Jump to content

Ultime / G-Class Development


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 1.2k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Nice interview from Tip & Shaft. Francois is honest about the aspects that need improvement. FRANÇOIS GABART: "SVR LAZARTIGUE HAS A HUGE DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL" A little over a month afte

Nice pic :

https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/bateau/ultim/gitana-quitte-la-classe-ultim-pour-conserver-sa-liberte-les-explications-du-patron-du-team-ead5661e-3d23-11ea-8ffc-11604c1fdc1f Longer interv

Posted Images

  • 3 weeks later...

Some construction pics of Gabart's tri in the last voiles&voiliers :

capture-decc81cran-2021-06-17-acc80-21.1

capture-decc81cran-2021-06-17-acc80-21.1

 

capture-decc81cran-2021-06-17-acc80-21.1

capture-decc81cran-2021-06-17-acc80-21.1

Top left one on the third page is quite impressive : just a few holes to get your head out !

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, yl75 said:

Top left one on the third page is quite impressive : just a few holes to get your head out !

I hadn't noticed this from the renderings in the PR release - looks like a Hugo Boss style fully enclosued approach - on the renderings there appears to be a forward looking windscreen just aft of the mast base plus those trimming capsules in the roof. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, NZK said:

I hadn't noticed this from the renderings in the PR release - looks like a Hugo Boss style fully enclosued approach - on the renderings there appears to be a forward looking windscreen just aft of the mast base plus those trimming capsules in the roof. 

voici-le-m101-de-francois-gabart-constru

Don't see that windscreen, the front arm ?

But on that rendering I get the impression that the "cockpit/center of the rear arm" could have been lowered a bit.

A pic from the inside :

1452027872_Capturedecran2021-06-19a07_04_32.thumb.png.17a0dbbccb1a6fb4529f5c848da8fab4.png

Will be quite a work out to go up on deck !

For Alex the key reasons were protection and center of gravity/weight considerations, here I think it's protection but mostly aerodynamics considerations, major modifications on Gitana also have been aero related.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, yl75 said:

Don't see that windscreen, the front arm ?

I was referring to the instagram pic from your post at the top of this page, it looks like thers a dark windscreen just aft of the mast in that colourised image.

Totally agree it's likely primarily aero focussed design, most of the ultimes seem to be heavily optimising the aero packages so any new boats should be ahead of the curve with more integration. Except Sodebo where Colville still sticks his head out of the sunroof like a labrador out of a car window.....

It looks like Gabart's new boat has the cockpit lowered into the main hull so it's flush between the fore and aft beams, that's a big reduction in drag and should allow some very good end-plating of the mainsail.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, NZK said:

 

It looks like Gabart's new boat has the cockpit lowered into the main hull so it's flush between the fore and aft beams, that's a big reduction in drag and should allow some very good end-plating of the mainsail.

Indeed they should get a good end plate effect, but it looks to me they could have done more in lowering the cockpit, but I'm sure there are other considerations such as lines routing, with the tensions on these things, it probaly brings some serious constraints.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
2 hours ago, jb5 said:

Gitana training UFO incident. Main rudder gone and central hull damage. Sounds pretty major. Back home for repairs. 

http://www.gitana-team.com/en/article.aspx?id=0&type=actu

I don't get it. 

How do they keep designing these things WITHOUT expecting to hit stuff. Yes they may be heavier, slightly slower, etc etc 

But F1 cars could also be much faster, but you know, safety and cost...

Also PSA, let's stop throwing our trash out everywhere -_-

Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of Ultimes, The MOD 70 Powerplay managed to beat IDEC and Actual for the line honours in the "Round The Island" (round Isle of Wight) race, I guess for an Ultime this is "short course" racing and not their forte?

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Floating Duck said:

I don't get it. 

How do they keep designing these things WITHOUT expecting to hit stuff. Yes they may be heavier, slightly slower, etc etc 

But F1 cars could also be much faster, but you know, safety and cost...

Also PSA, let's stop throwing our trash out everywhere -_-

4 knot shit boxes suffer structural damage running into things, you expect them to build up a 40 knot tri to withstand impacts? If anything you want to build the structures sacrificial so the boat survives to sail another day.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Supposedly live on Instagram right now with hangar door opening at 10AM (CET) and they put the boat in the water at 12PM but couldn't find any video. They have short bits on Instagram but nothing like a live video (except if the first part is over already, will have another look in 1h30).

