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H-Boat Renovation Project


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On 9/14/2019 at 4:52 PM, Bull City said:

 

I am looking forward to the trip, but I dread the flying. I am not afraid of flying, but I hate it for the usual reasons: cramped seating, jet lag, etc.

 

Bull, I realize you are there already,  I hope you survived.  FWIW, my wife and I, this go around, decided to heed the sage advice:  "Would you rather your kids fly first class or you".  So when we were told the up grade was "only" $560 we took about 5 seconds, and for the first time ever said "yes"!  Man did that make a yuge difference.   

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Hadn't posted in a while, so here's a pick of my ride for shit's & gigs....

German mustard. Sweet to balance the sauerkraut.

Posted Images

We have been in Corfu, Delphi, Nafplio and now on Hydra. Tomorrow we leave for Crete. We’re having a very nice time, ferry rides, sailing, swimming, etc. I’ll post some pics soon. 

One pic I missed was a big, ugly motor yacht in Hydra by the name of “Johnny Handsome.” Need I say more?

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  • 3 months later...

It hurts a lot...a lot...

 

to report that my old H-Boat went up on the beach in Capitola the day before New Years Eve, apparently.

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=4976&d=15777

My friend Skip aka "Sleddog" here on SA took the pictures on his morning beach walk. That boat was quietly berthed not three miles from my house, just six weeks ago. I left notes in the companionway.... "If you ever want crew, call me..."...."if you ever want to sell, call me".... FUCK.

 

Fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck...Skip talked to the owner, apparently the guy sailed down from SF Bay with his girlfriend and they didn't even have an anchor.  A $40 anchor, 20 feet of chain and 100 feet of three strand nylon would have kept that from happening.

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=4983&d=15779

 

I did my first solo spinnaker set on that boat....my first time solo around the Farallones...my first solo overnight ocean race.

and some know-nothing dumbass kills her.

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22 hours ago, Alan H said:

and some know-nothing dumbass kills her.

Awful! What happened?

13 hours ago, alphafb552 said:

Bet the guy wished he had more than a weedy torqueedo just before he hit the beach

That is not a Torqeedo; it looks like a cheap trolling motor.

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The guy told Sleddog that he'd bought it two weeks earlier "for cheap"....  He didn' t know how to sail and apparently it didn't come with the outboard or an anchor. He and "his girl" managed to get it up to San Francisco, out the Gate and down to Monterey Bay. They had no radio, no epirb, no lifejackets, evern.  Apparently he though he could tie up to the Capitola pier.  One look at the pier will show how faulty that idea is. He got there, couldn't tie up, I don't know what happened and the boat wound up on the beach.

It lasted 3 days...rudder tore off but everything else was fine. The 4th night they had big surf and that ripped the keel off and destroyed the mast.

 

She's been cut up and disposed of.  Sleddog helped with the cutting-up.   I've figured out who had the contract and I'm trying to see if I can find the pieces....the nice Harken self-tailers were still on it, and it would be nice to have a momento of my Quiet Victory aboard the Piper.

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6 hours ago, Alan H said:

The guy told Sleddog that he'd bought it two weeks earlier "for cheap"....  He didn' t know how to sail and apparently it didn't come with the outboard or an anchor. He and "his girl" managed to get it up to San Francisco, out the Gate and down to Monterey Bay. They had no radio, no epirb, no lifejackets, evern.  Apparently he though he could tie up to the Capitola pier.  One look at the pier will show how faulty that idea is. He got there, couldn't tie up, I don't know what happened and the boat wound up on the beach.

It lasted 3 days...rudder tore off but everything else was fine. The 4th night they had big surf and that ripped the keel off and destroyed the mast.

 

She's been cut up and disposed of.  Sleddog helped with the cutting-up.   I've figured out who had the contract and I'm trying to see if I can find the pieces....the nice Harken self-tailers were still on it, and it would be nice to have a momento of my Quiet Victory aboard the Piper.

Good luck, it would be nice. But it's sad this happened.

I guess they thought they could google "how to sail" and be fine? The sea is not a playground

FB- Doug

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10 hours ago, Alan H said:

The guy told Sleddog that he'd bought it two weeks earlier "for cheap"....  He didn' t know how to sail and apparently it didn't come with the outboard or an anchor. He and "his girl" managed to get it up to San Francisco, out the Gate and down to Monterey Bay. They had no radio, no epirb, no lifejackets, evern.  Apparently he though he could tie up to the Capitola pier.  One look at the pier will show how faulty that idea is. He got there, couldn't tie up, I don't know what happened and the boat wound up on the beach.

