Jump to content

Girl with patreon account goes sailing in hot place


Recommended Posts

They also proudly vandalised their Rasmus:

Clueless from the get go. Good riddance, feel sorry for the new owner who has to fix that mess. 

And naturally they were hipsters spamming their vegan life bs all over Berlin-Neukölln before this. Christ. Older I get, more I think that pol pot was on to something 
 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 12k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

First of all I had a few klicks from my favorite sailing forum so I started to search for the tread. Found it! I'm the guy who bought that massive steel thing...  Regarding the mustache, I always

She is the daughter of a sailor Both yachts and RN She came to me fully trained she can hold a course,  cook good food on one ring, loves rowing, can double declutch a land rover and ha

Before Tesla was a thing, I converted a 1974 VW Beetle to 100% battery electric drive. People told me "You can't do that." I did it. I drove it all over the Washington DC/Baltimore region for 2 y

Posted Images

3 minutes ago, robtoujours said:

They also proudly vandalised their Rasmus:

Clueless from the get go. Good riddance, feel sorry for the new owner who has to fix that mess. 

And naturally they were hipsters spamming their vegan life bs all over Berlin-Neukölln before this. Christ. Older I get, more I think that pol pot was on to something 
 

That really cut me up, never went back to watch them after that. The millennial crap was painful as well.

Anyhoo, we looked at a nice Rasmus in Annapolis years ago, it’s a motorsailer, they originally had a big four cylinder Volvo that put out three times as much power as they need, and huge fuel tanks.

They were meant to motor with steadying sails, a sail issue shouldn’t be any sort of problem. I suspect those kids became scared at sea and gave up, the reefing line was just an excuse..
 

The sails 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, robtoujours said:

They also proudly vandalised their Rasmus:

 

Look, I'll be the first to admit I don't know that much about sailing and liveaboarding, but even to my eyes there were so many painful mistakes in that video I think I lost a couple of braincells... Standing desks? heeled over? Electronics storage under the companionway? A curtain to hold the draws in? Jesus....

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Fintho said:

Look, I'll be the first to admit I don't know that much about sailing and liveaboarding, but even to my eyes there were so many painful mistakes in that video I think I lost a couple of braincells... Standing desks? heeled over? Electronics storage under the companionway? A curtain to hold the draws in? Jesus....

Swan have been building standing nav stations for years.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, savoir said:

Swan have been building standing nav stations for years.

Yes, standing navstations used to be a big thing.  Another approach is an outboard-facing navstation with a swingout seat.

So I thought that removing the fwd-facing seats wasn't completely daft.  I doubt they had the ailing experience to  understand the consequences of not having a secure nav seat when in tough conditions, but in principle there's a reasonable case for that mod.

But what really annoyed me was hacking out that lovely mahogany and building the new set-up with plenty of softwood parts.  That was so clueless that it hurt to watch it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, jvodan said:

 

They spent the winter doing up a Hallberg Rassey Ramus with the intention of sailing around the world. 4 days in on the way to Bermuda, their first offshore passage, the reality sunk in.

Skip the tedium to the 47min mark tears start @ the 48 min.

In summary the fulling line broke due to chaffing. The guy dealt with the situation but she was traumatized.

The boat is now for sale in Bermuda. They are going to fly home and move inland to an off gird homestead.

They have over 300,000 subscribers from a previous van adventure. Just goes to show the girl doesn't need a bikini body

she may or may not have a bikini body but she/they ARE incredibly annoying

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

This. Sitting in my off grid place ATM, on a 600 acre property. I had to haul every bit of stuff up a 4WD track I'd cut with chainsaw and hand tools until I got a tractor to improve the track a bit. 1.5 km from the public road in a straight line, 2X that on the ground.

Pretty comfortable now but if anyone thinks it's easy, I invite them to actually do it and then let me know what they think. Just like boat building you'll need to be competent in a bunch of trades or be willing to learn from a lot of mistakes. Watch all the vids you like, it still doesn't prepare you for the actuality of digging post holes with a pick, mattock, crow bar & shovel, then concreting in the footings.

I'll be quite happy to get back to my home with 415V 3 phase power, air conditioned house, big workshop and of course - my boat.

