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Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object


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Yep yep yep mee too! :-) I have a set of pics showing my wand crane (gantry?) repair. https://photos.app.goo.gl/VGT5NJFv2jS8HC2f9

Put a waxed stick to ensure the path for the rod clear -- holes are aligned, and it doesn't get blocked by glue. In my pictures (linked above), it'll be a chopstick. I save the chopsticks from sushi takeaways to mix and apply epoxies in small repairs, and in this case... wax it and use it for alignment and keeping the way clear.

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I’ve mentioned to a few folks about the challenges I face foiling in Savannah to include the tidal currents which can be very strong.  This past weekend I was working a section of the Wilmington River

Clean: not so sure the UFO is slower than. Waszp.  Dave has cuffed more than one or two around, but that could also be pilot differentiation. But to repeat and reiterate, we weren’t trying t

Actually not commenting on the above video but I don't want it to get buried by my Fulcrum update for the holidays, so i'm responding to it to keep it in frame. Martin is conveying what I'd love to co

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Fixed and back on the water.  I’ve got some more work to do to make it less ugly, but it works.  Somewhere along the line, I lost the cotter pin and ring ding for the flap actuator cam.  In a mad scramble to find something to get me back on the water, I scavenged a bolt and nut from my kids’ Red Flyer wagon which fits nearly perfectly — only about 1/2 cm too long, but allows the cam to rotate freely and less of a snag hazard.  Really appreciate the tips from this forum.

https://youtu.be/bD2Z96Twq1k

B57717AD-EB98-4748-8B96-0D5E217C6868.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Kelly Federal said:

Fixed and back on the water.  I’ve got some more work to do to make it less ugly, but it works.  Somewhere along the line, I lost the cotter pin and ring ding for the flap actuator cam.  In a mad scramble to find something to get me back on the water, I scavenged a bolt and nut from my kids’ Red Flyer wagon which fits nearly perfectly — only about 1/2 cm too long, but allows the cam to rotate freely and less of a snag hazard.  Really appreciate the tips from this forum.

https://youtu.be/bD2Z96Twq1k

B57717AD-EB98-4748-8B96-0D5E217C6868.jpeg

Sail fast and no-one will notice the finish of the repair ;-)

My son just read (over my shoulder) about your scavenging, and is busy hiding his wagon. I think that's a standard-size clevis pin, but I don't have size details or measurements. You'll want to replace it with a stainless steel part, before it rusts away.

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Great video Kelly!

Speaking of great videos I got a total jolt on instagram this weekend by one of our most recent (like a month ago) customers up in Toronto when he posted this.


This is from outing #2 and he's starting to get in the groove and learn solid lessons and it is not warm up there right now. Great growth! Great attitude! Unbelievable video editing and humor!

DRC

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52 minutes ago, Dave Clark said:


This is from outing #2 and he's starting to get in the groove and learn solid lessons and it is not warm up there right now. Great growth! Great attitude! Unbelievable video editing and humor!

DRC

Soooo funny. The truth is indeed out there...

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1 hour ago, Dave Clark said:

This is from outing #2 and he's starting to get in the groove and learn solid lessons and it is not warm up there right now. Great growth! Great attitude! Unbelievable video editing and humor!

Wow, I really need to up my editing game.  That said, I’d rather be on the water foiling than editing.  I’m just happy I figured out how to get multiple clips into one video...

 

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1 hour ago, Dave Clark said:

Great video Kelly!

Speaking of great videos I got a total jolt on instagram this weekend by one of our most recent (like a month ago) customers up in Toronto when he posted this.


This is from outing #2 and he's starting to get in the groove and learn solid lessons and it is not warm up there right now. Great growth! Great attitude! Unbelievable video editing and humor!

DRC

This is fantastic! Get this chap into SA so we learn about his camera mounts.

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23 minutes ago, Kelly Federal said:

Wow, I really need to up my editing game.  That said, I’d rather be on the water foiling than editing.  I’m just happy I figured out how to get multiple clips into one video...

 

@Kelly Federal - your upwind heel angle is fantastic. Digging into it. Wish I had the stamina to hold it. 

Also, people are turning up with these nice color sails. And lots of telltales. Where'd they come from? 

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52 minutes ago, martin 'hoff said:

@Kelly Federal - your upwind heel angle is fantastic. Digging into it. Wish I had the stamina to hold it. 

Also, people are turning up with these nice color sails. And lots of telltales. Where'd they come from? 

White sails were introduced in June replacing green. If you want different colors, vinyl accents can always go on a white background, so it actually enables greater diversity without requiring us to octuple our sail production pipeline. Regarding, telltales: I hit Jody at North in the head with a 2X4 a few times to get the point through about telltales. This spring I switched to a glavanized steel pipe and that seems to have got the point across. 

DRC

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Kelly has certainly upped the UFO game when it comes to video editing.  The clips of early aviators, the music (did he compose and perform the score himself :-))   Well done!   The answers to many of his questions can be found on the first 27 pages of this thread (that's only 2700 posts to read).   If he posts on here in person, I'm sure we'll offer specific advice.   Bad news, however.   While I agree that the truth is out there, many of us have been looking for it for the better part of three years and are finding out that in only reveals itself in parts, very slowly.   But this sailor has the right attitude, and will certainly begin to untangle the deep dark mysteries of the foil very quickly.

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On 10/14/2020 at 8:53 PM, Kelly Federal said:

I thought I remember seeing something about this, but 27 pages in now, I can’t find it:

Looking for a reason/solution to why I can’t position the main foil pin more aft than the middle (#3) position.  I’m generally sailing light winds here in Savannah, so would love just a little more lift.

Oh..and and I hit a manatee last weekend.  Not foiling, thankfully.  But sprit/tang/actuator busted.  Kirk and Dave are sending some spare parts...attempting to patch things up myself with their help for now.  Will post pictures of my Frankenstein when it’s done.

 

 

Kelly, I interpreted your question as why shouldn't you position the main foil in the aft 2 positions.   It should definately be mechanically possible.   I've tried it several times, as you suggest, in lighter air to try to get  earlier liftoff.   In my experience, it simply creates more drag, and the boat goes slower, so you are actually farther from takeoff.    I've measured the boatspeed with my speedpuck in 6-8 knots of breeze and I seem to lose about a knot of boatspeed pulling the mainfoil back to one notch behind the middle position.   I'm 180 pounds, perhaps this technique would work with a lighter skipper.    Or, you may be able to tune your sail for more power than i got from mine.   But I have not found any scenario where the aft two settings work for me.

 

By the way, 'hitting a manatee'   definately the coolest way to break a UFO part.   Hopefully the manatee wasn't injured.   

