Jump to content

Corsair Pulse 600


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 2k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

You folks must be fortunate to sail in places with steady windspeed with no gusts or lulls and no wind shifts and no current and very little traffic.   If you are looking at instruments where I sail,

Look at the most popular and best selling multi-hull sailboats of all time - none are over 18 feet in length. Boats that can be set up by one person, in less than about 30 minutes, and sell for less t

Top down will take longer (S'OK, though, you aren't racing) but will still need to have the halyard loosened some after furling before heading back upwind to keep the forestay loaded.  Be sure to clea

Posted Images

he used to be pretty bad about that.....

And I was one who was on his case a lot about that.

However, he has changed his tude pretty dramatically about this and now only posts :

 

If his patents gets "modified " to the point that he deems unsafe.

If people compare his designs with others and bring up half truths or speculations.

A lot of "new" things have been tried by him years ago and some have failed some others proved to be a keeper.

 

Understandingly he wants to make sure that his work is not tarnished by others.

---------------------

 

to say something about Wess comments, yeah you are absolutely right.

Well I haven't met any multihuller who is as braze as it seems here in person.

Funny enough in real person they seem to all get along pretty well.

( one exception that guy who was supposed to sail in a national event with me a couple years back. He did show up 2 days ! late and I had found a replacement for him in the meantime, we did found a boat for him after all, just not on mine )

-----------------------------

 

I have owned a Corsair 28 R and now a Farrier 33

and despite the Corsair dealers ( all in front Mr Wigston ) are class acts by themselves, it is pretty amazing how much after sales support you get from Ian.

He could care less as I bought the boat second hand, but he makes me feel that my boat is still his baby and he helps with anything.

 

-----------

Its much better to volunteer in Clubs, make Multihull racing possible everywhere, than to bitch and moan from one manufacturer to the other. Mine is bigger than yours ( it is, but I digress ) is so darn old. Changing the sailing instructions in many clubs from " selfrighting" to "selfrighting or unsinkable" is not a small feat. Lets put our energy back into worthwhile things like that.

 

-------------

Now back to the pulse ....

 

Thor

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought this was a thread about Corsairs Pulse, not a hate or love Ian Farrier moment. Can we get back to the topic and discus the Pulse and perhaps how it fits into the T20 class or will there be enough numbers to go OD which in some ways would be a shame as it would be pretty cool to have all the little Tri's such as the F22's, TC601's, Pulse 600, Richard Woods impending 20ft design, and a handful of others, with a race series to play in.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

But just remembered why I havent been on this forum for years - pathetic time wasters like Chris O who seems unable to do anything except criticize and attack others. Even Doug Lord, the main target of his obnoxious venom has done more.

 

Having DL, Chris O, and Baltic on Ignore makes all the difference in the world.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If there was one thing that would make me want to go back to Mono's it is OD racing. I don't think the pulse is for me, as I like to camp with my family and take longer trips. However, I really hope Corsair can make it a solid OD fleet. They have a huge uphill battle and there are a number of things that are working against them. The primary problem is that it seems like most big multi guys are somewhat non-conformist tinkerers who are not inclined to follow the "norm" into an OD fleet. It also needs a manufacturer who is committed to building an OD fleet and not changing the damn design. Corsair has not been very good at this in the past, and I'm concerned they didn't have enough prototyping time to get everything right. Remember the J24 had serious design issues like Vermiculite, incorrect keel placement causing lee helm etc... the true success of Johnston was marketing. I sure hope Corsair can do the same thing for multihulls.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If there was one thing that would make me want to go back to Mono's it is OD racing. I don't think the pulse is for me, as I like to camp with my family and take longer trips. However, I really hope Corsair can make it a solid OD fleet. They have a huge uphill battle and there are a number of things that are working against them. The primary problem is that it seems like most big multi guys are somewhat non-conformist tinkerers who are not inclined to follow the "norm" into an OD fleet. It also needs a manufacturer who is committed to building an OD fleet and not changing the damn design. Corsair has not been very good at this in the past, and I'm concerned they didn't have enough prototyping time to get everything right. Remember the J24 had serious design issues like Vermiculite, incorrect keel placement causing lee helm etc... the true success of Johnston was marketing. I sure hope Corsair can do the same thing for multihulls.