FKT

I crawled out of bed at 4:30 this morning to reset the wind turbine circuit breaker because a 60mph gust front came thru. Then I was swapping out 500lb rain barrels in my PJs and slippers (in the pelting rain) before breakfast thinking, "This isn't for everyone".:lol:

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Zonker said:

My wife's comment about living on land:

"its so easy. You never worry about the apartment dragging"

Funnily enough my friends, who gave up their plans of sailing to Japan about this time last year and sold their boat, say much the same thing.

Also how nice it is not to have to row ashore to go for a walk.

And showers. And doing the laundry.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

I crawled out of bed at 4:30 this morning to reset the wind turbine circuit breaker because a 60mph gust front came thru. Then I was swapping out 500lb rain barrels in my PJs and slippers (in the pelting rain) before breakfast thinking, "This isn't for everyone".:lol:

I hear you - it was raining last night, my thoughts were whether it was going to be cloudy for a few days and if the PV array & battery bank could handle the refrigerator if so. New refrigerator, I really need to quadruple the battery bank so as to cope with extended cloudy conditions. Usual rule of thumb with PV stuff - assume you need 4X the nominal amount in panels and storage and you'll probably be OK.

Can't use wind really as I sited this place to be well out of the prevailing winds.

I have big water storage tanks so no swapping barrels. Rainwater storage is the standard thing in country Australia.

It's 15 km to the nearest small town with basic supplies. 100km to the next town with a half-decent hardware store.

I drove over 200km round trip yesterday to get approx 60% of the items on my list. The others, probably have to wait until I bring them up from Sydney. I can't hook up the 3rd PV panel unless I kludge stuff and I don't like to do that.

OTOH there's not a single covid case in the entire 12,000 plus local govt area so sitting in a coffee shop in the town 100km away and having a late breakfast while reading the paper was a nice change. First time in almost 3 months.

Now if only I could get permission to cross Bass Strait and get back to my permanent residence...

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Zonker said:

My daughter's comment "You don't have to bail out the car first to use it" after one big rainstorm filled the dinghy

I put davits on my boat just so my GF could go ashore for a walk without the major hassle of putting the Chameleon dinghy together and taking it off the cabin top. Then reversing the process because I hate towing a dinghy.

Towing a trailer is a lot less prone to disaster. No chance of getting the painter wrapped around your rear axle for starters.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

This is one of the main reasons why I always advocate that people should sail reasonably high-performance dinghies before they set out on keelboats.  ..................

If the water is warm and the club actually caters for dinghies it works. Here I’ve seen dinghies regularly put newbies off sailing, both kids teens and adults.  It’s a path for a competent sailor but it’s not the only path. A well mannered forgiving keelboat design has been the start of many of the sailors around here.  Both racing and cruising.

Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

................Now if only I could get permission to cross Bass Strait and get back to my permanent residence...

FKT

Coastwatch has been flying over southern coastal waters lately, low and  obvious......... Usually we only see them once every few years in Tas.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, MikeJohns said:

Coastwatch has been flying over southern coastal waters lately, low and  obvious......... Usually we only see them once every few years in Tas.

Well, there goes THAT plan...

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Yes, standing navstations used to be a big thing.  Another approach is an outboard-facing navstation with a swingout seat.

So I thought that removing the fwd-facing seats wasn't completely daft.  I doubt they had the ailing experience to  understand the consequences of not having a secure nav seat when in tough conditions, but in principle there's a reasonable case for that mod.

But what really annoyed me was hacking out that lovely mahogany and building the new set-up with plenty of softwood parts.  That was so clueless that it hurt to watch it.

 

9 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Yes, standing navstations used to be a big thing.  Another approach is an outboard-facing navstation with a swingout seat.

So I thought that removing the fwd-facing seats wasn't completely daft.  I doubt they had the ailing experience to  understand the consequences of not having a secure nav seat when in tough conditions, but in principle there's a reasonable case for that mod.

But what really annoyed me was hacking out that lovely mahogany and building the new set-up with plenty of softwood parts.  That was so clueless that it hurt to watch it.

If you really want to suffer take a look at the episode in which they strip out the wet locker and turn it into shelving.  Where the foulies went they didn't get around to telling us.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, jvodan said:

 

They spent the winter doing up a Hallberg Rassey Ramus with the intention of sailing around the world. 4 days in on the way to Bermuda, their first offshore passage, the reality sunk in.

Skip the tedium to the 47min mark tears start @ the 48 min.

In summary the fulling line broke due to chaffing. The guy dealt with the situation but she was traumatized.

