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Construction of a Pogo 12.50


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Hi Saggy, thanks for all the photos, Fusion looks impressive.

 

You have four winches, two on the cabin top and two other further back in the cockpit. What is the proposed method of operating the main sheet as there is a jammer labelled 'main sheet'. Is the idea to use one of the Port side cabin top winches for the main sheet and with the jammer open. When this winch is to be used by the other lines simply lock off the main sheet jammer to free up this winch?

 

It also appears the main sheet line has no purchase, ie it is a one to one with a single line form the traveller through to the jammer?

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Any reason why you went the snuffer and not a top down furling assy? Snuffers are a bit of a hate them or love em thing shorthanded.

Most 40s and 60s use snuffers for the large A2 type runners and town down for other spins.

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Shaggy, Pogos have the best looking deck-mounted sprit system IMHO. Do you know who builds them? Re snuffers, been using one for 9 years - count me as in the "love them" camp.

 

This and the Ker 43 thread have the best boat p0rn in them! Please keep the pics coming.

Hi J28,

Sorry, I didn't know, so I asked the owner of Structures Christian Bouroullec about this. He told me the carbon sprit is made by ZSpars, the same as the mast, but the design is their own. They have been doing this for about 8 years apparently, it goes back to the 10.50.

I can vouch for its suitability, we were deploying the sprit, and then unlocking and retracting, all from the cockpit, and it all worked fine. The sprit brake (large green line) goes onto the starboard inner winch, and you overtension by about 3cm to allow for line stretch and for the lock of the Karver deck jammer to bite.

IMG_1809_zpsb2rg0grt.jpg

When releasing, the basics still apply, you simply take up tension again on the sprit brake with the winch, before pulling on the lock release (small green line) just to save wear on the dyneema through the jammer. To retract the sprit, you just haul on the spinnaker brace (grey line) which loops through a low friction ring on the end of the sprit and is tied off to the pulpit, and the pole slides back.

The sprit is stopped from smashing into your cabin top by a small dyneema lashing that is under the bowsprit and tied off at the back end, really simple

 

IMG_1819_zpsuw5nm9gr.jpg

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More pics of the floating jib leads please. Looking at doing a similar system.

Here ya go Alcatraz.....

 

 

IMG_1808_zpsf4ip4lsq.jpg

IMG_1753_zpstwfoosym.jpg

 

 

From the front to back, two jam cleats, and two turning blocks.

First cleat (Red line) is the inhauler, this is the one you make sure you have a few wraps on before opening the jammer!

Second cleat is (Blue line) is the outhauler. You tend to take some tension on this before it gets loaded up on a tack to stop it banging into the side of the cabin. After everything settles down, you ease it to position.

The first block is the genoa/gennaker sheet block.

Thge second is the spinnaker sheet block.

IMG_1835_zpstqfi7qqv.jpg

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Shag,

Have been following your build on Fusion, very fine s/v!

Any chance you considered or looked at RM from For a Marine.

Kinda intrigued by there build method.

 

Hi Mylar,

Sorry, I did look at these early on in the piece but I kind of steered away from RM pretty quick. The main reason for me was the difference between the two vendors construction techniques, being plywood for RM and composites for Pogo.

 

What they are doing with composites I personally find pretty impressive. The vacuum infused foam sandwich concept is really cool. Keeping in mind they use different foam for the different areas of the boat, there are advantages like weight difference (can be more than a 1/3rd of the weight when you look at the kgs/cubic metre numbers, and things like the ability to bend under load without breaking. Negatives with the Pogo technique is if you screw it up it is an expensive mistake, so you have to be good.

RM look like the make a really nice boat, but just not my cup of tea I'm afraid.

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More pics of the floating jib leads please. Looking at doing a similar system.

 

Here ya go Alcatraz.....

 

 

IMG_1808_zpsf4ip4lsq.jpg

IMG_1753_zpstwfoosym.jpg

 

 

From the front to back, two jam cleats, and two turning blocks.

First cleat (Red line) is the inhauler, this is the one you make sure you have a few wraps on before opening the jammer!

Second cleat is (Blue line) is the outhauler. You tend to take some tension on this before it gets loaded up on a tack to stop it banging into the side of the cabin. After everything settles down, you ease it to position.

The first block is the genoa/gennaker sheet block.

Thge second is the spinnaker sheet block.

IMG_1835_zpstqfi7qqv.jpg

Thanks mate. Devils in the details of course.

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Shaggy, thanks for the info re the sprit. Fusion has a wide variety of types and color combinations of cordage. Do you know who their cordage supplier is? Also, can you imagine how they would rig the boat if Dyneema single braid, low friction rings and Wichard folding padeyes didn't exist?

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A question on the snuffer - where happens with the line to raise and lower the snuffer and where is it stored/cleated off? I have one on our SF3200 but haven't used it as yet as I thought the line would end up flying to leward somewhere if not secured.

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Shaggy that inner/ babystay purchase arrangement of getting it below deck save for the Karver looks nicely thought out.

 

Any reason why you went the snuffer and not a top down furling assy? Snuffers are a bit of a hate them or love em thing shorthanded.

 

HI JS,

We took out a French couple and a mate of theirs yesterday that wanted a test sail, they have had a Pogo 40 for I think 6 or 7 odd years that they have taken to the West Indies and back a couple of times amongst other stuff. They were all over the babystay setup. I just wish I could understand what the hell they were saying :). Antoine was with us and said they were pretty impressed with it. The big thing for them for the 12.50 in comparison was the dry ride, ie: volume in the bow compared to theirs, apparently the early 40's were pretty narrow forrard.

Christian took us through the factory to have a look at the 40s3/36 and Pogo 3.....the 40s3 has a even more volume in the bow than mine, but as you can see, there's not much chance of it converting to a cruiser /racer with that freeboard!

IMG_1912_zpsvm5gfhrv.jpg

Regards the snuffer, my rationale is I am not experienced enough with either discipline to know, so I thought because I have two furling sails already, albeit not top down furlers, I'd give the snuffer a try and see how it goes.

We only got to play with it in 10 knots and under, but first impressions in that wind mode it seemed easy enough to manage short handed. Hauling the sock up and down is child's play, however I did note when it gets really light it is easier to gybe by hauling the snuffer down,throwing it around the forestay and then hauling it back up. Mind you, that's more of a reflection on the weight and size ofthe kite than the snuffer,but I assume you could just furl a top-down in and out to gybe more effectively in really light stuff.

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A question on the snuffer - where happens with the line to raise and lower the snuffer and where is it stored/cleated off? I have one on our SF3200 but haven't used it as yet as I thought the line would end up flying to leward somewhere if not secured.

 

Hi 42S,

We have been tying it off to one of the snapshackle fitting on the side of the mast that is used for the reef points, which is probably not ideal if you had a reef in. There is also a lashing at the base of the mast we could use if needed but haven't had more than one reef in yet, so I am being a bit lazy!

