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Bob Perry

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Sled:

The purpose the forward cockpit serves is that it satisfies the client';s request for a forward cockpit. Again this gets back to the whole concept of "custom design". The boat this sailor sees in his mind does not exist yet. He puts together his experiences with his father's schooner and his go fast cruising boat and comes up with something very different. Then I turn it into a design that works. My client's sketches always included the forward cockpit.

 

I'll say this about that cockpit. It raises hell with the layout forward. I'll post a layout here in the next few minutes.

 

In Dr. Frankenfurter's famous words defending Rocky's muscles, " I didn't build him for you!"

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Yeah, right, The rig is not rendered except for mast placement. That should be obvious. The mizzen will be free standing. The main will have shrouds as clearly shown on my sail plan. Here is a later revision of the sail plan. Client wants a swim platform so I will sheet the mizzen to the platform. No point in having two things sticking off the stern. I can't see what this would not work. Let me know if you can think of a real reason it will not work.

 

I am open to ideas on the lug mizzen. I have no lug experience except for sailing a Chinese junk. I'm not sure of the advantages and disadvantages of the various lug rigs. Help!

Moon%20SP_zpsqs62amnn.jpg

Here is the layout. Obviously the confines of the PH restrict what can be done with the volume under the side decks so I have reduced the side decks down to what I think is acceptable.

The P&S quarter berths are a step down from the PH sole level There is a wheel to port forward. The starboard settee extends outboard to make a "cozy double". This is an odd layout but I think I could live with it just fine. I like odd very "boatlike: shapes below. I already have my directives for the next round of revisions to this layout. They are minor.

Moon%20layout_zpsiguhmpu0.jpg[/uR

L]Ed%203_zpssyfyqx6n.jpg

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Ed:

Our client in NZ is very busy right now so we have slowed down but yes, I do believe we can show you what we are about this weekend. Be prepared to be surprised.

I'll have to think about it. There is so much bull shit going on this forum now that I am contemplating a break.

We'll see.

Bob,

I'm glad you've decided not to take a break. The forum would be a poorer place without you.

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I am open to ideas on the lug mizzen. I have no lug experience except for sailing a Chinese junk. I'm not sure of the advantages and disadvantages of the various lug rigs. Help!

 

It has a lot in common with the lateen rig on Sunfish. Obviously, you need a good, strong downhaul on the boom in line with the mast.

 

From Bolger:

 

Standing lugs: Standing lugs are easy and quick to reef. When the reef tack pendant is hauled down, the yard is peaked more than with full sail. This in turn cocks the boom up, which is desireable in heavy weather but usually hurts the set of the sail more or less.

 

The halyard sheave for all lugsails of all types should be athwartships in the masthead. A dumb sheave, a simple scored hole in the mast would be practical in [a little boat]. A swell in the masthead, in way of the sheave, will lead the halyard clear of the yard parrel, The halyard fall was sometimes belayed ahead of the mast to discourage bending the mast as the sheet was flattened down. The yard bears on the halyard that way on one tack,and will eventually chafe. If it's at all convenient, it's a good idea to leave the mast free to revolve because the short drift between the sheave and the fully hoisted yard will chafe the halyard on the flanges of the sheave as the yard swings from tack to tack.

 

Balance lugs: A balanced lug take reefing well. The center of the reefed sail stays closed to the center of the full sail. The reefed clew can be brought to the outer end of the boom, with the leftover boom projecting ahead of the reefed tack, so the boom is shortened by reefing. [not sure this is good for you. SS] It's wise to have the boom downhaul movable on the boom to encourage shifting the boom. In fact, a clove hitch on the boom next to the mast is a good though inelegant way to attach the downhaul to the boom [Like a Sunfish. SS] A parrel holding the boom to the mast is unnecessary.If used, it should be easy to cast off.

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Bob Perry:

Thanks Lips. This is my social life. This and the check out line at the supermarket. I live a sheltered life.

