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Jimmy Buffet just bought one of ugliest sailboats I have ever seen...


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10 years ago. When involved with many "Lobster Yachts". I thought that a derivative to include the basic hull design with a rig could be interesting; 2008 killed that idea. 

Something relevant? It takes some stones to bad mouth the designs of others, and post your crap on every thread under the sun.   Wow, 20,000 posts and how many decades of nothing relevant from you o

@Rasputin22   ... that's yet another glorious post from you which makes me feel a famine-like hunger for your book. If you die without writing it, I think I'll dig you up and kill you all over ag

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Let's see, no traveler, single helm way up front in the pilot house far away from sail controls, whimpy single set of winches, two props, no backstays...

 

Yup, this thing will be great for sitting at the marina mixing up margaritas. For actually sailing ... not so much.

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i consistently find that people on this forum have a very narrow view of what makes an acceptable sailboat

 

i think it looks ok, in a different sort of way.., and i imagine that if it is well executed, it can be a pretty good boat for a particular type of owner, with the right cruising/daysailing needs.

 

not every sailboat needs to be a "sailors" sailboat

 

this is a boat for someone who might not have found anything else that would work for them that isn't a motor boat.

 

and i'm certainly happy that there is a sailboat for that buyer.

 

the greater the variety of sailboats.., the more people will buy sailboats

 

maybe in the end this boat won't work - we don't know much about it yet - but it's worth trying.

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It's an appealing concept - more space dedicated to outdoor and outdoor-ish leisure, fishing and water sports, less to extraneous bunks and heads. Definitely some unusual solutions, but I can see how it would be exactly what he would want in a boat.

 

With his choices of designer and builder I imagine it will be pretty nicely executed.

 

Neat to see how different the perfect boat can be from one person to the next.

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if i recall correctly, moody built something similar a few years ago, with the galley and dining area up above.

 

i think it was mostly meant for charter, where people typically do short daysails, and then hang out on the hook. it's a good idea - who wants to go down below in that situation. many catamarans do the same thing

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I think it looks pretty good. The coach roof is way better looking than some of the other high ones out there (think Jeaneau DS 43) in that size range. The dual props don't make sense in the renderings one appears centerline and the other is starboard.

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..I see the practicality of it with regard to how it could be used. However, I don't see how you would "lock" it or secure it at the end of the day ...and I don't see how you would secure it in an area with tropical storms. (...For Florida use, I imagine some type of canvas cover would have to be fabricated to cover the back end to keep bird crap off and blowing rain out - and that would be something you'd want to remove for a storm - then what?.) With so much of the "inside" of the boat being placed "outside", I can see real challenges with fading, "sun rot", and upkeep of the "exterior" accomodations - even if they are made of "Starboard", "faux" wood, vinyl, and high-tech fabric.

In a boat yard, I imagine the back end of the boat and the exterior accomodations would get pretty dirty and take a lot of effort to clean unless you "shrink-wrapped" the back immediately upon haul out.

So, maybe the boat would be "practical" for use as a party/daysailer/beach queen, ...but it is seemingly impractical to maintain and care for unless you had a full time crew taking care of it. I know if I kept it at my house unattended for a single week, it would be covered in bird crap inside and out, raccoons would have climbed aboard and wreaked havoc with the exterior accomodations, rain would have blown in from behind, and all manner of bugs (..mud dobbers, wasps, bees, roaches, etc.) would have set up homes in the open back. I'd have to always spend a day cleaning it in hopes of using it the next day - so even basic weekend use would be diffcult.

So, it's not for me from a strictly practical standpoint - asthetics aside.

It is not a very attractive design to my eye, but I have seen uglier boats. I could tolerate the ugliness if it was exceptionally useful - but it seems like it would be a difficult boat to care for - at least in South Florida where I live. Perhaps in a place like Maine, where the season is maybe five months long, the impracticality of maintaining it wouldn't be so big a deal? However, that keel does not look like it would fair well in a collision with a "Maine" rock at any speed over 1 knot...

Interesting design. But, I wouldn't choose it.

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I'd rather have his old Cheoy Lee Clipper.

 

How could the same guy own those two boats?

IIRC, the whole point of one of his (least appealing) books was whether he should take the flying boat or the lear jet on vacation to Colombia. In the end they took both. :huh: Not something the average reader can relate to...

 

(Girls took the jet, boys took the sea plane.)

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They say I quote; "....target markets include experienced performance racing yacht owners who have exhausted their appetites for competition and the extensive demands of their campaigns. Having honed their sailing skills to near-professional levels, these potential owners associate high performance with high technology. They want to go fast and get there in style, and now that they are approaching their retirement years their need for speed is being seasoned with a newly appreciated desire for comfort and versatility afloat.

