Jump to content

H-Boat Renovation Project


Recommended Posts

On 7/2/2018 at 10:35 AM, Jdmilnes2 said:

Penrose is in the water. 

I first laid my eyes on this boat in the  yard seven years ago.  Probably in the water for the first time in around ten years.  It is as they say, a labor of love.

IMG_7640.JPG

IMG_7683 small.jpg

Very Nice JD!

Now for the perfect picture, get a mainsail cover that matches the color of the boot and cove stripe, get the round fender of the deck, close the foredeck hatch  and loose the outboard.  Then take the pic.  Send to Bull to paint for you. (Then you can put the outboard back one, etc :P)

Now go get sailing!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 959
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Hadn't posted in a while, so here's a pick of my ride for shit's & gigs....

German mustard. Sweet to balance the sauerkraut.

Posted Images

On ‎7‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 2:46 PM, Crash said:

Very Nice JD!

Now for the perfect picture, get a mainsail cover that matches the color of the boot and cove stripe, get the round fender of the deck, close the foredeck hatch  and loose the outboard.  Then take the pic.  Send to Bull to paint for you. (Then you can put the outboard back one, etc :P)

Now go get sailing!

Agreed!  I have to put some money back into the coffers, but yes a new sail cover is in the works...The "round fender" is the mooring pin....and I can easily lose the hatch and the outboard for a pic.  So Bull is also an Artist....does he do everything??  ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, so it is the mooring pin...shoulda looked closer, but was distracted by the beauty of the boat.  Ok, for picture purposes, put mooring pin on opposite side of cabin so not seen by camera:rolleyes:

 

Bull is a true renaissance man 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 2:12 PM, Alan H said:

Seriously, though....Really nice job.

H-boats are the bomb for two folks to sail and with a little tillerpilot you can singlehand them all over the place. You are gonna have FUN!....Also, the H Boat was honestly the easiest boat I've ever had to use the spinnaker on.  The pole is small enough that you don't have to have a bridle. A good solid pole and a mid-pole attachment for the foreguy and topping lift and you are set. The chute is small so it's easy to gybe and if it gets crazy you can manhandle it down.  Sure, they aren't rocketship fast but they're easy to sail to their rating and they're steady.  You can do long distance races with them, too...couple hundred miles is no biggie.

 

You are gonna have fun.

Thanks for that.  I know these boats for their size have a lot to offer.  Definitely plan to club race a bit, but mostly cruise.  My gal in fresh to sailing, but loves it.  Yesterday I fed the new halyards into the mast without incident, and tonight I will crimp on some shackles so I can get the damn thing under sail.  The bottom (shape) of the boat is so slippery, my 3-1/2 Tohastu pushes the boat along wonderfully (6+mph).  I have no criticism of the boat yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Crash said:

Ah, so it is the mooring pin...shoulda looked closer, but was distracted by the beauty of the boat.  Ok, for picture purposes, put mooring pin on opposite side of cabin so not seen by camera:rolleyes:

 

Bull is a true renaissance man 

He's someone we all look up to....:D

Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll see that the boat has the interior of an oversized, old-skool 23-footer.  I mean, *duh* you've been working on it you know what you got, but when you spend a weekend on it, you'll really understand. However, it sails nothing like that old-skool 23-footer so it's all good.  I think your lady is gonna like it.  The H-boat is sporty enough that it scoots along just fine, but it's heavy enough that it's stable.  Baby won't plane, but if you get 3 foot waves behind you, and 15+ knots  with the chute up, she'll surf at 8+.  I had mine up over 9 once, coming down a big wave outside the Golden Gate. She'll do 7 all day long on a deep reach in a breeze.  The cockpit is perfect for two people.

You'll come to hate going all the way aft to set up the outboard but aside from that one single detail, the boat is an absolute delight. ALL boat have something that's a PITA it wouldn't be right to not have *Something* ! LOL

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/5/2018 at 10:28 AM, Crash said:

Bull is a true renaissance man... 