 

IMG_1838_zpsldqdzdk3.jpg

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HI JaS,

Ok, a couple more. This is the interior fitout, very spartan for some I am sure, but has everything I need without adding extra weight. If you look below the front port side cabin berth, you can see the pullout section. This slides out and sits in two formed cutouts just beside the table to make this into a double berth. Lee cloths are supplied with all berths except the front cabin and sit in little grooves under the seats.

 

IMG_1781_zpsuu5ka5k6.jpg

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Tum tee tum..Are you gonna take me home tonight ? Ah down beside that red firelight Are you gonna let it all hang out ?

 

Fat bottomed girls You make the rockin' world go round!!! (props to Queen)

 

IMG_1945_zps5ckejq1w.jpg

 

IMG_1946_zpskxo6128d_1.jpg

 

Of course, I expected it to be horrific in pointing conditions and light airs due to the wetted surface area, but it is better than I thought. The best we achieved was 37 TWA close hauled without luffing, that was in about 13 kn TWS in flat water, and in one period in 4kn TWS we were still moving, so overall it is better , not worse, than I expected. You wont win any races like this, but at least you're stil sailing, and smiling doing it ;)

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Shaggy you must be getting close to pack her up and put her on ship time? If snuffin ends up being not your fancy SH, you can always change over to top down land. She looks a treat with every pic. As a matter of interest did they offer lithium batts as a option, and if so how much € and for how many Ah's?

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I love your boat and thank you so much for sharing the ride. The French are such a "sailing nation" that all their gear and systems are so well thought out!

 

My only comment is on the mainsheet system. Having the main trimmed by one winch, even an electric one, that also has to do other duty, is a pretty cruisey option. It can't be reached from the helm and invites a snarl up if it has to be eased in a hurry, especially with both reefs at the same station. It would be fine for cruising or short handed trans-ocean sailing where manoeuvres are (mostly) worked out well in advance and executed according to a well rehearsed plan, but fully crewed or round the buoy racing it is likely to be an issue. I totally get (I can't believe I just typed that! :blink: ) that the principal trimming weapon is the traveller, but just having the sheet and traveller at opposite ends of the cockpit is questionable IMHO.

 

Big Fathead mains need a fair bit of care and feeding, and the german mainsheet system would be a far more efficient way to go for any quick action. Two winches on the coaming within reach of the helm could be very easily retro-fitted. Just my 2 cents worth.

 

I hope we might see the boat down south, or is it too cold down here? :P

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Shaggy you must be getting close to pack her up and put her on ship time? If snuffin ends up being not your fancy SH, you can always change over to top down land. She looks a treat with every pic. As a matter of interest did they offer lithium batts as a option, and if so how much € and for how many Ah's?

 

Hi JS,

Well, playtime is over, back to reality. I have a few work commitments left in Europe before heading home this week. The boat will now be lifted and taken back to Structures for a couple of minor issues to be dealt with, then its time to wrap up the hull and mast, put them on cradles and have it ready for collection by the truck on the 4th November.

No to the lithium batteries being an option offered, but I didn't ask either. EV Power in WA seem to be very knowledgeable and were very helpful regards the lithium, but I didn't like the risk. Regards Ah, instead of 400AH which I have, in lithium I could make do with 200Ah with margin. The reason I didn't go lithium was I couldn't get past the BMS being so critical to avoiding a major issue. The boat may be unsinkable to water ingress, but not to fire, and the service batteries fit forrard of the engine inside the engine well, so a potential fire would block the main cabin egress.

 

I promised to publish a list of defects from commissioning. This is a list of what I found:

  • The biggest issue I found was the double berth pullout section on the front left hand cabin berth was not stowing correctly, on a port tack when the boat is heeled it could move under your arse which was a bit disconcerting. Not fixed when I left, will be addressed back at the shop.
  • Wiring harness for the navigation table was too tight, causing an loss of power when opening the panel too far. Fixed before I left.
  • The wires leading to the depth and speed log weren't protected where they entered under the wooden joinery around the keelbox, Fixed before I left.
  • The hose for the rear deck shower wasn't fixed to the joinery and was loose. Fixed before I left.
  • There was no support in the centre of the wooden cupboard lids when closed, these may warp over time if leaned on. Solution was to provide a small nub in the centre for the lid to rest against , not fixed yet.

This is a list of what Structures had already identified for me that they wanted to correct. These will all be done before shipment.

  • A cushion was marked and needs to be replaced.
  • The lower shrouds crimp at lower turn buckle to chainplates was not done with the right size tool and as a result were a little bit sharp (not good for spinnaker). They are being replaced.
  • Cover on last 1.5 mtr on the head of the spinnaker halyard.
  • The removable table top joinery that hides the hydraulic ram was out on one side compared to the other by 2mm, making it look a bit naff if you looked hard enough.
  • Rudder alignment looked to be out a poofteenth (that's the technical term for it)
  • The boom vang/preventer uses a lashing as a fuse.The line was too big, and replaced with the correct sized line.

So, nothing came close to what I deemed was to be a show stopper. I am glad I took the time and got to do the commissioning in France with Structures whilst all of the above list is easily rectified. I am also glad that Structures were very particular in their own defect inspection, that was good to see, thanks to Antoine for being so anal and Christian for ensuring that defect rectification stayed as a positive experience.

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I love your boat and thank you so much for sharing the ride. The French are such a "sailing nation" that all their gear and systems are so well thought out!

 

My only comment is on the mainsheet system. Having the main trimmed by one winch, even an electric one, that also has to do other duty, is a pretty cruisey option. It can't be reached from the helm and invites a snarl up if it has to be eased in a hurry, especially with both reefs at the same station. It would be fine for cruising or short handed trans-ocean sailing where manoeuvres are (mostly) worked out well in advance and executed according to a well rehearsed plan, but fully crewed or round the buoy racing it is likely to be an issue. I totally get (I can't believe I just typed that! :blink: ) that the principal trimming weapon is the traveller, but just having the sheet and traveller at opposite ends of the cockpit is questionable IMHO.

 

Big Fathead mains need a fair bit of care and feeding, and the german mainsheet system would be a far more efficient way to go for any quick action. Two winches on the coaming within reach of the helm could be very easily retro-fitted. Just my 2 cents worth.

 

I hope we might see the boat down south, or is it too cold down here? :P

 

Hi Judge,

Yes, it's to bloody cold down there, I'd have to eek...get a jacket! We Qlders only sail in shorts and stretch to sometimes dunlop volleys as you know :)

I can't disagree with you if you're talking single handed round the cans stuff. Don't forget the design is supposed to be a cruiser/racer, but I do take your point. I think I contributed to this by opting for the wheel option, with the tiller you are sitting far enough forward to reach the winches, and the traveller position is modified to be accessible form this position also.

The mainsheet is on the left hand winch, compared to my IOR type usual rides where the mainsheet is adjusted from the car on the traveller. You point out it is not good to have a multi-duty winch for the mainsheet even when crewed, but what else is on that winch that I need at the same time? (Not trying to argue for the sake of it, I am genuinely interested) Wouldn't it only be an issue when I am single handed?

