Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 418
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

While it is mostly known that Vela Sailing is the current VX Evo distributor for the Americas, little has been said and posted so far. Boats are in production and there is a formal announcement coming

Seems that a lot of good designs never get the traction required to make a big impact. There are exceptions such as the Aero. I suspect one thing missing in some new programs is the marketing side of

Almost as good as that.  Joking aside, we will explore the the possibility of helping with the financing of one of these guys. The sailboat financing market is a little strange as they give prior

Posted Images

Good Luck with this Rod. I wanted to go for a ride in sarasota but by the time I got in from racing I had taken my gear off without realizing and after the first cold beer, the lazy cogs had taken over my brain. BUt I will amke time for a ride sometime soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Rod,

Why does the VX Evo does not need wings like  other single handers with similar sail plans, like the RS 100 and the Devoti D-One ? 

 Why is the VX Evo a superior design to both of those boats ?  

Is the VX Evo more stable than both of those boats, and how do they compare in capsize recovery ? 

Neither of those boats is distributed in the US . 

Any updates on the VX Evo class development in the US ? 

Reference video links:

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Shoo said:

Rod,

Why does the VX Evo does not need wings like  other single handers with similar sail plans, like the RS 100 and the Devoti D-One ? 

 Why is the VX Evo a superior design to both of those boats ?  

Is the VX Evo more stable than both of those boats, and how do they compare in capsize recovery ? 

Neither of those boats is distributed in the US . 

Any updates on the VX Evo class development in the US ? 

Reference video links:

 

 

 

I've seen them, but not sailed one.  They have a little weighted bulb on the board for stability.  I think the class development is sluggish, but it is for any new $15,000 high performance single handers coming out now.  Limited marketplace...IMO 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Shoo said:

Rod,

Why does the VX Evo does not need wings like  other single handers with similar sail plans, like the RS 100 and the Devoti D-One ? 

 Why is the VX Evo a superior design to both of those boats ?  

Is the VX Evo more stable than both of those boats, and how do they compare in capsize recovery ? 

Neither of those boats is distributed in the US . 

Any updates on the VX Evo class development in the US ? 

Reference video links:

 

 

 

Shoo,

Great questions and valid points. RS and Devoti make excellent boats. Here is my take on this:

• No wings on the VX Evo: the wings only work to increase leverage while hiking, which we all know s a big plus, however this comes with a price, which is hull form stability.  Take for example a foiling Moth: the the hull just exists to give support to the rig and wings, therefore it is the smallest possible to keep structure to the rig and a very high instability, which is the price you pay for speed and light weight. now let's go to the other end of the spectrum and say a Flying Scot, which is one of the most stable dinghies out there still sailed in the US:  maximum hull stability at the cost of very high weight and drag. Then there is everything in between: designers looking for the highest form stability without making the boat too complicated or aggressive...bottom line USER FRIENDLY.  The VX Evo is a 180 lbs boat all up at 16 ft LOA, this means is a very light boat designed for sailors that may be too big/heavy for a Laser and are looking for that extra edge of speed and technical sailing. By not having wings a heavier sailor has the total of the hull form to support and avoiding the need to be on the edge of capsizing. This also has some advantages in marginal planning conditions as there is less "sinkage" of the hull. In short, there are more benefits on not having the wings if the weight does not get increased and that was achieved on the VX Evo: less cost, less complicated, nicer lines. 

• Superior design: it is a bold statement to say it is a superior design because different boats appeal to different sailors and the RS100 and the D-One are also great boats. The VX Evo has refined many things and the beauty of the boat is the simplicity and wide range of sailors can sail it. It is also a joyful boat to sail in light air and a real rocket in the heavy stuff, so it does check all the good list boxes.  Big sailors and small sailors, roomy cockpit, fast in all conditions, very well built, simple rig configuration. 

• Stability: while I have not personally sailed the D-One and the RS 100,  I think it is fair to say that the VX Evo is more stable, refer to the first point to confirm this.

• VX Evo class: at the time of this post, there is a container of VX Evos coming in to the US to our shop in Texas and we are working on refining the class rules before going loudly public. We have being doing some research and testing on sail sizes, sailros weight, etc to make sure is the friendliest class to sail with and that just takes time. All the boats we have brought have been sold and nothing but great feedback is coming from the owners. 

The next big regatt is the Wurstfest  I in Lake Canyon Yacht Club , San Antonio (Canyon Lake) which will be our first National Championship.  

Cheers,

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Shoo said:

Rod,

Why does the VX Evo does not need wings like  other single handers with similar sail plans, like the RS 100 and the Devoti D-One ? 

 Why is the VX Evo a superior design to both of those boats ?  