Who will paint most anything for money! :D 

But seriously Doug, you have done right by the boat, and for that you deserve God's favor, as do all of us who take care of stray dogs and boats.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Bull City said:

Who will paint most anything for money! :D 

But seriously Doug, you have done right by the boat, and for that you deserve God's favor, as do all of us who take care of stray dogs and boats.

Thank you Bull. 

I do (and other crazy people too) find great satisfaction in returning something neglected (particularly something beautiful), back to working condition.  Anytime I visit a boat yard full of neglected boats, I want to grab them all and take them to a barn to be restored.  I could give a rats ass about poorly designed sailboats or motor boats, but when a sailboat with beautiful lines has been abandoned, it drives me nuts.  I have learned that the vast majority of people these days just don't have the energy, or perhaps vision for it.  Point in case:  this weekend, after ,many months of work, my gal and I sailed Penrose for the first time.  Maybe the first time she was moving under sail in over 10 years.  I swear to you the boat looks and feels happy, they have a soul.

She sailed great, and spent two days on the boa in gorgeous weather.  Good stuff.

H-Boat Sailing04.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 2:28 PM, Alan H said:

You'll see that the boat has the interior of an oversized, old-skool 23-footer.  I mean, *duh* you've been working on it you know what you got, but when you spend a weekend on it, you'll really understand. However, it sails nothing like that old-skool 23-footer so it's all good.  I think your lady is gonna like it.  The H-boat is sporty enough that it scoots along just fine, but it's heavy enough that it's stable.  Baby won't plane, but if you get 3 foot waves behind you, and 15+ knots  with the chute up, she'll surf at 8+.  I had mine up over 9 once, coming down a big wave outside the Golden Gate. She'll do 7 all day long on a deep reach in a breeze.  The cockpit is perfect for two people.

You'll come to hate going all the way aft to set up the outboard but aside from that one single detail, the boat is an absolute delight. ALL boat have something that's a PITA it wouldn't be right to not have *Something* ! LOL

Right on all counts.  There is a beauty in the simplicity.  No complicated systems to worry about.  Just a clean, fun little boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been knocking together information to send to Nor Cal PHRF about my Piper O.D. and since the only place anybody has any data on these things is on the Clyde, in Scotland, I did some research. Upshot was, from one longtime class stalwart, that the Piper is "faster than a Folkboat but slower than a Dragon and about the same as a Sonata."

This got me looking at a bunch of race results from the Clyde Yacht Clubs Association. Lo and Behold, there are beaucoup  H Boats racing on the Clyde.  Their time allowance is exactly the same as a Dragon , and they have a LOT of data  - decades of it-  on which to base that.  Nor Cal PHRF has the Dragon at 192.  It has the H Boat at 186.  It has the H Boat at 186 because I'm the guy who originally applied for a rating and I started out with 168. After two seasons of not being able to finish anything but DFL or next-to-DFL, I finally did some boat on boat speed testing  with two other boats and applied for a rating change, requesting 186.  I got it, and I started finishing mid-fleet fairly often.

If you apply PHRF New Englands  "ORC to PHRF" conversion formula to the H Boat (and Dragon),  using UK-derived ORC ratings you get about 210.  PHRF New England has the H-Boat at 192.....exactly the same as the Dragon.

Conclusion, if you have to apply for a PHRF rating, it should probably be in the 190's.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Alan H said:

Conclusion, if you have to apply for a PHRF rating, it should probably be in the 190's.

Interesting. In a few PHRF races, I've had 186.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, there aren't very many H Boats in North America and such as there are, they're widely spread apart. There are (were)  supposedly 5 in the SF Bay Area but I've only ever seen three of them.  The only one that has raced in the past 20 years is mine, either with me driving it or with the subsequent owner.   So performance information is scarce.

However, on the Clyde in Scotland, guys have been racing Dragons against H Boats in large numbers since the late 60's, and there's a ridiculous amount of data backing up their conclusions that should have the same time-on-time handicap.  Ergo...kinda makes sense to rate them the same over here. So if your local PHRF squad has a rating for a Dragon, and it's somewhere between 188 and 204, or thereabouts, that's probably what you should be getting for your H Boat.