 

I call bullshit. The world beats a path to your door, I have seen it. The line of satisfied clients would stretch all the way from the shack to downtown Seattle. :rolleyes:

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The lug mizzen is 1) cool looking 2) pretty simple to deal with 3) (and most importantly) can be cut pretty flat and left up almost all the time except if you're in a good blow and perhaps even then without the main. It just stays up even at anchor and permits a nice stable head-to-wind attitude. Sure, it could be leg-o-mutton or bermudan or anything but with a gaff rig---it's just plaine neat. The mast, as you say, can be unstayed, it's simple, simple, simple and has little need for 'stuff & bits' that cost money...

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Veegs:

I think you summed up very well; why my client wants this lug mizzen. The look has grown on me. It's fun to do something quite different.

" Oh yeah, I do all the lugs, dipping, standing, squatting, barking all the lugs."

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I find it comforting when I can immediately identify structural elements inside the boat. Bulkheads make no apologies, floors are as thick as they need to be, and it still looks good. The pics of Kim's boat and the Radford both make me think of that.

The boat in those build pics is for sale just down the channel from here.

It's really tempting, but is definitely set up as a race boat.

I have seriously considered modifying it as a cruiserhttp://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/radford-12-2-red-jacket/169831

Unfortunately, I already have a perfectly good Adams 36

Sell the 36!
Well the Radford is wood...
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I find it comforting when I can immediately identify structural elements inside the boat. Bulkheads make no apologies, floors are as thick as they need to be, and it still looks good. The pics of Kim's boat and the Radford both make me think of that.

The boat in those build pics is for sale just down the channel from here.

It's really tempting, but is definitely set up as a race boat.

I have seriously considered modifying it as a cruiserhttp://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/radford-12-2-red-jacket/169831

Unfortunately, I already have a perfectly good Adams 36

Sell the 36!

 

You could buy it for your trips down that way:-)

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The lug mizzen is 1) cool looking 2) pretty simple to deal with 3) (and most importantly) can be cut pretty flat and left up almost all the time except if you're in a good blow and perhaps even then without the main. It just stays up even at anchor and permits a nice stable head-to-wind attitude. Sure, it could be leg-o-mutton or bermudan or anything but with a gaff rig---it's just plaine neat. The mast, as you say, can be unstayed, it's simple, simple, simple and has little need for 'stuff & bits' that cost money...

What's quite interesting to me is how infrequently lug mizzens seem to have been traditionally used on yawls. If anybody was going to use them, I would expect them to turn up on things like Albert Strange's canoe yawls, but he seemingly used gaff or leg of mutton. Easier to control, I suppose. Gaff under more control.

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I find it comforting when I can immediately identify structural elements inside the boat. Bulkheads make no apologies, floors are as thick as they need to be, and it still looks good. The pics of Kim's boat and the Radford both make me think of that.

The boat in those build pics is for sale just down the channel from here.

It's really tempting, but is definitely set up as a race boat.

I have seriously considered modifying it as a cruiserhttp://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/radford-12-2-red-jacket/169831

Unfortunately, I already have a perfectly good Adams 36

Sell the 36!Well the Radford is wood...

So is FRANCIS!

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P

 

 

 

I find it comforting when I can immediately identify structural elements inside the boat. Bulkheads make no apologies, floors are as thick as they need to be, and it still looks good. The pics of Kim's boat and the Radford both make me think of that.

 

The boat in those build pics is for sale just down the channel from here.

It's really tempting, but is definitely set up as a race boat.

I have seriously considered modifying it as a cruiserhttp://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/radford-12-2-red-jacket/169831

Unfortunately, I already have a perfectly good Adams 36

Sell the 36!

 

You could buy it for your trips down that way:-)

Sweet Hart reminds me we are at the stage of life where experiences are more important than possessions.

 

We already have three keelboats, the Eliott in the avatar, the Adams, and Steele's old Tartan in Seattle.

 

Our Adams has a lowish pilothouse, good deep bulwarks, a big deep cockpit, a hard dodger, a masthead cutter rig with a mainsail that already maxes out our capacity as double handlers, and a ballast ratio well over 50% so it is as stiff as a brick shithouse.

