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Yeah, I don't know why Oz gets such a bad rap. You can easily outrun (or outwalk) any of our nasties, except for a few ferals such as wild boars, and the salties (can't outswim them either).

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****** WARNING - GRAPHIC PHOTOS OF DEATH IN THIS POST - CONTINUE AT YOUR OWN RISK *****     I was walking the dogs on the beach the other day and stumbled across this body. This is eith

Point of Information, you are describing our parliament but it's an easy mistake to make.

Way up thread I think I proposed using powder actuated fasteners. These will drive a 20 penny spike through the flange of a steel I beam. You could jump off the boat, and have 4 cleats down before the

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1 hour ago, Fleetwood said:

Yeah, I don't know why Oz gets such a bad rap. You can easily outrun (or outwalk) any of our nasties, except for a few ferals such as wild boars, and the salties (can't outswim them either).

The problem is that as you outrun one nasty, you run into another. It's nasties all the way down.

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10 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Except the biggest boat is not going to eat you if you foul it. Except for freighters and shit like that.

They can bite you in 1/2, even if they don't chew and swallow.

image.jpeg.fbf3e63c0908d7f1f749da0120b97ee7.jpeg

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The first time I saw the attached, it was being passed around by fax and photocopy, and was credited to the BC Ministry of Wildlife (which never existed, under that name.) Now, of course, it's all over the internet.

 

 

warning.jpg

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Kermode bears.  A black bear subspecies. Some of them are white. 

Although the term 'Spirit Bear' is easily centuries older than Kermode, I'm sure there weren't many white people using it before the 90s.  Then eco tourism began competing with guided hunting.  Its been a very positive thing for the areas these bears are found. 

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Down here in California (that would be the Bear Flag State) the black bears come in shades of brown that can get pretty light, though I've never seen one as light as the bear we saw on POW. I've gotten quite a good look at some down here, defending my food while backpacking in the Sierra. That's how I know they smell really bad. Bad breath too. 

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16 hours ago, DDW said:

Down here in California (that would be the Bear Flag State) the black bears come in shades of brown that can get pretty light, though I've never seen one as light as the bear we saw on POW. I've gotten quite a good look at some down here, defending my food while backpacking in the Sierra. That's how I know they smell really bad. Bad breath too. 

I’m getting the feeling that there’s a pretty good story there.....

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In one particular incident, we hung our food on a tree branch as was the practice, then for good measure slept directly underneath. Awoke a couple of times with bears only two feet away, yelled at them to go away. In the morning, sleeping bag surrounded by bear tracks and stuff sack with food torn, indicating they had somehow gotten to it. In retrospect, this was probably not my very best decision making. Another incident a bear ran into camp, grabbed an entire backpack and made a run for it - smash and grab. We had to chase it down to retrieve and the pack reeked of bear for months. Another time my brother and I (15 and 13 years old at the time) were about 20 miles from the trailhead outbound when a bear got all of our food. Had to hike out with no food, then call mom with the $1 we had between us to drive 5 hours to rescue us. 

I've had a few run ins with bears in the back country. Nowadays, you are required to get a wilderness permit and carry a bear proof container to store food. But California bears are not particularly aggressive, very few actual incidents of harm from them to persons (though they can peel a car door or trunk open as if it were paper). The California grizzly is long extinct. The Canadian and Alaskan bears seem a little more threatening. We had a run in with one at the Anan bear observatory a couple of years ago, walking along the path which is a boardwalk through dense rain forest, came around a corner and face to face with a black bear and two cubs. Backed up quickly and now there was a standoff: she wanted the path to go upstream, we wanted the path to go downstream back to the dinghy. Eventually we prevailed, she and the cubs detoured 20' off the path and around. 

Suggested reading is John McPhee's "A textbook Place for Bears" which is in his Table of Contents collection. Apparently east coast black bears are the most cuddly of all. 

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 The Canadian and Alaskan bears seem a little more threatening.

If you mean grizz, they are a whole lot more threatening. Probably the most dangerous wildlife we have other than starving juvenile cougars.

Black bears not so much except mothers with cubs.

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5 hours ago, DDW said:

... In retrospect, this was probably not my very best decision making. ... 

