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Boat sailing  Dog flying 

Ghosting along near Castine.

Bearing away after hoisting the sails for the first time after 3 years retrofit.  Monterey.   

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19 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

Fantastic pictures Quilbily, not only of the boat which looks really cool but what an awesome place to sail. 

What is she?

 

Thanks. It is my design and build. Alaska is a great place to sail. Kind of like sailing through Yosemite.

 

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23 hours ago, Quilbilly said:

Thanks. It is my design and build. Alaska is a great place to sail. Kind of like sailing through Yosemite.

 

How is the little pilot house, if that is the correct term, working out?

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

How is the little pilot house, if that is the correct term, working out?

It works great for the Northwest. It rains a lot here. I have a heater and I can steer from inside using the remote with the autopilot. I made it narrow enough that I can see past it when in the cockpit sailing and it gives ample standing headroom to work in the galley. 

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I think it's neat. As Bob Perry sometimes says-  It looks purposeful.  You've managed to design a vessel that really fulfills its purpose without surrendering aesthetics. I like the bulwarks. It looks safe.

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On 11/27/2018 at 1:03 AM, Quilbilly said:

It works great for the Northwest. It rains a lot here. I have a heater and I can steer from inside using the remote with the autopilot. I made it narrow enough that I can see past it when in the cockpit sailing and it gives ample standing headroom to work in the galley. 

I read the WB article a few times. I think it's a cool boat. I love the flush deck forward. (I hope I'm not repeating myself.)

We have had some PNW weather lately - a cabin heater and little pilot house house would be just the thing.

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On 1/4/2019 at 9:01 AM, Kris Cringle said:

Trimming 3 sails. 

1024926476_3sails2.thumb.jpg.8271def0d7b12d9b145cf084d0134d7b.jpg

Kris, please don't think I am going full asshole with this, but what paint do you use on your cowl vents? Seriously, I have friend whose cowls need some beauty treatment.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Kris, please don't think I am going full asshole with this, but what paint do you use on your cowl vents? Seriously, I have friend whose cowls need some beauty treatment.

It looks like chromed bronze paint to me.

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8 hours ago, Ishmael said:

It looks like chromed bronze paint to me.

Right, the exteriors are fading nickel (chrome) on bronze. The red throats are Rustoleum oil enamel which I use for boot top and cove stripe. Yacht quality and Hardware quality are not far apart, maybe a foot or two. 

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Right, the exteriors are fading nickel (chrome) on bronze. The red throats are Rustoleum oil enamel which I use for boot top and cove stripe. Yacht quality and Hardware quality are not far apart, maybe a foot or two. 

I like a little patina on the nickel.

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On 1/5/2019 at 5:13 PM, Bull City said:

I read the WB article a few times. I think it's a cool boat. I love the flush deck forward. (I hope I'm not repeating myself.)

We have had some PNW weather lately - a cabin heater and little pilot house house would be just the thing.

I figure anywhere it is cold and rains a pilot house make a lot of sense. Almost all cruising boats around here have dodgers but I have never seen anyone who has a dodger take one down on a sunny day. The flush deck results in more windage but makes up for it in vee berth space. 

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On 1/11/2019 at 3:34 PM, Mr. Ed said:

Werry handsome sir, werry handsome. 

While the boat you're referring to is quite nice, This:

Image result for wherry

Is what the phrase 'wherry handsome" refers to. 

 

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1 hour ago, LB 15 said:

Here I am testing the new downwind rig on my Jeanneau over the Xmas break. 

cap.JPG

LB gave me a heads up of a new mooring he'd put in at Lucinda bay. We were over yesterday and picked it up, and you're right LB, it was a prime spot. 

We're leaving tomorrow, and Random is asking if he can come back with us. There's only enough oxygen to last another hour or so.

He thinks you've forgotten about him. I dropped a bunch of soda stream bottles to him as you requested, he should be twigging to it about now. I hope he sees the funny side of it...

Btw, the AIS PLB strapped to his head...well played sir.

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Sold some Esprit 37 plans to a guy in Brazil ten years ago. I got this email this morning: Nice to see a happy ending to a long project.