It lasted 3 days...rudder tore off but everything else was fine. The 4th night they had big surf and that ripped the keel off and destroyed the mast.

 

She's been cut up and disposed of.  Sleddog helped with the cutting-up.   I've figured out who had the contract and I'm trying to see if I can find the pieces....the nice Harken self-tailers were still on it, and it would be nice to have a momento of my Quiet Victory aboard the Piper.

"The guy" will end up in H-Boat Hell. What an asshole.

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Oh, and seeing as he couldn't afford an anchor.... When it became obvious that he wasn't going to get the boat off the beach and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary people were telling him about "remove it or there will be financial consequences"...he left the area.  He didn't pay for the disposal.

Of course.

I said somewhere else, that a $30 anchor off of Craigslist, 20 feet of chain and 150 feet of three strand rope would have prevented that from happening.  It would have, if he'd had half a brain to know how to use it.    It blows my mind that he thought he could tie off to the Capitola pier AT ALL.  Did he actually LOOK at the pier, even once?  Not only that but the sanctuary staffer said he told her he thought he could tie up there indefinitely FOR FREE.

I've identified the company that did the disposal. I'm trying to find out where they put the debris, apparently the Harken self-tailing winches were still on it when they cut it up.  The mast was destroyed in the surf.

Those winches would work just great on my Piper and be a nice momento of the wondrous role that "Quiet Victory" played in my life.

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56 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:
2 hours ago, Alan H said:

 It blows my mind that he thought he could tie off to the Capitola pier AT ALL. 

What's the problem?

 

Yeah really.

It looks like a great FREE place to keep your boat. First, why would anybody mind you leaving your boat there full time; second what could possibly go wrong

FB- Doug

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4 hours ago, Alan H said:

Those winches would work just great on my Piper and be a nice momento of the wondrous role that "Quiet Victory" played in my life.

Alan, if you get a shot at the spreaders, I would pay big $$.

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

Alan, if you get a shot at the spreaders, I would pay big $$.

If I find the boat, I'll get you the spreaders.  No problem....and your money's no good, here, Bull.

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Here's a quote....former owner to sleddog, when she was up on the beach but almost certainly salvageable.

 

" " I'm willing to donate the boat. Or maybe I can buy an anchor for $10 and pull it off at high tide." "

 

He didn't have an anchor.  He thinks that a little 15 pound danforth and some grunt will pull that boat back into the water again....This, AFTER HE LEFT THE HATCH AND COMPANIONWAY OPEN so the boat filled with water and sand.

 

clueless.

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2 hours ago, Alan H said:

Here's a quote....former owner to sleddog, when she was up on the beach but almost certainly salvageable.

 

" " I'm willing to donate the boat. Or maybe I can buy an anchor for $10 and pull it off at high tide." "

 

He didn't have an anchor.  He thinks that a little 15 pound danforth and some grunt will pull that boat back into the water again....This, AFTER HE LEFT THE HATCH AND COMPANIONWAY OPEN so the boat filled with water and sand.

 

clueless.

People like that are put on the earth so we have a benchmark for useless.

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8 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Wasn't Hot Rod good enough?

Does SF Bay need to be continuously reminded or something?

They keep setting new benchmarks. SF Bay is like Floriduh in that regard, although on the west coast they just walk away from shit, in Floriduh they eat your face.

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11 hours ago, Alan H said:

Here's a quote....former owner to sleddog, when she was up on the beach but almost certainly salvageable.

 

" " I'm willing to donate the boat. Or maybe I can buy an anchor for $10 and pull it off at high tide." "

 

He didn't have an anchor.  He thinks that a little 15 pound danforth and some grunt will pull that boat back into the water again....This, AFTER HE LEFT THE HATCH AND COMPANIONWAY OPEN so the boat filled with water and sand.

 

clueless.

A candidate for the Darwin Award - Honorable Mention.

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  • 5 months later...

