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She is the daughter of a sailor Both yachts and RN She came to me fully trained she can hold a course,  cook good food on one ring, loves rowing, can double declutch a land rover and ha

Before Tesla was a thing, I converted a 1974 VW Beetle to 100% battery electric drive. People told me "You can't do that." I did it. I drove it all over the Washington DC/Baltimore region for 2 y

I have watched these last few posts with interest I agree that I should put more effort in...... I also a agree that film making has changed. In one vid I made there was a 45 second shot....

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20 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

Well  I rather  enjoyed  that

I did too, which is why I shared it. It makes me want to get to NZ and circumnavigate the South Island. After of course we borrow @Fah Kiew Tu's mooring and machine shop in Taz. 

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10 hours ago, leuk said:

fap fodder

... and this, folks, is how new words and phrases enter the lexicon....   :P

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On 10/26/2019 at 5:13 AM, Presuming Ed said:

Around the UK in a ex-knackered Avon Searider - the original RIB. Pre jockey seats, so a real back killer. Bit of an oops on the first night, but more (well made) vids to come.

 

Minor issue this time. 

 

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On 5/5/2021 at 6:13 PM, Albatros said:

by the way, since this thread is going all over the place : octomum has just been outdone by a moroccan lady who gave birth to nine babies in one go, so bye bye octomum, all hail to novemum !!!
 

Dad:

601A015E-47CE-4700-AB16-A7F9892F258F.gif

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So this came up in my feed.  Very intense, I had a similar storm in October 2019 in Greece.  These two managed well.

 

 

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38 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Parlay

 

Who could have guessed that a floating condo the size of a tennis court stuck together with gobbetts of bondo by minimum wage slaves could ever fall apart.

On the bright side these things will not litter up marinas for that long

 

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You should see the state of some of these big rafts by the time they blow down this neck of the woods..

Bloody shocking

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38 minutes ago, wal' said:

You should see the state of some of these big rafts by the time they blow down this neck of the woods..

Bloody shocking

I see no reason why My over built 50 year old fisher 25 made of 1 inch thick grp should not go on for another century or so

As long as there are old blokes who want to sail in a cold place while standing in a warm wheelhouse.

 

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On 5/16/2021 at 6:39 AM, Dogscout said:

So this came up in my feed.  Very intense, I had a similar storm in October 2019 in Greece.  These two managed well.

 

 

I admired his efforts to keep the boat head into wind, but I can't imagine he had any headway for her to answer her helm.  I suspect the bow was just swinging back and forth through the wind on the anchor.  Glad they had a good hook down.  I'm sure that must have felt like a lot more than the 15 minutes or so that the storm lasted. 

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30 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

I admired his efforts to keep the boat head into wind, but I can't imagine he had any headway for her to answer her helm.  I suspect the bow was just swinging back and forth through the wind on the anchor.  Glad they had a good hook down.  I'm sure that must have felt like a lot more than the 15 minutes or so that the storm lasted. 

yes and kind of agree that with little or no steerage the impact will be limited. It does have some effect though from my experience.

What's more helpful is reducing the load on the anchor using the drive from the engine. This can help reduce the snatch loads and should prevent dragging.

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On 5/16/2021 at 5:39 AM, Dogscout said:

So this came up in my feed.  Very intense, I had a similar storm in October 2019 in Greece.  These two managed well.

 

 

In my two years watching Lake Worth, I'd say a squall like that comes 2-3x a year.  I remember watching them and wondering why the dinghy was still in the water. 

The parade of boats during the semi-annual cruising migration is interesting; from the sublime to the ridiculous. 

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5 hours ago, olaf hart said:

This is getting interesting, first Parlay has a series on repairing a twisted Lagoon cat, then another one.. 

 

There's a Facebook group for Lagoon 450 owners discussing this issue and repair. So far 40-50 owners have bent or broken bulkheads.

I no zilch about naval architecture or boat building but it surprises me that marine ply with very little fiberglass skin would be used for a structural component. Won't it eventually absorb water from the atmosphere (particularly in the tropics) and weaken? 

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1 hour ago, longhorn said:

There's a Facebook group for Lagoon 450 owners discussing this issue and repair. So far 40-50 owners have bent or broken bulkheads.

I no zilch about naval architecture or boat building but it surprises me that marine ply with very little fiberglass skin would be used for a structural component. Won't it eventually absorb water from the atmosphere (particularly in the tropics) and weaken? 

Without any through fasteners, the joint is only as strong as the weakest ply glue joint...