Dude (or dudette),

 

You are like my hero. Plus 1,000,000,000 X E5.

 

Alas, only Weta has/is doing that. Don't understand why Corsair does not especially in few OD hotspots but... One of these days I gotta get Steve, Bob or Don drunk and have them splain it to me.

 

Naps? Really, what's ya got?

 

Wess

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most companies will never turn to a forum like this to discuss their product due to the presence of tools such as some frequenting this thread.

Tools in every thread hasn't stopped FARR, C&C, Fred Barrett, Ian Farrier has & lets not forget Bob Perry laying it ALL open for everyone to ask about. So that's BS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Farrier is also the only designer/builder who takes shots at competitors

 

He's the only designer who has people copy his methods and use his trademark on their designs without his permission.

 

How many boats have "the farrier folding system" yet have no involvement with the farrier trademark? How many have failed to work properly over the years when the countless ones he's designed worked flawlessly?

 

It might be personal, but I've seen countless "folding boats" that I haven't seen folded ever, the number that the folding system barely works... Yet the maybe 30 Farriers I've been on or around have been flawless, even the TT680 a few weeks ago folded perfectly.

 

 

 

Most companies will never turn to a forum like this to discuss their product due to the presence of tools such as some frequenting this thread.

Tools in every thread hasn't stopped FARR, C&C, Fred Barrett, Ian Farrier has & lets not forget Bob Perry laying it ALL open for everyone to ask about. So that's BS.

 

 

Yet I think a lot of people hold them in very high regard, always impressed with their boats, always hear a lot of good things too!

Link to post
Share on other sites

He's the only designer who has people copy his methods and use his trademark on their designs without his permission.

Are you saying Corsair did this........ My understanding was Ian worked for Corsair before leaving them. Corsair retained the folding design. Ian, can you confirm?

 

There may or may not have been some bad blood with his departure however Corsair has been sold on and it is run by Seawind.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Most companies will never turn to a forum like this to discuss their product due to the presence of tools such as some frequenting this thread.

Tools in every thread hasn't stopped FARR, C&C, Fred Barrett, Ian Farrier has & lets not forget Bob Perry laying it ALL open for everyone to ask about. So that's BS.

It is not BS but arguably a good business rule. Some may get away with it however you can quickly do a lot of damage as well. The business I work in, the entire industry I work in and the majority of businesses I know would never engage in an Internet forum such as this. Many business prohibit any employee engaging in any form of social media.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

He's the only designer who has people copy his methods and use his trademark on their designs without his permission.

Are you saying Corsair did this........ My understanding was Ian worked for Corsair before leaving them. Corsair retained the folding design. Ian, can you confirm?

 

There may or may not have been some bad blood with his departure however Corsair has been sold on and it is run by Seawind.

 

 

From memory they did claim this, when he piped up, they removed it, I have also seen others like the Raw do the same thing.

 

It is still Ian's trademark, they did retain the design on the boats already designed by him though when they separated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Folding looks about how you would expect it. Not really seeing the big deal here. I'm sure on the water, at the dock, it's going to be pretty much the same. Gotta remember this is just a 20' boat not an F-31.

 

What's with the two-part main shrouds? At 1:32 in the video you can see a set of eye splices half way up the rig. Not sure why.

 

Only thing I might consider changing is those metal braces used to anchor the mast stepping pole and mast side stays for stepping the mast. I'd just put a spectra line with a SS ring at the anchor point and leave it on the boat. Could use it to hold the mast in place with the halyards if the boat is in the yard with the mast up (90% of the time for me).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Folding looks about how you would expect it. Not really seeing the big deal here. I'm sure on the water, at the dock, it's going to be pretty much the same. Gotta remember this is just a 20' boat not an F-31.

 

What's with the two-part main shrouds? At 1:32 in the video you can see a set of eye splices half way up the rig. Not sure why.

 

Only thing I might consider changing is those metal braces used to anchor the mast stepping pole and mast side stays for stepping the mast. I'd just put a spectra line with a SS ring at the anchor point and leave it on the boat. Could use it to hold the mast in place with the halyards if the boat is in the yard with the mast up (90% of the time for me).