 

The worst case scenario I can envisage is if I am single handed and tacking upwind in a constricted area, for that I need to autopilot to do the tacking for me, whilst I manage the headsail sheets, which are on the outer winches.

 

Heheh....The traveller... you have to see it, on a 12mtr boat at 3mtrs across, but the ratio made it no problem to manage from the helm, it reminds me of a cat. We did need to ease the mainsheet of course when we were off the wind, and even then not as much as I expected, which is good considering the rake on the spreaders is 27 degrees. But tacking, the mainsheet just didn't come into it, of course this is predicated by the fact it is trimmed right before the tack.

 

IMG_1830_zpsi6irtuww.jpg

 

I don't disagree with you if I was buying an out and out race boat, but the whole point of buying the 12.50 was to be able to go sailing without the pressures of organising crew, being lazy and still going fast. I feel guilty typing that, but I have to admit its true!

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Any plans for a dodger. The ones i have seen look really small. Also did you look into the JPK FC 38 at all while shopping around for this style of yacht?

 

Awesome looking piece of kit you have there I'm way way jealous.

 

Hi TS,

Yes mate, I looked at the dodgers, but even the large one was only to protect the hatchway really, it didn't offer any protection for me even if I had kept the tiller option. Besides, I hated the look of them, in my opinion it spoiled the lines totally. My rationale is if I realise later I really need one, I can take the time and try and design one that is more to my tastes.

Regards the JPK, no I never looked hard enough at them to be honest, but I do really like JPK. If I didn't get the 12.50 I would have seriously looked at the 38, but by the time I got to the Pogo it pretty much ticked all the critical points I wanted to tick off, so I bit!

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Hi Shaggy.

 

As I said the mainsheet winch is cruisey, which is fine if that's what you're doing, and lots of cruisers use similar set ups.

 

The limits will be dependent on how many hands (at the rate of no more than two per person) you have to operate the systems. Other than de-powering the main or easing when bearing away, the biggest opportunity for a snafu will be when reefing, particularly going between the first and second reefs. I see that the main halyard is on the starboard side and is a two to one purchase. Finagling the halyard, sheet, outhaul and reef lines will need some thought, and there will be a lot of string moving through stoppers and around winches. All perfectly do-able but probably not the most efficient racing set up. But it's your boat and, as I also acknowledge, the French are pretty damn good at this sort of thing, so I wouldn't give it any thought until you've used the systems a few times and can say whether they meet your needs.

 

Again, it's a beautiful boat and I look forward to more episodes of your antipodean adventures! ^_^

 

 

 

 

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You will need at least 312 NM range to get home from Gladstone.

I am glad you put this in distance LB, I once drove a 60ft cat aground in the narrows doing a return from B2G, so whilst it was only 312nm, we spent an extra day in our own little environment waiting for the next high tide.

Mind you, fat lot of good a hydrogenerator would do in that instance !

You'd probably hit 5 knots of current at peak in the narrows

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Shaggy you must be getting close to pack her up and put her on ship time? If snuffin ends up being not your fancy SH, you can always change over to top down land. She looks a treat with every pic. As a matter of interest did they offer lithium batts as a option, and if so how much and for how many Ah's?

 

 

Hi JS,

.......No to the lithium batteries being an option offered, but I didn't ask either. EV Power in WA seem to be very knowledgeable and were very helpful regards the lithium, but I didn't like the risk. Regards Ah, instead of 400AH which I have, in lithium I could make do with 200Ah with margin. The reason I didn't go lithium was I couldn't get past the BMS being so critical to avoiding a major issue. The boat may be unsinkable to water ingress, but not to fire, and the service batteries fit forrard of the engine inside the engine well, so a potential fire would block the main cabin egress.....

Shaggster I suspect cost is behind lithium not being on the options list, though it would make everything else appear great value for money. :-) I suspect this will change pretty soon with builders, though costs won't plumet as many mistakenly think.

 

For you and anyone interested here are a couple of quick comments to put your mind at rest if you ever consider Lithium (LFP) batteries.

 

1. Forget the stories about fires. The chemistry in celebrated thermal runway infernos, laptops batts etc had much higher energy density such as cobolt based chemistry. The chemistry of LFP is quite safe and arguably safer than sealed lead acid batteries of any construction, particulary in a boat.

 

2. In a small fractional discharge and charge arrangement in a boat you arguably can even get away without having a Battery Monitoring System (BMS) providing the cells are well balanced manually before hand and your not using it in areas of extreme temperature. It is not a safety necessity either but rather more a means of protecting your investment, namely from individual cell voltage extremes. If that happens they then your power source is shot and they become very expensive doorstops.

 

3. When establishing LFP costs it is essential to factor in firstly true capacity and partial State of Charge (SOC) use in a typical sailboat,ie capacity reduction and longevity shortfalls of lead acid. There are big savings with LFP there in weight, room req'd, charging and discharging efficiencies, charging costs/time and cycle life.

 

Secondly on the other hand you must factor in cost of reconfiguring your primary battery wiring to seperate charge and discharge bus's and modify charging sources to incorporate a flat fixed voltage charge curve. This involves modifying engine alternators so they are externally regulated. Plus also have your BMS set up to turn off the alternator before it shuts down the charge bus (many BMS's can't do this) for a cell overvoltage event, otherwise your alternator diodes are toast if it is still operating.

 

Hope the thread drift didn't anoy anyone and matey you have fun with that new toy.

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...

For you and anyone interested here are a couple of quick comments to put your mind at rest if you ever consider Lithium (LFP) batteries.

1. Forget the stories about fires. The chemistry in celebrated thermal runway infernos, laptops batts etc had much higher energy density such as cobolt based chemistry. The chemistry of LFP is quite safe and arguably safer than sealed lead acid batteries of any construction, particulary in a boat.

...

Boeing wishes they could forget that.
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...

For you and anyone interested here are a couple of quick comments to put your mind at rest if you ever consider Lithium (LFP) batteries.

1. Forget the stories about fires. The chemistry in celebrated thermal runway infernos, laptops batts etc had much higher energy density such as cobolt based chemistry. The chemistry of LFP is quite safe and arguably safer than sealed lead acid batteries of any construction, particulary in a boat.

...

Boeing wishes they could forget that.

Boeing wouldn't have to forget anything if they used lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO 4) or LFP batteries, but they DON'T and didn't as I indicated above. They use Lithium Cobalt Oxide (LiCoO2) or LCO which can also be with or without a derivitive such as magnesium etc; as do cell phones, laptops etc.

 

LFP/Li-Phosphate and LCO/LiCobolt are like chalk and cheese. That aside that debate is better continued down the hallway.

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Hi Shaggy.

 

As I said the mainsheet winch is cruisey, which is fine if that's what you're doing, and lots of cruisers use similar set ups.