Saloon Table

I would like to have a removable table for eating in the cabin. Big enough for two diners. I saw a few in small boats that I like, but I don't know how I could mount it so it's removable, and fairly steady. The mast is stepped on deck, so there's nothing on the centerline. There are a couple of ½" plywood covers for the bilge. These could be flipped over to reveal some sort of mounting point for the table. There's also a vertical fiberglass surface below the settees, as in the third pic.

For stowage purposes, it would be helpful to have the table top fold.

Here are some pics that caught my eye. The first one is very charming, and is the kind of look I'd like. The third one has some possibilities as to mounting.

1307019445_saloontable1.jpg.35d017645d1795551890098dac482129.jpg

1026767914_saloontable2.jpeg.fbebb2c1378fd117140cc0ad98e119c7.jpeg

539711976_saloontable3.jpeg.999e771debc0f4d1e37ec58ddf93b754.jpeg

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This shows the cabinets & bilge covers in relation to the settees. I'd want the table to be aft of the cabinets (pre-renovation). The bilge cover could be a decent base for the table.

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_36e3.thumb.jpg.c71594712427a62ee01686b62fa221d8.jpg

 

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I used to have an Albin Vega with a neat table. The table had 'lazy Z' shaped tubular legs that fit in sockets glassed in to the cabin sole and into bases on the underside of the table top. Because of the shape of the legs, the table could be in between the setees or swiveled to port, making it possible to walk forward to the heads. There was also a set of sockets in the cockpit floor, so you could dine 'al fresco' too. The whole thing disassembled easily and stowed against the overhead in the forepeak. I don't have a good photo but I found this one online that should give you the idea.

https://dailyboats.com/bimg/2/3/2/5/boat/7.jpg

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I was all set to make a pipe-leg table, like the one in post 922, pic 3.  But I ended up buying a "Lagun" table mount, which does all that and stores away more compactly.  It's sturdier than I had feared it might be.  You can get an extra mounting plate so that the whole thing is quickly relocated to the cockpit, or another location.  

The table top is just a piece of my old (too big) table, chopped down to size, but some day I'll make a folding top to double the size at will.  It pretty much lives rotated back over the settee like this, unless a nap or a meal is in progress. Very handy that way.

IMG_2538.thumb.jpeg.f7106682487e5412ba972509c6ca2464.jpeg

Bracket on the underside holds all the pieces compactly, for storage.

IMG_2059.thumb.jpeg.0aebb1a7503c0e576739df50b56b3741.jpeg

 

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9 hours ago, toddster said:

I was all set to make a pipe-leg table, like the one in post 922, pic 3.  But I ended up buying a "Lagun" table mount, which does all that and stores away more compactly.  It's sturdier than I had feared it might be.  

Toddster!

That looks like the answer. Thanks.

Bon Appetit!

B.C.

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I've got my toes buried in the sand, 100 miles from my computer, so only the one picture, below.

I did a home made version of toddster's pipe leg table.  The major difference is that I made the horizontal arm very long so that the vertical post could be mounted at the bulkhead.  It's built strong enough to take the weight of an adult (applied accidentally or intentionally).

Like toddster's mine lives pivoted off to the side until needed for meals, engine rebuilding or other activities.

The greatest thing about these offset pipe leg tables, is the infinite positions they can be placed.  I'll have a 6 person feast in progress when someone needs to go forward to take a leak.  No problem to swing the table aside enough for the leaker to sneak past without disturbing a wineglass.

Table can be quickly demounted from the leg, and the leg pivots out of the way - up against the bulkhead.

Originally, the table top could be stored vertically, fixed to the bulkhead.  I have since cut away most of the bulkhead to open up the interior.  Now that I have the pullman berth forward, I almost never demount the table.

Steve

https://i.imgur.com/mTKDtUE.jpg

 

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Steve, that looks very nice. I think the swinging Lagun system is the way to go.

For a top, I have found a source for teak veneer (one side) plywood in project size panels, and various edge moldings. 

http://www.buckwoodcraft.com/

The top would be about 30" X 36" using ¾" plywood. I need to measure some spaces to figure that out.

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52 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Steve, that looks very nice. I think the swinging Lagun system is the way to go.

For a top, I have found a source for teak veneer (one side) plywood in project size panels, and various edge moldings. 

http://www.buckwoodcraft.com/

The top would be about 30" X 36" using ¾" plywood. I need to measure some spaces to figure that out.