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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

Dry witted shit box sailing  brit brothers circumnavigate uk in five months

 

So are they turning right or left?

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12 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Dry witted shit box sailing  brit brothers circumnavigate uk in five months

 

The water in Cardiff looks like shit. Makes me feel better about our Chesapeake Bay.

"We're leaving at 0845 and we have no clothes on."

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42 minutes ago, Ajax said:

The water in Cardiff looks like shit. Makes me feel better about our Chesapeake Bay.

"We're leaving at 0845 and we have no clothes on."

I know a number of dinghy sailors who've been quite ill after sailing in Cardiff sewer, I mean harbor.

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42 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

I know a number of dinghy sailors who've been quite ill after sailing in Cardiff sewer, I mean harbor.

That's sad. I was hoping that it was just my imagination.

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Probably no point to it in that case, but in the US, organizers of some small boat races send me water samples a day or two ahead of time to test for pathogen loads and algal toxins. (Not soliciting anything here - trying to get serious about retirement! Your state may have a "free" program for this.)

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On 5/17/2021 at 4:47 AM, longhorn said:

Won't it eventually absorb water from the atmosphere (particularly in the tropics) and weaken? 

Really slowly though. Unpainted/unvarnished/uncoated plywood will last quite some time with no issues. Been on lots of boats with plain plywood drawers inside a chart table or made into a drawer that look just fine.

In this case it just looks like the structural engineering was maybe inadequate. Have to say I'm not a big fan of Plexus everywhere to bond things. Much rather have a few layers of glass tape and a proper thickened resin or foam fillet.

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On 5/17/2021 at 7:22 AM, Elegua said:

In my two years watching Lake Worth, I'd say a squall like that comes 2-3x a year.  I remember watching them and wondering why the dinghy was still in the water. 

The parade of boats during the semi-annual cruising migration is interesting; from the sublime to the ridiculous. 

Anyone paying any attention at all would have seen this storm coming and been watching it on a radar app. They have a lot to learn.

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1 hour ago, mookiesurfs said:

Anyone paying any attention at all would have seen this storm coming and been watching it on a radar app. They have a lot to learn.

You'd only need a radar at night.  if you miss the looming black clouds, the sudden gusts of cold wind, even mist of the  rain about to come.....I can't see how you'd be paying attention to the radar.  I had plenty of time to get the furniture off the balcony. 

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23 hours ago, Elegua said:

You'd only need a radar at night.  if you miss the looming black clouds, the sudden gusts of cold wind, even mist of the  rain about to come.....I can't see how you'd be paying attention to the radar.  I had plenty of time to get the furniture off the balcony. 

The radar helps determine the storm track and development to see if it’s a threat while the storm is still distant, say 20 miles or an hour away. Plenty of time to recover the dinghy, drop a second anchor, stow the Bimini, put an extra wrap on the sails, have the engines idling, batten down the hatches, put on goggles, and whatever else you think might be needed.

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23 minutes ago, mookiesurfs said:

The radar helps determine the storm track and development to see if it’s a threat while the storm is still distant, say 20 miles or an hour away. Plenty of time to recover the dinghy, drop a second anchor, stow the Bimini, put an extra wrap on the sails, have the engines idling, batten down the hatches, put on goggles, and whatever else you think might be needed.

I have a radar.  My point was simply that in daytime if you are aware, you really don't need it as the really big squalls tend to be pretty obvious and by my thinking it shouldn't take an hour to get ready. Probably I haven't been living aboard for long enough at a go, but I try very hard to keep my boat no more 15min from getting underway with no crap dragging, blowing, or falling over.  

BTW: I see a Taipan 4.9 in your sig - That's a really fun boat. I know it's not the most powered-up cat but it completely changed my perception of what performance meant and opened my eyes to apparent wind sailing. 

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33 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I have a radar.  My point was simply that in daytime if you are aware, you really don't need it as the really big squalls tend to be pretty obvious and by my thinking it shouldn't take an hour to get ready. Probably I haven't been living aboard for long enough at a go, but I try very hard to keep my boat no more 15min from getting underway with no crap dragging, blowing, or falling over.  

BTW: I see a Taipan 4.9 in your sig - That's a really fun boat. I know it's not the most powered-up cat but it completely changed my perception of what performance meant and opened my eyes to apparent wind sailing. 

Thank you for the compliment on the Taipan! It’s crazy how many compliments that boat gets and comments about what a good boat it is, even in the US.  Sailors I’m in awe of walk by and say “great boat, love those”.  I’ve worked my way from Taipans, to F-16s, to foiling A-cats, and back to Taipans. For where I race, I love it.