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22 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Kelly, I interpreted your question as why shouldn't you position the main foil in the aft 2 positions.   It should definately be mechanically possible.   I've tried it several times, as you suggest, in lighter air to try to get  earlier liftoff.   In my experience, it simply creates more drag, and the boat goes slower, so you are actually farther from takeoff.    I've measured the boatspeed with my speedpuck in 6-8 knots of breeze and I seem to lose about a knot of boatspeed pulling the mainfoil back to one notch behind the middle position.   I'm 180 pounds, perhaps this technique would work with a lighter skipper.    Or, you may be able to tune your sail for more power than i got from mine.   But I have not found any scenario where the aft two settings work for me.

 

By the way, 'hitting a manatee'   definately the coolest way to break a UFO part.   Hopefully the manatee wasn't injured.   

Yes — I’m 140 lbs, and the wind is frequently at or below foiling speed here in Savannah.  Plus, I’m on one of the interior islands on a river, so light and puffy is almost an everyday occurrence.  Because of that, I thought that notch #4 could get me that elusive take-off in light conditions, then once on the foils I wouldn’t really care about the added drag.  I was out in about 6-8 kts yesterday, and I just couldn’t quite get her up.  Rig tension was cranked on first, then cunningham, then just barely some outhaul to take out most of the wrinkles caused by the proud mast.  I’m going to try sanding the cutout to get enough room to get to #4.

Regarding the manatees — yes, a sad event all around.  Broken sprit and potentially injuring wildlife; but I wasn’t going fast and I saw them swim away after I got the boat back in control.  It was their lateral movement across/under my bow which ripped the sprit off the tang.

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Backward sailing:

Yesterday evening I was caught in a precarious position getting back to the dock: The dying breeze was blowing directly from where I needed to go and the current was picking up and pushing me away from the dinghy dock which was my target.  I made the first of what I knew was going to many heisman tacks, losing valuable distance each time in doing so.  When I got about two feet from a dock I tried to turn directly up wind and grab a hold, but the boat just stalled out and I again started getting pushed downwind.  After trying to backwind, gybe, anything to at least bail out and try again, I realized that when I pulled the wishboom in tight, the leech was acting like a luff and I was actually sailing backward — not back winded, just creating lift from the opposite direction.

I had to be very gentle with the rudder, but essentially I went from a forward close-hauled port tack to a close-hauled port tack in reverse, repeating about three times to work my way upwind.  The result was that I didn’t lose any ground because of tacks, and when I finally had the dinghy dock made I had plenty of room and control to get there.

It was a strange discovery, but very useful; so I’m sharing it here in case anyone else could use this.

backward sailing.jpg

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1 hour ago, Kelly Federal said:

Backward sailing:

Yesterday evening I was caught in a precarious position getting back to the dock: The dying breeze was blowing directly from where I needed to go and the current was picking up and pushing me away from the dinghy dock which was my target.  I made the first of what I knew was going to many heisman tacks, losing valuable distance each time in doing so.  When I got about two feet from a dock I tried to turn directly up wind and grab a hold, but the boat just stalled out and I again started getting pushed downwind.  After trying to backwind, gybe, anything to at least bail out and try again, I realized that when I pulled the wishboom in tight, the leech was acting like a luff and I was actually sailing backward — not back winded, just creating lift from the opposite direction.

I had to be very gentle with the rudder, but essentially I went from a forward close-hauled port tack to a close-hauled port tack in reverse, repeating about three times to work my way upwind.  The result was that I didn’t lose any ground because of tacks, and when I finally had the dinghy dock made I had plenty of room and control to get there.

It was a strange discovery, but very useful; so I’m sharing it here in case anyone else could use this.

backward sailing.jpg

Wow! That's impressive. Would love to know more – see a video, etc – about this technique.

Also, see recent posts (about 10 posts back) about a much smoother tack where the key new trick is a delay in popping the battens on the new tack. 

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9 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

Wow! That's impressive. Would love to know more – see a video, etc – about this technique.

 Also, see recent posts (about 10 posts back) about a much smoother tack where the key new trick is a delay in popping the battens on the new tack.

Will keep an eye out for the opportunity to film this.

I did these maneuvers in wind-surfing mode — standing up and controlling the wishboom with one hand, and other hand on the tiller.  In this case, I was on a port tack, holding the wishboom with my right hand (greater leverage further from the mast) and my left hand had the tiller extension behind my back.  In reverse mode, the wishboom was past centerline with the clew acting as the tack and the leech acting as the luff.  When I was ready to switch from reverse to forward, I eased the main until it started generating lift in the “right” direction, adding a little pump to get it going, and gently adding rudder input to come up into the wind as close as I dared.

The hardest part is this: switching from “forward” to “reverse” — and I think the light wind was key here.  Not sure this could be done >5kts.  Essentially I eased the main to as close to no-power or even slightly backwinded but WITHOUT popping any battens.  When reverse flow was established on my centered rudder, I added input to steer the stern upwind.  Then I gently pulled in the main past centerline to set it up in reverse mode.  There was a little pause there because the pressure caused by pulling the sail in slows or stops reverse travel, but once I got the sail generating lift in reverse, flow started again and voila — I’m on a close-hauled tack in reverse.

When I did this on Monday, I actually had the dinghy ramp made after two iterations of this; but because it was such a freaky situation, I decided to just do one more reverse-forward maneuver just to prove to myself that what I was seeing was happening and that it could be replicated.  FWIW, both foils were fully deployed.  I was standing as far forward and as close to centerline as possible for most of this.

We don’t, of course, look to launch these boats in light wind.  But if you find yourself where the wind dies or you’re in a wind shadow and you are facing away from where you want to go, keep in mind that you might be able to use this reverse mode.

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4 hours ago, Kelly Federal said:

Will keep an eye out for the opportunity to film this.

I did these maneuvers in wind-surfing mode — standing up and controlling the wishboom with one hand, and other hand on the tiller.  In this case, I was on a port tack, holding the wishboom with my right hand (greater leverage further from the mast) and my left hand had the tiller extension behind my back.  In reverse mode, the wishboom was past centerline with the clew acting as the tack and the leech acting as the luff.  When I was ready to switch from reverse to forward, I eased the main until it started generating lift in the “right” direction, adding a little pump to get it going, and gently adding rudder input to come up into the wind as close as I dared.

The hardest part is this: switching from “forward” to “reverse” — and I think the light wind was key here.  Not sure this could be done >5kts.  Essentially I eased the main to as close to no-power or even slightly backwinded but WITHOUT popping any battens.  When reverse flow was established on my centered rudder, I added input to steer the stern upwind.  Then I gently pulled in the main past centerline to set it up in reverse mode.  There was a little pause there because the pressure caused by pulling the sail in slows or stops reverse travel, but once I got the sail generating lift in reverse, flow started again and voila — I’m on a close-hauled tack in reverse.

