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I'm still troubleshooting the "vibration issue" that has been with me since departing Block Island.

Quick recap:

  • Verified tightness and integrity of all engine mounts
  • Replaced cutless bearing
  • Verified a straight and true propeller shaft
  • Tried 3 different propellers
  • Applied backstay tension (per advice given here)
  • Tested in the slip against the docklines*

Vibration characteristics:

Over periods of several minutes (15/30) the vibration completely fades and returns. When vibration is most prominent, it's fairly loud. Requires raised voices to converse in the cockpit. Vibration (when present) is most prominent at 2000 RPM. Vibration remains absent at 1700 RPM and below.  At 2000 RPM, vibration grows in amplitude but does not appear to change in frequency (ie vibration is not tied to engine RPM or any piece of rotating equipment). It seems harmonic.

I have placed my hands directly on the engine, mounts, transmission and stuffing box when the vibration is at its worst and you really can't feel anything. It's nothing more than the normal vibration you'd expect from a 3-cylinder diesel which isn't that smooth to begin with. The engine and driveline components are completely still when the vibration is present and do not exhibit any motion or high frequency, visual blurriness that indicates an unbalanced condition.

*When taking a strain against docklines, the vibration was completely absent at all RPMs. This really surprised me. I *think* it may have something to do with the rudder when water and prop wash are flowing over it underway combined with engine vibration. At the dock, the rudder is unloaded, even with prop wash flowing over it.

Here's my partial conclusion:  Although loud and distracting, the vibration doesn't appear to be destructive. The vibration is simply a harmonic of something not part of the engine/driveline that is vibrating in the lazarette. It's caused by normal engine vibration but it's not the engine or the driveline itself.

I did observe during my inspections that the steering cables are just a bit slack and require adjustment. I don't think this has anything to do with the sound but I'll tend to it anyway. Everything else in the lazarette seems tight and secure but I'll need to check while underway.

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After a long weekend... The wax will probably hold for 30 days before it fails and everything turns to chalk again.

The pan that holds the gauges was disintegrating after 40 years.  Since all the gauges blew up in the Great Alternator Debacle of '21, I just replaced it all. Added an hour meter for maintenance track

Well here's a new and interesting problem: As many of you know, I experienced a driveline vibration during my trip to Maine. I hauled out this week to replace the cutless bearing. The strut

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6 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I'm still troubleshooting the "vibration issue" that has been with me since departing Block Island.

Quick recap:

  • Verified tightness and integrity of all engine mounts
  • Replaced cutless bearing
  • Verified a straight and true propeller shaft
  • Tried 3 different propellers
  • Applied backstay tension (per advice given here)
  • Tested in the slip against the docklines*

Vibration characteristics:

Over periods of several minutes (15/30) the vibration completely fades and returns. When vibration is most prominent, it's fairly loud. Requires raised voices to converse in the cockpit. Vibration (when present) is most prominent at 2000 RPM. Vibration remains absent at 1700 RPM and below.  At 2000 RPM, vibration grows in amplitude but does not appear to change in frequency (ie vibration is not tied to engine RPM or any piece of rotating equipment). It seems harmonic.

I have placed my hands directly on the engine, mounts, transmission and stuffing box when the vibration is at its worst and you really can't feel anything. It's nothing more than the normal vibration you'd expect from a 3-cylinder diesel which isn't that smooth to begin with. The engine and driveline components are completely still when the vibration is present and do not exhibit any motion or high frequency, visual blurriness that indicates an unbalanced condition.

*When taking a strain against docklines, the vibration was completely absent at all RPMs. This really surprised me. I *think* it may have something to do with the rudder when water and prop wash are flowing over it underway combined with engine vibration. At the dock, the rudder is unloaded, even with prop wash flowing over it.

Here's my partial conclusion:  Although loud and distracting, the vibration doesn't appear to be destructive. The vibration is simply a harmonic of something not part of the engine/driveline that is vibrating in the lazarette. It's caused by normal engine vibration but it's not the engine or the driveline itself.

I did observe during my inspections that the steering cables are just a bit slack and require adjustment. I don't think this has anything to do with the sound but I'll tend to it anyway. Everything else in the lazarette seems tight and secure but I'll need to check while underway.