Um, DDW, you've owned multiple boats.  Your good judgment clearly disappeared many years ago. :D

 

Personally, I've spend a LOT of time in bear country, for fun and for work (I'm a biologist ... well, at least I was a biologist until I became a manager, at which time I stopped doing any 'real' work ;)).  I've had many, many close encounters.  But I've never had a 'problem' with a bear.  Maybe this is as much luck as it is situational-awareness.

It seems that Grizzly bears have a reputation as slavering demons.  But it also seems that 'bad' encounters with Grizzly bears are: i) extremely rare; ii) most typically happen when the bear (or on behalf of her cubs) feels threatened ... usually because they are taken by surprise); and iii) for the latter, result in an attack, but then typically the bear leaves.  Think of the ecology behind this.  Grizzly bears are creatures mainly of open areas. There is nowhere for them to hide or escape.  So in order to survive they need to aggressively protect themselves when threatened. 

One other even less common scenario is that you get too near their prey cache (for example, a dead elk or moose). One of my staff once came across an odd-looking pile of dirt and twigs.  Turns out it was a dead moose.  They quietly (lest they wake the bear having an after-lunch siesta) and quickly got the heck out of there.  Again, think in ecological terms.  Such rich food is likely in short supply and hard to get in open areas (or even in closed canopies, for that matter).  So a Grizzly will protect it.

Here is an interesting side anecdote for you.  When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone, there was a concern that the Grizzly bears would have less meat to eat.  But it turns out that the opposite is the case.  Grizzly are apparently not particularly good at capturing live elk.  But wolves are (relatively) great at this capture.  So the wolves will run-down and kill the elk.  Then the Grizzlies will arrive to steal the kill.

As has also been noted by several people, in my experience black bears are generally pretty easy to be around.  They tend to give their distance.

On 4/29/2021 at 6:10 PM, Zonker said:

... My wife did a hike with a black bear following her ...

But Zonker, your wife's experience of being followed by a black bear WOULD worry me.  Back when I worked for Parks Canada, one of our wildlife specialists opened my eyes about the behaviour specifically of black bears.  Sure, when you first encounter a black bear, by all means step aside in order to let it pass.  Most times that is quite sufficient, as you noted.  BUT if a black bear starts to follow you, then recognize that its mind-set has likely just changed in a very bad way.  It is likely now assessing whether you are suitable prey.  

How to respond to such (albeit rare) black bear encounters? Hmm, good question; I forget all of what my specialist had to say on that matter. And to be clear, I'm not an expert on bear behaviour; I'm just someone with a lot of exposure to the topic (and now I've started to sound like a lawyer; zeech! :rolleyes:). What I do recall from my specialist was something along the line of ‘make yourself into a threat, rather than a prey’.  Probably I would start to make myself sound meaner (loud, aggressive swear words, perhaps? … You’re a sailor, so this should be easy :D).  To state the obvious, do NOT scamper or run away; to do so is pure prey-behaviour.  Face the bear and try to look bigger (hold your pack above your head, rather than your camera in front of your face? Maybe turn side-ways, so that your too-fat belly is more prominent?? ;)).  Certainly I do remember my specialist saying that if a black bear does attack after 'stalking’ you, then 'fight for your life'.  This is all a much different technique than the stereotypical response to a threatened grizzly bear of 'curl up and play dead'.

Of course there are no 'absolutes' in any of this.  To bastardize a saying from one of my old statistics books: 'You can control for all of the variables; but in the end, nature (including bears) will do as it damned-well pleases'. :ph34r:
 

And to get back on the thread's true topic, the trick is to make sure that you tie all bears to bull-rails.  DDW's dreaded splinters will make sure that they never escape from those.  Perhaps we need to rename them 'bear-rails'?  And perhaps instead of bear-bells and bear-spray, we should all attach a section of dreaded bear-rail to our arms? ;)

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2 hours ago, J the landlocked dreamer said:

  

Um, DDW, you've owned multiple boats.  Your good judgment clearly disappeared many years ago. :D

Worse, I own two now. Fortunately neither tied to bull rails at this moment. 

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3 hours ago, DDW said:

Worse, I own two now. Fortunately neither tied to bull rails at this moment. 

I hope you have arranged for around the clock dockside surveillance....shame to lose two boats to inadequate dock equipment

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You mean inadequate like this? Since mid 19th century, high stress structures are inevitably built of metal, not wood, and for good reason.