Same as Farrier is testing on f22#1 I think. Some sort of automatic backstay.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like those shrouds are for testing. Notice the load cell at the base of the shrouds.

 

I believe when Ian left Corsair part of the deal was that they got to keep his folding mechanism.

 

You need the metal braces so that the raising wires rotate through the same point as the mast. That way they are tight all the way through the process and don't allow the mast to swing to one side or the other.

 

Why does the spin not go all the way to the mast. It seems like it is blowing to leeward a good foot or so? With that short prod I would want maximum spin-main separation. Maybe they are playing with the luff tension though.

 

The boat looks really. Should be super fun to sail. Wish it could be self righted.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Most companies will never turn to a forum like this to discuss their product due to the presence of tools such as some frequenting this thread.

Tools in every thread hasn't stopped FARR, C&C, Fred Barrett, Ian Farrier has & lets not forget Bob Perry laying it ALL open for everyone to ask about. So that's BS.

It is not BS but arguably a good business rule. Some may get away with it however you can quickly do a lot of damage as well. The business I work in, the entire industry I work in and the majority of businesses I know would never engage in an Internet forum such as this. Many business prohibit any employee engaging in any form of social media.

 

 

Public communication with clients or existing customers seems to work fine if one builds a good product and looks after customers well. Saves a lot of time too by eliminating multiple answers to the same question.

 

Just my experience from many years of being available publicly

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs that Work

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

He's the only designer who has people copy his methods and use his trademark on their designs without his permission.

Are you saying Corsair did this........ My understanding was Ian worked for Corsair before leaving them. Corsair retained the folding design. Ian, can you confirm?

 

I licensed Corsair as a builder from 1984, and a condition of the license was for me to have full control over both production and marketing. I then setup all their production and control systems from 1984 to 1991 in order to develop and build the F-27. However, design and policy differences arose in 1990, and I decided to leave full time involvement in 1991 - all past history and detailed at:

 

http://www.f-boat.com/pdf/47Newsletter.pdf

 

http://www.f-boat.com/pages/background/hall_of_fame.html

 

http://www.f-boat.com/pages/background/history.html(1984 to 2001)

 

They could continue to use my name and folding system with existing designs from 2000 on, when I finally ceased any involvement, but were obliged to remove my name should any unauthorized changes be made. They could also not use my name or trademarks on any new designs developed by them.

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs that work

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

Most companies will never turn to a forum like this to discuss their product due to the presence of tools such as some frequenting this thread.

Tools in every thread hasn't stopped FARR, C&C, Fred Barrett, Ian Farrier has & lets not forget Bob Perry laying it ALL open for everyone to ask about. So that's BS.
It is not BS but arguably a good business rule. Some may get away with it however you can quickly do a lot of damage as well. The business I work in, the entire industry I work in and the majority of businesses I know would never engage in an Internet forum such as this. Many business prohibit any employee engaging in any form of social media.

Public communication with clients or existing customers seems to work fine if one builds a good product and looks after customers well. Saves a lot of time too by eliminating multiple answers to the same question.

 

Just my experience from many years of being available publicly

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs that Work

Ian, even you have come across tools on these forums and arguing with them can unfairly and unnecessary make you look like a fool. I can search the archives in SA and find posts by yourself that reduces your credibility. Once online it can be difficult to remove.

 

The majority of businesses, particularly large business do not like to and have policies to ensure their employees do not engage in this way. It is smart business practice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say, were all pretty damn lucky, too have real designers and builders here, to talk about their work.

 

They all get a tip of the hat... a, well done, and a, thank you for your time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

Most companies will never turn to a forum like this to discuss their product due to the presence of tools such as some frequenting this thread.

Tools in every thread hasn't stopped FARR, C&C, Fred Barrett, Ian Farrier has & lets not forget Bob Perry laying it ALL open for everyone to ask about. So that's BS.
It is not BS but arguably a good business rule. Some may get away with it however you can quickly do a lot of damage as well. The business I work in, the entire industry I work in and the majority of businesses I know would never engage in an Internet forum such as this. Many business prohibit any employee engaging in any form of social media.

Public communication with clients or existing customers seems to work fine if one builds a good product and looks after customers well. Saves a lot of time too by eliminating multiple answers to the same question.