Consider using 1/4" teak ply laminated to 1/2" G2S fir ply.

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This may be easier that I thought. Thanks to Toddster, the Lagun table mount looks like an excellent way to mount the table.

As to the top, I found the The Teak Deck Company in Stuart, Florida. They stock nice looking table tops. I think the 24" X 36" will work. Their tops are 16mm ( 5/8") thick. The top 4mm is teak. The teak is unfinished. The bottom has a melamine finish. It is cheaper that buying the components and building it myself. It will also look better.

https://teakdeckcompany.com/store/teak-table-rectangular/

Note that is Scandinavian designed - only appropriate for an H-Boat! ;)

The Lagun has a mounting plate that is 7 7/8" X 11 13/16" and they recommend #8 pan head wood screws that go at least 1/2 the way into the table top.

Makes sense to me. How about y'all? Is it too easy?

2117276226_TDCtabletop.thumb.png.df8616c28f7072f02bb97540f5b52f41.png
 

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I've sailed a couple of charter boats that used the Lagun.  Very clever but not coped that will with charter life. A real owner will probably be more careful so it might survive better.

I always had an eye on the kids leaning on it or the Mrs dumping a heavy pan on one end. Never felt quite as relaxed as I  should have done with my gin close by but not quite in my hand...

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34 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

I've sailed a couple of charter boats that used the Lagun.  Very clever but not coped that will with charter life. A real owner will probably be more careful so it might survive better.

I always had an eye on the kids leaning on it or the Mrs dumping a heavy pan on one end. Never felt quite as relaxed as I  should have done with my gin close by but not quite in my hand...

Thanks, Bloke. This one will light use - candle light dinners at anchor. 

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@Sloop John B @toddster and others, I've got a question about installing the Lagun system (https://www.lagunusa.com/product/lagun-table-system) related to the strength of the settee riser.

lagun.thumb.png.6f8b1bc16d40b7b5a8e6b9b229af7b0d.png

The riser is a 10+ inch tall vertical surface, from the cabin deck to the horizontal settee base. I want to mount the bracket to the riser, and I'm wondering about the thickness. There are some ventilation holes in the riser, and it looks like it's about 1/4" thick at the bottom, and about 1/8" near the top.

The Lagun system comes with a  6 11/16" X 9 3/8" X 1/2" teak backing plate (bigger than the bracket). Also, I'll need to add a 3/8" block to the front, since there is teak molding piece that runs along the top of the riser (to keep the settee cushion from sliding off) that the leg will have to clear.

The table top will be 24" X 24".

 

 

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What was the question?  I think my "riser" thickness was about 3/16" but there is also a substantial 1x6 mahogany "fiddle" on top of that.  I had to add a filler block.  IIRC, there were also a couple of plastic shims included to help make it perpendicular, though it's possible that those came with something else.   It's good and stiff.

I decided that I wanted the mounting bracket as high as possible on the settee front to provide the range of height adjustment that I wanted. And to shorten the arm radius, for stability.  I've got three marks on the vertical piece for "workbench height," "dining height," and "coffee table height."

Also note that you can mount the table top off-center to produce various reaching and folding effects.  Worth experimenting with.  Mine is mounted (and sized) so that it rotates completely out of the walkway, and can reach forward or aft, depending on where you want to sit.

Found another picture with bonus shot of adjacent home-brew water-maker control panel.

IMG_2056.thumb.jpeg.52e2194daa99b076684ae961e707b8d5.jpeg

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7 hours ago, Bull City said:

@Sloop John B @toddster and others, I've got a question about installing the Lagun system (https://www.lagunusa.com/product/lagun-table-system) related to the strength of the settee riser.

lagun.thumb.png.6f8b1bc16d40b7b5a8e6b9b229af7b0d.png

The riser is a 10+ inch tall vertical surface, from the cabin deck to the horizontal settee base. I want to mount the bracket to the riser, and I'm wondering about the thickness. There are some ventilation holes in the riser, and it looks like it's about 1/4" thick at the bottom, and about 1/8" near the top.

The Lagun system comes with a  6 11/16" X 9 3/8" X 1/2" teak backing plate (bigger than the bracket). Also, I'll need to add a 3/8" block to the front, since there is teak molding piece that runs along the top of the riser (to keep the settee cushion from sliding off) that the leg will have to clear.

