fees that kill it for us here.

i believe 4 years ago it was more like $50k...an extra $20k effectively is p!55ed against the wall

There's a 2006 Corsair 750 up for sale here at $39k...I just really liked the pulse for its towability and easy launch

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You'd think there would be a niche for something like the Pulse but should be 25k new and 15ish used.  Otherwise makes no sense.  Apparently the demand simply doesn't exist since affluent youngsters have expressed no interest.  Only old beachcat sailors and surfers seem to lust after such toys.

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25K US would be a good price point.  Probably even feasible for a small company that only turns out that boat on a small production run basis.  There just isn't the demand for trimaran day sailors.  Gotta hand it to weta...they've sold a whole bunch of beach tris.  

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Look at the most popular and best selling multi-hull sailboats of all time - none are over 18 feet in length. Boats that can be set up by one person, in less than about 30 minutes, and sell for less than $15K remain popular and sell in good numbers. The easier and more convenient a boat is to set up and sail, the more paying fans it's going to have. I cannot fathom why companies build 20 to 25 foot trimarans, slap (out of necessity) a 40K+ price tag on them and then wonder why they sell so few.

If the Rocket Trimaran people can indeed bring their new Rocket 44 trimaran in for under $20K, it's going to be a grand success.

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46 minutes ago, Tom Kirkman said:

If the Rocket Trimaran people can indeed bring their new Rocket 44 trimaran in for under $20K, it's going to be a grand success.

That's what Ian thought a decade or more ago when he started fiddling with the F22.  His original concept was a "boat in a box" for under $20K.  Didn't happen.  An F22 costs 5 times original estimate and sure as heck isn't a DIY boat in box.  A windrider 17 redesigned to get rid of the skeg and seating arrangement and fitted with a snuffer/sprit---that'd be a good boat if it sailed well (current windrider isn't a great sailor upwind).  I think 18 feet is "the right size".  Take your Astus and add 18" but keep the price in mid 20s.  

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There's a fine line between super light and easy and being comfortable in the ocean.  I've been alternating between an 18 foot Nacra and my 7 meter tri lately.  The Nacra is very light and sails very well but not super comfortable and if it blows over 15 not so relaxing nor dry.  The tri is much harder to move around on land but is almost as fast and certainly much more comfy.  My multi 23 was close to being the best of both worlds but had a few bad habits too.  

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19 hours ago, mundt said:

Man, I sure think 39,500 is a lot of dough for a Pulse.  I'd love to sail one but I can think of so many other great boats that you could get for that money.  You could get a really well equipped F-boat and put some new sails on it to boot.  

How many good used L7s could you get for that.....3?

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On 7/18/2020 at 2:34 PM, MultiThom said:

That's what Ian thought a decade or more ago when he started fiddling with the F22.  His original concept was a "boat in a box" for under $20K.  Didn't happen.  An F22 costs 5 times original estimate and sure as heck isn't a DIY boat in box.  A windrider 17 redesigned to get rid of the skeg and seating arrangement and fitted with a snuffer/sprit---that'd be a good boat if it sailed well (current windrider isn't a great sailor upwind).  I think 18 feet is "the right size".  Take your Astus and add 18" but keep the price in mid 20s.  

I wouldn't disagree - another foot on the Astus 16.5 at the same price with better build quality (compared to what i got at the outset) and you'd be pretty close. in fact, that would make it pretty much a 17 to 18 foot Diam 24. Hulls are almost identical. But all these boats with cuddy cabins and other stuff that most sailors don't want nor need. The Hobie 16, even today, checks most of the boxes for most day sailors. If it didn't, it wouldn't still be in production. Too many boat companies are trying to cater to a very, very small market instead of the much larger sport market that Hobie has always seemed to understand.

The Windrider 17 doesn't point very high. It is available with a spinnaker (reacher, really) nowadays. It's affordable and does some things better than any other boat. But it's marketing is not exactly magnificent and it makes sailing so simple that many long time traditional sailors can't bring themselves to own one.

In the meantime, the Rocket 44 remains on schedule and at the hoped for price. I wish it was a couple feet longer, but I understand why they choose not to do that.

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57 minutes ago, Tom Kirkman said:

SNIP

In the meantime, the Rocket 44 remains on schedule and at the hoped for price. I wish it was a couple feet longer, but I understand why they choose not to do that.