Here is the link to their page if anyone is interested:
https://www.instagram.com/trimaransvrlazartigue/channel/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just pulled this from the Ultimboat instagram page. Those fighter plane windscreen cowlings are pretty rad - there does also appear to be a wheel and cockpit arrangement built into the aft beam. Guessing this is for inshore and light weather then they retreat into the main hull once they get launched..?

lzr.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure how I feel about the bubbles over the "cockpit". If they were in a bow up attitude to any degree I feel like they'd have zero viz forward. I'm guessing cameras. Lots of cameras.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Somewhere on Instagram there was brief video of the mast and boom up and the boom looks to be very much in between and below the top of the two bubbles to be proper deck sweeper.  That gives you some idea of how much travel they expect the main to have.  I wonder how you dump the main sheet?

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, NZK said:

 Guessing this is for inshore and light weather then they retreat into the main hull once they get launched..?

lzr.JPG

Docking and hospitality.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Foiling Optimist said:

Somewhere on Instagram there was brief video of the mast and boom up and the boom looks to be very much in between and below the top of the two bubbles to be proper deck sweeper.  That gives you some idea of how much travel they expect the main to have.  I wonder how you dump the main sheet?

image.thumb.png.b9c65b0a081f3a9e7b852fb34530d145.png

Only saw this one and difficult to judge the height of the boom but it looks to be in between the cockpits indeed. Navigation angle isn't a big surprise but it raises a few question about safety. Surely you might want more travel than that in some situation in the South Pacific.

About the view forward, not sure they have much at all given the forward fairing.

Can't wait to see the first sailing video as it should give another perspective...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha! I found it. Go to the Instagram feed of @matthieutordeur who is evidently an adventurer and friend of Gabart's. The video of the boom installation is on his Instagram Stories, so will be gone in hours, but I did get a screen cap.  Watching it again, it's more probable that the boom is low merely because they haven't raised it into position yet. It's super low over the exterior helm too.  Maybe the bubbles are mostly to look at the sails as they don't look like they are high enough to see forward. 

 

SVR Boom.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like they have updated the "cockpit" set up quite a bit compared to the 3d render above.

Typically the "roof" looks lower at the rear (in fact maybe not the case).

In below vid Gabart mentions HB indirectly for the cockpit set up (not naming him), at 2:00 :

 

The automatic translated subtitles seem to work more or less.

 

some other links :

https://www.20minutes.fr/sport/3089015-20210722-bretagne-francois-gabart-met-eau-nouveau-trimaran-geant

https://www.lequipe.fr/Voile/Actualites/Mise-a-l-eau-du-trimaran-svr-lazartigue-de-francois-gabart/1272115

https://www.bateaux.com/article/37596/francois-gabart-met-a-l-eau-un-nouveau-trimaran-pour-voler-autour-du-monde

https://www.letelegramme.fr/finistere/concarneau/a-concarneau-francois-gabart-devoile-son-nouveau-geant-des-mers-svr-lazartigue-22-07-2021-12795600.php

 

Another one with 11min vid of the launch :

https://www.courseaularge.com/ultime-mise-a-leau-du-trimaran-svr-lazartigue-de-francois-gabart.html

Not sure it plays completely (on my phone, damn adverts everywhere....) 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

In below link Gabart mentions the tri having an electric motor and generator. 

https://www.ouest-france.fr/sport/voile/concarneau-francois-gabart-tres-fier-et-tres-heureux-eca19f50-eaf4-11eb-83c8-e2dbdb6e43f2

Also that the next boat to come out of mer concept yard is a cruising cat with electric motors, will try to know more about that one..

 

In fact it's this thing I guess :

image.thumb.png.ccd94c249adf19028a045fd4126db9a6.png

So not a cruising cat

But announcing 90nm autonomy with 8 people on board at 22 knts, not bad! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tip & Shaft:

GABART: "SAVING 5 TO 10 DAYS ON A ROUND-THE-WORLD PASSAGE IS DEFINITELY POSSIBLE"

SVR Lazartigue, François Gabart’s new Ultim, was launched yesterday in Concarneau in blazing sunshine in front of a large crowd. Born as M101 the new giant was known for a long time only by this code name after the withdrawal of its initial sponsor. The VPLP design is the result of 150,000 hours of work and is characterised by its strong design choices. It is, in essence, a radical but very carefully conceived concept, just like its skipper who was very involved in every stage of the design. Here is our take on this newest generation Ultim.