When I did this on Monday, I actually had the dinghy ramp made after two iterations of this; but because it was such a freaky situation, I decided to just do one more reverse-forward maneuver just to prove to myself that what I was seeing was happening and that it could be replicated.  FWIW, both foils were fully deployed.  I was standing as far forward and as close to centerline as possible for most of this.

We don’t, of course, look to launch these boats in light wind.  But if you find yourself where the wind dies or you’re in a wind shadow and you are facing away from where you want to go, keep in mind that you might be able to use this reverse mode.

UFO shunting.  Whodathunkit?

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On 10/21/2020 at 12:23 PM, efrank said:

UFO shunting.  Whodathunkit?

Ok...didn’t know what shunting was, so had to look it up.  Not sure I could call what I did shunting because I did not reverse the rig...

...I tried to do this again yesterday, but with a tad bit more breeze with no luck: the force on the sail was just too much to control and the boat just accelerated downwind.

But because the wind was greater than 5-ish knots, I had more directional control and better vmg anyway so could work my way up to the proper dock with no issues.  As of now, I’ll just keep the pseudo-shunting technique for super-light breeze in a pinch for tight maneuvering.

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Okay, I might as well admit it now.

Becoming competent with the UFO has been more of a challenge than I expected.  Way too much of my time has been fighting bad sailing locations and/or bad conditions.  Bad sailing locations have contributed to a lot of damage requiring lots of repair efforts. 

However, even with good conditions, my progress has been slow. 

The physical demands of learning to foil this thing are also pushing this old man uncomfortably close to his limits (especially as I sail solo).  That and my "limits" seem to be rapidly getting worse these days. 

I do plan to continue to work on my UFO sailing, but I am restarting my small tri test platform effort. 

I will use a mix of old parts and UFO parts to try to assemble a boat that foils, requires less water depth, involves less swimming and dunkings and is generally easier on this old man.  Control lines will be used to lower / raise each of the 2 main foils.  It will probably be slower "around the cans",  but racing is not part of my needs.  The boat will require swapping the "down foil" at tacks (similar to an AC 75 but a whole lot slower).  The re-build part of the effort will be a good winter project.  I have started posting again at my old boat design net thread if anyone is interested in this effort.  https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/small-tri-test-platform.51551/page-5#post-890892 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/8/2020 at 2:32 PM, Kelly Federal said:

Great day for foiling in Savannah yesterday.  Tried out the new GoPro.  Strung together 3-4 legitimate tacks (no backing down out of irons).  Caught one of them on video...

 

This is what it's all about. Seriously.

DRC

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Great Video, Kelly!  You have me regretting putting my UFO away for the season....   I don't know much about go pros or making videos, but clearly your camera has some sort of motorized gimbal on it that lets it spin around to look backwards at you driving, or forwards where the boat is going.  How does the camera 'know' which way to point?  Does it simply follow some pre-programmed schedule?   Its a great looking video!

Doug

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1 hour ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Great Video, Kelly!  You have me regretting putting my UFO away for the season....   I don't know much about go pros or making videos, but clearly your camera has some sort of motorized gimbal on it that lets it spin around to look backwards at you driving, or forwards where the boat is going.  How does the camera 'know' which way to point?  Does it simply follow some pre-programmed schedule?   Its a great looking video!

Doug

@Kelly Federal video is amazing. The camera, I think, is a 360 camera, and the panning is done in editing...

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3 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Great Video, Kelly!  You have me regretting putting my UFO away for the season....   I don't know much about go pros or making videos, but clearly your camera has some sort of motorized gimbal on it that lets it spin around to look backwards at you driving, or forwards where the boat is going.  How does the camera 'know' which way to point?  Does it simply follow some pre-programmed schedule?   Its a great looking video!

Doug

Martin is right: it’s a GoPro Max which has a mode that records 360 degrees and stitches together the fields of view from the front camera and rear camera — it even will stitch out a selfie stick so that it looks like it’s drone footage.  Then the field of view is chosen during the editing process.  When the lenses get wet, the refraction of light through water is challenging for the software to do the stitching, so you can see the “seam.”  Because the UFO is a wet and fast environment, the seam is almost insignificant compared to the natural splashing that hits the camera.

I don’t have the mounting figured out yet.  For the video above, I just used a suction cup mount that came with an attachment package.  Ideally, I’d have a single pole mount, like a selfie stick so the GoPro can stitch it out of view, that is 2-3 feet forward of the hulls and slightly elevated.  The sprit seems like a natural choice, but there’s a lot of vibration there.  Plus, my sprit is in a tenuous state as it is thanks to a manatee collision, so added weight on the front of it makes me nervous.

I’m considering putting some kind of beam between the bows upon which I can mount the camera; or secure a selfie stick to the spreaders for a side view.  Would love to hear from someone who has mounted a camera forward from any place other than the sprit.

Back to the camera — I think the GoPro Max is ideal for the UFO having used it a few times now.  Just mount it, turn it on, and go foiling.  The video below was a trial run when I first got the camera.  You can get a glimpse of how the selfie stick that I was holding got automatically stitched out of the picture.  Total editing time was less than two minutes with the embedded GoPro software.

 

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On 10/19/2020 at 2:16 PM, martin 'hoff said:

This is fantastic! Get this chap into SA so we learn about his camera mounts.

Martin,

That's Alex By***o. Follow him on Insta. His name is Grand Fromage.

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Damn you guys are amazing with the videos. I am just happy to go sailing/foiling. Video making sounds like work but great fun to watch when I can’t sail so thanks! Oh and sorry to read about the manatee mess. Don’t have those issues up in the Chesapeake. 

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1 hour ago, Wess said:

Video making sounds like work

I got off the water from foiling, put the boat away, started the download from the camera to my phone before driving to pick up a kid from school.  The raw footage download was complete upon arrival in the carpool line — about 4 minutes.  Did a quick scan through about 35 minutes of footage, marking the highlights and framing the POV; then hit “Render” just as the kids were let out and the line started moving.  Had the video above ready to show my kid when he got into the car. 

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11 minutes ago, Kelly Federal said:

I got off the water from foiling, put the boat away, started the download from the camera to my phone before driving to pick up a kid from school.  The raw footage download was complete upon arrival in the carpool line — about 4 minutes.  Did a quick scan through about 35 minutes of footage, marking the highlights and framing the POV; then hit “Render” just as the kids were let out and the line started moving.  Had the video above ready to show my kid when he got into the car. 