 

I have just simultaneously read that and thrown up in my mouth.... monster gas turbines, foils, no sails and they're viaga dispensers not winches.

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When I design a custom boat I try to design a boat that reflects how the client sees himself on the water. It's all subjective. I'll deal with the objective part later. That's the easy part. But creating that "painting": of the boat sailing along, 15 knots true, beam reach, sail trimmed to carved ivory with an owner perfectly placed in his surroundings, that the tricky part.

 

If I designer gave me this design and said, "This is how I picture you on the water." I'd be insulted, I don't have any sailing friends that I think would fit that boat.

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..I see the practicality of it with regard to how it could be used. However, I don't see how you would "lock" it or secure it at the end of the day ...and I don't see how you would secure it in an area with tropical storms. (...For Florida use, I imagine some type of canvas cover would have to be fabricated to cover the back end to keep bird crap off and blowing rain out - and that would be something you'd want to remove for a storm - then what?.) With so much of the "inside" of the boat being placed "outside", I can see real challenges with fading, "sun rot", and upkeep of the "exterior" accomodations - even if they are made of "Starboard", "faux" wood, vinyl, and high-tech fabric.

In a boat yard, I imagine the back end of the boat and the exterior accomodations would get pretty dirty and take a lot of effort to clean unless you "shrink-wrapped" the back immediately upon haul out.

So, maybe the boat would be "practical" for use as a party/daysailer/beach queen, ...but it is seemingly impractical to maintain and care for unless you had a full time crew taking care of it. I know if I kept it at my house unattended for a single week, it would be covered in bird crap inside and out, raccoons would have climbed aboard and wreaked havoc with the exterior accomodations, rain would have blown in from behind, and all manner of bugs (..mud dobbers, wasps, bees, roaches, etc.) would have set up homes in the open back. I'd have to always spend a day cleaning it in hopes of using it the next day - so even basic weekend use would be diffcult.

So, it's not for me from a strictly practical standpoint - asthetics aside.

It is not a very attractive design to my eye, but I have seen uglier boats. I could tolerate the ugliness if it was exceptionally useful - but it seems like it would be a difficult boat to care for - at least in South Florida where I live. Perhaps in a place like Maine, where the season is maybe five months long, the impracticality of maintaining it wouldn't be so big a deal? However, that keel does not look like it would fair well in a collision with a "Maine" rock at any speed over 1 knot...

Interesting design. But, I wouldn't choose it.

I am assuming it has a garage type door that will cover the expensive bits, It is a rendering after all. Remember there are thousands of sportfishers out there that have that exact same stern and deal with the bird crap/racoon/cockroach issues you bring up. Again, I assume that may be where they got the inclination to go this route. It kind of looks like a gunboat with a sportfisher stern which makes sense for him. It is a moot point anyway as he will probably have a full time crew or it will be parked by the seaplane and the other toys that are taken care of the boat-boy.... It looks like all that glass ether comes off with the help of said boat boy, or actually slides somewhere in the superstructure. Glad there is another sailboat out there. Not everyone's cup o tea, but to each his own.....

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When I see boats like this with winches just above the nice settees, or with materials used below or on deck that don't like water, I don't know if this is rendering license or if the boat will actually be used with these features. When I see flowers or pillows I get it, put them away and go sailing; but how in this case will a wet jib sheet be handled- set on the counter so water can run around towards the helm, or just left to drip on the floor.

 

When the Gunboat cat lost its mast and was abandoned, it struck me that those people were sailing along in worsening conditions, but they were inside and had little clue till the mast fell and brought the outside inside. In addition to all the real problems created by water to the electronics, I imagine it was just a huge shock to the owner and his boy, and how helpless they felt. Even for this kind of use,

 

I guess I don't like the "oh so refined" aesthetic, but then I dislike dress shoes of any kind as well. My rule is never wear a shoe you aren't willing to change a tire in the rain in. I look odd at dress up weddings in my suit and practical shoes.

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They say I quote; "....target markets include experienced performance racing yacht owners who have exhausted their appetites for competition and the extensive demands of their campaigns. Having honed their sailing skills to near-professional levels, these potential owners associate high performance with high technology. They want to go fast and get there in style, and now that they are approaching their retirement years their need for speed is being seasoned with a newly appreciated desire for comfort and versatility afloat.

 

I have just simultaneously read that and thrown up in my mouth.... monster gas turbines, foils, no sails and they're viaga dispensers not winches.