 

It was designed with utter disdain for the IOR, we have had it over 12 knots sustained in Bass Strait with no effort, a previous owner clocked 19nm in an hour in a Melbourne to Hobart Westcoaster.

 

The Radford doesn't match up on cruising amenities, it is a beautifully built and equipped rocket ship, but it would be a real project.

 

What I am after in a design is a compromise boat, lighter than both so we can use less sail area, designed as a cruiser.

 

Joe Adams designed the 13 for himself after he circumnavigated in a 30 footer. By the time he finished the design seven mates had signed up for the boat as well.

 

It is an epic boat down here, but was designed nearly forty years ago, and it has problems upwind in a blow.

 

Time for an update.

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Why does your client want that archaic rig? Just because he likes it or is there some personal theory behind it?

 

With the ease of handling enabled by modern rigs I can't understand wanting something like that except for esthetics.

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Olaf:

Yes, have had for months, 19,000 lbs. is the designed displ. About the same as Frankie.

Thanks, so the Adams 13 displaces around 14,000 lb light on a 40' waterline, the Radford 12.2 is under 12,000 lb. on 40'.

 

Both have around 1000' sail area, which is too much for couples cruising round here.

 

Do you have a rule of thumb for displacement : waterline length for comfortable cruisers, or with keel bulbs these days can we go as light as the technology allows and still have a boat that is comfortable at sea?

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Olaf:

That's a bit of a tough one. Might depend on just how you define" comfortable cruisers" But my guess would be a D/L over 140 and under 180, maybe as high as 200 if you want volume and stability. I think if you get the D/L under 130 you may have bulb provided stability but you still will not have a comfy ride. For the rig where you have some breeze I'd say nothing over 17.5 in a mast head rig and nothing over 18.50 for a frac rig.

 

There are a lot of variables but I think those numbers are relatively representative.

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Jon:

I guess you are just going to have to live with the fact that you can't understand it. He has explained his reasoning to me several times and I am confident he knows what he is doing. Remember, one of the client's prime requirements is

"I want this boat to be different."

 

We all have our personal sailing styles and lifestyles on board. One works for one sailor may make no sense to another. That's where diversity comes from and I like diversity.

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Olaf:

That's a bit of a tough one. Might depend on just how you define" comfortable cruisers" But my guess would be a D/L over 140 and under 180, maybe as high as 200 if you want volume and stability. I think if you get the D/L under 130 you may have bulb provided stability but you still will not have a comfy ride. For the rig where you have some breeze I'd say nothing over 17.5 in a mast head rig and nothing over 18.50 for a frac rig.

 

There are a lot of variables but I think those numbers are relatively representative.

That's really interesting, I would think you would be the most experienced person around to answer that question from the "pattern recognition" angle.

 

According to sailboatdata, the Adams 13 has a SA/D of 29 and Disp/Length of 96.

 

The Radford is lighter and has more sail, can't find published figures but it will be even more extreme.

 

A lot of folks have cruised a long way in the Adams ,including some close friends who don't have any issues with comfort, just note it is very tender upwind.

 

Do you think beam becomes a variable at this level? The Adams only has 10' beam.

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Would waterplane area or PPI immersion be a more useful measure than bmax for describing a boats motion when compared with displacement? Beam will equate the hullshape of a pinched arse ior and cheese wedge of equivalent beam as the same motion, waterplane recognises at least some difference.

I wonder if anyone has ever bothered comparing a moment of area of waterplane about the centre of buoyancy and looked at correlation to sailing comfort. Probably more work than the accuracy would justify

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Olaf:

I think you live in an area that has been ahead of the US in investigating the advantages of light boats. I'd say New Zealand would be in a similar situation. I'd have to add some factor to reduce D/L's to comply with your range. D/L's under 100 are for race boats in the US. It was not so long ago when Seattle Yacht Club established for rating purposes "ULDB's" as starting at D/L 150. Shows you how time changes things. Today 150 would be considered "medium" and just maybe "medium light".