 

The limits will be dependent on how many hands (at the rate of no more than two per person) you have to operate the systems. Other than de-powering the main or easing when bearing away, the biggest opportunity for a snafu will be when reefing, particularly going between the first and second reefs. I see that the main halyard is on the starboard side and is a two to one purchase. Finagling the halyard, sheet, outhaul and reef lines will need some thought, and there will be a lot of string moving through stoppers and around winches. All perfectly do-able but probably not the most efficient racing set up. But it's your boat and, as I also acknowledge, the French are pretty damn good at this sort of thing, so I wouldn't give it any thought until you've used the systems a few times and can say whether they meet your needs.

 

Again, it's a beautiful boat and I look forward to more episodes of your antipodean adventures! ^_^

 

 

 

 

 

HI Judge,

Gotcha, now I understand. Obviously having little time on the boat to date I don't know how she will measure up in this regard. Finding crew seems to all of a sudden be a no-brainer, so the first few trips look like being over crewed, I'll get some miles up and report back and let you know!

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Shaggy you must be getting close to pack her up and put her on ship time? If snuffin ends up being not your fancy SH, you can always change over to top down land. She looks a treat with every pic. As a matter of interest did they offer lithium batts as a option, and if so how much and for how many Ah's?

 

Hi JS,

.......No to the lithium batteries being an option offered, but I didn't ask either. EV Power in WA seem to be very knowledgeable and were very helpful regards the lithium, but I didn't like the risk. Regards Ah, instead of 400AH which I have, in lithium I could make do with 200Ah with margin. The reason I didn't go lithium was I couldn't get past the BMS being so critical to avoiding a major issue. The boat may be unsinkable to water ingress, but not to fire, and the service batteries fit forrard of the engine inside the engine well, so a potential fire would block the main cabin egress.....

Shaggster I suspect cost is behind lithium not being on the options list, though it would make everything else appear great value for money. :-) I suspect this will change pretty soon with builders, though costs won't plumet as many mistakenly think.

 

For you and anyone interested here are a couple of quick comments to put your mind at rest if you ever consider Lithium (LFP) batteries.

 

1. Forget the stories about fires. The chemistry in celebrated thermal runway infernos, laptops batts etc had much higher energy density such as cobolt based chemistry. The chemistry of LFP is quite safe and arguably safer than sealed lead acid batteries of any construction, particulary in a boat.

 

2. In a small fractional discharge and charge arrangement in a boat you arguably can even get away without having a Battery Monitoring System (BMS) providing the cells are well balanced manually before hand and your not using it in areas of extreme temperature. It is not a safety necessity either but rather more a means of protecting your investment, namely from individual cell voltage extremes. If that happens they then your power source is shot and they become very expensive doorstops.

 

3. When establishing LFP costs it is essential to factor in firstly true capacity and partial State of Charge (SOC) use in a typical sailboat,ie capacity reduction and longevity shortfalls of lead acid. There are big savings with LFP there in weight, room req'd, charging and discharging efficiencies, charging costs/time and cycle life.

 

Secondly on the other hand you must factor in cost of reconfiguring your primary battery wiring to seperate charge and discharge bus's and modify charging sources to incorporate a flat fixed voltage charge curve. This involves modifying engine alternators so they are externally regulated. Plus also have your BMS set up to turn off the alternator before it shuts down the charge bus (many BMS's can't do this) for a cell overvoltage event, otherwise your alternator diodes are toast if it is still operating.

 

Hope the thread drift didn't anoy anyone and matey you have fun with that new toy.

 

 

Hi JS,

That's not a thread drift mate, that's great info. I have an application for work that would benefit from this, so this topic is of particular interest on several fronts.

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Hydraulic ram for the keel…somebody asked me a while back if there was a mechanical override on the hydraulic ram that lifts the keel. Yes is the answer.

The wooden joinery that houses the keel box has a top section at the rear that y9ou undo 4 screws, and lift off to get access to the ram and associated hydraulics. You also have a tilt out rubbish bin built into the back of the joinery that gives you quick access without unscrewing anything, but doesn’t give you as much room as removing the table top. Next to the ram there are two valves, one for up and one for down, that can be detented in by a steel clip that you slide over that engaged a manual lever, you can see the lever down to the starboard side.

 

IMG_1880_zpsaglx4vgn.jpg

 

The mechanical action is not heavy work, but according to Structures it will take you a good 12odd mins of hand pumping to lift the keel from fully extended, so not much fun if you have to!

The other adjustment is a hydraulic brake that sits to the starboard side of the ram facing forrard. The adjustment used to be a black knurled plastic knob, but they found after time vibration and slamming could move the brake minutely, so the system now has a screw off plastic cover over an allen key adjuster, which now doesn’t move at all.

The brake regulates the pressure that is applied to the ram. If you restrict it too much, the ram will not have lifted or lowered the keel fully before it stops. If you don’t restrict it enough, the keel will kinda bounce as it is being lowered, ie: it is not controlled. The main reason for having the adjustment is to compensate for changes in oil viscosity, ie: sailing in the heat of an Aus summer when it was calibrated in a European winter.

 

There is a sight glass in the right hand side of the keelbox that when the keel is fully down allows you to see the main pin, if you don’t see this after you have lowered the keel this is a good indication you need to adjust the hydraulic brake. Small turns only, 1/8 is typical and then simply press the button again, wait till it stops, peep at the sight glass to ensure it is fully extended. Repeat if necessary. This is only required to be adjusted once, unless you do something like change the environment or oil.

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This shows some numbers from day 1, we were testing with the gennaker or staysail going to windward. Main had the first reef in for most of it, we even tried out the single reef in the staysail.

Numbers on the display are:

 

Left Side: AWA

Right side: Top Boat Speed

Right side: Mid AWS

Right side: Low Depth (not vis)

 

This was in pretty flat water, and there was no real current, under main and staysail / trinquette. Going to windward in a Pogo.

 

P12_50_windward_zpsrldvwgvu.jpg

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Hi Guys,

Antione gave me an SD card from his gopro, I've got some video of us I thought you might like (I sure did!) when three sail reaching. This was from day one of commissioning, where we were mucking around with head sails, solent , staysails and reefs, gennaker, lots of wind, good fun.

This was a good day, we had from 12 to 30 knots (apparent), max 23 knots true..

My steering on optimum angles wasn't great, I was too busy looking inside the boat, but that's just the focus on commissioning though,

Trim was set light, we were trying to go easy on the sails. The max boat speed was with the gennaker only, so earlier than this time in the video. It looks like this was taken after that, so this is at about 12+ knots.

Edit: just an observation, as it's both positive and negative, the "in the groove" angle feels very wide. This is good as it compensates for bad helming and trim. It's bad because the "knife edge" groove approach like an IOR hull shape powered up to windward enforces really good optimum trim and helming. Must make sure I don't get lazy.

 

https://youtu.be/OQQDInrbwhg

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moves along very nice......

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Oops, for a moment there I read 34 degrees centigrade in the middle and knew the yard boys had clocked the instruments .....