BTW, I goofed up there. PHRF New England has the H Boat at 195   --  http://www.phrfne.org/page/567 --      But the Dragon at 216.

NorCal PHRF has the Dragon at 192.  International H Boat at 186

PHRF Long Island has the Dragon at 228 -  International  H Boat at 189

PHRF Pacific Northwest should have a rating for both designs but they don't seem to publish their base ratings on line.

 

Here's a One Design ORC certificate for an H Boat, and considering as ORC has a bumptyzillion H Boats and races over the span of almost 50 years from which to acquire data, this magic number is probably pretty accurate.

http://data.orc.org/public/od/2017/hboat.od.pdf

As you can see, their Time-on-Distance rating for "Ocean" is 0.8197  and their Time-on-Distance rating for Windward-Leeward is  0.8261

Look here:  http://www.phrfne.org/page/handicapping/conversion_formulae

PHRF New England recommends the following formula for calculating a starter PHRF number from an ORC rating - ( 650 / ORC ) - 557 = PHRF
Do the math...  (650 / 0.8197 ) - 557 =  174  -  that's for "ocean".  Do if for Windward/Leeward and you get 169.    Ain't no way an H Boat can sail to those PHRF ratings, so there you go.

More than we ever wanted to know about H  Boat ratings.
 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 9:09 PM, Alan H said:

Well, there aren't very many H Boats in North America and such as there are, they're widely spread apart. There are (were)  supposedly 5 in the SF Bay Area but I've only ever seen three of them.  The only one that has raced in the past 20 years is mine, either with me driving it or with the subsequent owner.   So performance information is scarce.

However, on the Clyde in Scotland, guys have been racing Dragons against H Boats in large numbers since the late 60's, and there's a ridiculous amount of data backing up their conclusions that should have the same time-on-time handicap.  Ergo...kinda makes sense to rate them the same over here. So if your local PHRF squad has a rating for a Dragon, and it's somewhere between 188 and 204, or thereabouts, that's probably what you should be getting for your H Boat.

BTW, I goofed up there. PHRF New England has the H Boat at 195   --  http://www.phrfne.org/page/567 --      But the Dragon at 216.

NorCal PHRF has the Dragon at 192.  International H Boat at 186

PHRF Long Island has the Dragon at 228 -  International  H Boat at 189

PHRF Pacific Northwest should have a rating for both designs but they don't seem to publish their base ratings on line.

 

Here's a One Design ORC certificate for an H Boat, and considering as ORC has a bumptyzillion H Boats and races over the span of almost 50 years from which to acquire data, this magic number is probably pretty accurate.

http://data.orc.org/public/od/2017/hboat.od.pdf

As you can see, their Time-on-Distance rating for "Ocean" is 0.8197  and their Time-on-Distance rating for Windward-Leeward is  0.8261

Look here:  http://www.phrfne.org/page/handicapping/conversion_formulae

PHRF New England recommends the following formula for calculating a starter PHRF number from an ORC rating - ( 650 / ORC ) - 557 = PHRF
Do the math...  (650 / 0.8197 ) - 557 =  174  -  that's for "ocean".  Do if for Windward/Leeward and you get 169.    Ain't no way an H Boat can sail to those PHRF ratings, so there you go.

More than we ever wanted to know about H  Boat ratings.
 

 

 

Well that is some juicy stuff......

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On ‎7‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 11:16 AM, Jdmilnes2 said:

Well that is some juicy stuff......

Hadn't posted in a while, so here's a pick of my ride for shit's & gigs....

Penrose01 Small.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Nice looking! What's your sail number? Is it a North?

US38, the original main is an Elvstrom?  The main is blown out but will use for the remainder of the season.  I got two (used) jibs from Denmark.  An Elvstrom and a....."E" on the ID....cannot remember

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/9/2018 at 10:27 PM, sam_crocker said:

H Boat in the PNW is 189.  Data here:

http://phrf-nw.org/welcome-to-phrf-nw/for-race-organizers/list-of-active-members/

No Dragons that I could find, not sure that our light air makes fun racing for them.