Your method is obviously solid. My point is, those two beginners have a lot to learn. They were clueless that they were going to whacked. That is no way to remain safe. Hopefully they’ve learned to be a little more aware.

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5 hours ago, mookiesurfs said:

The radar helps determine the storm track and development to see if it’s a threat while the storm is still distant, say 20 miles or an hour away. Plenty of time to recover the dinghy, drop a second anchor, stow the Bimini, put an extra wrap on the sails, have the engines idling, batten down the hatches, put on goggles, and whatever else you think might be needed.

And...pour yourself a stiff rum!

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So this is one recipe to be a YooTuube star. 

  1. Start with an otherwise good boat and ruin it with clutter and crap not just on the back, but everywhere.
  2. Turn your poor preventative maintenance and inability/lack of desire to find the root cause into drama
  3. Buddy boat with one of the more popular channels to give yourself YooTuube creditability. 

 

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I will blog my trip to Maine.

I hope my videos are a flop due to a complete lack of drama or equipment failure.

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6 hours ago, Ajax said:

I will blog my trip to Maine.

I hope my videos are a flop due to a complete lack of drama or equipment failure.

If there ain't no bikini shots we ain't watching.

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7 hours ago, Ajax said:

I will blog my trip to Maine.

I hope my videos are a flop due to a complete lack of drama or equipment failure.

Spill some water and claim to be sinking in a clickbaity title.

Good luck with your trip.

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For flat water, those tits sure do jiggle a lot.

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20 hours ago, Elegua said:

So this is one recipe to be a YooTuube star. 

  1. Start with an otherwise good boat and ruin it with clutter and crap not just on the back, but everywhere.
  2. Turn your poor preventative maintenance and inability/lack of desire to find the root cause into drama
  3. Buddy boat with one of the more popular channels to give yourself YooTuube creditability. 

 

Good on delos for helping

Bloody tiny tank

 

And

 

This thread is your friend

 

 

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On 5/22/2021 at 9:12 PM, olaf hart said:

Ever felt like buying a new catamaran?

 

H.O.L.Y F.U.C.K.

This has to be a wind up. This cannot be representative of new boats in general, surely?  

I'm now too scared to watch the Lagoon 450 video. 

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8 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

H.O.L.Y F.U.C.K.

This has to be a wind up. This cannot be representative of new boats in general, surely?

I was on a R&C 40 in St. Helena; they were on a delivery to the US. The delivery skipper said he did a trip from S.Africa to Thailand where that big front window you saw literally popped out a foot or so at the top. It was a mostly upwind trip and wave spray kept coming into the opening for days on end. When the boat got to Thailand the interior was pretty wrecked. Plywood does not like constant baths with salt water.

There were also lots of sharp corners and general shortcuts taken that were very obvious. For example the chart table was all sharp outside corners. To lift the lid, they had taken a triangular notch off the corner with a saw. No metal lift ring, not even a round hole. There was exposed end grain plywood stained off white. Looked like cheap Ikea.

Here's the inside of a 45. Note all the things that will hurt your hips if you fall against them in a seaway. That top window with the arrow is the window that the skipper said failed.

image.thumb.png.60ea9004292dd686d6c668ad31f1a532.png

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Here's a makeup table in the owner's hull. There's the triangular cut I was talking about to raise the lid.

And the exposed plywood edges. Just with some stain on them. I was too unkind to Ikea. At least they hide the particle board.

They look good at first glance, but after 5 minutes you see a lot of bad construction.

image.png.a5bca5e27cbedf620a0a789c88eedcc5.png

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8 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

This has to be a wind up. This cannot be representative of new boats in general, surely?  

Unfortunately I think it is - the difference is whether new owners are knowledgeable enough and/or have the patience to go through and snag every point like in that video. In fact I'd say it's almost a certainty that EVERY production boat goes out with a list of snags similar to this - it's a reality of the style of production with a mix of skilled/unskilled workforce, cost saving and time saving pressures, different departments working on top of each other etc. As the owner in the video said, it's not a truly automated production line - every boat has a lot of pieces that are installed/glued by a human who will have their own degrees of accuracy on different days. 

I work a lot on custom and semi-custom superyachts and race boats - no boat is symmetrical, no two 'identical' boats are the same. For production boats like the Leopards it's almost a case of luck as to whether you get one that just needs some cabinetry touch-ups or one that has serious issues like windows popping out (or in the case of the Irens 78 built by Green Marine, you bury the bows in your first Trans-At race and peel half the cabin roof off, flood the main salon and have a complete electrical black-out...)