Damn, you make it sound easy.  This old dude needs to up his IT game apparently!!

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10 minutes ago, Kelly Federal said:

I got off the water from foiling, put the boat away, started the download from the camera to my phone before driving to pick up a kid from school.  The raw footage download was complete upon arrival in the carpool line — about 4 minutes.  Did a quick scan through about 35 minutes of footage, marking the highlights and framing the POV; then hit “Render” just as the kids were let out and the line started moving.  Had the video above ready to show my kid when he got into the car. 

Same here. Some of the modern video tools complementary to the cameras are so smooth that you can make cool videos while waiting at the checkout line. 

As a teenager, I interned doing professional video editing on Media100 and Avid workstations. We'd spend untold hours to get a short video to have the cuts in the right place to go with the music or to match the action. This stuff is ridiculously easy

GoPro has the most polished tools; so it's not a property of the camera itself, but spend a few more $$ on a GoPro and it's all trivial. Garmin VIRB is pretty good too, but not quite there. 

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LOL, didn't think I would learn videography in this thread but there you have it.  Thanks guys.  I gotta check that stuff out.  Got the GoPro from many years ago but the loading and creating was a PITA.  Actually more interested in using it for scuba than sailing so nice to know.

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  • 2 weeks later...

And... we're back! After a hiatus due to lots of wprk and some hardware glitches... I went out to shake the rust and found that the afternoon had pretty wild sailing conditions waiting for me. Squalls blowing through. Local weather station registered 9 gusting 28kt in a 20 minute period. At times, gusts would rotate 60 degrees. Big swells at times. Confused swells following changes. Then flat for a few minutes. Crazy. Fun.

Not even the camera could keep up :-)

 

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On 11/20/2020 at 8:48 PM, martin 'hoff said:

And... we're back! After a hiatus due to lots of wprk and some hardware glitches... I went out to shake the rust and found that the afternoon had pretty wild sailing conditions waiting for me. Squalls blowing through. Local weather station registered 9 gusting 28kt in a 20 minute period. At times, gusts would rotate 60 degrees. Big swells at times. Confused swells following changes. Then flat for a few minutes. Crazy. Fun.

Not even the camera could keep up :-)

 

It always blows me away how much the UFO loves batsh*t insane wind conditions. We never factored this into the design and development process, but I suppose it was always sitting there between the lines when we designed the stability into the hull and the depowering potential into the rig. It's the mountain-bike of foiling.
DRC

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Any hints from the group on rigging your ufo on the water? If the forecast holds I'm going to be setting it up sometime tomorrow in the middle of buttonwood sound. 

I'll be tied up to a larger sailboat I rather not scratch... I imagine I'll hoist the main from the water, feet on the aft port quarter of the ufo :-)

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21 minutes ago, martin 'hoff said:

Any hints from the group on rigging your ufo on the water? If the forecast holds I'm going to be setting it up sometime tomorrow in the middle of buttonwood sound. 

I'll be tied up to a larger sailboat I rather not scratch... I imagine I'll hoist the main from the water, feet on the aft port quarter of the ufo :-)

Get a snap-shackle for the outhaul. Reaching out the stern on the water to hook that thing up taxes my patience when I do it.

DRC

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I’m back from my trip moving a Class 40 from Maine down here to Georgia.  Made one stop in Newport to wait for more favorable winds, during which time I made a side trip to see Dave, Kirk, and friends at Fulcrum Speedworks in Bristol (and pick up a replacement part).  So nice to meet those guys in person.  The trip as a whole was epic.  https://youtu.be/JVkvZaZA-58

And yesterday got back on the UFO.  Light and puffy conditions with 6-10 knots of wind, with a few gusts to 12.  The camera mount slipped soon after leaving the dock, so apologies.  Now that I’ve got a new back-up sprit, I’m going to test some mounting options there with the 360 camera.  In the meantime...

 

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On 11/23/2020 at 2:44 PM, Dave Clark said:

Get a snap-shackle for the outhaul. Reaching out the stern on the water to hook that thing up taxes my patience when I do it.

DRC

Yeah that's a good point. I have a soft shackle with a long tail after the knot so it's easy to thread through.

The picture below shows a tweaked bridle to ensure the ufo doesn't turn around. The towing bridle, attached to the same rope loops as the righting line, as described originally by David and Nick, allows the ufo to turn 180. Towing it stern first is bad. Real bad. So I tweaked it to ensure right was forward and to prevent the bridle from slipping under the main foil.

Both foils are tied as the rattling from chop will undo the clips. Mast is tied to the boat with cunningham.

 

large.PXL_20201125_194409917.jpg.8218000dfc389e5fc4836b54f6bbd69c.jpg

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Did a bunch of foiling in the FL keys. There are some bays that are amazing for UFO-ing. Buttonwood Sound. Lower Matecumbe Bight, Barley Basin. For various reasons I only captured good video on my last foil of the trip, back in familiar Miami. Too busy relaxing, I guess :-)

Light winds, marginal foiling conditions, and a quick small island visit to grab a drink with the family. 

 

 

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On 8/22/2020 at 2:12 PM, martin 'hoff said:

large.IMG_20200821_185041.jpg.d687e43b25bdcb3ec10284ab0c65f241.jpglarge.IMG_20200821_185033.jpg.64e0547630e734d760faad1325556a2d.jpg

In a modest wipeout, this cleat-on-a-coaster glued on the deck of the UFO left a big bruise & scratch on my thigh. Through spring wetsuit (2.5 or 3mm). I guess it's not for nothing that Dave made all the boat round and smooth.

I'll have to come up with a smooth "aero package" (as mothies would call it) for it so we don't end up scarring the sailor. Hmmm. 

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On 11/23/2020 at 4:18 AM, Dave Clark said:

It always blows me away how much the UFO loves batsh*t insane wind conditions. We never factored this into the design and development process, but I suppose it was always sitting there between the lines when we designed the stability into the hull and the depowering potential into the rig. It's the mountain-bike of foiling.
DRC

Completely agree.  I've had great days in 8-10 knots of breeze and great days in 28-30 knots of howl.  The boat is always fun and never feels overpowered or out of control.  Conditions that would terrify me on a Laser are a fun challenge on a UFO!

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Big days here at Fulcrum. That's another 12 out the door to Australia. Get your order in ASAP. They're going fast. Now we turn right around and finish off 14 for our partners in Japan. 

This racking system is new. Each boat has a "freight foot" built around it, enabling each row of boats to be loaded sequentially. This is a response to 1) snags at the dealer end. "Holy jesus what kind of forklift did you have on hand to load this huge cube. This just can't be unloaded by hand." Now it can be, and the goods can stay packaged individually while each unit waits to sell. 2) snags at our end with huge cumbersome six-packs of boats where you can't get to the one in the middle to clean dust off of it. 3) personal irritation at my end that waiting to fill a while six-pack is totally antithetical to continuous flow of production.

