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Looking forward to the invention of cleats in Canada


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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Yum. Does anyone raise them commercially? I was thinking the Japanese would like this stuff, like Kobe Roo.

Kanga is available in the large supermarkets and most good butchers, limited cuts tho'.. It's all free range - shot in the bush and immediately refrigerated. Pet food not so much.

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OK, after all this time we should give the Americans the 'real' explanation for bull rails. It dates back to 1963 when we were considering single payer healthcare. There were obvious cost issues and t

Way up thread I think I proposed using powder actuated fasteners. These will drive a 20 penny spike through the flange of a steel I beam. You could jump off the boat, and have 4 cleats down before the

Point of Information, you are describing our parliament but it's an easy mistake to make.

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On 1/28/2019 at 12:47 PM, Norse Horse said:

Horse fly protection for seniors. Attracted by fruity, discount Okanagan wine and the body odour of aged carbon units. The electric tennis rackets are a national sport up here...

You don't see those oxyclean tents heeled over close hauled very often, it looks motley at that angle billowing around

And all of the oxygen would leak out to boot. 

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I've seen a few steel bull rails, they at least don't have as many splinters or attract/grow as much slime. The rusty ones can be pretty hard on your line though.

The video is illustrative of the whole flawed concept (even though she ties the half hitches wrong). With a normal length docking line, you have maybe 20 feet to pass twice around the bull rail and through the hitches. All the time your boat is being blown across the harbor by the 20 knot cross wind. Next, suppose you want to adjust the length of that line. You have to undo the half hitches, unwrap the two turns, sweat it in, rewrap two turns, retie 2 hitches. In about one tenth the time WITH A PROPER CLEAT (yes I've raised my voice there) you could have been done with it. 

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2 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Absolutely. Those round steel rails are even better than wood, since you can slip off them and break an ankle.

 

Thanks for clearing that up for me Ish....

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1 minute ago, DDW said:

I've seen a few steel bull rails, they at least don't have as many splinters or attract/grow as much slime. The rusty ones can be pretty hard on your line though.

The video is illustrative of the whole flawed concept (even though she ties the half hitches wrong). With a normal length docking line, you have maybe 20 feet to pass twice around the bull rail and through the hitches. All the time your boat is being blown across the harbor by the 20 knot cross wind. Next, suppose you want to adjust the length of that line. You have to undo the half hitches, unwrap the two turns, sweat it in, rewrap two turns, retie 2 hitches. In about one tenth the time WITH A PROPER CLEAT (yes I've raised my voice there) you could have been done with it. 

I just pull a bight of the line under the rail and tie the half hitches with that. You don't need to get the whole line around twice. My transient dock lines don't have a spliced loop so I can adjust all the lines on deck cleats, no need to retie the half hitches.

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So you admit the cleats are better......

While the video shows an easy to remember method, it probably isn't the best. I pass a bight over the top of the bull rail and make the bight into a clove hitch, finishing with a half hitch for security when everything is where I want it. That's what you will usually see the full time wharfingers do. Nevertheless this is making the best of a concept flawed to its very core. 

Another "feature" of steel bull rails is when you tie your spring to it, don't expect it to stay put - unless you find an upright to go around, then you might just as well have a cleat there instead?

God Bless the Holy Cleat!!

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18 hours ago, toddster said:

Dunno... I've been chased by white-tailed deer. One year, a herd of them decided that one of my field sites was going to be their mating ground.  Big animals with pointy bits and momentum.  I usually parked the truck so I had a straight shot from the gate to the door. If I was walking along one side of the chain-link fence, they'd be on the other side, watching.  Waiting...

Eventually, I saw a group of them cross the Columbia River and move on to greener pastures.  The big buck literally forced the others into the water with his antlers.  Then he dove in and started swimming, leading the way.  The only problem was, he was about the only one of them strong enough to swim against the current.  The others were all getting washed downstream, behind him.  He got about a hundred yards out before looking back over his shoulder, and you could just see him thinking, "Well fuck!" Then he swam off after the others. "I must hurry and catch up with them, for I am their leader..."  Eventually they all did get across, about a mile downstream, where there was less current.  