 

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4 hours ago, Zonker said:

I was on a R&C 40 in St. Helena; they were on a delivery to the US. The delivery skipper said he did a trip from S.Africa to Thailand where that big front window you saw literally popped out a foot or so at the top. It was a mostly upwind trip and wave spray kept coming into the opening for days on end. When the boat got to Thailand the interior was pretty wrecked. Plywood does not like constant baths with salt water.

There were also lots of sharp corners and general shortcuts taken that were very obvious. For example the chart table was all sharp outside corners. To lift the lid, they had taken a triangular notch off the corner with a saw. No metal lift ring, not even a round hole. There was exposed end grain plywood stained off white. Looked like cheap Ikea.

Here's the inside of a 45. Note all the things that will hurt your hips if you fall against them in a seaway. That top window with the arrow is the window that the skipper said failed.

 

 

4 hours ago, NZK said:

Unfortunately I think it is - the difference is whether new owners are knowledgeable enough and/or have the patience to go through and snag every point like in that video. In fact I'd say it's almost a certainty that EVERY production boat goes out with a list of snags similar to this - it's a reality of the style of production with a mix of skilled/unskilled workforce, cost saving and time saving pressures, different departments working on top of each other etc. As the owner in the video said, it's not a truly automated production line - every boat has a lot of pieces that are installed/glued by a human who will have their own degrees of accuracy on different days. 

I work a lot on custom and semi-custom superyachts and race boats - no boat is symmetrical, no two 'identical' boats are the same. For production boats like the Leopards it's almost a case of luck as to whether you get one that just needs some cabinetry touch-ups or one that has serious issues like windows popping out (or in the case of the Irens 78 built by Green Marine, you bury the bows in your first Trans-At race and peel half the cabin roof off, flood the main salon and have a complete electrical black-out...)

 

I feel sick, I honestly didn't know this. If I had of, in hindsight I probably wouldn't have had the the balls to shell out for a new boat. This is all rather sobering, I am now super glad I didn't go for a production boat.

'Ignorance is bliss' has some merit after all.   

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8 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

 

I feel sick, I honestly didn't know this. If I had of, in hindsight I probably wouldn't have had the the balls to shell out for a new boat. This is all rather sobering, I am now super glad I didn't go for a production boat.

'Ignorance is bliss' has some merit after all.   

But ignorance is an awfully high price to pay for bliss.

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37 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

 

I feel sick, I honestly didn't know this. If I had of, in hindsight I probably wouldn't have had the the balls to shell out for a new boat. This is all rather sobering, I am now super glad I didn't go for a production boat.

'Ignorance is bliss' has some merit after all.   

This is one of the reasons the superyacht market is so active; some owners love the process of a new-build with all the decisions making, detailing etc and get bored after a few years of it being on the water. Others just want a boat so buy one of these 'cast-offs' that has already been through the warranty period and had all (most) of the snags fixed.... 

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14 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Good on delos for helping

Bloody tiny tank

 

And

 

This thread is your friend

 

 

Clearly not a member of our esteemed CA club. 

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8 hours ago, Zonker said:

I was on a R&C 40 in St. Helena; they were on a delivery to the US. The delivery skipper said he did a trip from S.Africa to Thailand where that big front window you saw literally popped out a foot or so at the top. It was a mostly upwind trip and wave spray kept coming into the opening for days on end. When the boat got to Thailand the interior was pretty wrecked. Plywood does not like constant baths with salt water.

There were also lots of sharp corners and general shortcuts taken that were very obvious. For example the chart table was all sharp outside corners. To lift the lid, they had taken a triangular notch off the corner with a saw. No metal lift ring, not even a round hole. There was exposed end grain plywood stained off white. Looked like cheap Ikea.

Here's the inside of a 45. Note all the things that will hurt your hips if you fall against them in a seaway. That top window with the arrow is the window that the skipper said failed.

image.thumb.png.60ea9004292dd686d6c668ad31f1a532.png

I thought that was a pic from a Yaletown condo real estate listing.  No way that’s a boat...

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I think all of these build quality issues is part of consumer culture now where everything is disposable.  Customers are willing to accept a certain level of quality knowing they will use it, then throw it away (sell).  I honestly dont think we are making boats today that will last for 30-40-50 years.  The plastic fantastics of the 70s and 80s are probably going to outlive the boats being manufactured this decade.  The used boat market of these latest generation boats are going to become a field of landmines.  I have heard and read here too many stories of boats disintegrating in the first foray into adverse weather with major breakage.  Scary stuff.