 This is a significantly leaner system and creates gains across the whole UFO enterprise. We broke our speed record for loading time. And we'll beat it by more next time. 
 
128521884_2765130670402632_5211108004209438852_n.jpg?_nc_cat=111&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=_TY3oA5Rrn4AX_oJV9h&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=e24eb0c9ea026d36464a19f7c99717bb&oe=5FEEE2DC128774719_2765130680402631_6043167756448940064_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=814bBkaptCwAX8hGGCo&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=b09e9ac15b3002e484b3544300adb960&oe=5FF00B5E128671391_2765130730402626_7049139601041078210_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=HUyNHzEn7YcAX99npcz&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=0c8b61530ca784930d0b6c2df9895651&oe=5FEFA902129960018_2765130827069283_2219024384450816042_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=U85fz23hIksAX-I2FiD&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=b8ed7bee53e56262669c9ace2e65f5e1&oe=5FEF436F129329743_2765130777069288_6485383490844486417_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=vFaYE-WrsV8AX-9Owol&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=8ed8ee3115f8a4d0326ed4fef2151bf9&oe=5FEE7EE2



DRC

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Tried a new GoPro mount on the sprit, and gotta say: I am impressed with how the GoPro Max handled the vibrations.  I had the camera on a rigid arc mount which was ok.  You can see parts of it in the frame which is distracting to me.  I’ve got a straight one on order which should enable the GoPro to totally stitch out the arm making it look like the camera is floating out in front of the boat.  Still undecided on the height of the camera — I love seeing the tunnel when on the foils, and the height I had it at today missed out on that, though it did capture more of the action on the deck.

Sadly, I noticed a hairline crack in the top of the port bow which wasn’t there when I launched.  No impacts whatsoever during the sail and conditions were light all afternoon, so no big structural stresses that I’m aware of.  Has anyone else seen this?  Anything I should do to tend to it?

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15 hours ago, Kelly Federal said:

Tried a new GoPro mount on the sprit, and gotta say: I am impressed with how the GoPro Max handled the vibrations.  I had the camera on a rigid arc mount which was ok.  You can see parts of it in the frame which is distracting to me.  I’ve got a straight one on order which should enable the GoPro to totally stitch out the arm making it look like the camera is floating out in front of the boat.  Still undecided on the height of the camera — I love seeing the tunnel when on the foils, and the height I had it at today missed out on that, though it did capture more of the action on the deck.

Sadly, I noticed a hairline crack in the top of the port bow which wasn’t there when I launched.  No impacts whatsoever during the sail and conditions were light all afternoon, so no big structural stresses that I’m aware of.  Has anyone else seen this?  Anything I should do to tend to it?

Another great video Kelly!   I'm really impressed at its ability to 360 pan during edit.   As for the crack, no, i have not seen any hairline cracks or heard of any in the bow area.   That is a hard area to over stress (other than a collision).   Take a photo of it and send it to Dave.   

The only hull weaknesses I'm aware of is that the deck under the seating pads can get spongy over time.   I know some of the early boats (single digit hull numbers) had some pretty serious reinforcing work done on their decks after a season or two.   I believe this was strengthened early in the build, but after 3 seasons mine is beginning to get a little springy as well.   Other that that, my hull has been rock solid.   

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On 12/4/2020 at 7:01 AM, Dave Clark said:

Big days here at Fulcrum. That's another 12 out the door to Australia. Get your order in ASAP. They're going fast. Now we turn right around and finish off 14 for our partners in Japan. 

This racking system is new. Each boat has a "freight foot" built around it, enabling each row of boats to be loaded sequentially. This is a response to 1) snags at the dealer end. "Holy jesus what kind of forklift did you have on hand to load this huge cube. This just can't be unloaded by hand." Now it can be, and the goods can stay packaged individually while each unit waits to sell. 2) snags at our end with huge cumbersome six-packs of boats where you can't get to the one in the middle to clean dust off of it. 3) personal irritation at my end that waiting to fill a while six-pack is totally antithetical to continuous flow of production.

 This is a significantly leaner system and creates gains across the whole UFO enterprise. We broke our speed record for loading time. And we'll beat it by more next time. 
 
128521884_2765130670402632_5211108004209438852_n.jpg?_nc_cat=111&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=_TY3oA5Rrn4AX_oJV9h&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=e24eb0c9ea026d36464a19f7c99717bb&oe=5FEEE2DC128774719_2765130680402631_6043167756448940064_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=814bBkaptCwAX8hGGCo&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=b09e9ac15b3002e484b3544300adb960&oe=5FF00B5E128671391_2765130730402626_7049139601041078210_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=HUyNHzEn7YcAX99npcz&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=0c8b61530ca784930d0b6c2df9895651&oe=5FEFA902129960018_2765130827069283_2219024384450816042_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=U85fz23hIksAX-I2FiD&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=b8ed7bee53e56262669c9ace2e65f5e1&oe=5FEF436F129329743_2765130777069288_6485383490844486417_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&ccb=2&_nc_sid=8bfeb9&_nc_ohc=vFaYE-WrsV8AX-9Owol&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=8ed8ee3115f8a4d0326ed4fef2151bf9&oe=5FEE7EE2



DRC

Dave, love the new loading system.  Solves the problem of how to make catamarans fit in a square shipping container with maximum efficiency.  BTW, might be able to sell a few of the boots to the Harbor Police for when you park your UFO in illegally.

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  • 2 weeks later...

We might have an informal Winter 2021 event in Miami. 

Lots of details to be filled in, but something like 3-4 day (Thurs-Sunday) around January 16th or February 20th. Hosted at Miami Rowing Club on Virginia Key. Masks and distancing taken seriously. If you are keen, drop me a PM with your email address...

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Can’t say how much I love this boat...

Was dropping a kid off at school in the morning, saw that the leaves were moving; checked the weather forecast in the carpool drop-off lane and saw 12-14G20.  Drove straight to the marina, rolled out my UFO, suited up, and had two glorious hours of foiling.  As much as I have left to learn, it’s a testament to this boat that it is so much fun even for a beginner like myself.