The boat is now for sale in Bermuda. They are going to fly home and move inland to an off gird homestead.

They have over 300,000 subscribers from a previous van adventure. Just goes to show the girl doesn't need a bikini body

I don't usually watch these two, but the fact they were actually sailing got me to skim the video and catch the stressed out monologue.  I didn't realize they'd actually put the boat up for sale.  I figured they'd lick their wounds for a bit and maybe learn something before setting out on the next leg.

Watching (skimming) the next vid where they describe deciding to sell was painful.  They're hardly the first couple to realize that bluewater isn't for them, and fair enough - it's not everybody's cup of tea.  But most have the good grace and humility to realize that they got their asses kicked.  Not these two:  "Somewhere, out there, we arrived at a Thin Place..."  Whatever in the zarking fardwarks that is.

Had to laugh at the bit where she's delighted that they can sell their boat in Bermuda.  Isn't Bermuda one of the graveyards of bluewater dreams (like Panama, and Hawaii).  I can picture the guy on the other end of the phone calling over his shoulder:  "Hey Larry,  we got another code 3.  Throw it on the pile with the others, willya?"

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

most have the good grace and humility to realize that they got their asses kicked. 

The first time we went to bermuda, I made a ton of mistakes and we got our asses kicked biggly . . . . and I guess I am a bit sick in the head, but I loved every minute of it - woke me right up, made life real, engaged and pushed me. I felt a bit sorry for Beth as she was having less fun, but I knew she had a stainless steel spine and would recover just fine - as she did - many years later when we were in a storm she said actually reflected that it was terrific to have a big blow so early in our cruising because everything else since had just been a tempest in a teapot in comparison. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MikeJohns said:

Coastwatch has been flying over southern coastal waters lately, low and  obvious......... Usually we only see them once every few years in Tas.

We have booked tickets to Queensland late November, hope our bet pays off and we can bring the Valiant home before Christmas

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

We have booked tickets to Queensland late November, hope our bet pays off and we can bring the Valiant home before Christmas

The way things are going you can pick me up as extra crew as you go by.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

I live inland on an offgrid homestead. Shit breaks all the time. Ain't nobody gonna come fix it for you.

Why wait for shit to break? I can screw it up all by myself.

Just got back late last night from a week canoeing and hiking in Wells Gray Park.  Turn on the water, and... there is none. This morning, I notice the yard hydrant (stop-and-waste valve) was left on. For a week. Goodbye, 10,000 litres of water. I watered the greenhouse before we left, and I guess...

And after a week, my wife really, really wanted to wash her hair. Fortunately, it rained a bit overnight and we were able to get enough from the rooftop rainwater collector.

BTW, Wells Gray is incredible. Google Helmcken Falls (although Dawson Falls is actually more staggering). Canoeing is fantastic, but we did get caught in a T-storm which had us racing to shore, followed by a two hour paddle in a downpour to get back to the launch area. Could hardly stand up to get out of the boats, but after getting to back to basecamp, and opening a bottle of wine, we decided it was one of those adventures we could tell our grandchildren (except, they wouldn't care...)

And just to round this up with a reference to the trend CA has taken in the past week, we did the trip in a minivan that's approaching 400k km, and has been our home-away-from-home for many years. Vehicles are sterile until you've used them... lots.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, savoir said:

If you really want to suffer take a look at the episode in which they strip out the wet locker and turn it into shelving.  Where the foulies went they didn't get around to telling us.

Chances of getting wet at sea?    Like being hit by a wave, it's one in a million.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Corryvreckan said:

I don't usually watch these two, but the fact they were actually sailing got me to skim the video and catch the stressed out monologue. 

Out of curiosity, I skim-watched their latest two videos. And I realised who that Wild we roam" couple are.

She is a ten-year-old girl, and he is her puppy.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, estarzinger said:

The first time we went to bermuda, I made a ton of mistakes and we got our asses kicked biggly . . . . and I guess I am a bit sick in the head, but I loved every minute of it - woke me right up, made life real, engaged and pushed me. I felt a bit sorry for Beth as she was having less fun, but I knew she had a stainless steel spine and would recover just fine - as she did - many years later when we were in a storm she said actually reflected that it was terrific to have a big blow so early in our cruising because everything else since had just been a tempest in a teapot in comparison. 