Uo2U26y.jpg

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3 minutes ago, DDW said:

You mean inadequate like this? Since mid 19th century, high stress structures are inevitably built of metal, not wood, and for good reason.

Uo2U26y.jpg

Since forever, high-stress structures (which this is not) are replaced when they get corroded or rotten.

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10 minutes ago, DDW said:

Well, the stress exceeded the strength in this case, eh?

Which is why we don't make studs out of rolled-up wet newspapers or aged and rotten 2X4's.

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Or ships out of cardboard, lest the front fall off?

It is also the reason I used steel for the deck cleats on my boats, rather than wood. Even in Canada, they go that far. :)

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On 5/1/2021 at 2:26 PM, J the landlocked dreamer said:

  

Um, DDW, you've owned multiple boats.  Your good judgment clearly disappeared many years ago. :D

 

Personally, I've spend a LOT of time in bear country, for fun and for work (I'm a biologist ... well, at least I was a biologist until I became a manager, at which time I stopped doing any 'real' work ;)).  I've had many, many close encounters.  But I've never had a 'problem' with a bear.  Maybe this is as much luck as it is situational-awareness.

It seems that Grizzly bears have a reputation as slavering demons.  But it also seems that 'bad' encounters with Grizzly bears are: i) extremely rare; ii) most typically happen when the bear (or on behalf of her cubs) feels threatened ... usually because they are taken by surprise); and iii) for the latter, result in an attack, but then typically the bear leaves.  Think of the ecology behind this.  Grizzly bears are creatures mainly of open areas. There is nowhere for them to hide or escape.  So in order to survive they need to aggressively protect themselves when threatened. 

One other even less common scenario is that you get too near their prey cache (for example, a dead elk or moose). One of my staff once came across an odd-looking pile of dirt and twigs.  Turns out it was a dead moose.  They quietly (lest they wake the bear having an after-lunch siesta) and quickly got the heck out of there.  Again, think in ecological terms.  Such rich food is likely in short supply and hard to get in open areas (or even in closed canopies, for that matter).  So a Grizzly will protect it.

Here is an interesting side anecdote for you.  When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone, there was a concern that the Grizzly bears would have less meat to eat.  But it turns out that the opposite is the case.  Grizzly are apparently not particularly good at capturing live elk.  But wolves are (relatively) great at this capture.  So the wolves will run-down and kill the elk.  Then the Grizzlies will arrive to steal the kill.

As has also been noted by several people, in my experience black bears are generally pretty easy to be around.  They tend to give their distance.

But Zonker, your wife's experience of being followed by a black bear WOULD worry me.  Back when I worked for Parks Canada, one of our wildlife specialists opened my eyes about the behaviour specifically of black bears.  Sure, when you first encounter a black bear, by all means step aside in order to let it pass.  Most times that is quite sufficient, as you noted.  BUT if a black bear starts to follow you, then recognize that its mind-set has likely just changed in a very bad way.  It is likely now assessing whether you are suitable prey.  

How to respond to such (albeit rare) black bear encounters? Hmm, good question; I forget all of what my specialist had to say on that matter. And to be clear, I'm not an expert on bear behaviour; I'm just someone with a lot of exposure to the topic (and now I've started to sound like a lawyer; zeech! :rolleyes:). What I do recall from my specialist was something along the line of ‘make yourself into a threat, rather than a prey’.  Probably I would start to make myself sound meaner (loud, aggressive swear words, perhaps? … You’re a sailor, so this should be easy :D).  To state the obvious, do NOT scamper or run away; to do so is pure prey-behaviour.  Face the bear and try to look bigger (hold your pack above your head, rather than your camera in front of your face? Maybe turn side-ways, so that your too-fat belly is more prominent?? ;)).  Certainly I do remember my specialist saying that if a black bear does attack after 'stalking’ you, then 'fight for your life'.  This is all a much different technique than the stereotypical response to a threatened grizzly bear of 'curl up and play dead'.

Of course there are no 'absolutes' in any of this.  To bastardize a saying from one of my old statistics books: 'You can control for all of the variables; but in the end, nature (including bears) will do as it damned-well pleases'. :ph34r:
 

And to get back on the thread's true topic, the trick is to make sure that you tie all bears to bull-rails.  DDW's dreaded splinters will make sure that they never escape from those.  Perhaps we need to rename them 'bear-rails'?  And perhaps instead of bear-bells and bear-spray, we should all attach a section of dreaded bear-rail to our arms? ;)

When my wife and I were on honeymoon we tented in a remote park in BC where bears were common.   We attended the evening talk by the naturalist whose topic was how to survive a bear encounter.