Does it match any motions of the boat? 

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Now you're finally discovering why she was abandoned in the first place :)

These vibrations are killer for an engineer / problem-solver type person.

My boat has a similar harmonic type thing that isn't tied to engine rpm, but only happens above 2100 rpm, and only in gear.

The dockline test is interesting.  The load on the prop/shaft will be very different than when underway. If I had to guess, I would think the shaft compression load would actually be lower at the dock for the same shaft torque load, since the prop pitch would be effectively higher (and less efficient at pushing) at 0kts boat speed.

When you had the shaft out did you have it roll-tested for straightness?

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13 minutes ago, debonAir said:

When you had the shaft out did you have it roll-tested for straightness?

No, I didn't test it that way. Inside at the exposed portion and outside, I secured a pointy scribe in place and rotated the shaft to observe if the shaft moved closer or further from the point. Kind of unscientific but better than nothing.

If the shaft were un-true, wouldn't the vibration be present at all times?

Not only does the vibration change with the compression load it also simply fades away and returns in 15-30 minute intervals in smooth water when the boat is riding perfectly level and there are no changes in load.

At this point, a lot of people would shrug and quit worrying about it since the noise doesn't seem destructive. I am inquisitive and persnickety at times, so I'll pursue it on a not-to-interfere with my enjoyment basis.

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The load on the prop is different when it's tied to the slip rather than moving along. 

My money's on the engine mounts. It can be very difficult to detect less-than-catastrophic failure modes. Rubber hardens. The metal-rubber joints can weaken, etc. As it vibrates, the rubber heats up and changes its physical characteristics, etc.

If they're more than 15 years old I'd replace them prophylactically. 

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8 minutes ago, IStream said:

The load on the prop is different when it's tied to the slip rather than moving along. 

My money's on the engine mounts. It can be very difficult to detect less-than-catastrophic failure modes. Rubber hardens. The metal-rubber joints can weaken, etc. As it vibrates, the rubber heats up and changes its physical characteristics, etc.

If they're more than 15 years old I'd replace them prophylactically. 

They're original. I wonder if I can even find exact replacements...

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Does the vibration seemed localized to a certain part of the boat or does it really vibrate the whole boat? If its a harmonic thing, then one of the hull structure's eigenfrequencies lies in the engine's operating range. The equation to change that is fairly simple, f = sqrt(k/m) where k is stiffness and m is mass. So you can change where those frequencies lie a number of ways. I do these sorts of calculations for the navy so I'm not completely talking out of my ass here. However I usually have the benefit of detailed structural plans and a fancy computer program.

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27 minutes ago, WillyT123 said:

Does the vibration seemed localized to a certain part of the boat or does it really vibrate the whole boat? If its a harmonic thing, then one of the hull structure's eigenfrequencies lies in the engine's operating range. The equation to change that is fairly simple, f = sqrt(k/m) where k is stiffness and m is mass. So you can change where those frequencies lie a number of ways. I do these sorts of calculations for the navy so I'm not completely talking out of my ass here. However I usually have the benefit of detailed structural plans and a fancy computer program.

It's localized to the aft 1/3 of the boat...but that's a lot of space. What you say makes sense.

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15 minutes ago, WillyT123 said:

Actually right now I'm betting its the rudder cables. If they stretched or slipped while you were sailing up the coast that would explain why the vibration just showed up, and why it didn't happen while you were in the slip with the rudder unloaded.

From your mouth to God's ears. I'll snug them up and report back.

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52 minutes ago, WillyT123 said:

Actually right now I'm betting its the rudder cables. If they stretched or slipped while you were sailing up the coast that would explain why the vibration just showed up, and why it didn't happen while you were in the slip with the rudder unloaded.

ya know, that makes a lot of sense.  My vibration started around the time I fixed the rudder bushing and tightened the cables.  I had also replaced the motor mounts and prop, etc. so hadn't thought of the rudder thing.  Looking forward to Spring already..

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1 hour ago, WillyT123 said:

Actually right now I'm betting its the rudder cables. If they stretched or slipped while you were sailing up the coast that would explain why the vibration just showed up, and why it didn't happen while you were in the slip with the rudder unloaded.