RVYC used to have a fleet of them dry sailed. The PO of my old QT Fred Again was the N.A. Dragon champion once.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

Hey folks.....time to start walking up after the insanity of the Holidays!  Many projects to do on the boat in 2019!  Who's doing what?

Some items on my list:

Remove, restore (replace?) the 1984 original air vent mounted on the deck in the bow.  It has to come off and I will see if I can get it functional, right down it does not rotate to open or close.

Add additional fiberglass cloth on the underside of my hatch (cover).  Its is original as I most of my boat, and flexes like rubber when I step on it.

Install a simple electrical system with a battery and a small solar panel for a trickle charge.  If anyone has info on this topic I would appreciate it.

Lots of the usual stuff as well.  Cheers to the New Year!  Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Apropos of nothing, and because it is winter for many of us, and because H-Boats came from Finland, and because we are cold and wet and waiting for spring so that we can sail and frolic in the sun, and because we want joy and happiness with our families, I thought I would mention that Mrs. Bull and I are cooking a Choucroute Garnie this weekend, an Alsace dish of love, a winter medley of sauerkraut, potatoes, sausages, ribs, and ham, with mustard and rye bread on the side. We are going to try the Jaques Pepin version:

https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/choucroute-garnie

I encourage you to do the same. Joy to the world.

(Thank you, I will now go quietly.)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Apropos of nothing, and because it is winter for many of us, and because H-Boats came from Finland, and because we are cold and wet and waiting for spring so that we can sail and frolic in the sun, and because we want joy and happiness with our families, I thought I would mention that Mrs. Bull and I are cooking a Choucroute Garnie this weekend, an Alsace dish of love, a winter medley of sauerkraut, potatoes, sausages, ribs, and ham, with mustard and rye bread on the side. We are going to try the Jaques Pepin version:

https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/choucroute-garnie

I encourage you to do the same. Joy to the world.

(Thank you, I will now go quietly.)

That's one of our go-to meals for winter, in a slight variation. It's called "Alsation Pork Chops" in our version, with European weiners and smoked pork chops, but very similar. It's yummy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

That's one of our go-to meals for winter, in a slight variation. It's called "Alsation Pork Chops" in our version, with European weiners and smoked pork chops, but very similar. It's yummy.

Ish, I recall you gave me the recipe for an excellent cold weather dish with Portuguese "snausages" and bell peppers. Can you give it to me again?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bull City said:

Apropos of nothing, and because it is winter for many of us, and because H-Boats came from Finland, and because we are cold and wet and waiting for spring so that we can sail and frolic in the sun, and because we want joy and happiness with our families, I thought I would mention that Mrs. Bull and I are cooking a Choucroute Garnie this weekend, an Alsace dish of love, a winter medley of sauerkraut, potatoes, sausages, ribs, and ham, with mustard and rye bread on the side. We are going to try the Jaques Pepin version:

https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/choucroute-garnie

I encourage you to do the same. Joy to the world.

(Thank you, I will now go quietly.)

Made that for my kids when they were young and it's become a commonly requested item. Quality of the input is key. When I lived in Asia I hoarded juniper berries - hard to find.

Meals like Choucroute and Plov are great boat foods in cooler climates. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

chorizo.jpg

On 1/27/2015 at 10:24 AM, Bull City said:

Tomatoe sauce, red and green bell peppers, mushrooms? Any seasoning?

 

I have never, and I mean never, met a snausage I didn't like.

 

Handful of oregano, bit of basil, caramelized onions and garlic, the usual stuff. We have some good snausage makers around here. Those were Portuguese chorizo. I love good snausage.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In fact there should be beaucoup good used sails from various European countries for the H Boat, as they're a super popular One Design in Germany, Denmark, Austria, Norway, Finland and so on.