It was actually back in June 2017, just before The Bridge race started that François Gabart who was then skippering the two year old Macif (which was M100 and is now Actual Ultim 3) started the first drafts of M101. Logically he went to VPLP who had designed M100, but also to Guillaume Verdier, designer of the freshly launched Maxi Edmond de Rothschild who then did the Imoca Apivia, which is project managed by Garbart’s MerConcept.

In this kind of project, you don't decide things on a sketch. Rather we choose the overall approach, the investment that everyone is able to bring to the table,” says the skipper, Gabart, who decided to continue his collaboration with VPLP: “They have brought in a bunch of other players, such as Gsea design for the structure, North Sails for the aero as well as Artemis Technologies [which spun off out of the Swedish America’s Cup programme Artemis Racing, Editor's note]. “All of this environment was vital,” specifies Antoine Gautier, director of studies at MerConcept, who is in charge of the design team.

Catamaran or trimaran ?

At this early point, Macif only gave the green light for preliminary studies. François Gabart was yet to set his round the world record and no one really knew if a multihull can fly on such a round the world course. However, the instruction was to explore all the possibilities, including that of a catamaran. "Catamaran or tri, we often see it in as binary choice but there are a lot of intermediate stages in between and it is true that a catamaran with a central pod, Decision or TF 35 style, was tempting," explains Gabart.

In the end, the cat idea was abandoned “particularly for security reasons,” explains Xavier Guilbaud, who is project manager at VPLP: “It's safer to have the main volume in the middle in which to take refuge. And while the catamaran can be very fast when it flies, it needs to always be at 100%. As soon as you are any kind of degraded mode you have both hulls in the water.

And so in February 2018, on the strength of his solo round-the-world record of 42 days, François Gabart got the green light from Macif to launch the M101 project properly. The construction of the trimaran started, the central hull at Multiplast, floats, foils, fore and aft arms at CDK Technologies, assembly and integration at MerConcept.

Three years later, the result is obvious, very slender with very fine bowed floats - at least at what the Ultim rule allows (220% of the displacement) - powerful with its rigging set up, the new SVR Lazartigue poses an obvious first question, why the lack of a cockpit, which is really down in the lower part of the main, central hull, under the two small bubbles, like a fighter plane.

The abiding obsession
with the aero

The lack of a coachroof and deckhouse reflects her skipper's obsession with aerodynamics. “It was clearly the area where we could make the most gains,” says Antoine Gautier. “The most important thing was to remove the coachroof and cabin. François is a free thinker and tends to believes the guy should adapt to the needs of the machine!" And so, like in the newest IMOCAs how to steer the Ultim without having to be outside? 

We have two small kart type steering wheels which hydraulically control the rudders which are mechanically linked to one another,” Gabart explains bluntly. A crew member will be stationed outside at the back - where there is still a steering wheel – ready to take over if required! 

Gabart, the SVR Lazartigue skipper defends his option: “In the end, it is not very different from what exists in IMOCA where you cannot see anything under the coachroof- not to mention the configuration of Hugo Boss. In a glider which is nevertheless very delicate and precise to handle, the pilot is also locked inside. Solo anyway there is such a fine line between actually steering and piloting. It often comes down to tapping on the controls while managing the mode and trajectory.

Beyond the gains in mass and centre of gravity, the main benefit of this option lies in the lowering of the actual sail plan. On board SVR Lazartigue, the mainsheet track even curved downwards in the center so that block to block the boom can be at actual deck level. “We have the same basic sail plan as on Banque Populaire XI, but we have it positioned 1.20 meters lower,” explains Xavier Guilbaud.
 
Heavier than M100 lighter
than Banque Populaire XI

A comparison between Gabart’s new SVR Lazartigue and the new Banque Populaire XI which was launched three months earlier and designed by the same architects is required. The two new Ultims have the central hull rudder, fin and the float rudder elevator system in common,  they don’t come out of the same moulds and their design differs on several points.