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Shaggy you must be getting close to pack her up and put her on ship time? If snuffin ends up being not your fancy SH, you can always change over to top down land. She looks a treat with every pic. As a matter of interest did they offer lithium batts as a option, and if so how much and for how many Ah's?

 

Hi JS,

.......No to the lithium batteries being an option offered, but I didn't ask either. EV Power in WA seem to be very knowledgeable and were very helpful regards the lithium, but I didn't like the risk. Regards Ah, instead of 400AH which I have, in lithium I could make do with 200Ah with margin. The reason I didn't go lithium was I couldn't get past the BMS being so critical to avoiding a major issue. The boat may be unsinkable to water ingress, but not to fire, and the service batteries fit forrard of the engine inside the engine well, so a potential fire would block the main cabin egress.....

Shaggster I suspect cost is behind lithium not being on the options list, though it would make everything else appear great value for money. :-) I suspect this will change pretty soon with builders, though costs won't plumet as many mistakenly think.

 

For you and anyone interested here are a couple of quick comments to put your mind at rest if you ever consider Lithium (LFP) batteries.

 

1. Forget the stories about fires. The chemistry in celebrated thermal runway infernos, laptops batts etc had much higher energy density such as cobolt based chemistry. The chemistry of LFP is quite safe and arguably safer than sealed lead acid batteries of any construction, particulary in a boat.

 

2. In a small fractional discharge and charge arrangement in a boat you arguably can even get away without having a Battery Monitoring System (BMS) providing the cells are well balanced manually before hand and your not using it in areas of extreme temperature. It is not a safety necessity either but rather more a means of protecting your investment, namely from individual cell voltage extremes. If that happens they then your power source is shot and they become very expensive doorstops.

 

3. When establishing LFP costs it is essential to factor in firstly true capacity and partial State of Charge (SOC) use in a typical sailboat,ie capacity reduction and longevity shortfalls of lead acid. There are big savings with LFP there in weight, room req'd, charging and discharging efficiencies, charging costs/time and cycle life.

 

Secondly on the other hand you must factor in cost of reconfiguring your primary battery wiring to seperate charge and discharge bus's and modify charging sources to incorporate a flat fixed voltage charge curve. This involves modifying engine alternators so they are externally regulated. Plus also have your BMS set up to turn off the alternator before it shuts down the charge bus (many BMS's can't do this) for a cell overvoltage event, otherwise your alternator diodes are toast if it is still operating.

 

Hope the thread drift didn't anoy anyone and matey you have fun with that new toy.

 

 

Hi JS,

That's not a thread drift mate, that's great info. I have an application for work that would benefit from this, so this topic is of particular interest on several fronts.

 

 

Shaggster and any others interested, just a quick final application note on Lithium (LFP) batteries.

 

LFP is not the ideal solution for all applications. For low capacity standby use, particularly where extended lifetime is required, lead acid (LA) chemistry is cheaper and more suited. AGMs and Gels in particular are better at this. Note: Firefly Carbon Foam is probably the LA pick of the crop but new technology at the moment. For instance I would put a bow thruster (with batteries beside the thruster) into this standby category on a sailboat, but not a windless driven by remote house batteries subject to regular use. LFP is better suited to high cyclic, high load/charge applications. In boats, electric vehicles etc…LFP loves being used.

 

LFP comes into own in applications that involve partial State of Charge (SOC) use. LA can’t accommodate this partial use without permanent degradation and capacity loss due to sulphation (which is like internal rusting), and for some types like AGM’s the actual capacity is restricted to a minimum of 50% SOC or just 12.3/24.6 volts. In other words LA “actual capacity’ is restricted to a SOC 50% - 100% band or half its “rated capacity”. However there is a further sting to the tail with LA and that is to regularly bring LA to 100% SOC to preserve battery life, that requires hours and hours of charging at low absorption currents (amps), irrespective of the capacity/amperage of the charging source. With LFP you charge and put 1 amp in .....you take 1 amp out (not 0.8 amps with LA) and take it out when ever you like!

 

The common practise in a sailboat of charging your LA batteries say for an hour or so a day from 50% to 80% SOC or up to 12.7/25.4 volts is murdering them. LFP on the other hand has no such restrictions other than a lower limit of 20% SOC and where everything like fridges, pumps, auto pilot drives, even instruments run far much better and more efficiently at the higher and flat discharge curve voltages of LFP. At 50% SOC or say 12.8/25.6 volts LFP is merrily producing power at the LA equivalent of nearly 100% SOC!! Taste buds not wet enough yet...well put in an Inverter and hey presto, high voltage (240/110 AC) toys can be broken out.....was that margaritta with fine, medium or course ice??

 

To conclude LFP is actually far cheaper per kw/h compared to LA when total cost of ownership is taken into account (even before LFP’s lesser recharging/diesel costs are factored in), charges quicker and more efficiently, less rated battery capacity, less weight and less room is required. Less diesel tankage or more effective use of existing capacity are another bonus.

 

If you can digest the initial high capital outlay for LFP, and use it enough enough to get that cost returned, then for a sailboat .........lead really is dead.

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Nice Ride Shaggy!

You ever get a chance to see the 10.5 or the 30? Curious what your impressions were?

HI Bulb,

I first went to Structures looking at a 30, so I spent a fair bit of time on looking into the 30. I like them, the feedback of the twin rudders is excellent, handles like a dinghy. It is more tender than the 12.50 in the first 10 degrees of heel, but when it digs the chine in it's rock solid. Speed is excellent, fuller bow section keeps the nose dry'ish.

This is Jean Remy's boat Bleizig 2 which we spent half the day punting about. You can steer it with the sheets easily, planes easily, and speed was no problem.

Annoying things: the mainsheet catching on the tiller extensions when you're gybing, that's most likely practice...

I didn't spend any time with the 10.50 unfortunately, it was end of life so to speak when I was getting near the ordering cycle.

 

IMG_1282_zpskqob7vzs.jpg

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Do you get any warranty?

HI Scanas,

Need to check the fine detail on the vinylester, but 12 months on the boat and standard Volvo warranty for the engine.

 

Now that I've had a chance to get bags unpacked, I can go through the photos and notes.

One item I need to get onto is the Aus ship registry, if I want to transmit AIS, as compared to just receive, I need to be registered as a Aust flagged vessel, Another $1500 and a bunch more forms. I am not upset , more resigned to the tax/duty/registration costs, they just go on the list and you pay them when you can.

Some more pics

Mast track and mainsail cars.

IMG_1840_zpsbd6q5yao.jpg

 

This is after we fitted the yellow cunningham lashing.

IMG_1943_zpsnqqoakfu.jpg

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All I did in order to transmit on AIS was register for a MMSI, ship registration is not a requirement for Class B.

 

One item I need to get onto is the Aus ship registry, if I want to transmit AIS, as compared to just receive, I need to be registered as a Aust flagged vessel, Another $1500 and a bunch more forms. I am not upset , more resigned to the tax/duty/registration costs, they just go on the list and you pay them when you can.