 

Just my experience from many years of being available publicly

 

Ian Farrier

 

Farrier Marine

Designs that Work

Ian, even you have come across tools on these forums and arguing with them can unfairly and unnecessary make you look like a fool. I can search the archives in SA and find posts by yourself that reduces your credibility. Once online it can be difficult to remove.

 

The majority of businesses, particularly large business do not like to and have policies to ensure their employees do not engage in this way. It is smart business practice.

 

 

That is the real problem isn't it - too many people are scared of looking like fools, so are too scared to do or say anything.

 

Many things I have tried or said have looked foolish, and many have been, but also many have worked extremely well or proved to be true. Many thought I was a fool when building the first Trailertri, as did I at times, but if too scared to try something new or look foolish, then no progress will ever be made.

 

Ian Farrier

Farrier Marine

Always trying foolish things

Link to post
Share on other sites

The other real problem is some business owners readily make them self look like a fool trying to defend or promote their product....... Is that really smart? Some even come here to criticise other peoples product. If a business owner dares to take the risk and engage with the animals here, he needs to display a high level of professionalism so as not to tarnish his name or that of the company. Unfortunately some that try to do so here, fail.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"It is not the critic who counts, nor the man who points how the strong man stumbled or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly...who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; who, at best, knows the triumph of high achievement; and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat."

Theodore Roosevelt, 1910
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen to end up in a Marketing thread.

 

It is interesting however, does anyone know where I can find the Pulse 600 thread?

 

That was what I was looking for :-).

 

Cheers,

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is your video of the Pulse folding.......... Video was shot a few weeks ago. Looking pretty good to me :D

 

http://sail.corsairmarine.com/pulse-600-a-winner-on-and-off-the-water

 

Looks like the jib is not on a continuous furler. For some reason I thought it would be.

 

Just a little disappointing that Corsair is releasing FB teasers of the original configuration in flat water and light air when they just had race rigged boats in good wind. If I'm going to be teased, it would be nice to see something with a little adrenaline inducing action.

 

And maybe I missed it earlier, but the Pulse brochure now includes both configurations.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen to end up in a Marketing thread.

 

It is interesting however, does anyone know where I can find the Pulse 600 thread?

 

That was what I was looking for :-).

 

Cheers,

Plus 1.

 

Has anyone seen one of these race anywhere or know it its likely to rate (round about in PHRF compared to the other Corsairs, Farriers, etc...).

 

Was stunned to see some F22s at ratings similar to the old F24s and much slower than the Sprints and guessing that can't be right. Just trying to get general idea of the relative ratings of an F24, F27, Sprint, Pulse, and F22.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Cheers,

 

Was stunned to see some F22s at ratings similar to the old F24s and much slower than the Sprints and guessing that can't be right. Just trying to get general idea of the relative ratings of an F24, F27, Sprint, Pulse, and F22.

 

Actually you only saw one with such a rating... The green home built from Canada. Some pertinent facts about that boat and its rating: it is a center boarder with no flaps to close the slot when the board is down, it was built as a pocket cruiser with a full interior, it has a short mast, and correspondingly small sail area, and it does not carry a spinnaker.

 

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers,

 

Was stunned to see some F22s at ratings similar to the old F24s and much slower than the Sprints and guessing that can't be right. Just trying to get general idea of the relative ratings of an F24, F27, Sprint, Pulse, and F22.

 

Actually you only saw one with such a rating... The green home built from Canada. Some pertinent facts about that boat and its rating: it is a center boarder with no flaps to close the slot when the board is down, it was built as a pocket cruiser with a full interior, it has a short mast, and correspondingly small sail area, and it does not carry a spinnaker.

 

Mike

 

 

 

Is that "Cricket"?

Link to post
Share on other sites

the winds were great the day before the multi-hull regatta then went down to 12-15 for the rest of the days with plenty of squals so in flat water was a great place to sail a multi

Link to post
Share on other sites

12 - 15 even without the squalls there should be some vid where they scream ..... seeing them in a squall would be even better

everything I see is 3 to 5 knots.. maybe ...lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Agree on the need for a longer prod.

 

2. Have BIG concerns about draggieness of the folding system.

 

Seems that the original water-stays were just replaced with a lower folding strut, instead of designing a proper folding system from the beginning. Compare the height off the water of the F-27 folding system, which when pressed, decapitates waves regularly.