The table top will be 24" X 24".

 

 

If you're getting into some serious acrobatics, I suggest putting in a stripper pole and a ceiling hook. Don't use them both at the same time.

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Actually, my new crew (50-pound Husky) decided that the best way to go below decks was to hop from the companionway to the galley counter, to the table, then to the settee.

Although after a couple of weeks, he's started going up and down the ladder.  

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On 7/6/2020 at 10:43 AM, Bull City said:

This may be easier that I thought.

I was wrong. After deciding that the top needed to be 24" X 24", it turns out the "Scandinavian" table top is not available in that size, or any size close enough. So I'm back to a build-your-own. Not a disaster, but not as easy as I hoped.

Fortunately, I have plenty of time, and a source of clamps that I can borrow.

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  • 1 month later...
5 hours ago, guerdon said:

If. I remember correctly the lost H boat sold [email protected]$500.  I. tried to get my. kids to buy it.  Sad, I run into plastic classics of viable stature about one per month.  Must be. getting. old, can't stand. the waste.

I bought it for $1500, lord...I dunno...back around 1998.  The guy who bought it from me (Nate T.)  kept it in good shape...some new sails, those self-tailing winches, a new traveler.  Apparently the guy HE sold it to was a former Danish or Swedish champion...former Olympian, maybe?  When he passed away, the family sold it for next to nothing.  I left notes with my contact information on the boat more than once. 

Like I need two boats, but that H Boat was special to me.

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On 7/7/2020 at 11:06 PM, Bull City said:

@Sloop John B @toddster and others, I've got a question about installing the Lagun system (https://www.lagunusa.com/product/lagun-table-system) related to the strength of the settee riser.

lagun.thumb.png.6f8b1bc16d40b7b5a8e6b9b229af7b0d.png

The riser is a 10+ inch tall vertical surface, from the cabin deck to the horizontal settee base. I want to mount the bracket to the riser, and I'm wondering about the thickness. There are some ventilation holes in the riser, and it looks like it's about 1/4" thick at the bottom, and about 1/8" near the top.

The Lagun system comes with a  6 11/16" X 9 3/8" X 1/2" teak backing plate (bigger than the bracket). Also, I'll need to add a 3/8" block to the front, since there is teak molding piece that runs along the top of the riser (to keep the settee cushion from sliding off) that the leg will have to clear.

The table top will be 24" X 24".

 

 

Hiya Bull

seeing as all the force you put on the table, with weight of gear or just leaning on it while seated or standing, is directly transferred to the 'riser'as you call it, it needs to be pretty strong. The size you mention 1/4" to 1/8" seems very light to me. Also consider that the force applied to that riser is not vertical, but at an angle.

The backing plate supplied will provide some strength, but ultimately still attaches to the riser. You may want to reinforce the support with a couple of brackets to the hull, but that will cost you locker space

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29 minutes ago, alphafb552 said:

Hiya Bull

seeing as all the force you put on the table, with weight of gear or just leaning on it while seated or standing, is directly transferred to the 'riser'as you call it, it needs to be pretty strong. The size you mention 1/4" to 1/8" seems very light to me. Also consider that the force applied to that riser is not vertical, but at an angle.

The backing plate supplied will provide some strength, but ultimately still attaches to the riser. You may want to reinforce the support with a couple of brackets to the hull, but that will cost you locker space

Alph, I'm unsure of it too. The table will only be for occasional meal in the cabin. How would brackets to the hull work? Thanks. I probably should measure again.

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

Alph, I'm unsure of it too. The table will only be for occasional meal in the cabin. How would brackets to the hull work? Thanks. I probably should measure again.

Bracket's not the right word come to think of it, I mean a panel (partial bulkhead) at 90 degrees to the riser connecting it to the hull at the area of the Lagun's bracket - so the loads are not supported at the bulkheads at either end of the riser, but directly to the hull

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/4/2020 at 11:04 PM, toddster said:

I was all set to make a pipe-leg table, like the one in post 922, pic 3.  But I ended up buying a "Lagun" table mount, which does all that and stores away more compactly.  It's sturdier than I had feared it might be.  You can get an extra mounting plate so that the whole thing is quickly relocated to the cockpit, or another location.  

The table top is just a piece of my old (too big) table, chopped down to size, but some day I'll make a folding top to double the size at will.  It pretty much lives rotated back over the settee like this, unless a nap or a meal is in progress. Very handy that way.