 

 

 

 

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All I did in order to transmit on AIS was register for a MMSI, ship registration is not a requirement for Class B.

 

 

One item I need to get onto is the Aus ship registry, if I want to transmit AIS, as compared to just receive, I need to be registered as a Aust flagged vessel, Another $1500 and a bunch more forms. I am not upset , more resigned to the tax/duty/registration costs, they just go on the list and you pay them when you can.

 

 

Karua is correct as Class B AIS transceivers are covered by a Class licence, so only a MMSI needed, an individual station licence is not required. In Australia in early days of AIS not sure that was the case so maybe some confusion. National Ship Rego only required if your going outside your country's waters. Unlike some countries Aust rego cost is a "one off" so not as high as it looks at first glance.

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Nice Ride Shaggy!

You ever get a chance to see the 10.5 or the 30? Curious what your impressions were?

 

HI Bulb,

I first went to Structures looking at a 30, so I spent a fair bit of time on looking into the 30. I like them, the feedback of the twin rudders is excellent, handles like a dinghy. It is more tender than the 12.50 in the first 10 degrees of heel, but when it digs the chine in it's rock solid. Speed is excellent, fuller bow section keeps the nose dry'ish.

This is Jean Remy's boat Bleizig 2 which we spent half the day punting about. You can steer it with the sheets easily, planes easily, and speed was no problem.

Annoying things: the mainsheet catching on the tiller extensions when you're gybing, that's most likely practice...

I didn't spend any time with the 10.50 unfortunately, it was end of life so to speak when I was getting near the ordering cycle.

 

IMG_1282_zpskqob7vzs.jpg

Thx nice to hear your thoughts. The 12.5 on the west coast will be interesting. I know you'll have lots of fun.

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All I did in order to transmit on AIS was register for a MMSI, ship registration is not a requirement for Class B.

 

One item I need to get onto is the Aus ship registry, if I want to transmit AIS, as compared to just receive, I need to be registered as a Aust flagged vessel, Another $1500 and a bunch more forms. I am not upset , more resigned to the tax/duty/registration costs, they just go on the list and you pay them when you can.

 

 

Karua is correct as Class B AIS transceivers are covered by a Class licence, so only a MMSI needed, an individual station licence is not required. In Australia in early days of AIS not sure that was the case so maybe some confusion. National Ship Rego only required if your going outside your country's waters. Unlike some countries Aust rego cost is a "one off" so not as high as it looks at first glance.

 

True but a radio operators licence (MROVHFCP) is. I can recommend an excellent school that offers this...

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Shaggy you must be getting close to pack her up and put her on ship time? If snuffin ends up being not your fancy SH, you can always change over to top down land. She looks a treat with every pic. As a matter of interest did they offer lithium batts as a option, and if so how much and for how many Ah's?

 

Hi JS,

.......No to the lithium batteries being an option offered, but I didn't ask either. EV Power in WA seem to be very knowledgeable and were very helpful regards the lithium, but I didn't like the risk. Regards Ah, instead of 400AH which I have, in lithium I could make do with 200Ah with margin. The reason I didn't go lithium was I couldn't get past the BMS being so critical to avoiding a major issue. The boat may be unsinkable to water ingress, but not to fire, and the service batteries fit forrard of the engine inside the engine well, so a potential fire would block the main cabin egress.....

Shaggster I suspect cost is behind lithium not being on the options list, though it would make everything else appear great value for money. :-) I suspect this will change pretty soon with builders, though costs won't plumet as many mistakenly think.

 

For you and anyone interested here are a couple of quick comments to put your mind at rest if you ever consider Lithium (LFP) batteries.

 

1. Forget the stories about fires. The chemistry in celebrated thermal runway infernos, laptops batts etc had much higher energy density such as cobolt based chemistry. The chemistry of LFP is quite safe and arguably safer than sealed lead acid batteries of any construction, particulary in a boat.

 

2. In a small fractional discharge and charge arrangement in a boat you arguably can even get away without having a Battery Monitoring System (BMS) providing the cells are well balanced manually before hand and your not using it in areas of extreme temperature. It is not a safety necessity either but rather more a means of protecting your investment, namely from individual cell voltage extremes. If that happens they then your power source is shot and they become very expensive doorstops.

 

3. When establishing LFP costs it is essential to factor in firstly true capacity and partial State of Charge (SOC) use in a typical sailboat,ie capacity reduction and longevity shortfalls of lead acid. There are big savings with LFP there in weight, room req'd, charging and discharging efficiencies, charging costs/time and cycle life.

 

Secondly on the other hand you must factor in cost of reconfiguring your primary battery wiring to seperate charge and discharge bus's and modify charging sources to incorporate a flat fixed voltage charge curve. This involves modifying engine alternators so they are externally regulated. Plus also have your BMS set up to turn off the alternator before it shuts down the charge bus (many BMS's can't do this) for a cell overvoltage event, otherwise your alternator diodes are toast if it is still operating.

 

Hope the thread drift didn't anoy anyone and matey you have fun with that new toy.

 

 

Hi JS,

That's not a thread drift mate, that's great info. I have an application for work that would benefit from this, so this topic is of particular interest on several fronts.

 

 

Shaggster and any others interested, just a quick final application note on Lithium (LFP) batteries.

 

LFP is not the ideal solution for all applications. For low capacity standby use, particularly where extended lifetime is required, lead acid (LA) chemistry is cheaper and more suited. AGMs and Gels in particular are better at this. Note: Firefly Carbon Foam is probably the LA pick of the crop but new technology at the moment. For instance I would put a bow thruster (with batteries beside the thruster) into this standby category on a sailboat, but not a windless driven by remote house batteries subject to regular use. LFP is better suited to high cyclic, high load/charge applications. In boats, electric vehicles etc…LFP loves being used.

 

LFP comes into own in applications that involve partial State of Charge (SOC) use. LA can’t accommodate this partial use without permanent degradation and capacity loss due to sulphation (which is like internal rusting), and for some types like AGM’s the actual capacity is restricted to a minimum of 50% SOC or just 12.3/24.6 volts. In other words LA “actual capacity’ is restricted to a SOC 50% - 100% band or half its “rated capacity”. However there is a further sting to the tail with LA and that is to regularly bring LA to 100% SOC to preserve battery life, that requires hours and hours of charging at low absorption currents (amps), irrespective of the capacity/amperage of the charging source. With LFP you charge and put 1 amp in .....you take 1 amp out (not 0.8 amps with LA) and take it out when ever you like!

 

The common practise in a sailboat of charging your LA batteries say for an hour or so a day from 50% to 80% SOC or up to 12.7/25.4 volts is murdering them. LFP on the other hand has no such restrictions other than a lower limit of 20% SOC and where everything like fridges, pumps, auto pilot drives, even instruments run far much better and more efficiently at the higher and flat discharge curve voltages of LFP. At 50% SOC or say 12.8/25.6 volts LFP is merrily producing power at the LA equivalent of nearly 100% SOC!! Taste buds not wet enough yet...well put in an Inverter and hey presto, high voltage (240/110 AC) toys can be broken out.....was that margaritta with fine, medium or course ice??