 

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In more nakedly commercial news, we have a sale going on: Commencing ad copy-

"Head’s up UFO world! Summer is just a few months away and Fulcrum is busier than ever before. We need you to help us make your summer run smoother. Presently we’re booking production through April and that’s not even likely to hold out for much longer. So this spring we’ll be going flat out delivering boats. We need your spare parts orders NOW so we can smoothly book it into the remaining production weeks we have left. To incentivise that, we’re willing to offer a 15% discount on all spare parts ordered between now and the 15th of January. We want everybody to have all the backups they could possibly have going into the spring to get as much time on the water as possible. To do that it will be best for us to front-load the seasons spares. Let’s get as prepped as we can get!

To everyone placing orders for new boats (and get those orders in now, because as we mentioned the production schedule zipping towards June at this point) we’re ready to help you out in the same way. Get your delivery geared up with backups where you’ll want them. On all new orders placed between now and January 15th, we’re offering 20% off on all spare parts.

We want your spring and summer of 2021 to have the maximum fun we can possibly provide. Let’s set up for some serious fun!"

-Ending ad copy. Which I also wrote. Suffice it to say, we're happy to discount parts now in order to take spare parts pressure off of us when the season kicks in.



DRC
 

Got spares?.jpg

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uxY2kvFnf0ao4MwrfCLFtTdas7rwraH2WeEzeOEY6qDX9wAg1EZvOWG-NaRsNK5TJ68p3lPnmPGfvW8vUrjzZyoPuUsmzLOnA9DbbNSoeUzINz0Zbrfsrnsf3iPNHb7VnVJM_fRe

Question about the bungee tension for the wand.

 

To help get up in marginal winds, I switched from a double bungee loop to a single bungee. I also put it on loose. Pictured above. This allowed my wand to be pushed further back to create more lift.

 

I had more success getting up. However, I have been getting too much elevation and ventilating despite increasing the rudder lift and adding back tension on the single bungee.

 

I am wondering if I should go back to a double bungee. Does anyone have any other suggestions for too much elevation?  Many thanks!

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21 hours ago, Paul B said:

To help get up in marginal winds, I switched from a double bungee loop to a single bungee. I also put it on loose. Pictured above. This allowed my wand to be pushed further back to create more lift.

I had more success getting up. However, I have been getting too much elevation and ventilating despite increasing the rudder lift and adding back tension on the single bungee.

I am wondering if I should go back to a double bungee. Does anyone have any other suggestions for too much elevation?  Many thanks!

Once you are up at height, is the bungee pulling the top of the wand back so the bottom flicks forward again?   If not, then yes, you need more bungee tension.   

If the bungee is pulling the wand top back once it leaves the water, then the bungee is not your problem.   You likely need more lift on the rudder, or need to sit further forward.   

I can't see how loosening wand bungee would help you lift off earlier.   The UFO will not generate enough lift to get you out of the water until the boat is going about 7 knots.   I find that the wand gets pulled back with a double length of bungee once the boat is going 3-4 knots.   Instead, you can increase lift at all speeds by moving the top of the main foil back one hole, from the middle to one slot aft of middle.   I've tried this and find that adding more lift for light wind doesn't help me.  It simply creates more drag, and slows me down.   If you are a light sailor, then this technique might work.   I'm 180 pounds, and find that I have earliest liftoff in the middle foil slot, and it comes when the boat is exceeding 7 knots, in 9-10 knots of wind or so.

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Hi Champlain Sailor,

I was increasing rudder AOA, decreasing main foil AOA and moving forward on boat. It did not dawn on me that the bungee tension might be the problem until driving home.  So I did not check wand position. I am going to assume that was the problem and go back to regular bungee tension.

To summarize, when I have trouble with ventilating:

Decrease wand height.

Increase wand tension.

Move forward on boat.

Increase rudder AOA.

Decrease main foil AOA (move pin forward).

Many thanks! I appreciate your help.

Paul

 

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On 12/22/2020 at 11:22 AM, martin 'hoff said:

UFOs in Miami - February 20. Contact me to get signed up.

Details at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1PHx3H89xx1m-w51IJLXetrHm81sFgFk9YqzzYKlCffQ/edit?usp=sharing

To anyone coming to the event -- or being in SoFlo around that time -- we'll coordinate to get a consolidated shipment of spare parts to save in shipping (particularly large items!) and ensure they're here for the event. Email or PM me.

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2 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

Fun run, on a December 24th in Miami... the first 10s follow my hands to see what's going on...

 

Actually not commenting on the above video but I don't want it to get buried by my Fulcrum update for the holidays, so i'm responding to it to keep it in frame. Martin is conveying what I'd love to convey if the water wasn't capable of killing me right now. So that's also imoprtant.

Given that this is such an abnormal year and many have wrecked holiday plans, I'm making an exception to spread what joy and community I can with sharing a holiday UFO update.

Fulcrum Speedworks is going into the new year mid way through filling a container load (14 UFOs!) going to First Marine, our new distributor in Japan. Another 12 boats are on their way to Foiling UFO Australia. Aussies. Get. Your. Orders. In. That box is partially sold out already. We are going into the winter with a frankly daunting amount of UFOs on order for the spring. Not since Christmas of 2016/2017 have I been this amazed by how thick the backlog is. So get ready for UFO world to grow by another leap going into the spring. If you want one in the spring. GET. YOUR. ORDERS. IN. We can only move so many mountains at once.

At the ground level, I want to give a HUGE shout out to out team who have done nothing but build year on year excellence. Quality in the shop has been hitting levels that gives me chills. This team makes me so proud. Biggest shout outs to Kirk Nash, Tony Diogo, Ernesto Bolieiro and Mario Neves who have been on the team since the beginning. Big shout outs to all of our newer crew who have been growing and gaining excellence since coming on. Being a hermetically sealed Covid-fortress means that I can't risk infecting my crew and traveling to anything. Katie and I called off all but the paperwork portion of getting married to keep the risks down, so the company will remain out of the in-person picture until the smoke clears on the pandemic. However, in every other way I can't stress how much we're with you.  

My bittersweet and fiercely optimistic remarks to kick off the holidays of 2020 sum up like so. While this year has been a brutal affair for all of us it has been a year to embrace trying new things and that has led to a stunning expansion of the UFO community, and likely other new good ideas across society. 

Merry Christmas!

DRC 

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I figured out why I was ventilating too much. I had shortened my push pull rod in the sprit to get more lift in marginal wind. I think this permanently put the foil in the lift position. I went back to the original position and the ventilating stopped. Much better! Has anyone tried increasing the surface area on the bottom of their wand to help in marginal winds. I tried this once and it gave me more lift for a given speed.  However,  the winds increased to about 11 kts that day so I doubt that I needed it. I used a credit card. See pict.