IMG_2538.thumb.jpeg.f7106682487e5412ba972509c6ca2464.jpeg

Bracket on the underside holds all the pieces compactly, for storage.

IMG_2059.thumb.jpeg.0aebb1a7503c0e576739df50b56b3741.jpeg

 

Toddster, I have ended up with a 24" X 24" X 3/4" table top, with a shape very similar to yours. I have been looking at the Lagun system, but I'm concerned about the geometry. I have been assuming that I'd center the mounting plate on the table top. The settees are 26" apart, and I'd like the table centered. The horizontal arm is 16" and I think it would interfere with one's legs.

Do you think it would work to have it more toward one of the corners, or even to one of the table edges?

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I think it would be OK, although you might need to try a couple of different mounting points.  Maybe clamp a piece of plywood in front of the settee as a test-mount and a scrap to mock up the table top before you commit.

Mine is mounted off-center to get it to where I wanted it - rotated back over the settee as far as possible.  FWIW, the top shown above is 24 x 19 inches. When you pivot it around to dining position, there are quite a few possible positions achievable by rotating the offset mount and the arm.  The horizontal arm does usually ends up diagonal to my lap and doesn't interfere. (Of course, if it did, one could always adjust the height.)

Consider a couple of examples with a 26" aisle and 24" tabletop, mount centered 7 inches from one side (approximately):  (Lifted from my plan drawing and squeezed to your dimensions, if that makes any sense.). 

1454332077_tableexample.jpg.50b7564016b12cedab449fb5de3697a7.jpg

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annotated for perhaps more clarity.  Although you could do it another way and have the arm diagonal in the stored position and straight in the dining position, but then you'd have to straddle the post.  I think you want the post mostly out from under the table top to dine.  

683589663_tableexample.jpg.df6d0e29f7db0e8042ec8ea5a22143e4.jpg

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9 hours ago, toddster said:

annotated for perhaps more clarity.  Although you could do it another way and have the arm diagonal in the stored position and straight in the dining position, but then you'd have to straddle the post.  I think you want the post mostly out from under the table top to dine.  

683589663_tableexample.jpg.df6d0e29f7db0e8042ec8ea5a22143e4.jpg

This is exactly what I was thinking. 

I have been in the mindset of having the mounting plate centered, which caused problems. The idea of attaching it off-center didn't occur to me until I happened to look at the photo showing the bottom of your table. Then Thag started to think outside box!

Thanks!

image.png.410cd7660a401d983d21479254c117b1.png

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Bull City (Thag) F*cks Up

I ordered a 24" X 24" table top from a wood supplier/fabricator and received it a couple of days ago. I asked for and got 3/4" teak plywood with a solid teak edge. The workmanship is very good, and I should be pleased, however, it weighs about 10.25 pounds (4.6 kg). I'm kind of shocked at the weight. I'm also concerned about the load, and type of load it will place on the settee riser if I use the Lagun system, with backing plates, etc.

FWIW, when I decided on 3/4", I was thinking of the fasteners to use for the Lagun system. I didn't think about just adding a block under the mounting plate. I should have gone with 1/2".

1) I thought about taking a router and removing about 1/4" of material from the bottom, which would bring the weight down to about 7 pounds. One of my sons, a cabinet maker, could do this, but he said plywood will likely warp if you remove a layer. This doesn't seem like the best idea, and it will not result in much weight saving.

2) The other idea is to scrap the Lagun, and attach the forward edge of the table to the sides of the cabinets which are at forward end of the settees with say barrel bolts, and then use a folding leg for the aft end, that would be rest on the sole with another barrel bolt or two to secure it.

Allweather was nice enough to measure the glass thickness on his H-Boat settee riser. It's 4 mm (5/32"). Maybe this is strong enough?

Advice appreciated. Calling @SloopJonB @Jules @toddster @allweather

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_575c.thumb.jpg.feee7f44211d1dda862b095291e775fb.jpg

 

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Go with what you've got - I've never seen a table on a boat that I thought was too solid.

Big backing plates for all fasteners - 1/4" aluminium is my preference, solid metal but light, compact and workable with carbide woodworking tools. When you are working the mounts out, keep in mind someone being thrown against it by a sudden boat motion.