Went to their site.  Any updates on price and when they will no longer be vapor ware.

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The plugs and molds are finished. I asked them when they might begin some marketing and perhaps have a facebook page and photos. I was told they are on schedule to do that but want a boat finished and ready to sail first. I have not heard of any changes to the target price of somewhere under $20K. That's all I know for now. In the meantime, work continues.

 

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Anybody using a whoopie sling for their shroud tensioner?  I'm thinking of trying one on the side I unfold first since it's downwind so not critical I get it tight.

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If the Windrider was updated with a model that allowed easy side-sitting (I know you can rig it that way) and more bench rather than cockpit seating and a few other changes, it might be able to address a middle ground. It's a heck of a value but I remember getting sore sitting in the same position when I rented them. 

Being able to bring family or friends onboard for a leisure ride is a nice thing. 

My 750 is headed off to a new owner this week...since we sold our house in RI. We now winter in Sarasota - and I can say for sure we have MANY days with brisk winds. 10-20 on many days with gusts to 22 being fairly normal in some weather patterns. 

The Pulse looks nice but too much money for just messing with - maybe the prices will come down like they did with the 750's - they were all in the mid and upper 30's and one guy from CA kept lowering and lowering until it was about 27K and that set the current market. Sooner or later someone will need to sell one badly...maybe?

I just noticed the RS Sailing cats - although I like the tri for safety against flipping, the cats are priced well and I may be able to outfit it with some seating (flat on the tramp) for friends and family. 

I'm going to stop by the Zim showroom in RI in the next few weeks and look at the various boats...assuming them have them all on display. 

I really did love that 750 in those RI waters. People thought I was nuts because I'd be out on days when no other boats would be comfortable (given the fetch, winds, etc.) - and passing 1.5 million dollar rigs was always satisfying. 

Sarasota Bay doesn't have that fetch so I need not worry as much about the heavier weight or slicing through. 

Maybe I'll just say "screw it all" in the end and get a Getaway or something - has those seats and was fun when I took them out. I can store mast up and rigged so pushing it into the water should be a cakewalk if I join the squadron. 

I'm not getting any younger so that figures in also. But the boats may help ward off Father Time - if the Florida COVID Grim Reaper doesn't harvest me. 

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On 7/25/2020 at 12:09 AM, MultiThom said:

Anybody using a whoopie sling for their shroud tensioner?  I'm thinking of trying one on the side I unfold first since it's downwind so not critical I get it tight.

I've been thinking of using dyneema shrouds on a small tri that I'm building and using a whoopie sling to tension. I think it'll need a bungie on the tail to keep it under tension so it won't slip.

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21 minutes ago, hobiedd97 said:

I've been thinking of using dyneema shrouds on a small tri that I'm building and using a whoopie sling to tension. I think it'll need a bungie on the tail to keep it under tension so it won't slip.

Why not just tie a knot?  Taut line hitch.  The whoopie sling I have put on my boat has about a 10 inch bury (1/4 inch line) so it "should" hold even without the knots, but why take chances.  I'm having a little difficulty (in the side yard), loosening it after it is tensioned since the bury starts close to the net.  If it is under tension when I try to detension it, I"m not sure I will be able to.  In any event, I'm giving it a go next time out, will let you know how it turns out.

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11 hours ago, hobiedd97 said:

I've been thinking of using dyneema shrouds on a small tri that I'm building and using a whoopie sling to tension. I think it'll need a bungie on the tail to keep it under tension so it won't slip.

F18 cats in my club use those to stabilize the prodder laterally without a problem 

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  • 5 months later...
On 7/28/2020 at 6:54 PM, MultiThom said:

Why not just tie a knot?  Taut line hitch.  The whoopie sling I have put on my boat has about a 10 inch bury (1/4 inch line) so it "should" hold even without the knots, but why take chances.  I'm having a little difficulty (in the side yard), loosening it after it is tensioned since the bury starts close to the net.  If it is under tension when I try to detension it, I"m not sure I will be able to.  In any event, I'm giving it a go next time out, will let you know how it turns out.

Sorry to take so long with a report, but the whoopie sling didn't work out well as a shroud tensioner.  It worked fine to hold the line, but could not be released without slack or under even a little load.  I ended up lowering the mast back down in order to release it.  I was thinking of doing a dyneema "hifield" lever with a soft shackle, but it'd be the same deal, can't undo under tension.  So I'm sticking with a cascade of lashings.