 

An SA/D of 29 like the Adams has is today in race boat range. Maybe not the newest sport boats which are pretty extreme in sail area but certainly top level club racers. That's a lot of rig for a cruising boat. It would take a skilled sailor to keep that boat under comfortable control. As you say it's "very tender upwind". Of course it with that kind of horsepower per pound.

 

" Back on the rail dear!"

 

Maybe we have a different view of "comfortable".

 

Ranti:

Maybe. I'll have to think on it. Remember, as I said, if you have two 40'ers with a 10,000 lb. displacement difference, waterplane will be quite close. It does not reflect overall displ at all. I would take a wild ass guess and say the range of waterplane areas for boats that share similar DWl and BWL numbers would be within 10% of overall waterplane area.

 

In past years when I would have some eager high school kid in the office for the summer this is the type of job I'd give to him, compiling comparative numbers.

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I was thinking waterplane would be lower for deeper hulled boats with plenty of deadrise, low PPI but lots of inches to make up the lbs. Not often you see a waterplane published with a design, so I nfi about the real numbers.

You are probably right about the spread of numbers, until you get to more extreme corners like the Adams hulls vs a pogo.

 

Great learning tool for a student, gets them nice and intimate with the details of a wide range of hulls, and still has a purpose. I need to find a way to include yacht design into a subject at school

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Bob, the new gaffer design is great. Right up my alley with the pilot house, traditional styling and modern materials.

 

As with all your projects, I look forward to the continued development and eventual building of the boat.

 

Cheers,

 

Steve

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Would waterplane area or PPI immersion be a more useful measure than bmax for describing a boats motion when compared with displacement? Beam will equate the hullshape of a pinched arse ior and cheese wedge of equivalent beam as the same motion, waterplane recognises at least some difference.

I wonder if anyone has ever bothered comparing a moment of area of waterplane about the centre of buoyancy and looked at correlation to sailing comfort. Probably more work than the accuracy would justify

There were some notions at one time about "anti-pitching" characteristics. As I understood it, the thought was that the bow and stern each have an inherent frequency of pitch, basically, how fast they would rise if depressed. If the two are the same, they reinforce each other and the boat pitches more heavily than if they are different. Of course, the weight and CoG location of the mast and keel have a huge effect on pitch.

 

Some designers have tried to tune their boats for the wave action they expect, e.g. 12 Meters in Newport, so the period of the waves doesn't reinforce pitching.

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How big is that alternator? Anybody know the manufacturer?

 

 

Visited the Carbon Cutters this morning. That Jim Betts runs a very impressive shop. Well laid out and well organized. Lots of talent in that building especially Jim, who can be pressed into service for just about anything boat building when there is a need. Here he is machining some custom bearings for the cutters:attachicon.gifIMG_7188.JPG

 

Here is the shop floor with numerous activities and projects of Cutter pieces coming together:attachicon.gifIMG_7193.JPGattachicon.gifIMG_7194.JPG

 

Here is the amazing alternator set up:attachicon.gifIMG_7190.JPG

 

And the bowsprit mockup:attachicon.gifIMG_7189.JPG

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Just one gripe Bob: where do you get off calling it a ketch?! The mizzen is too small.

It is a yawl.

It's not the size of the mizzen, it's where the mast steps, in front of or behind the rudder post.

 

Even so, you are right it is a yawl.

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There is an argument about that. I believe that definition came from the CCA rule, who needed a definition in writing more that "big mizzen (/driving sail) = ketch. Small mizzen (/balancing sail) = yawl."

 

Plenty of things like canoe yawls with a small mizzen, but aft rudder.

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Olaf:

That's a bit of a tough one. Might depend on just how you define" comfortable cruisers" But my guess would be a D/L over 140 and under 180, maybe as high as 200 if you want volume and stability. I think if you get the D/L under 130 you may have bulb provided stability but you still will not have a comfy ride. For the rig where you have some breeze I'd say nothing over 17.5 in a mast head rig and nothing over 18.50 for a frac rig.