MgDveNFdbbxN6Ge5RpbWTEhdRu7BIkBX2dFzBmYlJHWk2JWr-2DBr3RcRv6keKP-EBTqjPJ0eHsOXhAadfCVrluVKI7niMUXqiSHigyNlYWcdhdE6ZmFtH4r-z77Exxh-S0hIHtf0uq6gg3nG8PoDIfORV2tv6JDgCvYKqq6wbQgwQlwh5ttfaGo1QdSlbfEHLKnBGz4DrypKqX3Dxkc9DiYRtKfpNddwiM4WCwvSnSY3m7VrtcQ4JxYUiWOvlB33IJE0QzeQVxhm4pHXwK-LK9vzU0hZuexbg3K-fRfe6lwdTAyKHomRZimnJfyG8App8cs92UIa9BWMEnN1FC_uZR6B-nG-TupzyvolKrKSU9rxd2XNXIw8bZf6-0f_tnJ3QHTmoCs0W6EeRpagRRarxyoheLmFb1I0iFAiYvG0baQ03zgD2myK7wIIM-wTg_namo9sXrBs7Ml7Rlq8fLLSMDZSddSoQeT47kQKzlRaFhAN9BAt-NsIlbYOTTGyy5oUEgNnsfxmfeo8xeV1ESaMN1z9xi9z8TI-ULD8huT-3SLK2sasRJ7Y5CDF4wITtay7Z7Ba7InojMsEehW1x-pWPtlHxm65rLNmw7j5T3u_YJWDGidyE-oqUaqKwDblt5BetSfYobnv8_ICZz9j_CgjYwF-XunebVkc2PJvsxdHW90qvkN-DOY6EunOC-dzA=w1157-h867-no?authuser=0

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Foiling in low winds with a larger wand: The winds had increased to about 11 kts so probably was not necessary. Used center pin for main foil. Bungee for wand tightened to normal. Height set at 1 foot. Looking forward to see if it helps when winds are 8 kts. I probably would not use it above 12 kts as it may cause wand to break.

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Paul:

Perhaps I'm mis-understanding your post.   It sounds like you have made your wand paddle bigger in an attempt to foil in lighter winds.   When the wand is push aft by forward boatspeed, it pushes down on the main foil flap, thus configuring the foil to generate max lift.   In my experience, the wand will be pushed aft when the boat is moving forward at a speed of about 4 knots.   My gantry is set up with one length of bungee tied in a loop, so I have 2X bungee force on the wand, but not a tremendous amount.   

The UFO will not take off until it is moving through the water at 7 knots, maybe a little less if you are light (<150 pounds).  For me, at 180 pounds, I need to see a steady 7.7 knots before I can lift off with normal conditions, without exerting a ton of energy pumping myself up onto the foils.  I have a velocitek mounted to the gantry, so I have a good idea of the speeds I am seeing on the water.

Your wand, if rigged properly, should pivot fully aft once you exceed 4 knots with the standard end paddle.   Making it pivot aft earlier won't make you fool sooner, as you won't have enough water velocity over the foil to generate enough lift.   If your wand is not pivoting aft and you are at foiling speeds, I would recommend you put less tension in your bungee, or check your wand pivots to ensure they are not too stiff.   

Doug

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Hi Doug,

Thanks. That is really helpful to know that my wand should pivot fully aft at 4-5 kts. 

A month ago during multiple outings of 7-8 kt winds my wand was not going fully aft. I must have had my bungee too tight at the time.  I made the mistake of going to the other extreme: shortening my push/pull rod within the bowsprit and making my bungee very loose. I got lift but had lost of excitement ventilating. I went back to the original settings and the ventilating resolved. I will focus more on the bungee next time I am in marginal winds.

Having a blast foiling out here in San Diego.  Thanks again for the advice,

Paul 

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Paul:

Its been in the 30s here, both air and water temperature.  Even with a dry suit, that's too cold for me!   I'm envious of your SD climate at this time of year!   

Here's a little background on why I 'know' this about the wand.   Dave Clark convinced me to come down to Rhode Island in the summer of 2019 to race in Bristol with a half a dozen other UFO's.   "Come to Bristol" he said.   "It will be fun" he said.   Well, it was fun, eventually.  Initially we had very little wind.   We set up buoys and did practice races around them in 4-5 knots of wind.  One trick I discovered is that if you raise the wand out of the water, the boat was noticeably faster, almost a knot faster.   I think that some of this is due to the drag of the wand itself, but much of it is due to the drag of the foil trying to generate lift.  With a velocitek, and several light air races to gather data, I felt very confident that if the wind was less than 6 knots, to raise the wand all the way up.   ie, if you know you can't foil, don't let the boat waste energy trying.  I'm quite certain that on my boat. the wand will pivot back in 5 knots of wind, with the boat making about 4 knot of boatspeed.  I believe that is 'normal' functioning of the wand system. 

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5 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Paul:

Its been in the 30s here, both air and water temperature.  Even with a dry suit, that's too cold for me!   I'm envious of your SD climate at this time of year!   

Here's a little background on why I 'know' this about the wand.   Dave Clark convinced me to come down to Rhode Island in the summer of 2019 to race in Bristol with a half a dozen other UFO's.   "Come to Bristol" he said.   "It will be fun" he said.   Well, it was fun, eventually.  Initially we had very little wind.   We set up buoys and did practice races around them in 4-5 knots of wind.  One trick I discovered is that if you raise the wand out of the water, the boat was noticeably faster, almost a knot faster.   I think that some of this is due to the drag of the wand itself, but much of it is due to the drag of the foil trying to generate lift.  With a velocitek, and several light air races to gather data, I felt very confident that if the wind was less than 6 knots, to raise the wand all the way up.   ie, if you know you can't foil, don't let the boat waste energy trying.  I'm quite certain that on my boat. the wand will pivot back in 5 knots of wind, with the boat making about 4 knot of boatspeed.  I believe that is 'normal' functioning of the wand system. 

I can verify this finding as well.  While developing my digital flight controller / wandless foiling system, I noticed that maxing out lift below 5ish knots only slowed the boat down.  Beyond 4-5 knots, the lift on the forward foil is needed otherwise the bows dig into the water.  The sweet spot seemed to have the foiling system start to engage at 4-5 knots of SoG as read by the onboard GPS.  

One of my main drivers for developing the digital flight control system was to foil in lighter air by reducing wand drag.  I ended up finding out that reducing foil flap drag at lower speeds was perhaps the bigger benefit.  The wand drag has some effect but not a large one on being able to foil in lighter air.

I've asked Dave in the past about a larger "light air" sail but it sounds like it would require a new upper mast section.  If Fulcrum made one, I'd buy it.  Perhaps a more efficient sail on the same mast?  I love those soft wing sails the AC-75 guys are using in NZ right now.  It'd add weight but might improve the Lift / Drag ratio enough to get foiling in 6-8 knots.    Crazier ideas: maybe a jib or a Code Zero--we already have a spirit and mount point on the upper mast section??  Would Fulcrum void the warranty on the mast and mast track?? 