The gist of it was to find a large tree if possible, and get on the other side of it from the bear.  According to the talk, bears suck at corners, and you can just play dodge 'em with the bear around the tree until it decides to leave.  

Never had the pleasure of trying this....

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7 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

Wow, that talk sounds like absolute BS.

It all depends on how well it works with the bear. Most of the ones I met didn't speak English.

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5 hours ago, Autonomous said:

Count your blessings. Bullrails is why we don't have any goddamned poisonous sneks here.

Oz of course has everything; bullrails, cleats and poisonous snakes.

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3 hours ago, Ishmael said:

It all depends on how well it works with the bear. Most of the ones I met didn't speak English.

I don't want no French squeeking frog bear, Fuckers don't tip.

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7 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

Oz of course has everything; bullrails, cleats and poisonous snakes everything.

FTFY

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Does "Bear Spray" work on an aggressive grizzly bear or is that like kicking it in the shin?

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16 hours ago, Rain Man said:

According to the talk, bears suck at corners

I would guess that it applies only to American bears, European bears corner better.

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17 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Does "Bear Spray" work on an aggressive grizzly bear or is that like kicking it in the shin?

If it's aggressive, you're fucked no matter what you spray at it.

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4 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Does "Bear Spray" work on an aggressive grizzly bear or is that like kicking it in the shin?

Sorry to bring a note of seriousness to a thread of levity, but the answer to your question is yes, with qualifications.

Bear spray is pretty debilitating to any living thing on the receiving end, so if used properly, it is effective. But it must be used at close quarters, and wind is a problem, as is a heart rate a couple orders of magnitude above normal. How close? There is a story of one hiker who came around a corner, saw a grizzly sow with cubs, started backing away, and tripped. The bear charged and sank her teeth into the heel of the hiker's boot. He blasted her, and she took off. So that's an effective range.

The problem with firearms is they tend to make the people carrying them careless. There was a case in the Rockies about 15 years ago where three hunters, all well armed, were killed by a grizzly while they were dressing an elk they had shot. Gun shots, rather than "little, noisy bells," are a dinner bell for a bear.

This time of year, I have black bear encounters pretty much every week. I've had two close grizzly encounters in my life. One was as Zonker explained above: the bear was fishing and couldn't care less about us. The other was the result of my own stupidity. I got out alive, and there is now a grizzly out there habituated to PB&J sandwiches. 

The best defence is to be aware.

 

 

 

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There are stories of lucky fuckers landing a hard punch square in the bear's nose as they are being crushed/torn to bits - and the bear running away.

Maybe more like a hard flailing.  Don't want to find out.

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Then you have "bear bangers".  Some kind of firecracker, probably like a seal bomb (I haven't seen either).  I know one guy working in the Yukon (forestry)who thought a grizzly was getting a little too close to their work and fired one off.  It worked.  Too bad it went off behind the bear - who charged right through the site like a runaway dump truck.  Said you could feel it in your feet.

Same guy and another were doing some kind of survey from A to B through the bush.  Buddy sees a black bear and fires off a banger - bear heads in the other guys direction - who fires off his own bear banger, and sends it back the way it came.  The story goes that it happened three times each direction.  They called it "bear pong"

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On 4/30/2021 at 5:50 AM, Fleetwood said:

Yeah, I don't know why Oz gets such a bad rap. You can easily outrun (or outwalk) any of our nasties, except for a few ferals such as wild boars, and the salties (can't outswim them either).

Dude, I had two fucking terrifying encounters with snakes there and riding a bike is like being in the center of a dart board. The tearm "deadly treadly" became clear. 

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20 minutes ago, Russell Brown said:

Dude, I had two fucking terrifying encounters with snakes there and riding a bike is like being in the center of a dart board. The tearm "deadly treadly" became clear. 

We get browns in the garden often enough, if you back off and walk around them they'll leave you alone. Wouldn't try riding a bike straight at them tho', they can get angry.....

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3 hours ago, mcmurdo said:

The bear charged and sank her teeth into the heel of the hiker's boot. He blasted her, and she took off. So that's an effective range.