One winter, my Mom and Dad had a herd of white tails take up residence in their front yard in Colorado about ten years back. They liked the sunshine and also liked the tender branches of Dad's prized apple and cherry trees. So Dad got out a BB gun and tried to make them leave by shooting them in the ass. He was so engaged when the buck turned around and charged him and he realized a BB gun wasn't much of deterrent to a pissed off deer. He made it through the front door just in the nick of time. I'm sure it would have made a great video for U Tube. The trees never recovered but the herd eventually moved on.

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28 minutes ago, kinardly said:

One winter, my Mom and Dad had a herd of white tails take up residence in their front yard in Colorado about ten years back. They liked the sunshine and also liked the tender branches of Dad's prized apple and cherry trees. So Dad got out a BB gun and tried to make them leave by shooting them in the ass. He was so engaged when the buck turned around and charged him and he realized a BB gun wasn't much of deterrent to a pissed off deer. He made it through the front door just in the nick of time. I'm sure it would have made a great video for U Tube. The trees never recovered but the herd eventually moved on.

I have had success by being a "bigger buck". Running at a buck with a white lawn chair held over my head and making loud growling noises has so far worked well. They turn and run. If one runs at me, I can at least slow it down with the chair. We keep them off the roses with motion-activated sprinklers, only thing we have found to keep them away.

516kJEgLY-L.jpg

 

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3 hours ago, Zonker said:

Bull rails. Part of our Canadian west coast cultural heritage.

They're like poutine to the Quebecois. Not to be questioned...

I had to Google it. Despite having (unfortunately) spent quite a bit of time in Ottawa years ago, I'd never heard of it.

Clearly shows the Quebecois' fondness for English food.

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Poutine is a curious concoction, as obnoxious as bull rails. More curious in Quebec though, is their apparent inability to cook proper pomme frites. Even at the French Fry King. They are supposed to be somewhat crisp, not bend over like a noodle when you hold them. Now granted, made into poutine it makes no difference how they are cooked. This inability to cook french fries is endemic throughout Canada. Undercooked fries and overcooked burgers seem to be mandated by law. 

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10 minutes ago, DDW said:

Poutine is a curious concoction, as obnoxious as bull rails. More curious in Quebec though, is their apparent inability to cook proper pomme frites. Even at the French Fry King. They are supposed to be somewhat crisp, not bend over like a noodle when you hold them. Now granted, made into poutine it makes no difference how they are cooked. This inability to cook french fries is endemic throughout Canada. Undercooked fries and overcooked burgers seem to be mandated by law. 

To be fair, overcooked burgers are universal in the US too. When I order a burger in the US, I always order it medium rare and have "the talk" with the server about what, exactly, medium rare means. Soggy fries are also pretty common, though not nearly as big a problem. 

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1 minute ago, IStream said:

To be fair, overcooked burgers are universal in the US too. When I order a burger in the US, I always order it medium rare and have "the talk" with the server about what, exactly, medium rare means. Soggy fries are also pretty common, though not nearly as big a problem. 

That's because almost nobody parboils the fries before frying them, or they are using frozen potato shreds. Everybody's in a hurry.

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3 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

That's because almost nobody parboils the fries before frying them, or they are using frozen potato shreds. Everybody's in a hurry.

That's it, exactly. At home, it's understandable but restaurants have no excuse since you can buy high quality fries parboiled and frozen from every single supplier. Just add hot oil.

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47 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

That's because almost nobody parboils the fries before frying them, or they are using frozen potato shreds. Everybody's in a hurry.

I believe that's why burgers and fries are called "fast food".

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8 minutes ago, Norse Horse said:

Canada: Moose Escapes from Zoo and Goes on Cow-Raping Rampage

It's true...no, I didn't change the hyperlink this time...;)

“I saw this huge moose shagging one of my cows doggy-style”

Well, what other way was it going to do it?