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1 hour ago, DerekF said:

I can verify this finding as well.  While developing my digital flight controller / wandless foiling system, I noticed that maxing out lift below 5ish knots only slowed the boat down.  Beyond 4-5 knots, the lift on the forward foil is needed otherwise the bows dig into the water.  The sweet spot seemed to have the foiling system start to engage at 4-5 knots of SoG as read by the onboard GPS.  

One of my main drivers for developing the digital flight control system was to foil in lighter air by reducing wand drag.  I ended up finding out that reducing foil flap drag at lower speeds was perhaps the bigger benefit.  The wand drag has some effect but not a large one on being able to foil in lighter air.

I've asked Dave in the past about a larger "light air" sail but it sounds like it would require a new upper mast section.  If Fulcrum made one, I'd buy it.  Perhaps a more efficient sail on the same mast?  I love those soft wing sails the AC-75 guys are using in NZ right now.  It'd add weight but might improve the Lift / Drag ratio enough to get foiling in 6-8 knots.    Crazier ideas: maybe a jib or a Code Zero--we already have a spirit and mount point on the upper mast section??  Would Fulcrum void the warranty on the mast and mast track?? 

How about triplanes on the stays?

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1 hour ago, DerekF said:

I can verify this finding as well.  While developing my digital flight controller / wandless foiling system, I noticed that maxing out lift below 5ish knots only slowed the boat down.  Beyond 4-5 knots, the lift on the forward foil is needed otherwise the bows dig into the water.  The sweet spot seemed to have the foiling system start to engage at 4-5 knots of SoG as read by the onboard GPS.  

One of my main drivers for developing the digital flight control system was to foil in lighter air by reducing wand drag.  I ended up finding out that reducing foil flap drag at lower speeds was perhaps the bigger benefit.  The wand drag has some effect but not a large one on being able to foil in lighter air.

I've asked Dave in the past about a larger "light air" sail but it sounds like it would require a new upper mast section.  If Fulcrum made one, I'd buy it.  Perhaps a more efficient sail on the same mast?  I love those soft wing sails the AC-75 guys are using in NZ right now.  It'd add weight but might improve the Lift / Drag ratio enough to get foiling in 6-8 knots.    Crazier ideas: maybe a jib or a Code Zero--we already have a spirit and mount point on the upper mast section??  Would Fulcrum void the warranty on the mast and mast track?? 

The sprit is weak. Very weak.

But the bows are strong. If you're willing to live with a contraption, and void your warranty, take a look at the jib add on for the Stunt S9. Or the "code f" sail on the iFly.

But I suspect it won't foil sustainably. You might get enough speed to take off, but the awa will jump forward, and you'll need to adjust sail depth I'm a blink...

 

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More thoughts on very light wind conditions. There's a clearer path - IMHO - to shaving a knot or two in minimum foiling wind with tweaks and technique.

Most of them improve your performance across the windrange too. So win all around.

With the adjustable outhaul setup there might be an even deeper mainsail sail configuration that allows you to take off, then quickly reduce camber.

With the adjustable wand length setup, you can raise the wand until you hit 7kt sustained boat speed. 

There's some drag gains to be had sanding your foils and putting silicone caulk in the joint of foil horizontal and vertical. 

Put telltales on your shrouds -- cannibalize those audio tapes -- and improve technique and kinetics. Pump, rock, ooch and schmooze (will make you better on the dance floor too!).

My personal takeoff technique involves rocking/rolling the boat as if roll tacking. Get the leeward hull to fly, build up speed, pull my rear out of the water.

We could ask Dave whether he ever tried a deep camber / larger surface main. @Dave Clark

 

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1 hour ago, martin 'hoff said:

We could ask Dave whether he ever tried a deep camber / larger surface main. @Dave Clark

 

It would require a whole new mast. A larger sail would put the mast at risk of breaking.

DRC

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51 minutes ago, Dave Clark said:

It would require a whole new mast. A larger sail would put the mast at risk of breaking.

DRC

So Dave, what I'm hearing you say is that the official Fulcrum recommended approach is to add JATO bottles to your UFO and that a retrofit kit is available for preorder?

Screen Shot 2021-01-06 at 09.26.39.png

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31 minutes ago, DerekF said:

So Dave, what I'm hearing you say is that the official Fulcrum recommended approach is to add JATO bottles to your UFO and that a retrofit kit is available for preorder?

Screen Shot 2021-01-06 at 09.26.39.png

I cannot control what people hear, only what I say. 

If you start reading this Darwin Awards entry about Jato boosters but don't finish it, I'm sure it would seem like a great idea. 
https://darwinawards.com/darwin/darwin1995-04.html

DRC 

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Although it would not be a "fast foiler", a boat with a bigger (more square inches) main foil with a section optimized for a good L/D at 5 knots with "full flap" deflection would be a better bet for lowering takeoff speed.  Look at the take off speed for the wing foilers. 

If there is enough determination, it can be done.

Martin, do you still have the pieces of your failed main foil.  Just asking.

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11 minutes ago, P Flados said:

Although it would not be a "fast foiler", a boat with a bigger (more square inches) main foil with a section optimized for a good L/D at 5 knots with "full flap" deflection would be a better bet for lowering takeoff speed.  Look at the take off speed for the wing foilers. 

If there is enough determination, it can be done.

Martin, do you still have the pieces of your failed main foil.  Just asking.

some guy built a catamaran foiler on a European Alpine lake 10 or 15 years ago with a huge foil that took off early like that.

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Just now, fastyacht said:

some guy built a catamaran foiler on a European Alpine lake 10 or 15 years ago with a huge foil that took off early like that.

And it was immensely slow

DRC

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Having a second "low wind" main foil as an extra would not compromise the fun provided by the UFO.  And I am not talking about a huge foil, probably along the lines of 1.5x of the surface area of the original.   

And so what if the boat tops out at 8 - 10 knots on a day where you are otherwise lowriding 95% of the time at 5 to 6 knots. 

As a warning, the main foil is a tricky bit of kit to make.  The cost of an "extra" (low speed) foil made by Dave would discourage use by most.  I doubt he would sell enough to pay for any tooling involved.

I was actually thinking of making one mostly from scratch.  I have made a few wood core foils (no hinge).  They are typically not as rugged and my profiles are not precise, but again we are not talking "racing foils".  The tricky parts for a home build would be the stainless inverted "T" tab in the middle and the hinge/flap of course.   I remember guys hand making moth foils so I know it is possible. 

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