So that's the directions on the can? Wait till you feel the whites of their teeth?

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3 hours ago, Ishmael said:

That would weird me out.

Yes - they got lazy/careless (maybe lucky)  12 g shotty was on the ground 1/2 way to bear. I'd bet they were trying to figure their speeds & odds on going for it.

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Rattlesnakes are pretty easy to get along with if you follow a few simple rules.  Just don’t step on them when they’re napping.  If they coil up and rattle, leave them alone.  They won’t back down but they won’t attack, either.   I have a non-aggression pact with a couple of big females who live under my pump-houses.  I make a point of stomping around and making noise as I approach, and they go down in their holes until I’m done.  Sometimes in the summer, I’ll look down and see a rattler enjoying the shade of my shadow.  If I move, he moves too.  Usually I grab a rake and toss him into the bushes.  I once rented an apartment at the edge of town.  Apparently my bristly welcome mat was the best place to catch the dawn sunshine.  I’d open the door, briefcase in hand, and step out to my First Real Job, and have to reverse all the muscles in my body to avoid stepping on the snake basking on the mat.  I’d reach for the broom to shoo him off and he’d just go.  Just as long as he was there when the Jehovah’s Witnesses came around...  Last fall, I had a close encounter with a young male. I was bent over in pump house #3, working on a pressure switch, and by the time I noticed him, he’d come up between my legs, lifted his head up to look at what I was doing... “What’s up, boss?”  I levitated up a couple of feet and psycho-kinetically levitated out the door...  He pulled the same trick on my brother last week and sadly ended up as dinner.  Wednesday! I took the dog for a hike and he lunged into the bushes... I figured he was going for a mouse.  Came back with a rattler by the tail!  I yanked back on the leash and he dropped it - snake just boogied off into the bushes.  Dog used up one of his nine lives.  Didn’t seem to learn anything from it either.  Vet says they have a rattlesnake vaccine now... better look into it.

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As you suggest, one learns to live with them. Snakes are protected in Oz (native animals) so chopping their heads off is frowned upon. (Didn't stop me when the kids were little tho'.)

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  • 1 month later...

The Pandemic is spreading. 

I refer not to Covid 19, which is after all preventable now. Rather the disease that is Bull Rails.

I'm on a short cruise into the southern reaches of Puget Sound, have been down there only briefly in Anomaly, and with the North closed off by that other pandemic we are left slumming it south in the motorboat. 

First stop Deception Pass park - Bull Rails. Got my first bull rail splinters of the season. This might have happened in Roche Harbor on the bull cleats (or whatever they are) but somehow I avoided it. 

Next: Langley - Bull Rails. Then Bell Harbor - Bull Rails, though these were steel so no splinters. Then Blake Island - Bull Rails, followed by Gig Harbor - Bull Rails, then Eagle Island with a park service mooring ball (what were they thinking when they designed these?*), Olympia - Bull Rails, in this case broken and rotted at one dock and nasty splintery huge things at the other - but at least there they put some cleats on top of the rails. Good thing because the splinters being shed were the size of ceremonial daggers.

This scourge is spreading south like Blood Rust. I think we need a wall built south of the Sound to keep the pestilence to the north. 

 

*The mooring balls used by the Washington State park system have an oval ring hidden down in a deep recess on the top of the buoy, no pennant. Pretty easy to grab with your hands from a kayak I guess, but how do you do that from 6' up on a deck? With a 3.5 knot tide running? Even with the fancy Hook & Moor, very hard to snag the ring down in the hole. Back east were they have tons of moorings they have figured out how to do this and make it easy. 

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On 5/3/2021 at 10:06 PM, zenmasterfred said:

Fuki'n snakes, give me grizzly anytime.  On our little island the biggest predators are Eagles and the occasional randy dog.

I've heard you get the occasional swimming bear.

Or was it a different island?

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2 hours ago, DDW said:

The Pandemic is spreading. 

I refer not to Covid 19, which is after all preventable now. Rather the disease that is Bull Rails.

I'm on a short cruise into the southern reaches of Puget Sound, have been down there only briefly in Anomaly, and with the North closed off by that other pandemic we are left slumming it south in the motorboat. 

First stop Deception Pass park - Bull Rails. Got my first bull rail splinters of the season. This might have happened in Roche Harbor on the bull cleats (or whatever they are) but somehow I avoided it. 