Rudder/cables are sounding likely…you could repeat the “in the slip” test, but this time add in say 10 degrees of rudder.  That would load the rudder, as prop wash would create lift…

Or, adjust cables first, and see if that solves it.  Cable stretch likely given you were underway for much longer than normal during you NE cruise, and in higher than “normal” sea states

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I have something fairly similar.  Replaced my motor in 2018.  New engine mounts from PYI as well.  New everything.  At idle and only in idle, I get a very loud rattling noise and vibration from...somewhere.  It is not the engine.  It is not the drivetrain.  Not that I can tell anyway.  But some part of the boat does not like the vibration that the Yanmar is putting out.  

I bump the throttle to slightly above neutral doing anything but motoring dead slow to quell the vibration.  I almost raised the idle point up slightly but I wonder if the tranny would protest in some fashion years down the road.

In the spirit of this thread, I am going to empty out my lazarettes and hunt for this damn vibration tomorrow.  I have lived with it for long enough.

I should add, I am missing my favorite winch handle and it, by most reports (damn kids), might be under my fuel tank.  Which, of course, necessitates emptying of the lazarette...

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You wouldn't happen to have dyneema backstays or shrouds would you?  Both my racing boats have problems with the loud rigging vibration under tension.  The engine vibration could be very close to the natural harmonic of the shrouds inducing them to vibrate in the wind. 

If the vibration happens at the dock too this theory can be thrown out.

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20 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Mainly to stbd. Definitely has something to do with prop wash and loading up the rudder. 

To me, that points to engine mounts. Prop loads up and hits a resonant frequency.  

On my boat, all rpms are ok except 8-900. At those rpms, everything on the boat vibrates. 

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I’m also guessing engine mounts.

Maybe the combination of little to no shock absorption left in them, and a tiny amount of hull flexing when the rudder is loaded while underway is just enough to develop harmonics from an initial rattle at x rpm. It might not be the the steering but actually the flexing that starts the process at the point of one of the mounts.

The harmonic distortion then becomes more powerful than just a single vibration as it migrates to wherever it’s going.

The reality is that there’s only one way to find out once you’ve eventually eliminated everything else.

edit: ...or the prop/shaft sends load to the mounts as Elegua suggested, but maybe one offending mount is the culprit which would explain why it happens on starboard only...

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31 minutes ago, fufkin said:

edit: ...or the prop/shaft sends load to the mounts as Elegua suggested, but maybe one offending mount is the culprit which would explain why it happens on starboard only..

What you said. Some people have a way with words, some people not have way. Loads up on one mount(s)- I think Ajax's engine has 3? - which is stiff and then transmits vibration to the boat, or conversely, too squishy so it bottoms out on something also sending vibration. 

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I ain't saying that you guys are wrong but I'll say that the noise appears to be coming from directly under the helm seat, well aft of the engine.  I really feel that the on/off nature of the vibration precludes engine mounts.

Once I snug up the steering cables we'll see what happens.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I ain't saying that you guys are wrong but I'll say that the noise appears to be coming from directly under the helm seat, well aft of the engine.  I really feel that the on/off nature of the vibration precludes engine mounts.

Once I snug up the steering cables we'll see what happens.

I hope the cable tension does the trick, but I'm skeptical. Still, it's good to get it out of the way:

“Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.” - Sherlock Holmes”

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

I ain't saying that you guys are wrong but I'll say that the noise appears to be coming from directly under the helm seat, well aft of the engine.  I really feel that the on/off nature of the vibration precludes engine mounts.

Once I snug up the steering cables we'll see what happens.

You may get lucky and it's just something vibrating. Sometimes it's the strangest things. 

Fingers crossed...

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16 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I also have a strange noise when my engine is running and in gear.  It happens whenever I'm down below facing stbd, and the door under the galley sink is open while standing on one foot and yawning at the same time. 

 

It is without a doubt the hinges on the door.  Stand on you other foot and problem solved.

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  • 4 weeks later...

So I upgraded my ancient Garmin to a 9” Vulcan on my T33.  After 6 months I am getting low voltage errors on Vulcan. 
 

The power bus for all electronics is fed with #14 so should not have a voltage drop.  On the bus is depth, water speed, head for AP, but not pilot computer or drive and the Vulcan. So there are no big power demands on bus.