Compared with the curved arms of Banque Populaire XI, François Gabart preferred a parallel structure with arms in a single part "which limits the joins and is more reliable", underlines Xavier Guilbaud. Above all, the arms are much less “butted” (less curved upwards) on SVR Lazartigue, reflecting the idea that the boat should spend more time flying the air than sailing in Archimedean mode. "It is structurally more interesting for the transmission of forces and it allows better care of the aero by avoiding the ‘toboggan’ effect of the tarpaulins and nets behind the sticks," explains the architect.

Unlike Team Banque Populaire, which had to reuse existing tools to stay on schedule, MerConcept - which started its project a year earlier - opted for floats assembled hull to deck and not using half-hulls. This method which makes it possible to avoid any excess lamination in the most stressed area. SVR Lazartigue's shorter floats could be cooked in the CDK Technologies autoclave at 7 bar pressure, an additional guarantee of careful construction.

With its additional meter (at the maximum of the rule), very enveloping larger floats and a particularly reinforced front arm structure, Banque Populaire XI is published to be 16 tonnes when SVR Lazartigue claims one tonne less on the weight scale. “We didn’t experience the trauma of Armel’s capsizing,” recalls Antoine Gautier. “There was a lot of talk after that accident, but we didn't feel the need to go as far as they did in some structural areas."

This does not prevent M101 from being "more powerful and heavier than M100," says François Gabart. How much ‘mum’s the word’ smiles the skipper who concedes, “What is true, is that Gitana 17 undoubtedly keeps everyone to a minimum their weight [officially 15.5 tonnes, editor's note]. From the moment we manage to take off the question of mass is less important. Ten years ago we were wondering how to take off so weight was the big obsession. Today, that is far from the only criterion. But in saying that if we can save 10 kg in weight I still take it, everytime.

A new generation of Ultims 
 
In many ways SVR Lazartigue seems to embody a new path for a new generation of Ultims. For François Gabart, naval architecture is not a “fixed stable area: “When the M100 was launched in 2013, we were heading towards flying but the America’s Cup was not there yet and no one knew if we could build foils capable of withstanding these loads and efforts. Since then we have learned a lot and the ambition for M101 is to fly all the time. I do not like to give figures because they devalue the revolution we are undergoing. Under certain conditions, the gains are gigantic. I'm not saying it's going to be easy, but saving 5 to 10 days on a round-the-world passage is definitely possible. And the Atlantic in less than three days, we have the rights to dream about that!"

Despite the innovation underway on these machines, the question of their vulnerability to Ofnis (Unidentified floating objects) remains a fundamental question as the recent loss of the central rudder of Gitana 17 shows. “The boat will be equipped with Oscar, which continues to improve, but there is nothing very much which is new on that subject today,”admits Antoine Gautier. And Gabart concludes: “With the increase in speed, the weather factors becomes less random. On the other hand, the risk of damage to the boat by an impact with an Ofni increases. It remains to be seen whether how these odds stack up.
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Really interesting this tip& shaft article.

Also there is a zip of high res pics available on the official site, link to download the zip :

https://agencelignebleue.extranet-e.net/index.ies?act=show&mid=3081&k=e9f16b467aca2a914ec277fcb50fa28b&to=3081467260f9a436ea456586746910&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwe.tl%2Ft-oRp5TjXAUC

Link is on the front page below the column of pics :

https://agencelignebleue.extranet-e.net/index.ies?act=show&mid=3081&k=e9f16b467aca2a914ec277fcb50fa28b&to=3081467260f9a436ea456586746910

(guess it's a preliminary site, or url at least)

Front page also says that the cockpit includes a small 30 cm diameter fly by wire steering wheel, with active sensation feed back :

Quote

Le système de pilotage, développé en interne est complètement novateur. Il n’est pas mécanique et 5 fois plus petit que l’habituelle barre à roue d’1m50 de diamètre. Il consiste à sentir les sensations de barre avec un volant de 30 cm de diamètre entre les mains, enfermé dans le cockpit. 