 

There are a lot of variables but I think those numbers are relatively representative.

That's really interesting, I would think you would be the most experienced person around to answer that question from the "pattern recognition" angle.

 

According to sailboatdata, the Adams 13 has a SA/D of 29 and Disp/Length of 96.

 

The Radford is lighter and has more sail, can't find published figures but it will be even more extreme.

 

A lot of folks have cruised a long way in the Adams ,including some close friends who don't have any issues with comfort, just note it is very tender upwind.

 

Do you think beam becomes a variable at this level? The Adams only has 10' beam.

 

 

I think that it is also very much dependant of the shape of the forward part of the boat. I remember doing a bit of cruising on a First class 12 which was a one tonner and to my surprise the boat had a very comfortable motion at sea. IME light boats with flattish sections forwart can be a nightmare and really not suitable for cruising.

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Saturday afternoon and apparently Jody is bored. Not very Euro is it?

 

Interesting. Why take the main peak halyard to the end of the yard like that?

 

Also never seen peak and throat halyards on a lug. Normally just hook he yard onto a traveller on the mast unless sails are really quite large. Out of interest, why go with 2 halyards?

 

o80722_spiritofmystery_003.jpg

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Moccasin_2.jpg

 

Bolger boat. Standing lug with spritsail boom. The difference in effect between this and the balanced lug is pretty minor, but the yard and sprit boom don't project as far ahead of the mizzen mast. That might or might not be important depending on rest of the layout. Note the mast height above the yard both in the picture and in the one above. I don't know the reasoning about this for sure, but the section of halyard between the yard and the sheave has to allow the yard to swing. I can see that wear, tear, and chafe could be a problem if it was too short.

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Thanks Semi:

I looked at a lot of examples before drawing my "loafing lug". Still not aware of the differences in the minor variations. I can see the advantage of having more mast height. I wish I had some lug sailing experience. I wish I could call Phil.

 

Not sure if I'll use the single halyard gaff arrangement. It did have limitations you don't get with throat and peak halyards. My current inclination is to offer suggestions but leave the final rig details to the clint's choice. He's far from a newbie and he as, as do I, plenty of gaff rigged boat experience. He the one who will have to live with it. It should be the way he wants it.

 

Could be there would some problems with the single halyard rig on this boat as due to the higher gaff angle compared to the rather ftat gaff angle of JAKATAN. I like the extra shape control of two halyards.

 

Doesn't look like a peak halyard is required. That's one less line.

 

Not going to get into "is it a ketch or a yawl?" debate. You can call it anything you like. In light of the movement of rudders in the last 50 years I feel strongly that the old definitions don't work anymore. I tend to go with P. Ed's approach, i.e. big mizzen =ketch, small mizzen = yawl. My boat is probably a yawl. I'll call it Arnold.

BD%202_zps9afntlqn.jpg

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BTW:

My client , the man in the moon, is reading this thread and enjoying it very much. I got two emails from him this morning and he is very happy with the progress of the design. He's still up in the air on a couple of items but at this stage everything can change.

 

Client says, "It is a phenomenally good looking boat".

 

That's what I want to hear.

 

Jody and I can walk around with smiles on our faces today.

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Streamer: I caught that. Thanks. Client does not seem concerned. But it's not good form.

Well that did not stop you from dragging me into this place when you posted the first SLIVER drawings with my name all over them.

 

Got strange phone calls from various people who said: "Hey! I see you are getting a custom boat designed by Perry."

 

My son Derek was the one who revealed the source of where those people found out. "Hey Dad, your name is on Bob's drawings in the "Canoe Stern" thread on CA!"

 

It all worked out OK, I never even got the "traditional greetings".........