Showing 12.5 on battery monitor and 11.2 on Vulcan(displaying bolts on screen).  


I think it may be the 40 year old breaker.  Any other ideas??

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16 minutes ago, Snore said:

So I upgraded my ancient Garmin to a 9” Vulcan on my T33.  After 6 months I am getting low voltage errors on Vulcan. 
 

The power bus for all electronics is fed with #14 so should not have a voltage drop.  On the bus is depth, water speed, head for AP, but not pilot computer or drive and the Vulcan. So there are no big power demands on bus.

Showing 12.5 on battery monitor and 11.2 on Vulcan(displaying bolts on screen).  


I think it may be the 40 year old breaker.  Any other ideas??

Hm...it could be the breaker but I'm more inclined to blame the wiring run to the plotter. You have a hefty voltage drop going on. It's not the length of the wire, I think it's more like a poor connection. Have you tried disconnecting the wires from the breaker and cleaning wire and breaker terminals with a little sandpaper?

Another possible but unlikely culprit could be that you were provided with a faulty power cable.

Also, just to confirm- when you say "power bus" you just mean normal 12v power, not the NMEA 2000 bus, right? The plotter is meant to be run from an independent power supply even if it's connected to the NMEA 2000 bus.

Also-also- You *do* have the NMEA 2k bus powered from a separate breaker than all the other electronic shit, right? All the NMEA authorities say to power the NMEA bus separately to avoid ground loops.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Hm...it could be the breaker but I'm more inclined to blame the wiring run to the plotter. You have a hefty voltage drop going on. It's not the length of the wire, I think it's more like a poor connection. Have you tried disconnecting the wires from the breaker and cleaning wire and breaker terminals with a little sandpaper?

Another possible but unlikely culprit could be that you were provided with a faulty power cable.

Also, just to confirm- when you say "power bus" you just mean normal 12v power, not the NMEA 2000 bus, right? The plotter is meant to be run from an independent power supply even if it's connected to the NMEA 2000 bus.

Also-also- You *do* have the NMEA 2k bus powered from a separate breaker than all the other electronic shit, right? All the NMEA authorities say to power the NMEA bus separately to avoid ground loops.

Thanks, some good points.   There is a front coming in tomorrow, good time to chase these down.  
 

 

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Never guess where the failure was!  Traced the route the power took taking readings along the way.  
 

Found the +/-1volt drop was at the relatively new Blue Seas battery switch.  A few years ago I added an automatic battery combiner switch.  Part of that system is an on/off/emergency combine switch.  

The house load is connected to the load side of that switch.  Running the switch through all the positions a few times cleared the corrosion and voltages went back up.

Although I will likely redo the 12vDC supply to the plotter and separate it from the NMEA feed.

 

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10 minutes ago, jsaronson said:

Nice!  Glad it was that simple.

Yup.  Just need to find time to unmount and clean the switch… sucks when new stuff fails and the 40y/o stuff still works 

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6 minutes ago, Snore said:

Yup.  Just need to find time to unmount and clean the switch… sucks when new stuff fails and the 40y/o stuff still works 

Yeah, you can't discount newly installed stuff as being the culprit all of the time. I've had plenty of fresh out of the box parts fail.

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Is the Vulcan a B&G product? We are chasing a similar issue on the M-32. The voltage reading on the mast display (not a Vulcan, I think it is a B&G 5000 system) is not the same as the voltage at the battery. What we are really trying to make sure of is that the tiny alternator on the 9.9 OB is charging the tiny AGM battery that we ask to run electronics all day long, and start the OB at the end of the day. Sometimes it is dead.

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1 hour ago, Hike, Bitches! said:

Is the Vulcan a B&G product? We are chasing a similar issue on the M-32. The voltage reading on the mast display (not a Vulcan, I think it is a B&G 5000 system) is not the same as the voltage at the battery. What we are really trying to make sure of is that the tiny alternator on the 9.9 OB is charging the tiny AGM battery that we ask to run electronics all day long, and start the OB at the end of the day. Sometimes it is dead.

Yes the Vulcan is their touch screen, a good choice for bay boats.