François Gabart « Cest une nouvelle façon de naviguer, les repères vont changer, il faudra probablement se fier davantage aux bruits, aux mouvements. Nous pourrons aller très vite, tout en étant protégé dun vent apparent qui peut aller jusqu’à 120 km/h. Cette configuration devrait nous permettre daller encore plus vite sur leau. Dans certaines conditions, le gain de vitesse va être énorme. Ce qui est certain, cest quon peut aller 10 à 15 % plus vite. Sur une journée, ça peut représenter 200 kilomètres…»

Also it looks like all the furlers will be below "deck" (or aero cover):

419688019_TrimaranSVR-LAZARTIGUEMaximeHorlaville_2107220030.thumb.jpg.778676bf128636fd300fd0e8078e49c7.jpg

not done on any of the other I think.

Note : the steering wheel can be seen in the fb vid psted above at around 1:02, hope to see more inside pics soon !

1040703676_Capturedecran2021-07-24a00_54_22.thumb.png.a9aa708fbdce225898f4ad9b7a54305a.png

looks like a cheap "car tuning" steering wheel, lol :)

(probably is, but a quality one)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, yl75 said:

Also it looks like all the furlers will be below "deck" (or aero cover):

Makes sense since the furlers kept getting damaged when plowing through waves at 40+kts on his last solo RTW...

Surprised it hasn't been done before actually as it seems like a no brainer.

I wonder if they took the concept all the way and built in an acess from "down below" for maintenance as that would be the main downside of them not being easy to get to from above...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think that there's still a purchase  system connected to the base of the furlers so they could easily be pulled from their holes for maintenance .

9 hours ago, Airwick said:

Makes sense since the furlers kept getting damaged when plowing through waves at 40+kts on his last solo RTW...

Surprised it hasn't been done before actually as it seems like a no brainer.

I wonder if they took the concept all the way and built in an acess from "down below" for maintenance as that would be the main downside of them not being easy to get to from above...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

And the holes are really huge, (if you compare to the guys on the pic, so I guess you can go in there.

But there still remains one outside at the bow. (removed in heavy wheather most probably)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

From Gabart's Instagram, showing the fighter style cockpit canopies that slide open, which is what's happening in this clip.  Still unclear how they'd see forward but it looks really cool. They also showed the instrument display reading 43kts. 

SVR Canopy.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/12/2021 at 9:30 AM, NZK said:

Is it just me or are the amas of Gabart's new boat way lower volume than the existing boats? 

Also looks to be the case for me, new vid :

 

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sort of makes sense if they're just platforms for foils, love the totally chill noshing moment in the fighter cockpit :lol:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/17/2021 at 3:15 AM, yl75 said:

Also looks to be the case for me, new vid :

 

 

 

Amazing.  I keep thinking back to The Race with Phillips, Cheyenne/PS, and the Multi-plast boats... just how much more efficient these boats are, now. 

Watching them sail it, it looks like they have much better vision that you would think just by looking at the boat.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Gitana is going to have their work cut out for them against the immaculately coiffed and perfectly moisturized SVR Lazartigue team. In addition to the new foils they're getting, Frank and Charles might need a makeover. Remember what Derek Zoolander said, "Moisture is the essence of wetness and wetness is the essence of beauty". 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Foiling Optimist said:

Gitana is going to have their work cut out for them against the immaculately coiffed and perfectly moisturized SVR Lazartigue team. In addition to the new foils they're getting, Frank and Charles might need a makeover. Remember what Derek Zoolander said, "Moisture is the essence of wetness and wetness is the essence of beauty". 

Quite humorous.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Laurent said:

I want to know what he sees from this cockpit position... Isn't the front beam "right in his face"???

 

 

Awesome... now lets get these fuckers out there racing around the world soon.... with lots of live footage and stats

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Laurent said:

I want to know what he sees from this cockpit position... Isn't the front beam "right in his face"???

 

 

Probably can't get in the groove at 40kts so watching the waves is pointless?  Just watch the tell tales and use radar/AIS for collision avoidance.  Auto pilot drives during races anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Laurent said:

I want to know what he sees from this cockpit position... Isn't the front beam "right in his face"???

 

 

Sometimes foiling boats adopt a bow down trim, could it be that with the platform raked forwards he can then see where he’s going?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice interview from Tip & Shaft. Francois is honest about the aspects that need improvement.