 

Gale.png

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Quietly Competent Canadian does great job of communicating his experience of transitting the Dismal Swamp. Narrative falls apart a bit once they go offshore....because there is not much to say or film while doing 72 hour schlepps  creaming along through good weather in a well maintained boat..

The QCC put some visuals to my favourite North American cruising book...the boy, me and the cat

I commend it to you.

D

 

 

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Out of curiosity, I skim-watched their latest two videos. And I realised who that Wild we roam" couple are.

She is a ten-year-old girl, and he is her puppy.

I had originally thought he was the one with a bit of a realistic view (and wondered how on earth he put up with her in close quarters for extended periods).  But in their last, he's the one going on about what a magical/sublime/terrifying/mystical experience it was out there.  So I think he really is on her wavelength.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

I had originally thought he was the one with a bit of a realistic view (and wondered how on earth he put up with her in close quarters for extended periods).  But in their last, he's the one going on about what a magical/sublime/terrifying/mystical experience it was out there.  So I think he really is on her wavelength.

I do hope that that they are on drugs.  It would be dangerous to be that spacey without hallucinogenic assistance.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

Quietly Competent Canadian does great job of communicating his experience of transitting the Dismal Swamp. Narrative falls apart a bit once they go offshore....because there is not much to say or film while doing 72 hour schlepps  creaming along through good weather in a well maintained boat..

The QCC put some visuals to my favourite North American cruising book...the boy, me and the cat

I commend it to you.

D

 

 

 

 

I really like that guy, who reminds me of some of my Canadian in-law relatives. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

Bath salts may have induced this one

It is a huge shame that the power centres of this world have not devoted much effort to the War on Bath Salts.  The bath salt cartels and their local pushers are allowed to go about their wicked trade almost unhindered, turning minds to mush around the globe.  But the UN, the World Bank, the IMF, China, Russia, the EU, USA etc have no co-ordinated response.

It is suspected that bath salts may have been a key factor in the severe mental decline of the UK's Prince Charles, leading him to talk to flowers and develop a destructive paranoia about modern architecture while expressing a desire to be reincarnated as a tampon.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Zonker said:

My daughter's comment "You don't have to bail out the car first to use it" after one big rainstorm filled the dinghy

Cabriolet and freak snowstorm would change her mind. Friend got his Bimmer's sunroof stuck open and even that was pain.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/13/2021 at 5:43 AM, TwoLegged said:

This is one of the main reasons why I always advocate that people should sail reasonably high-performance dinghies before they set out on keelboats.  On a Laser or a 420 or 470 it doesn't take much wind to get into some wild situations where the boat is bucking in five dimensions and if you screw up at all you get to wear the hull as a hat.

[...]

These kids clearly never had that experience.

There's a mindset of dealing with adversity without giving up.  It isn't sailing specific.  Though a dinghy teaches these lessons well they can also be learned mountain climbing, backcountry camping, in the desert, aviation, scuba diving, etc.  The real, physical world isn't some bondage game where you can safeword out without consequences if it gets too scary (though people try with PLBs, EPIRBs, etc.)

There are parallels with smallholding.  Richard A. Coffey's book, Bogtrotter, captures some of the essence and the psychosocial factors well.  It was out of print for years but is now available for e-readers.  Later editions include an epilogue that describes he and his spouse's departure from the land and return to the city.  But the time scale with smallholding fiascos is different.  In a boat or while climbing things go to hell quickly and (in some cases at least) have to be dealt with immediately to survive.  In smallholding most of the consequences are longer term.  Farms, cabins, and smallholdings that fail (and I've seen many) ordinarily do so once the sum total of the patches and workarounds becomes untenable because nothing has been fixed properly for months or years.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, 2airishuman said:

There's a mindset of dealing with adversity without giving up.  It isn't sailing specific.  Though a dinghy teaches these lessons well they can also be learned mountain climbing, backcountry camping, in the desert, aviation, scuba diving, etc.  The real, physical world isn't some bondage game where you can safeword out without consequences if it gets too scary (though people try with PLBs, EPIRBs, etc.)