Missionary position?

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13 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

I had to Google it. Despite having (unfortunately) spent quite a bit of time in Ottawa years ago, I'd never heard of it.

Clearly shows the Quebecois' fondness for English food.

Poutine

Would cottage cheese be considered cheese curds? That poutine sounds like a good dish for a cold winters night. 

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Ughh. Cottage cheese is so not cheese curds.

Cheese curds is cheese curds. They have to be fresh. So fresh that they literally squeek when you bite into them.

They gravy has to be hot enough to partly melt a bit of the cheese curds.

It's a Quebec invention, not English food at all.

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30 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Ughh. Cottage cheese is so not cheese curds.

Cheese curds is cheese curds. They have to be fresh. So fresh that they literally squeek when you bite into them.

They gravy has to be hot enough to partly melt a bit of the cheese curds.

It's a Quebec invention, not English food at all.

Sounds like those would be illegal down here in Texas.

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In poutine the gravy is everything. not canned crappy gravy, home made simmered for hours gravy, extra crispy fries so they stand up to the gravy and real cheese curds. and start with fresh cut fries, par boiled then fried. its an art form when done right, washed done with a bottle of '50' its a religious experience

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5 hours ago, IStream said:

To be fair, overcooked burgers are universal in the US too. When I order a burger in the US, I always order it medium rare and have "the talk" with the server about what, exactly, medium rare means. Soggy fries are also pretty common, though not nearly as big a problem. 

It's been explained to me that in Canada, it is illegal to cook hamburger anything but medium well, to combat mad cow disease. The only problem is, overcooking does not kill mad cow disease. 

Prima restaurant in Langley (which is excellent, including the frys) has this notation on the menu: "Washington State Health Department reminds you that eating raw or undercooked meats can be hazardous, and Primas Restaurant reminds you that they are Delicious!"

Or words to that effect. 

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

Ughh. Cottage cheese is so not cheese curds.

Cheese curds is cheese curds. They have to be fresh. So fresh that they literally squeek when you bite into them.

They gravy has to be hot enough to partly melt a bit of the cheese curds.

It's a Quebec invention, not English food at all.

I doubt it would be regarded as French cuisine in France.

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

Trying to explain the distinction between Quebecois and French to an American is a waste of time so I didn't try.

Best story I ever head about that distinction was a group of people in a Paris restaurant. One was from Quebec so he was ordering for everyone.

The waiter finally said "Please order in English - your French hurts my ears". :D

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In Paris, the waiter will say that about the French from Provence, Brittany, Aquitane - pretty much anywhere except a Parisian accent. 

One main difference between Quebec and France - they don't favor bull rails in France. And they generally know how to cook French Fries, and also know that good meat is served rare. 

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4 hours ago, Zonker said:

Ughh. Cottage cheese is so not cheese curds.

Cheese curds is cheese curds. They have to be fresh. So fresh that they literally squeek when you bite into them.

They gravy has to be hot enough to partly melt a bit of the cheese curds.

It's a Quebec invention, not English food at all.

Soggy chips with gravy on top, sounds English to me!

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5 hours ago, Zonker said:

Ughh. Cottage cheese is so not cheese curds.

Cheese curds is cheese curds. They have to be fresh. So fresh that they literally squeek when you bite into them.

They gravy has to be hot enough to partly melt a bit of the cheese curds.

It's a Quebec invention, not English food at all.

The curds, ideally are eaten same day and never even refrigerated. It would not be uncommon to find fresh cheese curds at the counter of a rural depanneur (that's a Quebec convenience store in case the non cleat challenged are wondering), and find them for sale at the cash checkout as a snack, made that day and squeaky...and yeah the food scene in Montreal and Quebec is its own incredible thing...not English at all.

 

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3 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I can't believe the legs this thread has had.  

Never doubt the power of thread drift.

We had steak au poivre tonight, butter, cream, baby red potatoes, mushrooms and broccoli. Lotsa pepper. It was brilliant.