 

IMHO, take your voltage meter, start at the battery and “walk” the circuit to the base of the mast.  Obviously, if there is no drop to the base of the mast, yet a drop at the top… 

 

Why not buy a simple 50 watt panel? It will likely yield 30 watts.  I’m not sure how much the 5000 pulls, but that should do ya.

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1 hour ago, Snore said:

Why not buy a simple 50 watt panel? It will likely yield 30 watts.  I’m not sure how much the 5000 pulls, but that should do ya.

This is The Way.

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9 hours ago, WillyT123 said:

@Ajax Did you ever figure out your vibration issue?

I need to snug up the steering cables and try again. It's winter so it might be awhile. Depends on the weather. 

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The pan that holds the gauges was disintegrating after 40 years.  Since all the gauges blew up in the Great Alternator Debacle of '21, I just replaced it all. Added an hour meter for maintenance tracking. 

20211226_100847.jpg

20211226_145717.jpg

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On 12/24/2021 at 8:05 AM, Ajax said:

I need to snug up the steering cables and try again. It's winter so it might be awhile. Depends on the weather. 

Check exhaust hose routing.. I recently wasted 2hours of my life helping someone check propshaft runout and check flexi coupling install on their boat...

They had All the same symptoms as yours. 
Long story short, Someone had dropped a rusty old spanner into the lazarette, it was lodged between the exhaust hose and ruddershaft.. On port tack and/or certain rev range pump speed and water weight in exhaust hose was causing slight movement and contact and a harmonic noise they had never heard before...

10mm spanner theres was..Yours may be a different size of course:D 

On my own boat, just exhaust hose renewal caused a change in perceived engine tone. Good luck.

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15 hours ago, Ajax said:

The pan that holds the gauges was disintegrating after 40 years.  Since all the gauges blew up in the Great Alternator Debacle of '21, I just replaced it all. Added an hour meter for maintenance tracking. 

20211226_100847.jpg

20211226_145717.jpg

Wow looks like a perfect fit.  Where did you find the panel?

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4 hours ago, Snore said:

Wow looks like a perfect fit.  Where did you find the panel?

Not quite, but close. You have to cut away about 1/4 inch on the left side in order for the pan to drop in. There's plenty of "meat" to do this.

Made in the USA, Hollywood, Maryland:

https://www.ssicustomplastics.com/

https://www.ssicustomplastics.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SSI-2019-Product-Catalog.pdf

This is the company that supplies the instrument pans for Beta Marine. They do sell some pieces to private buyers.

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Next trivial project:

The faucet in the head has a shower diverter and the valve no longer seals. When you wash your hands, the diverter weeps all over the counter/vanity. When you shower, you lose 1/4 of the pressure and water out of the faucet and down the sink drain. Where water conservation is a real thing, this is unacceptable. Plus, the plastic chrome finish looks like shit.

The galley faucet functions adequately but looks like shit.

I have a clearance issue in the head- the mirror/medicine cabinet door barely clears the top of the faucet so that limits my choices. I was forced to choose another plastic fixture. Hopefully the diverter seals properly, at least for awhile.  I found a real stainless steel galley faucet that matches fairly well, with a pull out sprayer. This will really help with cleaning the larger cookware.

De-installing the old faucet was terrible. Under the vanity is a snake pit of holding tank hoses, pumps and seacocks. I have the option of side deck pump-out, overboard pump out (with manual waste transfer pump), flushing toilet to holding tank and flushing toilet directly overboard. I could barely access the faucet hoses. I melted one of the big white discharge hoses with a hair dryer trying to remove it so now I have to replace it.  :angry:

A possible winter project:

I think I've discovered a way to discretely install an anchor washdown system.  The electrical wiring is already in place. There is adequate space in the locker where the pump will live.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Next trivial project:

The faucet in the head has a shower diverter and the valve no longer seals. When you wash your hands, the diverter weeps all over the counter/vanity. When you shower, you lose 1/4 of the pressure and water out of the faucet and down the sink drain. Where water conservation is a real thing, this is unacceptable. Plus, the plastic chrome finish looks like shit.

The galley faucet functions adequately but looks like shit.