 

On my short list of dream boats is the grown-up cousin to the H-Boat the H-323.

 

Purjevene-H-323-e99c34e713ffff1d-large.j

 

I've never seen one for sale on this side of the Atlantic, though.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ishmael said:

chorizo.jpg

 

Handful of oregano, bit of basil, caramelized onions and garlic, the usual stuff. We have some good snausage makers around here. Those were Portuguese chorizo. I love good snausage.

Merci mille fois, mon ami!

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Alan H said:

In fact there should be beaucoup good used sails from various European countries for the H Boat, as they're a super popular One Design in Germany, Denmark, Austria, Norway, Finland and so on.

 

On my short list of dream boats is the grown-up cousin to the H-Boat the H-323.

 

Purjevene-H-323-e99c34e713ffff1d-large.j

 

I've never seen one for sale on this side of the Atlantic, though.

They are really sweet. Someone needs to blaze a new path and have one shipped here.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/17/2019 at 8:17 PM, Bull City said:

Apropos of nothing, and because it is winter for many of us, and because H-Boats came from Finland, and because we are cold and wet and waiting for spring so that we can sail and frolic in the sun, and because we want joy and happiness with our families, I thought I would mention that Mrs. Bull and I are cooking a Choucroute Garnie this weekend, an Alsace dish of love, a winter medley of sauerkraut, potatoes, sausages, ribs, and ham, with mustard and rye bread on the side. We are going to try the Jaques Pepin version:

https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/choucroute-garnie

I encourage you to do the same. Joy to the world.

(Thank you, I will now go quietly.)

21264304_choucroutegarnie.thumb.jpg.a12b3f5ec0365f31ab6071ddcc2b4880.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I found a recipe and it's on the meal plan fort his coming weekend.   Thank you for the inspiration Bull.

 

Btw, it's -10F with a windchill of -27F in Montreal today.  Time to curl up in front of the fireplace with the Admiral.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, py26129 said:

I found a recipe and it's on the meal plan fort his coming weekend.   Thank you for the inspiration Bull.

 

Btw, it's -10F with a windchill of -27F in Montreal today.  Time to curl up in front of the fireplace with the Admiral.

That sounds good. What's your address?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, py26129 said:

I found a recipe and it's on the meal plan fort his coming weekend.   Thank you for the inspiration Bull.

Pepin's recipe called for caraway seeds, but I left them out. I like them in rye bread, but not so much in sauerkraut. It also called for seasoning the ribs with sugar and salt overnight before cooking. I forgot until morning and it was OK.

If you need another cold weather dish, be sure to try Ish's snausages (see post#829)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Look Choucroute from French Alsace.  French doing German food, only properly 

My recipe

The Secret is to cook fresh fermented sauerkraut  (choucroute), not canned or bottled, in dry Alsatian Reisling. Add raw meat (pork shoulder), smoked sausage  and a salty sausage and salt pork. Boudin (blood sausage for some, not me) and smoked pork knuckle (cooked in Reisling as well). Potatoes, horse radish and Dijon mustard. Feeds an army and if you have a new girlfriend you may get laid too!  

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

That sounds good. What's your address?

Ish, better check the forecast for this weekend before you buy your plant ticket.  It's gonna stay colder that a witches armpit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Pepin's recipe called for caraway seeds, but I left them out. I like them in rye bread, but not so much in sauerkraut. It also called for seasoning the ribs with sugar and salt overnight before cooking. I forgot until morning and it was OK.

If you need another cold weather dish, be sure to try Ish's snausages (see post#829)

Snausage post has been saved.  Love that kind of recipe.  Just  a list of of ingredients and make up the rest

In the spirit of contributing here is one of my comfort food faves:  Braised beef

https://simplyhomecooked.com/braised-beef/

image.png.d73655b9b59f3cbd0fb0e4fce093973a.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, py26129 said:

Braised beef

That looks disgustingly delicious. It's on the list.