 

piccorsairf27104a.jpg

 

Cheers!!!

 

-MH

Link to post
Share on other sites

Will withhold final judgment until I sail it but don't immediately see an issue w either MH.

 

Its the rear beam that rips the wave tops off on the F27 I think its because on that design that the ass end squats so much, and when combined with the low volume floats that really get depressed low in the water when pushing hard, it really drives the folding mechanism lower to the point you see the behavior of the waves tops being hit. Gets you wet if seated in the wrong place but never seemed like a big speed hit on the 27. Think the float shapes and volume are very different on the Pulse.

 

Its only a marginally informed and uneducated guess however on both counts I admit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

12 - 15 even without the squalls there should be some vid where they scream ..... seeing them in a squall would be even better

everything I see is 3 to 5 knots.. maybe ...lol

I've not seen any vid of the multihull week only a week later in the race week where is was 3-5kts

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a bit poor that Corsair have been flogging factory boats to races all over Thailand (nice for them) but all we get are glimpses in overall regatta videos. One would think that the promotional budget would stretch to, at the very least, some shaky cell phone video from a rib.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Any idea of the race results, they would give an indication of the Pulse capabilities, I understand they had some pretty good skippers on board.

 

They raced in their own class: http://phuketraceweek.com/results/

Based on elapsed times, they were about 20 - 25% slower than the firefly 850's ( assuming they sailed the same course )

Link to post
Share on other sites

25% less water length , 25% less sail area , 25% less weight, Did you really expect them to be faster.

I think i read some where that a couple of them hit the top mark first on the first beat by 3 to 4 boat lengths,,

Apparently the 850 then wanted there own start .

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just coming back from vacation and opening this thread.

LOL, best reading since the paperback version of Conan the Barbarian...

 

Seriously, guys. Do some of you really think they can comment on the folding system or the sheeting angle from a single pic, and teach Corsair how to do it better? Criticising Corsair for not providing videos or any other information that you are too lazy to get yourself? At least they sell boats you can sail.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just coming back from vacation and opening this thread.

LOL, best reading since the paperback version of Conan the Barbarian...

 

Seriously, guys. Do some of you really think they can comment on the folding system or the sheeting angle from a single pic, and teach Corsair how to do it better? Criticising Corsair for not providing videos or any other information that you are too lazy to get yourself? At least they sell boats you can sail.

 

Ahhhh..., the old marketing by secrecy ploy - and then calling customers lazy for not finding out for themselves.

Usually only used for products with hard to explain problems.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a good look at the Pulse at the boat show, impressive looking boat. Big volume in the floats should allow it to be pushed pretty hard. The folding mechanism looked quite solid, more than sufficient for the size of the boat. A bit heavy in my mind, but I suppose that is how they keep the cost down.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a good look at the Pulse at the boat show, impressive looking boat. Big volume in the floats should allow it to be pushed pretty hard.

The Pulse by having a large bouyant float on the leeward side, may have great allowances to be pushed hard. But that big ( and by consequence weighty ) float has a twin brother on the windward side. Now that can be a real downside for a boat that has limited sail area ( the sail area on the Pulse is only just bigger than an F18 ) as on the windward side that float is acting as unwanted ballast ( think of having someone constantly out on the trapeze in all wind conditions on a cat ).

 

There are two schools of thought on this, some think that for a small Tri to go fast, it needs to reliably lift the centre hull on high volume floats and then you are the equivalent of a cat on one hull with lots of righting moment, but to do that you need very light, large volume floats and quite a large rig. The other "Farrier esq" way is to assume you will always be on two hulls, which allows much less volume floats ( lighter weight and less drag ) with a smaller rig which makes the boat generally safer and easier to sail, but just a tad slower due to the higher hull drag of two hulls in the water. Over a race period those two forms in unskilled hands ( think 95% of most sailors ) seem to get to the finish line in about the same time.

 

A question to ask then is do you really need such bouyant ( think draggy and heavy ) floats when most of the time the boat will have two hulls in the water, as the rig probably is not really big enough to fly 2 hulls, most of the time. Its a conundrum and I would guess once the boat gets used more, we will see if Corsair have inadvertantly fallen into a media led trap that all Tris need to fly 2 hulls or have they got it just right with a smallish rig, that powered up in good sailors hands, can fly 2 hulls and yet be a safe platform for the inexperianced skipper on 2 hulls.