I have a clearance issue in the head- the mirror/medicine cabinet door barely clears the top of the faucet so that limits my choices. I was forced to choose another plastic fixture. Hopefully the diverter seals properly, at least for awhile.  I found a real stainless steel galley faucet that matches fairly well, with a pull out sprayer. This will really help with cleaning the larger cookware.

De-installing the old faucet was terrible. Under the vanity is a snake pit of holding tank hoses, pumps and seacocks. I have the option of side deck pump-out, overboard pump out (with manual waste transfer pump), flushing toilet to holding tank and flushing toilet directly overboard. I could barely access the faucet hoses. I melted one of the big white discharge hoses with a hair dryer trying to remove it so now I have to replace it.  :angry:

A possible winter project:

I think I've discovered a way to discretely install an anchor washdown system.  The electrical wiring is already in place. There is adequate space in the locker where the pump will live.


Suggestion, while replacing the faucet- consider replacing the Formica.  Don’t make the mistake I did.  I replaced the sink with a new Chinese one.  Dang new one is 2 years old and has as much rust as the 40y/o one it replaced.

 

 

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I had the same issue in my head.  My solution was to pull the existing sink and faucet from 1976 out.  Then I bought a new stainless sink and dry fit a piece of marine plywood over the counter top.  I cut out the existing top so the sink dropped in and I bought this shower faucet combo (https://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?path=-1|51|2234270|2234273&id=2117421).  After dry fit I painted the new counter top and bonded it in place with 4200.  

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@sailman Yes, the real solution for working on all this plumbing is to pull the sink. I can't figure out what's holding it in. There are these metal tabs protruding down into the vanity interior around the sink. I'm also unsure what kind of sealant may have been used.

Due to the lower quality of stainless available today, I'm sticking with my current basin. With some Barkeeper's Friend or ordinary Comet scouring powder, it polishes up just fine. It has no rust. I just want the ability to pop it out now and then for maintenance underneath.

It has been wet and gray here for a week now so I made use of the time.  I forged ahead and installed the more intelligently designed Perko battery cutoff switch with alternator field disconnect. I had to create a mounting bezel out of Starboard because the old hole was too large.  I'm going to create a wood trim ring for aesthetic purposes.

Next, I did dig into the vanity and replaced the old head faucet fixture. It looks very nice. It remains to be seen how long it will stay looking like that. I replaced the sanitation hose that I melted with the hair dryer. The white Raritan hose is much more flexible than the rigid Shields "Odor Shield" hose and will last almost as long.

I'm pretty much back to waiting for warmer weather to haul out and swap the depth transducer through hull.

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

@sailman Yes, the real solution for working on all this plumbing is to pull the sink. I can't figure out what's holding it in. There are these metal tabs protruding down into the vanity interior around the sink. I'm also unsure what kind of sealant may have been used.

 

Can you see a narrow 2 rail track running around the perimeter of the sink? If so, you might have the regular metal tab hold-downs that may be rusted enough to break with pliers. Then there's always some plumbers putty or caulk bonding the sink to the counter you'll have to work loose. A stiff putty knife usually does that. 

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On 11/19/2021 at 10:43 AM, Ajax said:

GTFO. They actually have them for my engine. Man, I love this place.

PYI is a really, really good company. They helped design  and spec the complex Whitlock wheel steering system for the boat I built, one of those "they said it couldn't be done" scenarios. I also got my Maxprop and shaft seal from them.

Everything I've ever bought from them was good.

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2 hours ago, accnick said:

PYI is a really, really good company. They helped design  and spec the complex Whitlock wheel steering system for the boat I built, one of those "they said it couldn't be done" scenarios. I also got my Maxprop and shaft seal from them.

Everything I've ever bought from them was good.

Every time I have communicated with them it was good, as well. Class company, good people.

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On 12/22/2021 at 5:39 PM, Ajax said:

This is The Way.

Not my boat...But they do have a baby solar panel, which was recently replaced. It is one of those semi-rigid things, maybe 2 watts. I have a 30w on my 4KSB and it keeps my 230aH house bank up no problem.

So maybe what will be enough. thanks for the hijack, Ajax..carry on.

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On 12/27/2021 at 4:22 PM, Ajax said:

Not quite, but close. You have to cut away about 1/4 inch on the left side in order for the pan to drop in. There's plenty of "meat" to do this.