Is the VX Evo more stable than both of those boats, and how do they compare in capsize recovery ? 

Neither of those boats is distributed in the US . 

Any updates on the VX Evo class development in the US ? 

Reference video links:

 

 

 

@Shoo if you want a Devoti D-One in the US, I have one for sale.  Used but in good condition.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rod,

Why does the VX Evo does not need wings like  other single handers with similar sail plans, like the RS 100 and the Devoti D-One ? 

 is the VX Evo a superior design to both of those boats ?  

Is the VX Evo more stable than both of those boats, and how do they compare in capsize recovery ? 

Reference video links:

 

 

Rod,

Thanks for your understandable explanation about the differences between the VX Evo, the RS 100, and the Devoti D-One.

If one capsizes with the chute up, can a reasonably quick recovery be made ? The instability of the RS 100 in windy conditions is evident on the video clip.  Nobody wants to end up like this chap.

The thrill of racing in a fleet of single-handed boats with flying asymmetric chute is evident on the video clips from the RS 100 and D-One championships. Hopefully, similar moments can be captured from the upcoming VX Evo championships and shared on the VX Evo Facebook page so as to build momentum for the class in the USA. 

For those of us who have never sailed with an asymmetric spinnaker, do you think that skills learned on the VX Evo would transfer to a larger boat, such as the VX-One ? 

About how long does it actually take to get from taking the boat off the trailer to sailing away from the dock ? From your rigging video, I would estimate 45 minutes.

How about the reverse, from the dock to the trailer ?

Jim

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good observations Jim.

If you capsize with the spinnaker up, you need to douse it, which is not really complicated, but it is not that you can bring the boat back up with the lite up unless is blowing less than 8 knots or so. It is indeed a thrill and super fun sailing. We just had DinghyFest regatta this past weekend with 4 boats together with some Portsmouth boats and it was a blast....the VX Evo was far ahead by quite a bit.

Here are some videos we made for fun with fellow sailor Greg Gust:
 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Shoo said:

About how long does it actually take to get from taking the boat off the trailer to sailing away from the dock ? From your rigging video, I would estimate 45 minutes.

How about the reverse, from the dock to the trailer ?

I’m interested in the rig time, too.

Maybe 20 minutes? The 45 minute video includes a lot of good description by Rod.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Shoo said:

Rod,

Why does the VX Evo does not need wings like  other single handers with similar sail plans, like the RS 100 and the Devoti D-One ? 

 Why is the VX Evo a superior design to both of those boats ?  

Is the VX Evo more stable than both of those boats, and how do they compare in capsize recovery ? 

Neither of those boats is distributed in the US . 

Any updates on the VX Evo class development in the US ? 

Reference video links:

 

 

 

Shoo,

Great questions and valid points. Here is my take on this:

Oops sorry, guys, missed that. 

From road to splash including bottom and top cover removal, etc it could run around 30 min. The video is extremely long because we are taking out time  explaining in detail each one of the steps:

• Park the car
• Undo tie downs
• Take top cover off
• Step the mast (easier than a Laser rig)
• Pin the shrouds
• clean all the crap we carry in the cockpit. 
• Select the mainsail you are going to use and feed the head in the mast track, connect the main halyard.
• Remove bottom cover
• Put the rudder on the transom pintles
• Push the dolly off the trailer
• Walk it to the launching area or leave the dolly on the trailer and drive the whole thing to the ramp if needed.

Typically the spinnaker travels rigged in the snuffer and the halyard, retrieving line remains connected, so it all comes down to how many times you get interrupted by friends and beer what it takes to launch, but 30 minutes is a realistic time frame from arriving to the rigging area to splashing.




 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Helpful info on rig time, Rod. If you can leave the spinnaker in the snuffer with halyard and retrieving lines attached, that means you can take down the mast without disconnecting them? There is enough slack in the lines to do that?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, superg said:

Helpful info on rig time, Rod. If you can leave the spinnaker in the snuffer with halyard and retrieving lines attached, that means you can take down the mast without disconnecting them? There is enough slack in the lines to do that?

yes, that is correct,  but if the halyard may get caught or for any reason ends up being too short, just untie it from the head of the sail and sky it to the top of the mast (tie a stopper knot before, of course) and pulls the slack inside the boat....that is how I do it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Rod, Nice pics from Wurstfest. The EVO is a nice boat to look at. Enjoyed your capsize recovery. I realized that at my age I'd be struggling up into one side of the boat just as you had already scampered to the opposite side for balance. As you achieve balance I would be watching the boat roll on top of me. I even managed to flip the boat in about 3 feet of water just trying to get aboard from a position standing on a sandy bottom. My dinghy days are sadly over. Good luck promoting the EVO.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Announcements


×
×
  • Create New...