 

I hope the latter is correct but my betting is on that a 20sqm main on an "R" version, will be a pretty good option to utilise those big floats properly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Had a good look at the Pulse at the boat show, impressive looking boat. Big volume in the floats should allow it to be pushed pretty hard.

The Pulse by having a large bouyant float on the leeward side, may have great allowances to be pushed hard. But that big ( and by consequence weighty ) float has a twin brother on the windward side. Now that can be a real downside for a boat that has limited sail area ( the sail area on the Pulse is only just bigger than an F18 ) as on the windward side that float is acting as unwanted ballast ( think of having someone constantly out on the trapeze in all wind conditions on a cat ).

 

There are two schools of thought on this, some think that for a small Tri to go fast, it needs to reliably lift the centre hull on high volume floats and then you are the equivalent of a cat on one hull with lots of righting moment, but to do that you need very light, large volume floats and quite a large rig. The other "Farrier esq" way is to assume you will always be on two hulls, which allows much less volume floats ( lighter weight and less drag ) with a smaller rig which makes the boat generally safer and easier to sail, but just a tad slower due to the higher hull drag of two hulls in the water. Over a race period those two forms in unskilled hands ( think 95% of most sailors ) seem to get to the finish line in about the same time.

 

A question to ask then is do you really need such bouyant ( think draggy and heavy ) floats when most of the time the boat will have two hulls in the water, as the rig probably is not really big enough to fly 2 hulls, most of the time. Its a conundrum and I would guess once the boat gets used more, we will see if Corsair have inadvertantly fallen into a media led trap that all Tris need to fly 2 hulls or have they got it just right with a smallish rig, that powered up in good sailors hands, can fly 2 hulls and yet be a safe platform for the inexperianced skipper on 2 hulls.

 

I hope the latter is correct but my betting is on that a 20sqm main on an "R" version, will be a pretty good option to utilise those big floats properly.

 

 

 

I think that with smaller floats (amas) the same wind and sheeting will result in amas that get pushed deeper into the water, possibly resulting in more drag and certainly allowing more heel, spilling more wind and therefore losing some power that might translate into greater speed if the boat had stayed more upright.

 

Many times I've wished my Weta had slightly larger amas so that I wouldn't have to back off as quickly on higher wind days. I'd sure like to be able to use that extra power rather than just spilling it to save a capsize.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Had a good look at the Pulse at the boat show, impressive looking boat. Big volume in the floats should allow it to be pushed pretty hard.

The Pulse by having a large bouyant float on the leeward side, may have great allowances to be pushed hard. But that big ( and by consequence weighty ) float has a twin brother on the windward side. Now that can be a real downside for a boat that has limited sail area ( the sail area on the Pulse is only just bigger than an F18 ) as on the windward side that float is acting as unwanted ballast ( think of having someone constantly out on the trapeze in all wind conditions on a cat ).

 

There are two schools of thought on this, some think that for a small Tri to go fast, it needs to reliably lift the centre hull on high volume floats and then you are the equivalent of a cat on one hull with lots of righting moment, but to do that you need very light, large volume floats and quite a large rig. The other "Farrier esq" way is to assume you will always be on two hulls, which allows much less volume floats ( lighter weight and less drag ) with a smaller rig which makes the boat generally safer and easier to sail, but just a tad slower due to the higher hull drag of two hulls in the water. Over a race period those two forms in unskilled hands ( think 95% of most sailors ) seem to get to the finish line in about the same time.

 

A question to ask then is do you really need such bouyant ( think draggy and heavy ) floats when most of the time the boat will have two hulls in the water, as the rig probably is not really big enough to fly 2 hulls, most of the time. Its a conundrum and I would guess once the boat gets used more, we will see if Corsair have inadvertantly fallen into a media led trap that all Tris need to fly 2 hulls or have they got it just right with a smallish rig, that powered up in good sailors hands, can fly 2 hulls and yet be a safe platform for the inexperianced skipper on 2 hulls.

 

I hope the latter is correct but my betting is on that a 20sqm main on an "R" version, will be a pretty good option to utilise those big floats properly.