Made in the USA, Hollywood, Maryland:

https://www.ssicustomplastics.com/

https://www.ssicustomplastics.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SSI-2019-Product-Catalog.pdf

This is the company that supplies the instrument pans for Beta Marine. They do sell some pieces to private buyers.

Mrs. HB took my extra brownie pan I had stored as an eventual replacement panel frame, and (gasp!) used it to make brownies! The nerve of that bitch!

SSI is right around the corner from me. I suspect 99.9% of their business is shipped out, but they do have a small retail counter in the shop. The guy that was managing the place was my first boss at a powerboat store in the 80's..not sure if he is still there.

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Ajax,

When I removed my galley sink it was held in with standard clips (as suggested above) and sealant.  The clips had either corroded off or were so bad that I could break them off.  from there, it was two putty knives and a lot of patience.

With the  sink out, check to make sure the plywood counter is solid, replace the faucet etc.

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13 minutes ago, Hike, Bitches! said:

Mrs. HB took my extra brownie pan I had stored as an eventual replacement panel frame, and (gasp!) used it to make brownies! The nerve of that bitch!

SSI is right around the corner from me. I suspect 99.9% of their business is shipped out, but they do have a small retail counter in the shop. The guy that was managing the place was my first boss at a powerboat store in the 80's..not sure if he is still there.

They will allow you to pick up the part.  They mailed mine but USPS screwed up and it made a giant loop around Maryland right back to them. Mrs. Ajax had work tasks nearby so she was able to pick up the part directly and bring it home to me.

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10 minutes ago, jsaronson said:

Ajax,

When I removed my galley sink it was held in with standard clips (as suggested above) and sealant.  The clips had either corroded off or were so bad that I could break them off.  from there, it was two putty knives and a lot of patience.

With the  sink out, check to make sure the plywood counter is solid, replace the faucet etc.

Ok, so these clips are sort of a "one way" method of securing the sink (plus sealant). You can't release them but you can break them off and pry the sink out?  My Google-Fu sucks but I'll see if I can find some photos of this.

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Ok, if you click on this sink and click the Zoom-in photo, you can see a tab:

Sink

This is pretty much exactly the sink that I have.  It looks like you bend the tab up, and screw it into the underside of the vanity.  I think mine weren't even used. They're still unbent and have no screws in them. I guess it must be all adhesive.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Ok, if you click on this sink and click the Zoom-in photo, you can see a tab:

Sink

This is pretty much exactly the sink that I have.  It looks like you bend the tab up, and screw it into the underside of the vanity.  I think mine weren't even used. They're still unbent and have no screws in them. I guess it must be all adhesive.

Hey I have one of those, in my contender for the smallest powder room. 

605226019_Powderroom2.thumb.jpg.5901120f1f32f8667bb642ab100c11a7.jpg

This is how it attaches. If they didn't use these, it hopefully just held down with caulking of a not too permenent nature. 

IMG-3611.thumb.jpg.907c47d799a7f7768d58310faffefc2a.jpg

I bought this one about 10 years ago at Hamilton Marine. Is this what you have? 

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Yep,  looks just like that.  The tabs aren't bent over or screwed in. 

I'd bet somebody put it down with silicone. It should come up with a couple stiff putty knives. Go slow so you don't bend it. 

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It's super tight in there.  Maybe a small bottle jack,  just enough to exert upward pressure. 

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

It's super tight in there.  Maybe a small bottle jack,  just enough to exert upward pressure. 

Times & places like this is when a 10 tonne porta-power hydraulic ram is your friend... I've got the ram heads as small as 50mm high, only get 6mm of lift with one that short but you can always shim stuff up as you go.

FKT

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2 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Times & places like this is when a 10 tonne porta-power hydraulic ram is your friend... I've got the ram heads as small as 50mm high, only get 6mm of lift with one that short but you can always shim stuff up as you go.

FKT

Smart! I have a portapower. Thanks for reminding me. 

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4 minutes ago, Crash said:

No connection, just stumbled on it.  But looks like someone has done a bunch of work on this one...