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5 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

 

I feel sick, I honestly didn't know this. If I had of, in hindsight I probably wouldn't have had the the balls to shell out for a new boat. This is all rather sobering, I am now super glad I didn't go for a production boat.

'Ignorance is bliss' has some merit after all.   

I think the Pogo are differnt shaggyb

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Dunno.  Friends of mine bought a big new mobo about 30 years ago that they were going to pay for in part with charter income.  It had all sorts of issues like the above.  There was some hassle between the factory and insurance about who would pay for repairs.  They got their boat fixed, but between that and damage from charters, the boat was always in the yard getting fixed, and not earning money on charters.  

So anyhow this isn't really a new thing.  Maybe the "lemons" get weeded out over time until only "good" old boats are left?

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12 hours ago, Zonker said:

Here's a makeup table in the owner's hull. There's the triangular cut I was talking about to raise the lid.

And the exposed plywood edges. Just with some stain on them. I was too unkind to Ikea. At least they hide the particle board.

They look good at first glance, but after 5 minutes you see a lot of bad construction.

image.png.a5bca5e27cbedf620a0a789c88eedcc5.png

Not defending the workmanship, but exposed multi-ply edge is a longtime Scanda design aesthetic.

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/gypsyandwillow/plywood-edge/

Hardwired into Danish Modern construction. It's actually an offshoot of English arts&crafts, celebrating honesty in materials and construction techniques. Reaction to two centuries of elaborate veneering, carved acanthus leaves, plaster Louis XIV mantelpieces, etc.

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1 hour ago, Diarmuid said:

Not defending the workmanship, but exposed multi-ply edge is a longtime Scanda design aesthetic.

Fine for Ikea household furnishings, but exposed end grain has no place in yacht joinery. Only common sense in a humid to wet environment...

default.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Not defending the workmanship, but exposed multi-ply edge is a longtime Scanda design aesthetic.

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/gypsyandwillow/plywood-edge/

Hardwired into Danish Modern construction. It's actually an offshoot of English arts&crafts, celebrating honesty in materials and construction techniques. Reaction to two centuries of elaborate veneering, carved acanthus leaves, plaster Louis XIV mantelpieces, etc.

ya just gotta spring for the good ply

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1 hour ago, chester said:

ya just gotta spring for the good ply

And then apply lots of coats of 'penetrating' epoxy (which of course, doesn't...)

FKT

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7 hours ago, chester said:

ya just gotta spring for the good ply

Yes. But even MDO or ABX is fine if you apply a sealant to exposed edges. For which purpose, BTW, penetrating epoxy is not great unless you use enuf to plasticize the xylem 6" deep. Wanna seal the fark out of plywood edges? Run a bead of Six10 epoxy along them, trowel it smooth, scrape the excess off the face/edge corner with a putty knife, and set the panel aside. In 45 minutes, your plywood is ready to install, and the edges are likely less absorbant than the face veneers.

Latex paint is pretty effective, too. Sawmills and woodturners use it to prevent end-checking.

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7 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Yes. But even MDO or ABX is fine if you apply a sealant to exposed edges. For which purpose, BTW, penetrating epoxy is not great unless you use enuf to plasticize the xylem 6" deep. Wanna seal the fark out of plywood edges? Run a bead of Six10 epoxy along them, trowel it smooth, scrape the excess off the face/edge corner with a putty knife, and set the panel aside. In 45 minutes, your plywood is ready to install, and the edges are likely less absorbant than the face veneers.

Latex paint is pretty effective, too. Sawmills and woodturners use it to prevent end-checking.

I wish I'd known this when I replaced my cabin sole. I sealed the backs and edges with penetrating epoxy but it was insufficient.

Structurally the cabin sole is fine, I just have a small stain in one corner when my starboard water tank developed a leak. The leak is fixed but the discoloration is permanent.

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

I wish I'd known this when I replaced my cabin sole. I sealed the backs and edges with penetrating epoxy but it was insufficient.

Structurally the cabin sole is fine, I just have a small stain in one corner when my starboard water tank developed a leak. The leak is fixed but the discoloration is permanent.