There are parallels with smallholding.  Richard A. Coffey's book, Bogtrotter, captures some of the essence and the psychosocial factors well.  It was out of print for years but is now available for e-readers.  Later editions include an epilogue that describes he and his spouse's departure from the land and return to the city.  But the time scale with smallholding fiascos is different.  In a boat or while climbing things go to hell quickly and (in some cases at least) have to be dealt with immediately to survive.  In smallholding most of the consequences are longer term.  Farms, cabins, and smallholdings that fail (and I've seen many) ordinarily do so once the sum total of the patches and workarounds becomes untenable because nothing has been fixed properly for months or years.

 

Just a passage I came across in my bedtime reading:

“So part of my job is to ease such dissonance, and measure men and ships, and do my best to put one man on a yawl and another on a schooner, one brother on a sloop and his twin on a steamer; for men are just as different as ships, and how they weather storms, and how they handle in high winds, and how grim their resolve when all is dark, and how much they will steal when no one is watching—these are things to be discovered only by living, for no man knows his own character until it endures some dirty weather. That is one true thing I have learned from my years at sea.”

— The Adventures of John Carson in Several Quarters of the World: A Novel of Robert Louis Stevenson by Brian Doyle
https://a.co/3Sdz8FP

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, 2airishuman said:

There's a mindset of dealing with adversity without giving up.  It isn't sailing specific.  Though a dinghy teaches these lessons well they can also be learned mountain climbing, backcountry camping, in the desert, aviation, scuba diving, etc.  The real, physical world isn't some bondage game where you can safeword out without consequences if it gets too scary (though people try with PLBs, EPIRBs, etc.)

There are parallels with smallholding.  Richard A. Coffey's book, Bogtrotter, captures some of the essence and the psychosocial factors well.  It was out of print for years but is now available for e-readers.  Later editions include an epilogue that describes he and his spouse's departure from the land and return to the city.  But the time scale with smallholding fiascos is different.  In a boat or while climbing things go to hell quickly and (in some cases at least) have to be dealt with immediately to survive.  In smallholding most of the consequences are longer term.  Farms, cabins, and smallholdings that fail (and I've seen many) ordinarily do so once the sum total of the patches and workarounds becomes untenable because nothing has been fixed properly for months or years.

 

The Wild we Roamers seem to have dealt with their (very minor) adversity in the moment, and completed their crossing.  Instead it seems that they just realized bluewater sailing was harder than they wanted to deal with. 

I've heard advice that you shouldn't announce specific cruising goals (e.g., to circumnavigate) before you set off because it makes anything less seem like a failure, and you feel pressured to continue even when it isn't working out.  I wouldn't argue for a never give up attitude just for an arbitrary goal.  (And I'd venture that never admitting defeat can sometimes lead to just as much trouble as giving up too soon).

But I'd have a lot more respect for these two if they'd tried sailing to see if they actually liked it before they made a bunch of ill advised modifications to their boat.  Instead, they self aggrandize for a year about their plans, then self aggrandize again about their decision to quit and do something else when it wasn't what they expected.  Alas their Patreons will likely keep enabling them.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Corryvreckan said:

The Wild we Roamers [...] Instead, they self aggrandize for a year about their plans, then self aggrandize again about their decision to quit and do something else when it wasn't what they expected.  Alas their Patreons will likely keep enabling them.

This sums up a lot of the nonsense out there.  Time was when people did their adventures (climbing all 7,000ers, circumnavigating under sail, skiing to the South Pole, etc) that they wanted to do and wrote a book about it *after* they got back (if they got back)...just sayin’ :-)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

This sums up a lot of the nonsense out there.  Time was when people did their adventures (climbing all 7,000ers, circumnavigating under sail, skiing to the South Pole, etc) that they wanted to do and wrote a book about it *after* they got back (if they got back)...just sayin’ :-)

Well that's because today's model is based on "fund my adventure, cheer me on, which will make you feel like part of my tribe."  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

This sums up a lot of the nonsense out there.  Time was when people did their adventures (climbing all 7,000ers, circumnavigating under sail, skiing to the South Pole, etc) that they wanted to do and wrote a book about it *after* they got back (if they got back)...just sayin’ :-)

A former member of our club, long passed away before I joined, has as their claim to fame that they were one of the first people to sail around the world and not write a book about it.  Just went out and enjoyed the trip.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Corryvreckan said:

A former member of our club, long passed away before I joined, has as their claim to fame that they were one of the first people to sail around the world and not write a book about it.  Just went out and enjoyed the trip.