FRANÇOIS GABART: "SVR LAZARTIGUE HAS A HUGE DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL"

A little over a month after the launch in Concarneau, of his new Ultim SVR Lazartigue François Gabart takes stock of his first sails aboard the giant trimaran on which the emphasis was focused heavily on aerodynamics.

Since SVR Lazartigue was launched, how much have you been able to sail and in what range of conditions?
We have sailed six times making a total of almost 2,000 miles that is including twice for two nights at sea. On the second of these we had 25-30 knots for an hour with a swell of about 3 metres otherwise the vast majority of the time it was between 10 and 25 knots. The difficulty when you discover such a boat is that you have to step things up gradually but you still push it, you still test it. Especially since from a purely contractual point of view the sale [of Macif to the Kresk group, Editor's note] is effective from today [the interview took place on Wednesday, Editor's note] and could not be validated until after this testing period. For insurance reasons we were confined to a restricted area and we couldn't go out in, say, 50 knots of wind. But it was fine enough to get to know the boat and if there were any parts that might break because they were not so well conceived, designed or built, it was best it happened there. But really we had few breakages at all and really no major problems, which is always reassuring, because when you put a new boat in the water, you are never 100% sure. Of course that doesn't mean we'll never have any problems, there is still a lot of work to do for the boat's long-term reliability.

Who have you sailed with?
Tom (Laperche) did almost all the sailing so far and of course there was our technical team, the designers and the sail and rig people but also external guys like Pascal Bidégorry who of course is historically very close to the project and is part of the 11th Hour Racing team which includes Charlie Enright and Mark Towill.

What were your first impressions?
This boat has extraordinary potential, but there is a lot of work to take advantage of it, to find the settings and to make everything reliable. This week I was discussing with Nicolas Goyard, the iQFoil world champion that when we see the performance gaps in that fleet, of the order of 10 to 15%, that they manage to generate compared to their competitors in a relatively one-design class, you can see that simply with different settings, the performance differences are proportionately greater. So imagine what it can be like on our boats which are extremely complex prototypes - I couldn't tell you the number of combinations of settings that exist between the different configurations of sails and all the on-board systems. Suffice to say there is enormous potential for development, I admit the challenge is very exciting, I find the sensations similar to those I experienced when I started off in ocean racing or during my first trips on M100 (the old Macif) in 2015.

"We must have made 44.9 knots i
n less than 15 knots of wind"

 What struck you the most during this first month of sailing?
Two things: the surface and shape of the appendages mean that the boat not only has the ability to fly fast enough, but when there is a seaway they work like being on shock absorbers. This ability of the foils, rudders and daggerboard to cushion the boat in difficult seas, even upwind, is quite impressive and very encouraging, because the sea remains the biggest blocker  for the performance of these boats today. The second point is aero, where we have worked a lot: we feel that when the boat is properly trimmed, whether longitudinally or laterally, it accelerates very hard, all the more upwind, as soon as we have very low apparent wind angles and very strong apparent wind forces. On the other hand, as soon as  we are wider reaching when we reach sufficiently strong heeling or trim angles (longitudinally), we immediately feel the brake and the loss in RM (righting moment, therefore power). This is a notable difference from M100. Suddenly, that implies a lot of requirements in terms of settings, the boat is probably less easy, you have to adjust the trim to go very quickly.

Talk to us about speed, can you give us some numbers?
We get up over 30 knots very quickly and between 35 and 40 quite easily, including in rough seas, while there are things that we don’t have fully operational on board. If we are talking about top speed, we must have made 44.9 knots in less than 15 knots of wind on flat seas. These are machines for creating fabulous speeds. But what is especially interesting is the ability of the boat to maintain good speed in a seaway which remains the objective of these boats.

Including upwind?
Upwind - and when we talk about upwind on an Ultim, we are obviously not at 35 degrees to the true wind, but rather at 55-60 - we easily manage to keep averages over 30 knots in 14-15 knots of wind, and to climb to 35-38 knots as soon as we drop the bow a little. We have already managed to go over 40 knots at 75-90 degrees to the wind, on M100, we had to really hang in there to do it. It's a fairly new thing and it's very interesting, because it opens up many possibilities from a tactical and strategic point of view.