Have you ever made Tante Yvonne's Beef Daube? It simmers over three days, with evenings spent in the fridge. Here is the recipe, plus the macaroni gratin that goes with it. Great winter dish. We made it for my recent 70th. Bon appétit!

TANTE YVONNE'S DAUBE.pdf

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, HuronBouy said:

Look Choucroute from French Alsace.  French doing German food, only properly 

My recipe

The Secret is to cook fresh fermented sauerkraut  (choucroute), not canned or bottled, in dry Alsatian Reisling. Add raw meat (pork shoulder), smoked sausage  and a salty sausage and salt pork. Boudin (blood sausage for some, not me) and smoked pork knuckle (cooked in Reisling as well). Potatoes, horse radish and Dijon mustard. Feeds an army and if you have a new girlfriend you may get laid too!  

Sounds just like Jaques Pepin version, minus the knuckle. We're having left-overs tonight.

Maybe I'll get L.... uckey!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously, we have a shorter and less intense winter in North Carolina than you Canuckistans do, so we have to pack all those yummy winter dishes into a short season. Not that I want a long cold winter!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/18/2019 at 11:44 AM, Ishmael said:

chorizo.jpg

 

Handful of oregano, bit of basil, caramelized onions and garlic, the usual stuff. We have some good snausage makers around here. Those were Portuguese chorizo. I love good snausage.

 

I understand I am being a nit-picker, but as I've been eating Chouriço since I could chew solid food (my family comes from the Azores) I can state that there is a difference between Chouriço and Chorizo. I've eaten Chorizo multiple times and don't really care for it, although that may be as I grew up eating Chouriço.

Notes:

* Chouriço is Portugal’s most popular sausage. A dry sausage somewhat similar to the Spanish chorizo. Chouriço is very garlicky, red-brown with paprika, and smoked.

* Chorizo is a Chile-garlic flavored sausage much loved in Mexico and the American Southwest.

Chouriço is great in Kale Soup (kale, cow meat, Chouriço, potatoes, and a few other vegetables). Unlike Millennials, Hipsters, Yuppies, and Yuccies, until recently, kale has been considered "peasant food" and certainly needs to be cooked before eating.

If anyone is interested in making some real Portuguese food, take a look at Portuguese Home-style Cooking, and Authentic Portuguese Cooking by Ana Patuleia Ortins.

http://portuguesecooking.com/about-ana

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎17‎/‎2019 at 8:17 PM, Bull City said:

Apropos of nothing, and because it is winter for many of us, and because H-Boats came from Finland, and because we are cold and wet and waiting for spring so that we can sail and frolic in the sun, and because we want joy and happiness with our families, I thought I would mention that Mrs. Bull and I are cooking a Choucroute Garnie this weekend, an Alsace dish of love, a winter medley of sauerkraut, potatoes, sausages, ribs, and ham, with mustard and rye bread on the side. We are going to try the Jaques Pepin version:

https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/choucroute-garnie

I encourage you to do the same. Joy to the world.

(Thank you, I will now go quietly.)

How on earth is one man (you) so versed on EVERYTHING?

Link to post
Share on other sites

And.....not entirely sure how this blog transformed into a COOKING SHOW......but I digress  :rolleyes:.... Here's my H-Boat stuff, whilst eating Bull's savory stew......

The hatch cover on Penrose has gotten a bit soft with all the gorgeous New Jersey UV rays beating upon it for 35 years.  I added some fiberglass mat to stiffen it,.  First of many little project for the winter. 

Go back to eating now....

IMG_8728.JPG

IMG_8729.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎18‎/‎2019 at 12:44 PM, Ishmael said:

chorizo.jpg

 

Handful of oregano, bit of basil, caramelized onions and garlic, the usual stuff. We have some good snausage makers around here. Those were Portuguese chorizo. I love good snausage.

Fuck yeah.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Jdmilnes2 said:

How on earth is one man (you) so versed on EVERYTHING?

A long life, well lived.

I'm about the same age and I'm equally well versed on everything.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/20/2019 at 8:18 PM, Ishmael said:

That looks good. Hungry now. 