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I looked at a book of Yachting designs from the 1960s. The ketches mostly had mizzens with the hoist and foot were about 2/3 of the main. That gives mizzen are of about 45% main area. For yawls, it was about 1/2 on hoist and foot with area of about 25% of the main. Of course, you can find examples everywhere in between and beyond, like this Thomas Gilmer ketch where is the mizzen is about 1/3 of the main (if I read correctly).

 

ketchplan.gif

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Well isn't that refreshing, to see someone prepared to do something completely different for this day and age. Interesting. Are we allowed to know where in NZ, Bob?

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Bob,

 

Love the "New" project and I look forward to seeing it take shape!

 

But for now...

 

Any chance we could see what's up with that "Old" project?

 

You know...

 

That little carbon cutter thingy you started a while back?

 

;-)

 

fs

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Fall:

I took a few photos last week, mostly of my dog climbing the scaffold. Work right now on the boat is all taking pace i the bilge and I can't get good definitive photos of that. They are working on the pieces for the other three boats and getting the deck for No. 1 ready for painting inside.

 

Here are a coupe of pics I took. I walked into the shop where the deck is and I noticed that they had taped off a lot foo areas. I wondered why it was taped like that. Andrew told me that those spaces are where the taping goes for the bulkheads. It was pretty obvious then. I'm still learning.

 

Here's a shot of the freezer going in.

dog%201_zps8wgayfbh.jpg

Here are a couple of shots of the deck. You ca see obviously where th bulkheads go and you can see the margin at the deck edge for the taping of the deck to the hull.

dog%204_zpsryic3tft.jpg

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Ed:

Here you go. Here is Ruby climbing up ahead of me. I could not get her to hold still for a good photo. She was quite nervous up there but damn it, if Dad's going, I'm going. She is one hell of a dog.

dog%202_zpsarscqcnn.jpg

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I think the easy way to avoid being smacked upside the head with the mizzen boom is to raise it. 10" should be enough. That'll do it. I should have seen that earlier.

Here are some more images from Jody. The more I look at this boat the more I like it. I mean, I like it when I draw it in 2D but those feelings are confirmed when I see Jody's work

Ed%201_zpso9bpmjx4.jpg

Ed%204_zpsketawdqt.jpg

Ed%202_zps1lhqjgsi.jpg

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I for one love going to a marina or an anchorage and seeing lots of different kinds of boats (even old home built steel ones). That kind of variety is so much more stimulating than seeing a hundred identical Hunter/Beneteau/etc boats. Not saying they are bad boats, maybe just too much of a good thing.

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I love the infinite varieties of boats' back ends. It shows the endless number of ways there are to bake a hedgehog, and they all work!

 

Was working on our big girl this afternoon and watching the yard launch a Fairey speedboat from the 60s I noted how much the stern tumblehome reminded me of the Vertue transom.

 

And I wanted an excuse to post this favourite picture.

 

"There's a divinity that shapes our ends"

 

Alasdair-Flint-2.jpg

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I for one love going to a marina or an anchorage and seeing lots of different kinds of boats (even old home built steel ones). That kind of variety is so much more stimulating than seeing a hundred identical Hunter/Beneteau/etc boats. Not saying they are bad boats, maybe just too much of a good thing.

 

I know what you mean, I was just up in Anacortes early this morning. I love poking around up there looking at all the different boats on the hard from ICON to some metal hulled Pinky style schooner.

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I think the easy way to avoid being smacked upside the head with the mizzen boom is to raise it. 10" should be enough. That'll do it. I should have seen that earlier.

Here are some more images from Jody. The more I look at this boat the more I like it. I mean, I like it when I draw it in 2D but those feelings are confirmed when I see Jody's work

Ed%201_zpso9bpmjx4.jpg

Ed%204_zpsketawdqt.jpg

Ed%202_zps1lhqjgsi.jpg

Lovely hull shape, Bob.

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It's a Morse code thing.

.-. . .- .-.. .-.. -.-- ..--..

.... --- .-- ... --- ..--..

Yeah, really. You can pound out a nice message that way. Plus the port lights say kitty.
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It's a Morse code thing.