 

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That sauce is a dream.

But  we brought ants on a bull rail to a praries pot luck,  I wasn't going to post it but here we are.  And there was Bulllrsoia salad too.  Jealous?  They thought it clashed with the bacon fried potato bacon fried potatoes, but who gives a fuck?  

7 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

We had steak au poivre tonight, butter, cream, baby red potatoes, mushrooms and broccoli. Lotsa pepper. It was brilliant.

 

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3 minutes ago, Norse Horse said:

Well, I had Vancouver Island Marmot Burgers cooked on the coals from a Garry Oak fire...with a hand picked sea grass coleslaw.

Did you skin them first? I found they are a little nasty with the fur on, even ground fine.

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10 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

Well, I had Vancouver Island Marmot Burgers cooked on the coals from a Garry Oak fire...with a hand picked sea grass coleslaw.

Did you have both of them? ;)

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On 2/8/2019 at 10:36 PM, Ishmael said:

Did you skin them first? I found they are a little nasty with the fur on, even ground fine.

Oh yeah, not my first marmot...have enough pelts for seat covers for my truck...

On 2/9/2019 at 8:44 AM, SloopJonB said:

Did you have both of them? ;)

The other one is in the freezer.

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Strange news from the land of bull rails... Man in canoe arrested in Portage Inlet after crash on Helmcken Road

No word on whether it was a little man...

This should go in the cougar thread in GA but here it is... Sooke man stalked by cougar hits it with an axe

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Did you ever see the Poitier movie "Shoot to Kill"? A lot of it was filmed here.

Tom Berenger is a guide taking FBI agent Poitier across the mountains after a killer. They are eating a critter Berenger caught and cooked over the campfire. Poitier comments that it's good and asks what it is.

"Marmot - a small rodent"

Poitier looks disgusted.

Berenger says "Yeah, I ate oysters once in San Francisco - tasted like snot" :D

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4 minutes ago, Norse Horse said:

Strange news from the land of bull rails... Man in canoe arrested in Portage Inlet after crash on Helmcken Road

Make your getaway by canoe. :lol:

God they can be hopeless.

When my wife worked on Robson street she experienced a couple of classic "Bank Robberies" by that sort of Dunning Kruger specimen.

One held up the branch and made his getaway in the cab he had waiting outside. The cops had him in 20 minutes - he had the cab take him straight home.

Another mugged a woman at the cash machine and made his escape by bicycle - he got about 100' before the crowd had him.

For non-locals, Robson Street is Vancouver's version of Rodeo Drive.

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My wife worked in a mental health group home in West Vancouver for young adults. Typically drug addiction + schizophrenia.

One day 3 of the guys come home all COVERED in green paint. 

Wife: "what have you been up to...?"

Guy: "painting my brother's bedroom. Got a bit messy.
Uh, we're going up to our rooms and are going to skip dinner. Please don't disturb us"

Cops knock on the door 10 minutes later...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Damn island deer...a young bull male, still waiting for the horn nubs to turn into man horns, has been terrorizing our place. I took down some cedar trees and they love that stuff. He broke through the old fence that night and proceeded to dine on everything on the property. He broke 4 more places in the fence, including 2 spots where he slipped under the mesh, sneaky bugger. I found him under my sundeck taking a nap one afternoon, much to my surprise, after I had repaired the fence. Then I found his last breach, wired it up and opened the gate to escort him off the premises. He was a robust deer with an ass like a football player. I took a snowball and wound up for the pitch. Smack in the cheek. He turned and looked at me like wtf buddy...since I had no plastic lawn chair to similate a much creater beast, I took a stick and rattled it up against the shrubs as grunted and snorted. This worked, I guess not having horns he was sensitive to horned bucks giving him a hard time. After 4 days of break ins I can let the dogs out now without worrying they will get the shit stomped out of them.