"The brave dies perhaps two thousand deaths if he's intelligent. He simply doesn't mention them."
- Ernest Hemingway 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Corryvreckan said:

The Wild we Roamers seem to have dealt with their (very minor) adversity in the moment, and completed their crossing.  Instead it seems that they just realized bluewater sailing was harder than they wanted to deal with. 

I've heard advice that you shouldn't announce specific cruising goals (e.g., to circumnavigate) before you set off because it makes anything less seem like a failure, and you feel pressured to continue even when it isn't working out.  I wouldn't argue for a never give up attitude just for an arbitrary goal.  (And I'd venture that never admitting defeat can sometimes lead to just as much trouble as giving up too soon).

But I'd have a lot more respect for these two if they'd tried sailing to see if they actually liked it before they made a bunch of ill advised modifications to their boat.  Instead, they self aggrandize for a year about their plans, then self aggrandize again about their decision to quit and do something else when it wasn't what they expected.  Alas their Patreons will likely keep enabling them.

 

 

They can probably do a whole series of Utubes about how difficult it is to sell a sailboat, even one with a custom bespoke interior…

Link to post
Share on other sites

Impressed how mads has managed to keep the same style of presentation cruising as he did fettling. 

the repetition of stylistic elements and catchphrases are comforting for the audience, I think this must be some broadcasting trick for audience retention? I’ve noticed most of the popular channels do something like this 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Poor plucky.  

 

 

 

His voice has the wrong timbre for YouTube stardom. He also seems on the verge of depression a lot. Think he needs to get a job doing something wholesome for a while and get out of the public eye, tv presenting ain’t for everyone. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, toddster said:

I am shocked SHOCKED that Mads bought the wrong color of jerry cans.  And hasn’t actually got a dodger.

Eva seems nice.

The diesel-in-red-cans thing was a bit cringey.  And it will be horribly visible.

So far, I have seen too little of Eva to form a view, other than that she seems a bit bland and submissive.  Maybe she will be more assertive in future.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To be fair if I was her I would feel a bit weird being the new person not only on someone else’s boat but also on their celeb partners utoob channel. and without 5 years of broadcasting experience which mads now has

you need time to develop your own style and confidence which is harder when you are slotting in to someone else’s gig

and style / niche is important. Imagine free range sailing doing a “collab” with la vagabonde for example. Would be a train wreck tho maybe entertaining 

i do really like the tiny battlestar galactica dodger mads has though, for looks anyway

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, toddster said:

I am shocked SHOCKED that Mads bought the wrong color of jerry cans.  And hasn’t actually got a dodger.

Eva seems nice.  With their well-formatted patter, they could be the sailing Spencer and Kate.  Or maybe George and Gracy…

I think the trapezoidal windshield thingy qualifies as a dodger, but agree that some aditional canvas would be nice in the rain. Red containers have always been the universal colour for flammable liquids - IMO the yellow jerry cans for diesel are a relatively recent 'fashion designer choice'.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Jim in Halifax said:

I think the trapezoidal windshield thingy qualifies as a dodger, but agree that some aditional canvas would be nice in the rain. Red containers have always been the universal colour for flammable liquids - IMO the yellow jerry cans for diesel are a relatively recent 'fashion designer choice'.

I code mine as follows:

Red: unleaded petrol.

Yellow or black: diesel.

Green: pre-mixed 2 stroke fuel.

Nice to not have to guess.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Nice to not have to guess.

FKT

But then you don't get to enjoy the buzz from poly-aromatic hydrocarbons... ah, the bouquet of fresh summer diesel is unmistakable. Straight gas (petrol) versus two-stroke mix is more challenging.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Over here, blue seems to be the designer designated colour for kerosene (paraffin). You could add that to your palette FKT. Not sure who uses 5 gallon jugs of kero - maybe somebody who keeps a helicopter at home? Some kinds of portable heaters too, I suppose.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Israel Hands said:

Well you will all be happy to know that the Wild We Roamers have quickly moved onto their next adventure: homesteading in Hawaii. I DARE you to read the description they posted under this YT video without puking.