"Tom has experience and fabulous skills for his age"

What is the program for the next sailings?
We will soon start again on a block of about a month until the beginning of October, with training sessions with Actual at the beginning of next week, a session at the Finistère offshore race centre which will allow us to sail with the other boats in our class. And we will also try to find difficult conditions to build miles and firm up on reliability issues, in order to tick as many boxes as possible before the Transat Jacques Vabre. We will continue to bring in people from outside to help us improve - I am thinking in particular of Jimmy Spithill, who as you will remember was on M100 before with me and who I have spoken with quite a bit since the start of the year.

Tell us some words about Tom Laperche: Did he find the measure of the boat fast enough considering that the whole Ultim world is new to him?
I'm not going to praise him too much and make him blush, but I find that he already has, for his age, some pretty great experiences and skills, but also an amazing ability to learn and adapt. . He immediately has the right moves, the right ideas and to have seen a lot of people sailing. And this is not that easy, because they are quite special boats. We have a good feeling between us and a confidence that has settled between us from the start. Tom really is someone who, despite his relative inexperience, will bring us a lot.

Bringing in Tom, is that some kind of succession planning?
Not directly, but with me I had the chance to learn a lot from sailors who were much more experienced than me, I am obviously thinking of Mich '(Desjoyeaux) and also Kito (de Pavant), Pascal (Bidégorry), Antoine Koch and others, so there is something important to me in that: I feel like I can give something back. I am happy and quite proud to be able to transmit and help younger sailors like Tom make advances. And of course it is not just one way traffic, it is not completely selfless either, I feel like I can learn from him too!

"Gitana will be the favourite on the Jacques Vabre"

Six years ago, at less than three months after Macif was launched, you won the Transat Jacques Vabre. Will that be the goal again for the 2021 edition?
We are not favourites, because we will not yet have all the setting and gears. And up against us are very reliable and well sorted boats and teams facing us. However, when I see the potential of the boat, I tell myself that if we can do the whole race without major technical problems, there is no reason why we should not be challenging to win. But one of the main objectives will be to progress. If we are lucky enough to arrive in Martinique we will undoubtedly be the boat that has made the most progress during the race.

If you are not a favorite, who will be?
From a very objective point of view, Gitana (the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild) is clearly the most reliable boat, it is well sorted and has done many miles and Franck (Cammas) and Charles (Caudrelier) know the settings well, they have really dominated the Fastnet, they're a little ahead.

Finally, can you tell us about your company MerConcept, what are the current projects?
We launched the new Imoca 11th Hour Racing a few days ago, on which we participated on the design in collaboration with Guillaume Verdier, we feel that it has a very strong potential; Apivia, like Gitana in Ultim just crushed the competition in the Fastnet, Charlie (Dalin) and Paul (Meilhat) will clearly be among the favorites on the Jacques Vabre, they are a great crew on a boat which remains extremely efficient. Pierre (Quiroga) and the Figaro are projects that are a bit further away from our technical core business, knowing that they are not development boats, and so I am modest about our contribution, but I am nevertheless delighted to see it work so well on the Solitaire, Erwan (Le Draoulec) too. We are also very happy with the flying electric catamaran project which came to Concarneau at the end of July, we are in the final phase of assembly and integration of the systems, it should be launched in early December. Otherwise, we have started the construction of the new Imoca for Maxime Sorel, that is a sistership of Apivia. So it's quite full on, busy, we are delighted to have all these challenges on our plate. For Tip & Shaft readers and sailing enthusiasts, it's good news to see ocean racing doing so well, now we have to manage this significant increase in activity, we are recruiting a lot across the board all of the trades of our world and some are not so obvious

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

A short video in French of the official christening of the new Ultim of François Gabard.

Nothing really new in the video. Just a small comment that, of course, one of the objectives would be to break the North Atlantic crossing record, currently held by Pascal Bidegorry... and, why not, with Pascal on board!