I would think that it being winter, all the windows closed, house sealed up, wouldn't sauerkraut be a dangerous thing to eat?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I can feel the weight going on.

So can i.

39 minutes ago, woahboy said:

I would think that it being winter, all the windows closed, house sealed up, wouldn't sauerkraut be a dangerous thing to eat?

Yes, it is. Ask anyone who lives with me.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Bull, just for you. Full resolution will look so much better on your Mac.

That is much better. Thanks, Ish. Now I can smell it when I pop open my MacBook.

Ahhh...

BTW, do you serve it over rice or anything? I made it a while back and don't remember.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Bull City said:
  8 hours ago, woahboy said:

I would think that it being winter, all the windows closed, house sealed up, wouldn't sauerkraut be a dangerous thing to eat?

Yes, it is. Ask anyone who lives with me.

On second thought, they're all unconscious.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Bull City said:

That is much better. Thanks, Ish. Now I can smell it when I pop open my MacBook.

Ahhh...

BTW, do you serve it over rice or anything? I made it a while back and don't remember.

We usually serve it over/with Rice or broad egg noodles, or even a side of sourdough bread.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Ishmael said:

We usually serve it over/with Rice or broad egg noodles, or even a side of sourdough bread.

Loving carbs like I do I would go with all 3..... Mmmmmmm.

 

23 hours ago, Ishmael said:

We usually serve it over/with Rice or broad egg noodles, or even a side of sourdough bread.

 

On 7/8/2018 at 8:07 PM, Bull City said:

Who will paint most anything for money! :D 

But seriously Doug, you have done right by the boat, and for that you deserve God's favor, as do all of us who take care of stray dogs and boats.

And would never think of wearing of wearing a MAGAt hat.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Ok, back here after a few months....so figured I'd throw my hat into the ring and start it up...(sans a new recipe)

I am installing a new (simple) electrical system into my boat.  12-volt battery to take care of lights, charging receptacle and compass light.  Eventually I would like to get a small solar panel to install for recharging the battery, but I digress....

I installed the battery in the forward most storage area in the forepeak.  Nice place to balance out the boat, considering I have the engine hanging off the transom.  I built a simple bracket, and cut to contour the shape of the hull.  It's pretty solid and I think it will work well in this position.  Also installed a simple on-off switch and a selector panel for my loads.  It's been a fun job and it will be nice to have basic amenities in the boat.  I I will send more photo's when its complete.  Perhaps this weekend.  Doug

DAQV2877.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Jdmilnes2 said:

Ok, back here after a few months....so figured I'd throw my hat into the ring and start it up...(sans a new recipe)

I am installing a new (simple) electrical system into my boat.  12-volt battery to take care of lights, charging receptacle and compass light.  Eventually I would like to get a small solar panel to install for recharging the battery, but I digress....

I installed the battery in the forward most storage area in the forepeak.  Nice place to balance out the boat, considering I have the engine hanging off the transom.  I built a simple bracket, and cut to contour the shape of the hull.  It's pretty solid and I think it will work well in this position.  Also installed a simple on-off switch and a selector panel for my loads.  It's been a fun job and it will be nice to have basic amenities in the boat.  I I will send more photo's when its complete.  Perhaps this weekend.  Doug

DAQV2877.JPG

I would put the L brackets under the shelf and through-bolt, it would be much stronger. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

I would put the L brackets under the shelf and through-bolt, it would be much stronger. 

They are, this picture was taken before the final install.  the wood is painted and it's bolted to the bulkhead wall.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
On ‎4‎/‎5‎/‎2019 at 1:35 PM, Jdmilnes2 said:

Friggin' windows, Part Duex

 

IMG_9200.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
On 1/18/2019 at 9:20 PM, Alan H said:

In fact there should be beaucoup good used sails from various European countries for the H Boat, as they're a super popular One Design in Germany, Denmark, Austria, Norway, Finland and so on.

 

On my short list of dream boats is the grown-up cousin to the H-Boat the H-323.