I think they meant "You're too old to race old man and your eyes aren't good enough too how terrible this boat looks; you should buy it."

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When I see boats like this with winches just above the nice settees, or with materials used below or on deck that don't like water, I don't know if this is rendering license or if the boat will actually be used with these features. When I see flowers or pillows I get it, put them away and go sailing; but how in this case will a wet jib sheet be handled- set on the counter so water can run around towards the helm, or just left to drip on the floor.

 

Sheet bins outboard of the winches. Plus it's highly unlikely that the jib and main sheets will ever get wet, as boats like this are intended to live on the dock at the end of the garden (or on a mooring visible from the house), and who would go sailing if the weather's not nice?

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Personally I don't think it looks that bad and for it's intended purpose, day sails and Island cruising, she will be a nice boat. A week or two in the BVI's on this boat would be just about perfect for a couple. That being said with the price point for a boat like this I do not think is going to work for a charter boat. Unless there is a market for couples wanting to drop 10K on a 44' boat for a week. Maybe there is???

 

AFA Jimmy owning this boat I think there are two things going on or maybe a combo of both:

 

1) Jimmy certainly can afford a MUCH bigger boat. Maybe he already has one? But bigger is not always better and maybe he simply wants to spend some time on a smaller yacht. I know for me, provided the conditions are right, I much prefer fishing off my 20' boat versus my friend's 34'. Depending on what you are doing, weather and where you are going bigger is not always better.

 

2) Could just be a brilliant marketing plan. Let's face it Buffet does an excellent job marketing himself, his music and packaging it all up into 'The Island Lifestyle". The 'Parrot Heads' are getting older and some of them have A LOT of money. How many are going to say, "I want the same boat as Jimmy!" And for sitting at the dock, blender going, cranking out Buffet all afternoon it's a great platform. Might not be that ugly after all is it???

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Personally I don't think it looks that bad and for it's intended purpose, day sails and Island cruising, she will be a nice boat. A week or two in the BVI's on this boat would be just about perfect for a couple. That being said with the price point for a boat like this I do not think is going to work for a charter boat. Unless there is a market for couples wanting to drop 10K on a 44' boat for a week. Maybe there is???

 

AFA Jimmy owning this boat I think there are two things going on or maybe a combo of both:

 

1) Jimmy certainly can afford a MUCH bigger boat. Maybe he already has one? But bigger is not always better and maybe he simply wants to spend some time on a smaller yacht. I know for me, provided the conditions are right, I much prefer fishing off my 20' boat versus my friend's 34'. Depending on what you are doing, weather and where you are going bigger is not always better.

 

2) Could just be a brilliant marketing plan. Let's face it Buffet does an excellent job marketing himself, his music and packaging it all up into 'The Island Lifestyle". The 'Parrot Heads' are getting older and some of them have A LOT of money. How many are going to say, "I want the same boat as Jimmy!" And for sitting at the dock, blender going, cranking out Buffet all afternoon it's a great platform. Might not be that ugly after all is it???

 

Anything cranking out Buffet is ugly.

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When I see boats like this with winches just above the nice settees, or with materials used below or on deck that don't like water, I don't know if this is rendering license or if the boat will actually be used with these features. When I see flowers or pillows I get it, put them away and go sailing; but how in this case will a wet jib sheet be handled- set on the counter so water can run around towards the helm, or just left to drip on the floor.

 

Sheet bins outboard of the winches. Plus it's highly unlikely that the jib and main sheets will ever get wet, as boats like this are intended to live on the dock at the end of the garden (or on a mooring visible from the house), and who would go sailing if the weather's not nice?

 

 

actually - i think you are completely wrong

 

mooring fields are full of "conventional" sailboats that never go anywhere...

 

why?

 

because they are entirely unsuited to the kind of sailing the owner and his family want to do.

 

most families want to go somewhere and have fun when they get there. they want a boat in which everyone can hang in the _comfortable_ cockpit - out of the sun - swim etc..., who wants to go down below to prepare lunch if you don't have to?

 

this is the perfect boat to take your wife, and a few kids to anchor off a nice swimming beach for a day and have fun.

 

conventional sailboats mostly suck at that job - most people buy motor boats for that job.

 

i think this would be a great boat for a family of four to charter in say greece, sardinia, the BVI's.., places like that

 

currently charterers will choose some kind of crappy catamaran - this almost certainly sails better than say a 38ft charter cat...