Farrier has been designing fairly high volume floats for his small Tri's for about ten years and even the Corsair Dash and Sprint MkII have similar. They have no pretensions to single hull yet in most conditions are quicker and more comfortable than the smaller float designs such as F24 and Sprint MkI. The lumps get the short boats and float volume helps.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there is a difference between 2 hulls in the water and the main hull just touching.

IMHO a rough guide is if you can fly the main hull you can pitchpole

Trust me. You can pitchpole a boat that does not fly a main hull.

 

Don't ask me how I know.

 

Thankfully it wasn't mine but it was a sistership.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think there is a difference between 2 hulls in the water and the main hull just touching.

IMHO a rough guide is if you can fly the main hull you can pitchpole

Trust me. You can pitchpole a boat that does not fly a main hull.

 

Don't ask me how I know.

 

Thankfully it wasn't mine but it was a sistership.

 

Corsair?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I put my name down for a sail when they bring it up to Pittwater. Maybe line up against the RMYC fleet on a Saturday?

When is this happening?

Link to post
Share on other sites

25% less water length , 25% less sail area , 25% less weight, Did you really expect them to be faster.

I think i read some where that a couple of them hit the top mark first on the first beat by 3 to 4 boat lengths,,

Apparently the 850 then wanted there own start .

From what I have seen of the conditions there I would expect a firefly to be faster around a course. On flat water up to say 15 knots wind I would expect Pulse to be considerably faster than firefly.

Firefly is an offshore capable cat. Not fair to compare to a 6m daysailer, then there's cat vs tri.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

25% less water length , 25% less sail area , 25% less weight, Did you really expect them to be faster.

I think i read some where that a couple of them hit the top mark first on the first beat by 3 to 4 boat lengths,,

Apparently the 850 then wanted there own start .

From what I have seen of the conditions there I would expect a firefly to be faster around a course. On flat water up to say 15 knots wind I would expect Pulse to be considerably faster than firefly.

Firefly is an offshore capable cat. Not fair to compare to a 6m daysailer, then there's cat vs tri.

 

Phuket wasnt a great regatta to compare as you have experienced crews racing their optimised Fireflys versus new to everyone, Pulses

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been following this forum because I love sailing on tris and am, quite possibly, the target market for the Pulse.

 

Tuesday, August 4, a friend and I went out on another friends Corsair F28 from Ventura Harbor. As we got out into the Santa Barbara Channel the wind and seas kept getting stronger. Checking the buoy data later we determined that we were out in 23kts - 27kts of wind with a very short period 2'-4' chop. The F28 handled it masterfully w/ full main and working jib. When we turned around for the reach back home we hit 20.9 kts briefly once, but were consistently doing over 15 kts occasionally getting up over 17 kts and at least once more up over 18 kts, still w/ just full main and working jib. It was definitely a very fun, thrilling, Mr. Toad's Wild Ride.

 

Since then I have been trying to imagine how the Pulse would have done in those conditions. It makes for some enjoyable flights of fancy. I know I would be very thankful for the open transom. We will never know until somebody tries it and videos it.

 

As to marketing. It was a video made in 2007 on YouTube of Wetas being sailed, and capsized, in very high winds on a NZ lake that motivated me to buy one 7 years ago. I may not have a degree in marketing, but I know what gets me excited about a boat: High wind, high seas, high performance sailing either on video or eye-witnessed. Come on Corsair, get on with it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like the asym might be undergoing revision

 

The shy spinnaker is great if you want to sail angles and best sailed around the 70 to 80 AWA , but lacks a little area when you want to carry the breeze at lower angles. We will be reviewing a larger Spinnaker design with North Sails and if the design is changed we will replace spinnakers on all pre launched pulses to ensure the Pulse 600 remains a true One Design class.

 

 

http://sail.corsairmarine.com/the-first-pulse-600-one-design-fleet-off-to-a-successful-start

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

HI all,

 

When they say a roller furling boom, does this mean you can furl it anywhere to reef it and reduce the sail size? Or does the sail still has to have discreet reefing points?

 

Cheers,

Link to post
Share on other sites

HI all,

 

When they say a roller furling boom, does this mean you can furl it anywhere to reef it and reduce the sail size? Or does the sail still has to have discreet reefing points?