 

To conclude LFP is actually far cheaper per kw/h compared to LA when total cost of ownership is taken into account (even before LFP’s lesser recharging/diesel costs are factored in), charges quicker and more efficiently, less rated battery capacity, less weight and less room is required. Less diesel tankage or more effective use of existing capacity are another bonus.

 

If you can digest the initial high capital outlay for LFP, and use it enough enough to get that cost returned, then for a sailboat .........lead really is dead.

 

 

Thanks JS, this interests me, but it took a bit of time to absorb!

I get the SOC advantage, the part I missed was the non-ideal scenario. So a LA is more suited than an LFP battery as a ups battery bank? We provide comms electronic equipment with small UPS battery backup systems in outdoor enclosures in the Pilbara, and we are getting great results out of initial trials using lithium batteries in increased uptime on mains power fail.

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Shaggy depends on the UPS application.

 

Providing there is some means to maintain a constant maintenance or float charge, say using mains or solar, then Lead Acid (LA) is a more effective option. The need for charging, regardless of battery chemistry, is probably dictated by how often standby use is triggered.

 

If standby is not a regular occurrence or for what ever reason a constant charge source can't be maintained, then the pendulum quickly swings towards Lithium (LFP) as it doesn't need nor like a float charge and it can stay in an uncharged state for a very long time. The need for charging equipment is also dispensed with as that can be dealt with by maintenance, either by quick insitu charging or simply battery exchange.

 

Alternatively constraints such as minimising battery size for say outdoor enclosures, a high power capacity and or duration need when standby is required, makes LFP even more compelling.

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All I did in order to transmit on AIS was register for a MMSI, ship registration is not a requirement for Class B.

 

One item I need to get onto is the Aus ship registry, if I want to transmit AIS, as compared to just receive, I need to be registered as a Aust flagged vessel, Another $1500 and a bunch more forms. I am not upset , more resigned to the tax/duty/registration costs, they just go on the list and you pay them when you can.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks Karua/JS, thats good news. That's an entry in the green column, wahoo! There's not many in that column...:)

 

 

True but a radio operators licence (MROVHFCP) is. I can recommend an excellent school that offers this...

 

 

 

Does this school of which you speak, is it a good establishment, a respected community member with a sense of charity in their hearts, that believing in the betterment of the sport will/would gladly donate their time (and successful pass) to the poor broken yacht owner that is always on his knees ?? (bare,grazed ones at that)

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Well, if this was the Melbourne Cup, we would be in the last 800 mtrs I reckon.

Fusion is on her way, everything that is needed off is off, stowed and shrink wrapped, and is ready to go.

The cradle is ours, Baguleire provide the truck and shipping. The boat is shipping as under deck cargo, with no transhipping, it will stay on that boat all the way.

Next is to organise:

-Loading and transport the boat from the docks after customs clearance.

-Organise insurance for the above.

-Check when the hardstand is available. Book it, will have to allow some fudge as we don't know if customs will clear it before Xmas holidays or after.

 

20151029_092110_zps0hdgqkyl.jpg

 

SAM_3439_zpsm1iyrksu.jpg

 

20151103_100437_zpsasycmx6q.jpg

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Very nice, I'm surprised they left the rudders in..?

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Interesting to note that the straps go in above the raised keel with insufficient clearance to place them between the sail drive leg and the tip of the keel. Probably worth noting at launch. You won't want a yard placing straps blind to get her out of the water. Perhaps rig straps with the keel in an intermediate position and then raise it if that's you intention?

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Thanks IB, I'll have a closer look. So,I need to check the strap positions, but for when it is out of the cradle though? There is lifting out the cradle as one sling, then lifting out of the water as another. I'll look it up and check.

 

The start of the final?? chapter of the build phase...then you'll have to put up with some sailing photos :)

 

SAM_3444_zps8t3cbxyf.jpg

 

SAM_3443_zpseipbb5sd.jpg

 

SAM_3446_zpsvqqcajgu.jpg

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Hi Tomasis,

Did he? I wish Rimas would explain how he does it, and not need years of toil and sweat and scrimping and saving to own his own boat, he da man.

That's not me in the pic btw, that Antoine from Structures, he is the 12.50 and 40 commissioning fella. Good guy.

Must not forget to ring the insurance mob today, they are struggling how to insure it as they don't have a model for it, probably not helped by the fact I keep banging on about how the unsinkable rating should be factored into the premiums. :)

I think they're just a bit confused. Oh well, time to get on the phone and sell it again.

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hi shaggybaxter,

 

it takes very little to have equally fun in sailing, i guess :) However, calling insurance is no option for him.. your insurance probably cover more than he is going spend anything for next 50 years. Rimas seems to be unsinkable too.

 

Aside jokes, you've earned the boat, yes!

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Bigrpowr, if you ever get a chance to drop in let us know prior and we'll drag you out.
The first two weeks in January look good for lots of visitors :) (I'm expecting this is when we just get her)
In the meantime, I need to get my radio license.....paging Mr LB, Mr LB, accused bastard brother/mother/child of LID...come to reception please....
I'm attempting to upload a video thingy..lemme see how this goes.

 

Edit:We were trimmed for 130-150, Mikey was heading up too much and we fell off the plane..grr.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi Scanas,

Sorry, work and clients needed some love, have been a bit distracted of late.

This is our last pic before loading at Le Havre.

It reminds me of the Pink Floyd song "Southhampton Dock", she looks somehow forlorn and a bit lost, she needs a home.

At least the mast got its own little flat bed, it's all travelling under deck, so the service is what I hoped for so far.

 

IMG_1483_zpsqox29k6y.jpg

 

Except...we got one of those calls two weeks ago. The freight forwarder rang to let us know that the vertical height was in fact 60cm over what the quote was based on (3mtr inc cradle), so we owe them another US$6000.....please. Or no boat.

 

As freight works on cubic measurement, even though it doesn't take up floor space, you'll pay if you cube over. We used the numbers supplied from Pogo, who supplied in good faith, everybody, me included (but I wasn't there), never measured the thing, so what do you do?

To be fair to all, everyone has been really good, I may get it knocked down to half this, so only US$3K. Still, expensive fucking stanchions.

 

SB

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Yep, the next stage is all forming up.

Boat docks on the 25th.

We've pre-cleared customs, but quarantine keeps the boat till the 28/9th.

Currently organising road haulage to RQ for the 29th.

 

Work on boat. I decided to fly Antione from Structures out to help step and tune mast, and assist with putting everything back together. We're covering his flight and accom in Brisbane, he's bringing his partner on his coin, and then they take a holiday after the commissioning.

It would be a bit cheaper with a local rigger, but Antoine's been with Structures for 9 years, he's passionate about the boats, damn good and a great guy to boot. Check.