If you look at the possible weight savings from going very lightweight you're only talking a net 10 Lbs or so.

 

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While I measured the thickness I also took the opportunity to "feel" how stiff the riser is when unsupported. Sadly I did not take a picture of the area for better illustration.

On my boat there is a cutout in the riser for a 300x150mm slide drawer we use for storing flares, bolt cutters and the like for emergencies.
When grabbing the unsupported edge of that cutout and pulling/pushing there is some give but not horribly so. Nevertheless I would not want to mount a table with that much leverage on them unsupported.

However this is when the structure is severly weakened by the large hole and farther from the settee and hull bottom which make it all but impossible to bend near them and where the bolts for the Lagun system would be mounted.

I remain of the opinion that a solid backing plate will prevent any localised stresses that could lead to damage. 3mm+ Aluminium over the full height should be plenty since you only need to transfer the loads to the strong edges(hull/settee riser and settee/riser)
Plus as you can remove and store away the table easily slamming in heavy seas won't be an issue either. Or sailing on a lake unlikely to see big waves ;)

The weight shouldn't be a big issue. Outside of racing where it is of course left in the harbor!
And if you're still worried about overloading the structure and risk of work intensive repairs you could opt for nylon screws/bolts that fail with peak loads and protect the rest of the structure.

Bottom line, don't settle for something less. The lagun should not cause any issues and if the relatively heavy table later bothers you(handling between cockpit and inside too!) you can still opt for removing thickness or getting another made thinner to begin with.

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On 8/28/2020 at 5:36 PM, chester said:

not on your call out list but i would be tempted to put as big a backing plate as room will allow and try the lagun.  they seem such a slick solution to having a table i do everything possible to make it work

 

On 8/28/2020 at 5:42 PM, SloopJonB said:

Go with what you've got - I've never seen a table on a boat that I thought was too solid.

Big backing plates for all fasteners - 1/4" aluminium is my preference, solid metal but light, compact and workable with carbide woodworking tools. When you are working the mounts out, keep in mind someone being thrown against it by a sudden boat motion.

If you look at the possible weight savings from going very lightweight you're only talking a net 10 Lbs or so.

 

 

On 8/29/2020 at 6:27 AM, allweather said:

While I measured the thickness I also took the opportunity to "feel" how stiff the riser is when unsupported. Sadly I did not take a picture of the area for better illustration.

On my boat there is a cutout in the riser for a 300x150mm slide drawer we use for storing flares, bolt cutters and the like for emergencies.
When grabbing the unsupported edge of that cutout and pulling/pushing there is some give but not horribly so. Nevertheless I would not want to mount a table with that much leverage on them unsupported.

However this is when the structure is severly weakened by the large hole and farther from the settee and hull bottom which make it all but impossible to bend near them and where the bolts for the Lagun system would be mounted.

I remain of the opinion that a solid backing plate will prevent any localised stresses that could lead to damage. 3mm+ Aluminium over the full height should be plenty since you only need to transfer the loads to the strong edges(hull/settee riser and settee/riser)
Plus as you can remove and store away the table easily slamming in heavy seas won't be an issue either. Or sailing on a lake unlikely to see big waves ;)

The weight shouldn't be a big issue. Outside of racing where it is of course left in the harbor!
And if you're still worried about overloading the structure and risk of work intensive repairs you could opt for nylon screws/bolts that fail with peak loads and protect the rest of the structure.

Bottom line, don't settle for something less. The lagun should not cause any issues and if the relatively heavy table later bothers you(handling between cockpit and inside too!) you can still opt for removing thickness or getting another made thinner to begin with.

Thanks for the advice. I will follow it.

The Lagun unit comes with a 1/2" teak backing plate. It's 9 ⅜" tall which is just about the height of the riser's flat surface. Is an aluminum backing plate significant? If so, I can use the teak plate for blocking in front of the riser.

 

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Not really, I just like to use aluminium since I never ever need to worry about it again like with wood. 

Okay, unlikely that it will get wet there and rot. If I was buyiing new however that would be my go to. I‘m already doing upkeep for the few wooden parts on deck and that is enough. 

Anyway, I don‘t see an issue with using a teak plate that thick. Use some oversized washers and you should be good to go. If anything does turn out not to quite fit you can still change it afterall. Not that I expect anything. 

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