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/94296

Looks well kept. The name on the side is...obnoxious. Too large. Cosmetically it's a little nicer than mine.  The new, opening ports are a big plus. I mean, mine open but they are tired, Beckson plastic ports.

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5 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Looks well kept. The name on the side is...obnoxious. Too large. Cosmetically it's a little nicer than mine.  The new, opening ports are a big plus. I mean, mine open but they are tired, Beckson plastic ports.

Yeah, name is way to big!  But if the boat is on the Great Lakes and the hull was painted in 2017, then chances are the name is vinyl and shouldn't be too hard to get off, and their shouldn't be any/too much sun bleaching of the paint?

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@Crash For sure, it's a sweet water boat which is highly desirable for a number of reasons.

Looking at that beautiful paint makes me grind my teeth. My boat deserves a hull finish as fine as that. I made room in the garage this weekend. I'm bringing the dinghy in to strip it in preparation for paint when it warms up. The dinghy will be my test/practice project to see if I'm capable of prepping and painting the mothership. 

@Hike, Bitches! is our resident Alexseal paint expert in these parts so I'll be enlisting his knowledge and experience. 

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1 hour ago, Crash said:

Yeah, name is way to big!  But if the boat is on the Great Lakes and the hull was painted in 2017, then chances are the name is vinyl and shouldn't be too hard to get off, and their shouldn't be any/too much sun bleaching of the paint?

My boat hull is painted with flag blue awlgrip.   When I bought the boat I changed the name removing the original name which had been on for 17 years.   When I removed it it was hard to see where it had been and after a couple of seasons I couldn't tell where it had been.

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Whew, supply chain and semiconductor shortages are really biting me in the ass.

In December a B&G Triton 2 display unit was $479-$499 pretty much everywhere and they were plentiful. I figured Ok, I'll buy one in February or March, maybe pick up a spring sale somewhere.

Last week, everywhere I checked, the price had jumped $100 and many places showed "out of stock."  Surprisingly, West Marine was the best price at $579. This week, the WM price had jumped $20 more to $599 but the Annapolis store had them in stock which meant that I could eliminate shipping costs.

Someone gave me a WM gift card for Xmas so I figured this is as good as it's going to get, and drove down there and picked one up. The manager said he got a shipment of 8 units in that morning and I was the 3rd one he sold that day.

The Triton display is pretty much the final piece in cleaning up the electronics after the Great Alternator Debacle of 2021.  The boat has a very modern suite of electro-bling now.  All I need to do is haul out and replace the transducer through hull fitting.

@IStream recommended these crimp-on pins for wires that you secure under pinch screws such as solar controllers and battery chargers. I bought a kit like this: Ferrule Crimping Tool Kit.  This is "the shit."  Way better than just shoving stranded wire under the screws and praying that you have enough metal-to-metal contact and a secure connection. I've finally installed them on all the charging systems.

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On 12/27/2021 at 7:45 AM, FixinGit said:

They had All the same symptoms as yours. 
Long story short, Someone had dropped a rusty old spanner into the lazarette, it was lodged between the exhaust hose and ruddershaft.. On port tack and/or certain rev range pump speed and water weight in exhaust hose was causing slight movement and contact and a harmonic noise they had never heard before...

10mm spanner theres was..Yours may be a different size of course:D 

The 10mm sockets and box ends are always the first thing to go missing.  One wonders how many of the phantom noises of the world are caused by this fiendish coalition of 10mm wrenches that have joined forces to go walkabout in the dark places of this world... 
 

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7 minutes ago, Lex Teredo said:

The 10mm sockets and box ends are always the first thing to go missing.  One wonders how many of the phantom noises of the world are caused by this fiendish coalition of 10mm wrenches that have joined forces to go walkabout in the dark places of this world... 
 

I don't think it's as bad as all that. All those lost socks tend to muffle the noises of the sockets and wrenches banging together.

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On 1/10/2022 at 12:27 PM, Ajax said:

Looks well kept. The name on the side is...obnoxious. Too large. Cosmetically it's a little nicer than mine.  The new, opening ports are a big plus. I mean, mine open but they are tired, Beckson plastic ports.

I am looking at this boat tomorrow. Owned byTartan parts guy. There is another one newly for sale in the area. Wife wants more cruising.

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