One really wild property of epoxy -- and especially notable with thickened, pre-cured epoxies like WEST's outstanding Six10 product -- is its thixotropy. Also known as 'shear thinning.' You've probably observed it: as you tool epoxy, its viscosity goes down and it flows (or sags, frustratingly). When you stop working it, it thickens. Tool it some more, it goes runny again. Add to this some exothermic thinning, and you get a thick, sticky adhesive that will briefly flow and penetrate quite small cracks & surface features. Judicious use of a vibration source, hair dryer and/or shop vac lets you do some fun tricks with epoxy. ;) 

Upshot is Six10 wicks/keys into end grain pretty well, but enuf stays on the surface to supply what amounts to waterproof edgebanding. It's moderately flexible. It's moderately clear. Expensive by the ounce, and you achieve the same effect cheaper stirring your own goop and applying with a Dollar Store cake decorating funnel -- but I do love me some Six10 mixing wand convenience! :)

 

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On 5/6/2021 at 12:11 AM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Speaking of Doodles, one of the most exciting ones yet:

 

We were next to them in yacht haven, they certainly make an entrance.

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16 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

You mean her tits specifically, or those people?

It’s quite nice when tits are supported by a solid ass-and-thigh superstructure too

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On 5/24/2021 at 1:53 PM, shaggybaxter said:

H.O.L.Y F.U.C.K.

This has to be a wind up. This cannot be representative of new boats in general, surely?  

I'm now too scared to watch the Lagoon 450 video. 

 

As bad as this looks, they did not get into the pass the buck game if something big goes bad with an installed system. The gearbox fails, the owner contacts the broker who declines responsibility and says call the boat manufacturer. They claim it is the responsibility of the engine maker, who then states it was a problem with the install, and back the owner goes to the broker. They say they did not do it, it was a subcontractor, now out of buisness. That ends up being irrelevant since they claim it is was actually the fault of the buyer who must have put in the wrong oil. By this time the boat is miles away frrom the dealer and the company says it needs to be inspected by a factory authorized shop, 200 miles away.

One example, 

 

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6 hours ago, darth reapius said:

 

Thoughts

Nice arse

Mooring up to a fishing bouy !!!

Goodonem for having the camera running.

No hand held radio

She got stuck in fixing the engine

What about cutting it all free?

Bolt cutters

d

 

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Wow.  A youtube video that didn't have fake drama.  Dismasting is pretty serious.  Well handled I think, but, I agree, I would probably have cut it all loose.  Doesn't take much to hole the boat and then you really are screwed pretty hard.

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Should have spent their money on rigging instead of camera gear to become u-tube stars.  She does have a nice ass though, and a pleasant voice.  Its entertainment to us, and there are plenty of fools to watch.

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16 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Thoughts

Nice arse

Mooring up to a fishing bouy !!!

Goodonem for having the camera running.

No hand held radio

She got stuck in fixing the engine

What about cutting it all free?

Bolt cutters

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Agree about the nice arse.

The boat was a death trap anyway so it's not a surprise that the rig went. Did you notice that it had an offset companionway?

FKT

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15 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Agree about the nice arse.

The boat was a death trap anyway so it's not a surprise that the rig went. Did you notice that it had an offset companionway?

FKT

I am still weirded out about using a fishing float as a mooring....

 

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18 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Thoughts

Nice arse

Mooring up to a fishing bouy !!!

Goodonem for having the camera running.

No hand held radio

She got stuck in fixing the engine

What about cutting it all free?

Bolt cutters

d

 

They were in SE Asia right? So cutting shit free would be an option if the boat was in danger. Otherwise, boat things are hard to come by in those parts. Try getting a custom mast made or lots of boat things.

<edit> Nice arse

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On 5/26/2021 at 11:32 AM, Diarmuid said:

One really wild property of epoxy -- and especially notable with thickened, pre-cured epoxies like WEST's outstanding Six10 product -- is its thixotropy. Also known as 'shear thinning.' You've probably observed it: as you tool epoxy, its viscosity goes down and it flows (or sags, frustratingly). When you stop working it, it thickens. Tool it some more, it goes runny again. Add to this some exothermic thinning, and you get a thick, sticky adhesive that will briefly flow and penetrate quite small cracks & surface features. Judicious use of a vibration source, hair dryer and/or shop vac lets you do some fun tricks with epoxy. ;) 

 

Yes, I developed thixotropy at the age of 52. As you tool the viscosity goes down and sags frustratingly. Stop working it, and later, it thickens. Damn. Tool it some more, runny again. I will not comment on penetrating the small crack and surface features, but will attest to judicious use of a vibration source and a little blue pill, but strong NO zone the hair dryer and shop vac.

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