 

so.., again, i think you are completely wrong - this is a boat for an owner that wants to buy a boat that is comfortable and fun for family and friends - so that it will not sit unused on the mooring or in the marina - like all the conventional boats that fail so miserably at their job.

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Boy ain't hurting for boats. You might have missed one or two.

 

I watched Jimmy bang into a coral head or rock just outside of Gustavia a couple of years ago on that pretty little daysailer "Groovy". Talked to his 'boat boy' the next day and he said he came down to tidy up the boat in the evening after Jimmy had brought it back to the dock mid-afternoon. Jimmy apparently just ties it up and heads back to the mothership. Boat boy found water over the floorboards and dives the keel and sees the divot missing and Jimmy never fessed up to hitting the rock.

 

Jimmy is getting a bridge named after him in Pascagoula.

 

http://www.gulflive.com/news/index.ssf/2015/09/pascagoula_bayou_under_jimmy_b.html

 

Don't think he even had to pay for it...

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Great story! The more I think about it I am really leaning towards my theory 2.

 

2) Could just be a brilliant marketing plan. Let's face it Buffet does an excellent job marketing himself, his music and packaging it all up into 'The Island Lifestyle". The 'Parrot Heads' are getting older and some of them have A LOT of money. How many are going to say, "I want the same boat as Jimmy!" And for sitting at the dock, blender going, cranking out Buffet all afternoon it's a great platform. Might not be that ugly after all is it???

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Specs don't say anything about twin engines. I think that may be the water hydro generator!

 

I was hoping it was something other than twin screws, but this is a cup/paste from the OP linked to article...... Lightweight, composite “grand prix race boat” construction, a carbon fiber mast and boom, and twin 75 HP auxiliary engines are further features that differentiate the Surfari 44. Yikes!! :o

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When I see boats like this with winches just above the nice settees, or with materials used below or on deck that don't like water, I don't know if this is rendering license or if the boat will actually be used with these features. When I see flowers or pillows I get it, put them away and go sailing; but how in this case will a wet jib sheet be handled- set on the counter so water can run around towards the helm, or just left to drip on the floor.

 

Sheet bins outboard of the winches. Plus it's highly unlikely that the jib and main sheets will ever get wet, as boats like this are intended to live on the dock at the end of the garden (or on a mooring visible from the house), and who would go sailing if the weather's not nice?

 

 

actually - i think you are completely wrong

 

mooring fields are full of "conventional" sailboats that never go anywhere...

 

why?

 

because they are entirely unsuited to the kind of sailing the owner and his family want to do.

 

most families want to go somewhere and have fun when they get there. they want a boat in which everyone can hang in the _comfortable_ cockpit - out of the sun - swim etc..., who wants to go down below to prepare lunch if you don't have to?

 

this is the perfect boat to take your wife, and a few kids to anchor off a nice swimming beach for a day and have fun.

 

conventional sailboats mostly suck at that job - most people buy motor boats for that job.

 

i think this would be a great boat for a family of four to charter in say greece, sardinia, the BVI's.., places like that

 

currently charterers will choose some kind of crappy catamaran - this almost certainly sails better than say a 38ft charter cat...

 

so.., again, i think you are completely wrong - this is a boat for an owner that wants to buy a boat that is comfortable and fun for family and friends - so that it will not sit unused on the mooring or in the marina - like all the conventional boats that fail so miserably at their job.

 

 

You're probably right..... but it's still butt ugly.

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When I see boats like this with winches just above the nice settees, or with materials used below or on deck that don't like water, I don't know if this is rendering license or if the boat will actually be used with these features. When I see flowers or pillows I get it, put them away and go sailing; but how in this case will a wet jib sheet be handled- set on the counter so water can run around towards the helm, or just left to drip on the floor.

 

Sheet bins outboard of the winches. Plus it's highly unlikely that the jib and main sheets will ever get wet, as boats like this are intended to live on the dock at the end of the garden (or on a mooring visible from the house), and who would go sailing if the weather's not nice?

 

 

actually - i think you are completely wrong

 

mooring fields are full of "conventional" sailboats that never go anywhere...

 

why?

 

because they are entirely unsuited to the kind of sailing the owner and his family want to do.

 

most families want to go somewhere and have fun when they get there. they want a boat in which everyone can hang in the _comfortable_ cockpit - out of the sun - swim etc..., who wants to go down below to prepare lunch if you don't have to?

 

this is the perfect boat to take your wife, and a few kids to anchor off a nice swimming beach for a day and have fun.

 

conventional sailboats mostly suck at that job - most people buy motor boats for that job.