The Rock is maybe 60 miles NNE of Fuctifino, in bull rail deer country. There are no predators on the island for some reason, even though it is 6 miles to the mainland. No cougars or wolves, not even coyotes.

https://www.pqbnews.com/news/herd-of-deer-attack-b-c-woman/

 

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On 2/8/2019 at 6:37 PM, SloopJonB said:

Best story I ever head about that distinction was a group of people in a Paris restaurant. One was from Quebec so he was ordering for everyone.

The waiter finally said "Please order in English - your French hurts my ears". :D

this was said to me this week by a native french speaking belgian:...there are so many quebecois here...i can't understand a thing they say.

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3 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

Damn island deer...a young bull male, still waiting for the horn nubs to turn into man horns, has been terrorizing our place. I took down some cedar trees and they love that stuff. He broke through the old fence that night and proceeded to dine on everything on the property. He broke 4 more places in the fence, including 2 spots where he slipped under the mesh, sneaky bugger. I found him under my sundeck taking a nap one afternoon, much to my surprise, after I had repaired the fence. Then I found his last breach, wired it up and opened the gate to escort him off the premises. He was a robust deer with an ass like a football player. I took a snowball and wound up for the pitch. Smack in the cheek. He turned and looked at me like wtf buddy...since I had no plastic lawn chair to similate a much creater beast, I took a stick and rattled it up against the shrubs as grunted and snorted. This worked, I guess not having horns he was sensitive to horned bucks giving him a hard time. After 4 days of break ins I can let the dogs out now without worrying they will get the shit stomped out of them.

The Rock is maybe 60 miles NNE of Fuctifino, in bull rail deer country. There are no predators on the island for some reason, even though it is 6 miles to the mainland. No cougars or wolves, not even coyotes.

https://www.pqbnews.com/news/herd-of-deer-attack-b-c-woman/

 

Yeah you just wait! That buck is gonna come back in a couple of years with his manly rack to challenge you for your territory. You and your lawn chair wont stand a chance!

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1 hour ago, chester said:

this was said to me this week by a native french speaking belgian:...there are so many quebecois here...i can't understand a thing they say.

I think it's much the same as trying to understand a Cajun or Good Ol' Boy speaking "English".

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43 minutes ago, Jabber said:

Yeah you just wait! That buck is gonna come back in a couple of years with his manly rack to challenge you for your territory. You and your lawn chair wont stand a chance!

We've had deer living or at least crashing on our Okanagan property and they've been really mellow. Time of year matters I guess.

One time there was two young bucks - 6 points IIRC - one had a lame foot and the other one was missing half his rack.

We had the idea they had teamed up to make one good one between them.

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1 hour ago, Jabber said:

Yeah you just wait! That buck is gonna come back in a couple of years with his manly rack to challenge you for your territory. You and your lawn chair wont stand a chance!

After some research I have found the Suit of Many Hooks for when he comes back with a 4 point rack this fall after fornicating llamas on the other side of the island.

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11 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

I had a little spike try to challenge me last fall. 

Didn't think to hold up fingers behind my head bunny ears style.

You could try taping a TV antenna to your head. Let us know how that works out.

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The mule deer around here are pretty unimpressed by people.  They’ll be munching away on your young trees and you wave your arms and yell at them.  So they look offended and move over to the next tree.  There’s a rogue Veterinarian a couple of miles away who runs her own private wildlife rehab clinic and half of them are her babies.  

The coyotes are about the same way, until your point your arm and finger-bang at them.  Then they run.  

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7 hours ago, toddster said:

The mule deer around here are pretty unimpressed by people.  They’ll be munching away on your young trees and you wave your arms and yell at them.  So they look offended and move over to the next tree.  There’s a rogue Veterinarian a couple of miles away who runs her own private wildlife rehab clinic and half of them are her babies.  

The coyotes are about the same way, until your point your arm and finger-bang at them.  Then they run.  

We have coyotes in our neighborhood. I started stinging them with a BB gun so they'll learn respect. One was following me while walking the dog, a few years back, and I beaned him with a rock which only made him mad. So for a while I was taking stronger measures.