This pair are making me begin to agree with Rob

On 9/13/2021 at 12:15 PM, robtoujours said:

Older I get, more I think that pol pot was on to something

Pol Pot would have given them an opportunity to rediscover the dignity of manual labour and the superfluousness of food.  And best of all ... he would have taken away their camera

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hereabouts, the scheme is:

Red - gasoline

Yellow - diesel

Dark blue - kerosene

green/aqua - water

The ones at the farm co-op come with the name of the fluid embossed thusly.  But that doesn't stop some people from mis-using them.  As far as grades of fuel within a designation, you're on your own.  I put only 92 octane ethanol-free gas into the 5-gallon cans and mix two-stroke fuel in one-gallon cans.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used all red for diesel and gas. I knew the smaller 2 gallon one was gas for the outboard and the rest were diesel. 

I also had a dedicated external locker for them all. None of this "lash them all to the lifelines".

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Zonker said:

I used all red for diesel and gas. I knew the smaller 2 gallon one was gas for the outboard and the rest were diesel. 

I also had a dedicated external locker for them all. None of this "lash them all to the lifelines".

I think you wouldn't be allowed to have a YouTube sailing channel.   The abominable practice of lashing tanks to the lifelines seems to be compulsory for the vloggers.

Shame, 'cos you may look great in a bikini ;) 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Shame, 'cos you may look great in a bikini ;) 

Funny story. In 1996 we spent the summer in the Sea of Cortez on our first boat. Latitude 38 magazine sponsored "Sea of Cortex Cruiser's Race Week". It was a week of very casual racing, contests, and totally excessive amounts of partying. It still had a wet T shirt contest for the women.

Between my wife and I we won 9* bottles of rum. One of them was for the bikini contest. I was one of the top 4 finalists who each got a bottle of rum. My wife took a picture of me on stage, in her bikini and promptly mailed it off to my old workplace.

When I went back to Vancouver one year later for a visit and to do some work there as a contractor, there was my picture, on the bulletin board in the kitchen. FIRST thing one of my co-workers said upon my return was "Hey you look good in a bikini"
 

* the Race Committee only gave us 8 because they were worried about our health.

We won following contests/events
- bikini contest
- "guzzle beer / row dinghy 200m / guzzle beer / row dinghy back / guzzle beer"
(My wife won that; I don't drink beer)
- beach volleyball
- blindfold dinghy race, by a large margin
- sailing dinghy race
- three legged race
- 3 others I don't remember.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

20l is a good size for water cans.  One in each hand is just about manageable, and an incentive to stay fit.

Those metal ones look better than my white plastic jobbies.  But I fear that onlookers would think that I was preparing to invade Poland.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Zonker said:

Between my wife and I we won 9* bottles of rum.

[snipped]

* the Race Committee only gave us 8 because they were worried about our health.

Very wise.  8 bottles of rum per day is the safe limit.

And great story.  Sounds like a bundle of fun

Link to post
Share on other sites

Many of the young and affluent "adventure" types seem to be going in for these stackable cans in the 10L size.  They come in various colors and sizes and have clever mounting hardware and are hideously expensive.  They also appear to waste a lot of space.  A stack of these things seems to be more can than contents.

IMG_1144_heic-XL.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

We met one couple on an Outremer 38 who had finished the boat themselves. Super light. They had 1 forward locker partly filled with 10L plastic jugs of water. Every day you would go and get another jug of water.

- no pumps or moving parts
- no hoses or faucets
- easy to track consumption
- lots of redundancy if a jug leaks
- jugs can fit in odd spaces

Truly would appeal to the minimalist.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Very wise.  8 bottles of rum per day is the safe limit.

 

As the owner of a distillery, I have to disagree with that.  As would Capt'n Jack Sparrow...

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sculpin said:
3 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Very wise.  8 bottles of rum per day is the safe limit.

As the owner of a distillery, I have to disagree with that.  As would Capt'n Jack Sparrow...

It is great to see the industry committing itself to the promotion of safe drinking.

Personally, i went through a phase where I thought that two bottles of vodka at a party was safe.  Then my friends had to rescue my drinking pal who was unaware that he had bitten the top off his vodka bottle.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

It is great to see the industry committing itself to the promotion of safe drinking.

Personally, i went through a phase where I thought that two bottles of vodka at a party was safe.  Then my friends had to rescue my drinking pal who was unaware that he had bitten the top off his vodka bottle.

You need more friends, then 8 bottles of rum is easy...

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

Well you will all be happy to know that the Wild We Roamers have quickly moved onto their next adventure: homesteading in Hawaii. I DARE you to read the description they posted under this YT video without puking.

 

for the love of god, please,please no one EVER post these people again....please...I beg of you.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share