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  • 2 months later...

Windrider appears to have pivoted to the outdoor clothing business - not even the pic of a boat on their main page or FB. I'd guess maybe they are selling the molds or brand to someone?? Very strange to have the site, the Prez and a picture "about us" and not a mention of the boats or parts!

Meanwhile, some Pulse models appear to be pending or sold - probably don't know the final sale price, but I'd guess 30K for one and 33 for the other. The low priced on (25K FL) is a strange listing b/c it only has one fuzzy pic and was never updated. One of the higher priced ones had a major collection of sails - which is likely how some might invest so much money in these boats! For the buyer we have talked about (not OD, just wants a day sail) having a collection of sails isn't a plus (that is, you don't want to pay for them...nor deal with them). 

There are unlikely to be real value priced used models b/c of how few there are. I don't follow hull numbers but going by what we see, I'd be surprised if 30 existed in the USA - so few dealers and each of them can't have sold more than a handful. 

I would still happily sail one- but the PITA of ownership isn't enticing enough over the simplicity of those beach cats sitting right there on the beach nearby. Yet. 

Maybe, in secret, someone is fixing up those wind rider 17 molds and going to update it! A couple of those sitting on the sand would be a great addition to local rental fleets. 

------

I guess it was no big secret - nor recent...
"Family-owned sailboat company shifts from boat making to ...

 
Jul 27, 2017 — WindRider International, an Edina-based sailboat company, is diverting from being a sailboat manufacturer to becoming a replacement part ..."

 

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I had dinner last night with the guy who brought the Windrider 17 to the market way back when - Andy Zimmerman. He agreed with me that the biggest issue with the Windrider is no dealer network and no sense of how to market the boat. Of course, saiing remains a dying sport here in the U.S. I suppose many sailboat manufacturers are simply scrambling as to ways to stay in business. Pity - the Windrider is still a unique and marketable boat.

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Jordan Lake, smack in the middle of the state, is about 15,000 acres and generally very good for sailing year 'round. Norman, the "inland sea" closer to Charlotte is huge, but it's covered up with power boats most of the year. Really, really busy water. Some love it, I just don't find it my cup of tea. Kerr (Buggs Island) on the NE Carolina border with VA is fantastic. Of course, Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds inside the Outer Banks are great places to sail.

If you go further south into South Carolina then you've got Wylie south of Charlotte, Lake Murray (very highly recommended for sailing) and the chain of Marion and Moultrie but they are huge and get very rough in a good blow.

How big is your multihull? Lake Waccamac (NC) is really nice but only about 5 miles across. Good yacht club there that holds monthly events. Their Alligator River regatta is coming up next month.

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On 3/25/2021 at 9:48 PM, Tom Kirkman said:

I had dinner last night with the guy who brought the Windrider 17 to the market way back when - Andy Zimmerman. He agreed with me that the biggest issue with the Windrider is no dealer network and no sense of how to market the boat. Of course, saiing remains a dying sport here in the U.S. I suppose many sailboat manufacturers are simply scrambling as to ways to stay in business. Pity - the Windrider is still a unique and marketable boat.

They were such a bargain - even new. I noticed that certain "day lakes and resorts" had fleets of them. Perfect for that kind of a setup.

If anyone ever buys the molds they could probably make a go of it by making one basic model (the 17) and just having a "resort" model and a "sport" model, the later perhaps with some upgrades to enhance it (w/out expensive mold changes)...like larger Jib/Genny, maybe rudder and control changes and extra skews on the hull or ama....not my department, but I'm sure if you put some heads together and looked at it from an engineering perspective something could be added.

No dealers.....could say the same about Corsair and many sailboats. Having 10 in the country is "no dealers" - but I suppose that's all part of the "sailing is dead" overall truth. 

Back when I sold high ticket goods that lasted the story was always told of the 1st refrigerators. The makers and marketers said "Fine, we will sell one to each household but soon it will be the end because everyone will have one". Of course, we now see where there is no end to most appliance manufacturing.

With sailboats, tho, it does seem they last too long and are used too little (all in all) to maintain a market unless the tastes (younger people) change. Far be it from me to make that happen or push it along....but I think the USA is missing out on something. 

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Actually, Windrider bought Nickels about 3 or 4 years ago. I remember talking to Dean about it right about the time he was involved in that purchase.

 

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