The deer around here are timid.

FB- Doug

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Almost 40 years of living in NC deer country, without having an automobile collision with one, came to an end two weeks ago. I'm hoping to pick up my car later today. Thank goodness for USAA.

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39 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Almost 40 years of living in NC deer country, without having an automobile collision with one, came to an end two weeks ago. I'm hoping to pick up my car later today. Thank goodness for USAA.

Holy Moly..... Hope you're okay. Did you get to keep the meat?

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58 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Almost 40 years of living in NC deer country, without having an automobile collision with one, came to an end two weeks ago. I'm hoping to pick up my car later today. Thank goodness for USAA.

Owww..... that can hurt. My sympathy......

FB- Doug

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We have deer (about 12 of them), foxes, coyotes, rabbits, bobcats, raccoons, possums, and turkeys living around the house. By far the worst pests are the turkeys. I've taken to chasing them off with the paint ball gun, kind of sporting as they move pretty quick after the first shot and being a paint ball gun you have to kind of range in on them like tracers. However you are rewarded with a hit because from a dead run the hittee will jump in the air and flap its wings several times, confirming the hit. 

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8 hours ago, woahboy said:

Holy Moly..... Hope you're okay. Did you get to keep the meat?

I'm OK. The meat continued running into the night. I didn't see anything the next day. I assume she died later.

8 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Owww..... that can hurt. My sympathy......

FB- Doug

The repairs were about $3K - on a 2016 Impreza that was drivable after the collision.

7 hours ago, Norse Horse said:
Related image

On this rare occasion, I wasn't speeding.

It really happened quickly. I was able to brake a moment before the impact, and the deer was running from my right to left, so her momentum continued. I've heard about deer going through the windshield and injuring the occupants of the car.

I feel fortunate.

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

I'm OK. The meat continued running into the night. I didn't see anything the next day. I assume she died later.

The repairs were about $3K - on a 2016 Impreza that was drivable after the collision.

On this rare occasion, I wasn't speeding.

It really happened quickly. I was able to brake a moment before the impact, and the deer was running from my right to left, so her momentum continued. I've heard about deer going through the windshield and injuring the occupants of the car.

I feel fortunate.

Just kidding deer memes choices were few.:)

My heart stopped once when a chipmunk did it's kamikaze highway crossing zigzag while I was cornering on my street bike doing triple digits. Luck prevailed as it did when I missed a black cow in the middle of the trans canada at Boston Bar, on a dark night once.

I saw his tail, with a patch of white on it flick at the last seconds.

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16 hours ago, Bull City said:

I'm OK. The meat continued running into the night. I didn't see anything the next day. I assume she died later.

The repairs were about $3K - on a 2016 Impreza that was drivable after the collision.

On this rare occasion, I wasn't speeding.

It really happened quickly. I was able to brake a moment before the impact, and the deer was running from my right to left, so her momentum continued. I've heard about deer going through the windshield and injuring the occupants of the car.

I feel fortunate.

Good to hear that you're fine. 

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On 2/8/2019 at 5:00 PM, crankcall said:

In poutine the gravy is everything. not canned crappy gravy, home made simmered for hours gravy, extra crispy fries so they stand up to the gravy and real cheese curds. and start with fresh cut fries, par boiled then fried. its an art form when done right, washed done with a bottle of '50' its a religious experience

Fuck yah "50" is de riguer or "Old V" 

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On 2/20/2019 at 5:22 PM, SloopJonB said:

I think it's much the same as trying to understand a Cajun or Good Ol' Boy speaking "English".

I grew up in Montreal and had a ear for the local "joyale". Ws on a street in Montreal with then to be wife  from French speaking Switzerland. A local asked her a question she had no idea what the guy said. But I understood and with my primitive French gave him direction to the nearest bust stop. Quebecois movies in France of subtitles in French.

I heard a teenager ask in shopping mall "Mama peux tu watchez mon purse?"     

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