 

Red Flag....haven't booked the crane. Timing is not good, the 2nd would be ideal, but dunno if I want a still-pissed crane driver banging around my nice new carbon fibre stick.

 

Slip and have test sailing the 4th. That's a month from now.

 

Backup plan. Slip and have sailing the 4th-10th January.

Hardstand has plenty of float, not much activity at that time of year.

I have booked the first two weeks off in January.

 

We're setting ourselves a goal to be at the start line for the Surf to City, we should make it at this stage.

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Yep, the next stage is all forming up.

Boat docks on the 25th.

We've pre-cleared customs, but quarantine keeps the boat till the 28/9th.

Currently organising road haulage to RQ for the 29th.

 

Work on boat. I decided to fly Antione from Structures out to help step and tune mast, and assist with putting everything back together. We're covering his flight and accom in Brisbane, he's bringing his partner on his coin, and then they take a holiday after the commissioning.

It would be a bit cheaper with a local rigger, but Antoine's been with Structures for 9 years, he's passionate about the boats, damn good and a great guy to boot. Check.

 

Red Flag....haven't booked the crane. Timing is not good, the 2nd would be ideal, but dunno if I want a still-pissed crane driver banging around my nice new carbon fibre stick.

 

Slip and have test sailing the 4th. That's a month from now.

 

Backup plan. Slip and have sailing the 4th-10th January.

Hardstand has plenty of float, not much activity at that time of year.

I have booked the first two weeks off in January.

 

We're setting ourselves a goal to be at the start line for the Surf to City, we should make it at this stage.

 

dotting the I's and crossing the T's ! sooo close !

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Yep, the next stage is all forming up.

Boat docks on the 25th.

We've pre-cleared customs, but quarantine keeps the boat till the 28/9th.

Currently organising road haulage to RQ for the 29th.

 

Work on boat. I decided to fly Antione from Structures out to help step and tune mast, and assist with putting everything back together. We're covering his flight and accom in Brisbane, he's bringing his partner on his coin, and then they take a holiday after the commissioning.

It would be a bit cheaper with a local rigger, but Antoine's been with Structures for 9 years, he's passionate about the boats, damn good and a great guy to boot. Check.

 

Red Flag....haven't booked the crane. Timing is not good, the 2nd would be ideal, but dunno if I want a still-pissed crane driver banging around my nice new carbon fibre stick.

 

Slip and have test sailing the 4th. That's a month from now.

 

Backup plan. Slip and have sailing the 4th-10th January.

Hardstand has plenty of float, not much activity at that time of year.

I have booked the first two weeks off in January.

 

We're setting ourselves a goal to be at the start line for the Surf to City, we should make it at this stage.

I will bring the beer! Trying to ring you mate...

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Yep, the next stage is all forming up.

Boat docks on the 25th.

We've pre-cleared customs, but quarantine keeps the boat till the 28/9th.

Currently organising road haulage to RQ for the 29th.

 

Work on boat. I decided to fly Antione from Structures out to help step and tune mast, and assist with putting everything back together. We're covering his flight and accom in Brisbane, he's bringing his partner on his coin, and then they take a holiday after the commissioning.

It would be a bit cheaper with a local rigger, but Antoine's been with Structures for 9 years, he's passionate about the boats, damn good and a great guy to boot. Check.

 

Red Flag....haven't booked the crane. Timing is not good, the 2nd would be ideal, but dunno if I want a still-pissed crane driver banging around my nice new carbon fibre stick.

 

Slip and have test sailing the 4th. That's a month from now.

 

Backup plan. Slip and have sailing the 4th-10th January.

Hardstand has plenty of float, not much activity at that time of year.

I have booked the first two weeks off in January.

 

We're setting ourselves a goal to be at the start line for the Surf to City, we should make it at this stage.

 

dotting the I's and crossing the T's ! sooo close !

Try and locate an owner driver with a long reach Hiab truck. No dramas with the mast and normally happy to work extra hours as its money in their bank ac, not the bosses. Good luck with the schedule.

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Good call going with Antoine. The Brisbane rigger we deal with does good work, but he is hard enough to get to turn up during normal hours, let alone the holidays.

I think we will miss seeing the boat, delivery south should be all done by Christmas. Hopefully we see you when you bring it north for b2g

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Yep, the next stage is all forming up.

Boat docks on the 25th.

We've pre-cleared customs, but quarantine keeps the boat till the 28/9th.

Currently organising road haulage to RQ for the 29th.

 

Work on boat. I decided to fly Antione from Structures out to help step and tune mast, and assist with putting everything back together. We're covering his flight and accom in Brisbane, he's bringing his partner on his coin, and then they take a holiday after the commissioning.

It would be a bit cheaper with a local rigger, but Antoine's been with Structures for 9 years, he's passionate about the boats, damn good and a great guy to boot. Check.

 

Red Flag....haven't booked the crane. Timing is not good, the 2nd would be ideal, but dunno if I want a still-pissed crane driver banging around my nice new carbon fibre stick.

 

Slip and have test sailing the 4th. That's a month from now.

 

Backup plan. Slip and have sailing the 4th-10th January.

Hardstand has plenty of float, not much activity at that time of year.

I have booked the first two weeks off in January.

 

We're setting ourselves a goal to be at the start line for the Surf to City, we should make it at this stage.

I will bring the beer! Trying to ring you mate...

 

Sorry LB, I'll give you a call.

You are welcome to come mate, but... ahem....how do we put this....can you bring LID?

I've become a shameless Ian groupie, I've missed him at nights, when its cold.

 

It is sad when you realise you're checking MarineTraffic 3 hourly.

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Good call going with Antoine. The Brisbane rigger we deal with does good work, but he is hard enough to get to turn up during normal hours, let alone the holidays.

I think we will miss seeing the boat, delivery south should be all done by Christmas. Hopefully we see you when you bring it north for b2g

 

Hi Rantifarian,

I am sorry I'll miss you, but delivery south? Does that mean you've sold her?

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Congrats, that's really great news! Edit: You should delay your delivery, and time it so you port tack Comanche and WOXI as they come out of the heads :ph34r:

 

Some light reading to settle down for the night...getting a chance to practise my schoolboy French.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I need to work on my planning a bit better it seems. Had a phone call on Monday from a lovely lady from the freight forwarders.

We have a truck booked for the 29th December to move the boat the 15 miles from the Customs port to the yacht club.

She tells me in a tone that makes me think I've won the lotto that there is a transport embargo in place over the Xmas period, a complete ban on any movement of extra-wide loads till the 6th Jan.

I have Pogo flying out, cranes coming up from Northern NSW, the whole process is organised for the 29th.

 

...crickets.....

 

So, we are now trying to negotiate a way where I can receive the boat from Quarantine, then promptly toss it back over the fence and float it in the Brisbane River, fill up with diesel and we'll motor it around out of the river and south to the yacht club, it'd be less than 15nm.

The lesson out of this is always have a plan B