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Also from Tip and Shaft, and interview with Pascal Bidégorry:

"You also sailed with François Gabart this summer on his new Ultim SVR Lazartigue, how was it?
Awesome. I loved it. The MerConcept team has done an incredible job. From the point of view of pure performance the gap is not necessarily that bit to the previous boat (Macif now Actual), on the other hand, it flies much better, it has an ability to fly in a seaway which really blew me away. I have a great soft spot for this way of sailing and the use of these boats, it’s the best thing and it only brings me good memories. It’s really just fun, pure sailing, these boats are flying very fast and the stability is impressive. It is about the use of technology, fun, speed, it's brilliant!"

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we're at a point where it's not so much raw speed that they're looking for now, it's the ability to always be flying no matter what the seastate is. If you look at the Brest Atlantic, Gitana spent the most time foiling, hense the higher average speed. 

I think the 24h record is going up soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

BPXI is quick, this will be a fascinating faceoff in November. I wonder how much they learned from their limited time with IX, esp considering she was quicker than Gitana at the time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Having seen an Instagram post that Team Moisture-Is-The-Essence-of-Wetness was back in Concarneau after a 48 hour training sail, I was randomly looking at Concarneau on google Maps. It turns out, if you look at the marina at Port La Foret, which is just north of Concarneau, you can see this ultime. I think this is BPIX?  NB You can also currently see Sodebo at La Basse in Lorient with a bunch of IMOCAs but you'd expect that. 

(Vaguely related, another cool google satellite thing I discovered is if you look just off Kephui Beach on the western end of Moloka'i Hawaii. You can see the surf skis and outriggers preparing to start the 2019 Moloka'i to O'ahu race. Crazy that you can see surf skis in the water from space.) 

Concarneau 2.jpg

Concarneau 1.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Foiling Optimist said:

Having seen an Instagram post that Team Moisture-Is-The-Essence-of-Wetness was back in Concarneau after a 48 hour training sail, I was randomly looking at Concarneau on google Maps. It turns out, if you look at the marina at Port La Foret, which is just north of Concarneau, you can see this ultime. I think this is BPIX?  NB You can also currently see Sodebo at La Basse in Lorient with a bunch of IMOCAs but you'd expect that. 

(Vaguely related, another cool google satellite thing I discovered is if you look just off Kephui Beach on the western end of Moloka'i Hawaii. You can see the surf skis and outriggers preparing to start the 2019 Moloka'i to O'ahu race. Crazy that you can see surf skis in the water from space.) 

Concarneau 2.jpg

Concarneau 1.jpg

Indeed looks like it.

Note : About details seen from space, in fact  alot of google maps/earth pictures are  taken by planes :

https://support.google.com/earth/answer/6327779?hl=en#zippy=%2Csatellite-aerial-images

Don't know if it is systematic for the highest details level though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Below a Le Cleach interview with videos from BPXI (not sure if behind a paywall or not) :

https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/transat-jacques-vabre/video-transat-jacques-vabre-armel-le-cleac-h-o-n-va-voir-ce-que-le-bateau-a-dans-le-ventre-776364c8-26c5-11ec-b8e1-a5d0cfbb7050

About the pic above, did you mean BPXI, the current one ?

BPIX is the one that was completely destroyed in its second capsize.

But the one on the pic doesn't look like BP XI :

51442077661_859e6da442_b.jpg

(the GV sheet "bar" especially looks different, and the two beams makes much less of an X than on BPXI)

So indeed it is maybe BPIX on an old pic ! (but looking on gg maps the pics are dated 2021, so really I don't know which boat it is! Strange ...

Maybe Macif (now Actual).

Edit : yes I think it is Macif before its Actual paint job :

https://www.alamyimages.fr/24-heures-avec-le-marin-francais-francois-gabart-a-bord-de-son-trimaran-macif-de-100-pieds-concu-par-l-equipe-de-conception-vplp-ce-bateau-de-30-metres-de-large-et-de-21-metres-de-large-a-ete-concu-pour-la-voile-en-solo-un-bateau-leger-14-5-tonnes-avec-des-coques-tres-fines-port-la-foret-mars-2017-photo-christophe-launay-dppi-image414752675.html

On gg street view from the nearby parking lot, no boat can be seen.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Seems to me that you could house a noncavitating foil within the low speed foil. Then when you get up to cavitation speed jack the noncavitating foil down and lift the traditional foil up. Exactly, how will require a lot more thought.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Announcements


×
×
  • Create New...