.-. . .- .-.. .-.. -.-- ..--..

.... --- .-- ... --- ..--..

Yeah, really. You can pound out a nice message that way. Plus the port lights say kitty.

????

Kitty would be -.- .. - - -.--

 

How do you read that in those port lights?

 

-.. . -.- --... .. --

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Fall:

I took a few photos last week, mostly of my dog climbing the scaffold. Work right now on the boat is all taking pace i the bilge and I can't get good definitive photos of that. They are working on the pieces for the other three boats and getting the deck for No. 1 ready for painting inside.

 

Here are a coupe of pics I took. I walked into the shop where the deck is and I noticed that they had taped off a lot foo areas. I wondered why it was taped like that. Andrew told me that those spaces are where the taping goes for the bulkheads. It was pretty obvious then. I'm still learning.

 

Here's a shot of the freezer going in.

dog%201_zps8wgayfbh.jpg

Here are a couple of shots of the deck. You ca see obviously where th bulkheads go and you can see the margin at the deck edge for the taping of the deck to the hull.

dog%204_zpsryic3tft.jpg

 

 

Thanks Bob!!!!

 

I really enjoy watching your drawings/renderings come to life

 

Thanks again!

 

fs

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Fall:

You are very welcome. It is my pleasure. I do enjoy showing off my design efforts. I get a bit tired of hearing, "It's all about you!" No, it's not about me. It's about my work. I can' help it if they are connected.

 

Going back to the yard on Thursday to meet with Rusty Rutherford from Harken to go over the final hardware selection. I have known Rusty for a coon's age and he is very easy to work with. I'll get more photos at that time.

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It's a Morse code thing.

.-. . .- .-.. .-.. -.-- ..--..

.... --- .-- ... --- ..--..

Yeah, really. You can pound out a nice message that way. Plus the port lights say kitty.

????

Kitty would be -.- .. - - -.--

 

How do you read that in those port lights?

 

-.. . -.- --... .. --

 

Right, I misread the portlights, but you're breaking up with DEK7IM? maybe it's simply a demonstration that you can sheet in and out continuously at the helm.

 

More seriously, it demonstrates the difficulty of locating the helm in a cat. Once an oxygen tent style dodger is put up there, and the boom is raised to clear heads, the boat looks like a bad beach house with a ridiculous flag pole sticking out of it. And, when those type cats have passed me (sailing a modern 44'er mono with nice new sails) in the Caribbean the guy at the helm sitting in a big chair cranking on a winch looks like such a tool. How can something so dumb be so fast?

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It's a Morse code thing.

 

.-. . .- .-.. .-.. -.-- ..--..

.... --- .-- ... --- ..--..

Yeah, really. You can pound out a nice message that way. Plus the port lights say kitty.

????

Kitty would be -.- .. - - -.--

How do you read that in those port lights?

-.. . -.- --... .. --

Right, I misread the portlights, but you're breaking up with DEK7IM? maybe it's simply a demonstration that you can sheet in and out continuously at the helm.

 

More seriously, it demonstrates the difficulty of locating the helm in a cat. Once an oxygen tent style dodger is put up there, and the boom is raised to clear heads, the boat looks like a bad beach house with a ridiculous flag pole sticking out of it. And, when those type cats have passed me (sailing a modern 44'er mono with nice new sails) in the Caribbean the guy at the helm sitting in a big chair cranking on a winch looks like such a tool. How can something so dumb be so fast?

Well there are good looking cats and not so good looking cats.....just like all vessels.....

 

BTW,

You were suppose to read that as "de K7IM" does that make more sense to you? Where did you get your CW skills?

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I think I'll call those the wizard of oz helms.

 

Very cool, your Ham station. i have no Morse skills, and only tuned in short wave, never transmitted. Do you have an SSB radio on Francis?

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All passions are good, but I can't get my head around that one.