Next: Langley - Bull Rails. Then Bell Harbor - Bull Rails, though these were steel so no splinters. Then Blake Island - Bull Rails, followed by Gig Harbor - Bull Rails, then Eagle Island with a park service mooring ball (what were they thinking when they designed these?*), Olympia - Bull Rails, in this case broken and rotted at one dock and nasty splintery huge things at the other - but at least there they put some cleats on top of the rails. Good thing because the splinters being shed were the size of ceremonial daggers.

This scourge is spreading south like Blood Rust. I think we need a wall built south of the Sound to keep the pestilence to the north. 

 

*The mooring balls used by the Washington State park system have an oval ring hidden down in a deep recess on the top of the buoy, no pennant. Pretty easy to grab with your hands from a kayak I guess, but how do you do that from 6' up on a deck? With a 3.5 knot tide running? Even with the fancy Hook & Moor, very hard to snag the ring down in the hole. Back east were they have tons of moorings they have figured out how to do this and make it easy. 

victory.

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6 hours ago, Autonomous said:

I've heard you get the occasional swimming bear.

Or was it a different island?

Yup, poor little bugger was just looking to let off some teenage steam and couldn't find a girlfriend.  His multiple islands in the Juans.

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On 6/10/2021 at 9:57 PM, zenmasterfred said:

Yup, poor little bugger was just looking to let off some teenage steam and couldn't find a girlfriend.  His multiple islands in the Juans.

I've seen 'em swimming places like Alberni Inlet but not the Salish Sea.

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Some hope: At Jarrell Cove (WA) State Park, the docks have very recently been replaced with new. Other parks apparently scheduled for this eventually. Nice cast steel cleats every 6 feet, and not a bull rail in sight. Say Hallelujah! We are SAVED!

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One word:

Galvanized.

But another thing has captured my razor sharp attention. Sailboats seem to prefer white or at least light colored docking lines. Power boats seem to favor black lines. Why?

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Black is pretty popular on both here - it's what I have.

Black lines is cheating.  They deprives you of the emotional pain of watching  expensive, shiny white lines turn into heavily stained grey.

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But, like the toothbrush with the built in aging color tint to tell you that it is time to replace, white lines do the same. When the get too ugly you get new ones. I will admit that Bull Rail Slime has less of a staining effect on black lines than white. Maybe that is why they are popular in Sloop's corner of the world, populated as it is by that Pestilence. Where I'm from, it is pretty rare to see black lines on a sailboat.

My trawler, when I bought it, had the trifecta: black docking lines, black fenders, black fender pendants. 

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Heading to the South Sound from the very North Sound in July w/ our little YC.  Probably only us and one other sailboat, the rest power boats that drive as fast as they can to the next dock and drink.  I have solved that conundrum, I drink on the way at a safe and sane speed.  Will skip the multiple days at the docks and re-visit some lovely anchorages between the Juans and Olympia.

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1 hour ago, zenmasterfred said:

Heading to the South Sound from the very North Sound in July w/ our little YC.  Probably only us and one other sailboat, the rest power boats that drive as fast as they can to the next dock and drink.  I have solved that conundrum, I drink on the way at a safe and sane speed.  Will skip the multiple days at the docks and re-visit some lovely anchorages between the Juans and Olympia.

From down south... with both LaPush and Neah Bay closed, only people who actually sail are gonna get up there this summer.

 

Or those who carry a shitload of gas cans.  

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Once in the Sound, the people that actually sail to get somewhere are rarer than tits on a fish. Saiing you see, requires wind. So far in we are in the south Sound approaching 3 weeks and there was but one day when it might have been possible to sail from origin to destination. 2 more days one might have been able to sail for 1/4 or 1/3 of the distance. The rest approaching dead calm. Your VMG with a 4 knot headwind against a 4.5 knot current is poor on most sailboats. Which is why they call them "trawlers with masts" up here, and what led us to buy the trawler with the black dock lines: right tool for the job. 

Tying them to bull rails is still an exercise in repugnance: the wrong tool for the job. 

From the Narrows south, we have seen a surprising number of human powered craft: small sailboats with pedals, sculling oars, or sweeps, several pure micro cruising rowboats or pedal boats, along with the usual kayaks. One couple had fully packed SUPs, and seemed to be doing about the same miles/day as we were (saw them over a couple of days). 

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