 

i think this would be a great boat for a family of four to charter in say greece, sardinia, the BVI's.., places like that

 

currently charterers will choose some kind of crappy catamaran - this almost certainly sails better than say a 38ft charter cat...

 

so.., again, i think you are completely wrong - this is a boat for an owner that wants to buy a boat that is comfortable and fun for family and friends - so that it will not sit unused on the mooring or in the marina - like all the conventional boats that fail so miserably at their job.

 

 

You're probably right..... but it's still butt ugly.

 

BUTT UGLY................

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I have to go with Dacapo on this. Beauty is subjective but I cannot see me drawing that unless I was really hungry.

 

 

it doesn't look beautiful.., it looks functional

 

how about a challenge: show me a boat with equal function.., that is also beautiful

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I have to go with Dacapo on this. Beauty is subjective but I cannot see me drawing that unless I was really hungry.

 

 

it doesn't look beautiful.., it looks functional

 

how about a challenge: show me a boat with equal function.., that is also beautiful

 

 

Most of the cruising boats owned reflect what we dream of doing. I suspect this boat reflects how most sailors really use their boats.

 

It needs to be prettier though.

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i consistently find that people on this forum have a very narrow view of what makes an acceptable sailboat

 

i think it looks ok, in a different sort of way.., and i imagine that if it is well executed, it can be a pretty good boat for a particular type of owner, with the right cruising/daysailing needs.

 

not every sailboat needs to be a "sailors" sailboat

 

this is a boat for someone who might not have found anything else that would work for them that isn't a motor boat.

 

and i'm certainly happy that there is a sailboat for that buyer.

 

the greater the variety of sailboats.., the more people will buy sailboats

 

maybe in the end this boat won't work - we don't know much about it yet - but it's worth trying.

Shhhh & a word of warning. Don't mention twin wheels, folding transoms or the b-word (BENETEAU) in CA.

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I guess I don't like the "oh so refined" aesthetic, but then I dislike dress shoes of any kind as well. My rule is never wear a shoe you aren't willing to change a tire in the rain in. I look odd at dress up weddings in my suit and practical shoes.

 

Yeah, I went to a wedding last week in hiking boots. My wife was horrified. I pointed out they were the most expensive steppers at the wedding and I washed the cow shit off and polished them.

 

My Asolo hikers or Chaco sandals are all I do. I don't even know where my Cole Haans are and my suits don't fit anymore.

 

But then my ideal sailboat would be about 28' with a big cockpit and a little cuddy to hide from heavy rain and sleep in. I'd cook in the cockpit on a camping stove. A hook to hang my backpack would be my locker.

 

You could do the Great Lakes with that. I guess I'd need a porta potti to be legal as well.

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I guess I don't like the "oh so refined" aesthetic, but then I dislike dress shoes of any kind as well. My rule is never wear a shoe you aren't willing to change a tire in the rain in. I look odd at dress up weddings in my suit and practical shoes.

 

Yeah, I went to a wedding last week in hiking boots. My wife was horrified. I pointed out they were the most expensive steppers at the wedding and I washed the cow shit off and polished them.

 

My Asolo hikers or Chaco sandals are all I do. I don't even know where my Cole Haans are and my suits don't fit anymore.

 

But then my ideal sailboat would be about 28' with a big cockpit and a little cuddy to hide from heavy rain and sleep in. I'd cook in the cockpit on a camping stove. A hook to hang my backpack would be my locker.

 

You could do the Great Lakes with that. I guess I'd need a porta potti to be legal as well.

 

Shoes? What are these "shoes"?

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For $8500 you can charter a nearly new 44' catamaran in the BVI. They are largely poorly built, they don't sail well, but they are great fun to hang out on. If this were 10k for the week and you get the fun of the cat as well as reasonable sailing, then it makes sense for a charter for those of us that want both the party platform with better sailing characteristics than a charter cat.

 

It's ugly to my eye, but then so is a Lagoon 44

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Dufour has the "Atoll" line where the cockpit floor is on the same level as the floor of the main salon. They put the wheel(s) aft, though. They intended it for charter but I believe they ended up by selling them to just anyone. The level of accommodation was "beach cabin plain." While scouting out the picture, I found some references of the being advertised to people with mobility problems.

 

25719_3.jpg

 

This may not be the exact same design.

 

6260da1183a19068d402b9d1613fa746.JPG

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Does it have a reversed bow (is that called a destroyer bow?) or is that an illusion?

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It does keep the helmsman out of the sun. I will wish i had something like that when i discover my numerous skin melanomas seeds poisons to my prostate and later moves to give me brain cancer.

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