 

I was told by a sailor about taking paying Ham guests to Jan Mayen island - which is famously remote and difficult to get to - and how the guests showed no interest whatsoever in the boat, the passage, the history, the geography, the natural history or anything. They just had to land and do their tap taps and get off home again. The electronic equivalent of twitching for birds.

 

Sorry, Kim, I guess I'm guilty of judging a whole community by its extremists!

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All passions are good, but I can't get my head around that one.

 

I was told by a sailor about taking paying Ham guests to Jan Mayen island - which is famously remote and difficult to get to - and how the guests showed no interest whatsoever in the boat, the passage, the history, the geography, the natural history or anything. They just had to land and do their tap taps and get off home again. The electronic equivalent of twitching for birds.

 

Sorry, Kim, I guess I'm guilty of judging a whole community by its extremists!

 

I am (was) keen on long distance cycling and there was one guy who was also a ham and he would do what he would call SOTA (summit on the air) basically he would cycle up summits and establish radio contact to other hams. I found this quite amusing and geeky in a positive way and somehow that made me decide that hams were cool.

 

That's his web page : http://haigh.org/cycling/index.html

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All passions are good, but I can't get my head around that one.

 

I was told by a sailor about taking paying Ham guests to Jan Mayen island - which is famously remote and difficult to get to - and how the guests showed no interest whatsoever in the boat, the passage, the history, the geography, the natural history or anything. They just had to land and do their tap taps and get off home again. The electronic equivalent of twitching for birds.

 

Sorry, Kim, I guess I'm guilty of judging a whole community by its extremists!

Well there are some very strange birds in Ham Radio!

 

I am about 99% listening. I do like to copy CW (morse code) and I do send it once in a while. But generally I am more of a SWL (short wave listener.)

 

I have had a ham license for more than 50 years. It is a carry over from my teenage years. It does come in handy on the boat sometimes. I have several ham SSB/CW rigs that I might carry aboard on occasion.

 

You might remember our problems with the humming back stay which is not SS, I am thinking of changing it to SS so I can insulate it to use as a HF antenna.

 

But this is not the Sliver thread, so we should stop polluting this thread with this conversation.

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All passions are good, but I can't get my head around that one.

 

I was told by a sailor about taking paying Ham guests to Jan Mayen island - which is famously remote and difficult to get to - and how the guests showed no interest whatsoever in the boat, the passage, the history, the geography, the natural history or anything. They just had to land and do their tap taps and get off home again. The electronic equivalent of twitching for birds.

 

Sorry, Kim, I guess I'm guilty of judging a whole community by its extremists!

 

I am (was) keen on long distance cycling and there was one guy who was also a ham and he would do what he would call SOTA (summit on the air) basically he would cycle up summits and establish radio contact to other hams. I found this quite amusing and geeky in a positive way and somehow that made me decide that hams were cool.

 

That's his web page : http://haigh.org/cycling/index.html

Oh no!! I am a former racing cyclist......that SOTA stuff is actually kind of fun (did I just admit that?)

 

I have ridden all of the iconic climbs of Le Tour in the Alps.

The most I have ever ridden in one day was 285 miles, but that was a while ago.

Pano, come visit, we can sail and ride together!

post-8115-0-65402700-1461088267_thumb.jpeg

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Small world. Pano, I do not carry an SSB, even though I make over some big passes and I'm riding Ride the Rockies again this year. Yes on Garmin, however.

 

Kim, 285m is a big day. I ride a few centuries every year, but never anything close to that. Next weekend is the White Rim in Canyonlands. 100 miles around Island in the Sky on the mountain bike.

 

Bob, those bikes are all carbon, well almost.

 

 

 

IMAG0570%201_zpsf9qb1y4q.jpg

 

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LasaL

When I worked for Carter I rode 32 miles a day on a $97 bike. I wore my work clothes and averaged 55 minutes a trip depending on the Little League games that were in progress as I rode home. I finally broke down and bought basket clips and shoes. I put those clips on. I put the shoes on and I took off like a shot. I came to the first stop sign and could not get my shoes out of the clips and I feel over.

Oh yeah, I'm cool.

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