 

Cheers,

No idea on the Pulse but I have boom roll furl on my Sprint but use the reefing point. The roll of the boom just means you can quickly and easily tidy the excess sail. Reefing and shaking out is quick and clean. Just furling on the boom with the Sprint would be very unkind to the sail and there would be no cunningham. I suppose it could be done on an emergency but I wouldn't want to explain it to my sailmaker. I assume it would be the same for the Pulse.
Link to post
Share on other sites

HI all,

 

When they say a roller furling boom, does this mean you can furl it anywhere to reef it and reduce the sail size? Or does the sail still has to have discreet reefing points?

 

Cheers,

The sail it just furled on the boom for storage when not in use (typical Corsair). By the pictures, it looks like a normal single reef setup. Mainsail has a single reinforcement patch a couple of feet up. Although, to be honest, I don't actually see any reefing lines or sheaves on the end of the boom.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

For contrast - Nacra - 20 sail areas: Main = 206, jib = 50, spin = 269. Pulse: main = 184, jib = 80, spin = 215.

I think the Pulse's sail plan may just have gone on steroids

ast length: 31’ 2” (9.5m) Unladen weight: 992.1lbs (450kgs) Mainsail: 205.8sqft (19.1m2) Jib: 76.4sqft (7.1m2) Spinnaker: 273.4sqft (25.4m2) Screecher: 205.6sqft (19.1m2)

Certainly when we finished the design for the TC601 and Corsair released the specs for the Pulse the sail plan was almost identical, er now its not, mmmmm

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pulse sail areas: Main = 205.8, jib = 76.4, spin = 273.4. Total upwind = 282.2. Total all = 555.6

F18 sail areas: Main = 180, jib = 44.7, spin = 230. Total upwind = 224.7. Total all = 454.7

Nacra 20 sail areas: Main = 206, jib = 50, spin = 269. Total upwind = 256. Total all = 525

 

That should liven the little pocket rocket up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I can read, only 4 were sold to Multihull Solutions in Thailand for the Phuket Raceweek. One is also owned as a display / demo boat by Multihull Central Australia (The Ronstan wrapped boat)....... I have not heard of any other customers taking delivery. Hopefully what we are seeing is Corsair have taken feedback from the Phuket Regatta, not handed over any more boats, revised the rig and are very serious about maintaining a one design fleet.

 

I am pretty exited about these boats. Can't wait to see one in the flesh and hopefully sail one. I may trade the F18 in on one in a few years time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mmmm, certainly when we did the TC601 design we new the upwind from an F18 size rig was marginal in size, we upped the size of the jib to compensate ( its surprising how much power is generated from the jib ) and I would suspect that may yet be not enough as I think Corsair may well have proved and had to correct.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like the asym might be undergoing revision

 

The shy spinnaker is great if you want to sail angles and best sailed around the 70 to 80 AWA , but lacks a little area when you want to carry the breeze at lower angles. We will be reviewing a larger Spinnaker design with North Sails and if the design is changed we will replace spinnakers on all pre launched pulses to ensure the Pulse 600 remains a true One Design class.

 

 

http://sail.corsairmarine.com/the-first-pulse-600-one-design-fleet-off-to-a-successful-start

 

Were they originally designing it for NZ? 30% larger on the kite smells like a miss... Did they also change the mast height? Also if the kite foot gets longer it might not be so easy to jib the genny inside. Still smells to me like the first mod most people will do is to put a longer prod on even with the same size kite as that's not a rating hit.

 

I also like how they make the competition seem more impressive by referring to the Firefly as a 30 footer <_<

 

Up wind the boat trucks, on occasions we were pointing higher then the bigger multihulls and were hitting the top mark before the 30ft firefly class. The Pulse surprisingly pointed higher than any other trimaran we have experienced.

 

 

Had a good look at the Pulse at the boat show, impressive looking boat. Big volume in the floats should allow it to be pushed pretty hard. The folding mechanism looked quite solid, more than sufficient for the size of the boat. A bit heavy in my mind, but I suppose that is how they keep the cost down.

Shortage of cameras in AUS?

I guess the question is how does this thing compare to a Multi23?
Link to post
Share on other sites