 

Purjevene-H-323-e99c34e713ffff1d-large.j

 

I've never seen one for sale on this side of the Atlantic, though.

Artekno also built the H-35.

lightbox-bat1119.jpg?1300322589

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
On 2/3/2017 at 10:54 AM, Bull City said:

I bought a Garelick-type bracket, and with some modifications, it will work from a vertical travel standpoint. The springs provide plenty of lift. The mounting hole pattern even matched the old bracket. I changed the brackets the other day.

This bracket has been great, until yesterday. The "Thingy" in the photo below is used to raise & lower the motor. Yesterday, when I used it to raise the motor, one of the black plastic knobs slid off in my hand, and what appeared to be a smooth aluminum rod with the other plastic knob (I only got a quick look) slid out of the bracket arm and (naturally) fell into the water. I put the surviving knob in my pocket, and thought, "What the fuck?" 

The bracket still works without the handle, but it's not satisfactory. When I got home, I called the company for some help, only to find it (Trac) was bought out several months ago. The bracket had been discontinued before the buy out. No support or parts are available.  I went to McMasters-Carr, and ordered a SS 1/2" X 3" long threaded rod and a couple of lock nuts which should do the job. Luckily, I measured the hole before I left the boat.

Given the quality of the bracket, I'm surprised that the Thingy wasn't more securely designed. It seems it depended solely on the friction between the plastic knob and the smooth rod.

 

bracket_alum_lg.jpg.2853885edfb41c9b24bc35f1d9728d16.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/5/2019 at 9:42 PM, Alan H said:

NIIICE!!!

+1 on that as they say. Since my father in law built one and sailed one back in the 70's it warms my heart to see one in such good condition on the other side of the pond (and then across the meadow to that). 

Now, the food pics on the last page got me thinking that maybe one of you have a good recommendation for some food typical for the Pacific Northwest that goes well with white wine? We are going to have a white wine tasting with some Washington State white whine for our midsummer's party and I'm a bit lost what to cook.

Cheers,

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently purchased a garelick. Hope it all goes well. Tohatsu 9 long shaft.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Klamm said:

+1 on that as they say. Since my father in law built one and sailed one back in the 70's it warms my heart to see one in such good condition on the other side of the pond (and then across the meadow to that). 

Now, the food pics on the last page got me thinking that maybe one of you have a good recommendation for some food typical for the Pacific Northwest that goes well with white wine? We are going to have a white wine tasting with some Washington State white whine for our midsummer's party and I'm a bit lost what to cook.

Cheers,

 

Halibut, Dungeness crab, oysters...

photo-708909.jpg

Sockeye salmon overpowers a white wine, otherwise I would toss that in too. Black bear goes best with a vibrant red.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Klamm said:

Thanks for the tips. How would you cook the halibut?

I like to BBQ it on a griddle with a bit of lemon pepper. One of these thingies...

rectangular.png

My wife also likes it poached in white wine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Ishmael said:

I like to BBQ it on a griddle with a bit of lemon pepper. One of these thingies...

rectangular.png

My wife also likes it poached in white wine.

Great, thanks. FYI the Washington State white wines that are readily available here are:

14 Hands, Riesling
14 Hands, Hot to Trot Whie Blend
14 Hands, Chardonnay
Kung Fu Girl, Rielsing
Chateau Ste Michelle, Chardonnay
Chateau Ste Michelle, Riesling
Charles and Charles, Chardonnay
Sixto, Uncovered Chardonnay
K Art den Hoed, Viognier
Yakima, Chardonnay Viognier
Eve, Chardonnay
Eroica, Riesling

Any comments on any of them are welcome. Would they be well known, mainstream wines or more unknown ones?

 

Cheers,

 

PS. Regarding the sailing my father in law upgraded to a Vindö 40 which we now sail instead. Only one week ago she went back into the water for the summer.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Rght now there are two H-Boats for sale in California. One is in Santa Cruz and they want $10K for it.  The other one is in  Southern California and has been given to a Non-Profit.

Link to post
Share on other sites