“MANI MANI “ ( click on this name)

The story of my sailer , began as follows : I saw the plan in a U.S. nautical magazine and fell in love with it at first sight . I contacted Bob Perry the designer and asked him if he was willing to sell me the plans to build it in Brazil, from wood using the method of cold mold, the Gougeon Brothers’s “West System” to be specific.

Perry, is a guy who likes challenges (agreed to make changes that ultimately achieved the goal – Mani Mani won matches against bigger and lighter vessels) so I bought the designs exclusive for Latin America. Then I went to the U.S. and visited the Gougeons in Bay City in Michigan. I got a lot of information and tips on building my boat, which proved very helpful. They offered me the opportunity to work with them , but I returned to Brazil and began the construction . Due to scarcity of money progress was very slow. I built first few other vessels, afterwards I started making the windsurfing boards and that way I collected the money to finish my boat. 85 % to 95 % of the construction I did it myself for reasons of economy. I worked weekends and holidays for nine years – but it was fine because I would not bitch about someone else’s faults. I did it exactly as I wanted!

What canal you say about this boat? 

Thanx Remy

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/36717

 

 

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On 1/13/2019 at 4:18 PM, Mr. Ed said:

That’s no wherry! 

This, sir, is a wherry

The Albion

[actually now I think about it those traditional Thames rowing boats are wherries as well, so we’re both right.]

C.P. snow's first book, circa 1935, was a mystery involving a pleasure yacht described as a wherry. I've wondered what it was supposed  to be like.

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I'm bombarded in my 'feed' with long flat racing sleds hitting 30 knots in 35 knots of wind, white knuckled crew half under white water spray, 20' rooster tail in the wake, all accompanied by heavy metal music background. 

 

This came in yesterday. I miss 10 knots of wind on flat inland water in my 'feed'. I don't want this boat, it wouldn't fit me well, but I like how it sails. 

 

 

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Very beautiful boat but I'm not keen on the contours of that deck house. I would have made the fore and aft camber of the profile go the other way to avoid that sagging look. Look at the old,S&S and Rhodes short houses. Just an aesthetic judgement, no right and wrong. Nice tight bow wave.

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Maybe one of the design team remembered a beautiful old yacht from his youth and said “let’s do a spirit of tradition” and forgot to mentally pull the house back up.

I would have to take it if it were given to me

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6 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Very beautiful boat but I'm not keen on the contours of that deck house. I would have made the fore and aft camber of the profile go the other way to avoid that sagging look. Look at the old,S&S and Rhodes short houses. Just an aesthetic judgement, no right and wrong. Nice tight bow wave.

That was my first thought - it looks like a ski jump.

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21 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'm bombarded in my 'feed' with long flat racing sleds hitting 30 knots in 35 knots of wind, white knuckled crew half under white water spray, 20' rooster tail in the wake, all accompanied by heavy metal music background. 

 

This came in yesterday. I miss 10 knots of wind on flat inland water in my 'feed'. I don't want this boat, it wouldn't fit me well, but I like how it sails. 

 

 

Lovely video and very pretty boats all three are... but ahhh... shouldn't they show the proper day shape since they appear to be motor sailing.  :)  I would still gladly take one.

Or all three.

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The ski jump coach roof is certainly not practical. It's just an aesthetic judgement. But to my eye a bad one. It can look fabulous on traditional Dutch boats but it looks awkward on this hull. But it's a small nit to pick.

 

I look at that hull and I'd like to see it with no trunk at all. A flush deck with a prominent and peaked up sliding hatch aft Maybe some curvature to the hatch profile, scuttle style. I'd even put some dark deadlights in the hull.

 

Began design work this morning on a new 56'er for a PNW client.

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2 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I reckon Sean Macmillan (of Spirit Yachts) has always had a slight problem with coachroofs, including a slight telly-tubby fixation

 

cabin-entrance-600x450.jpg

spirit-i-deckhouse-65-sailing-yacht.jpg

I ALMOST have enough balls to install a compass post like that one on my boat but think it would kill the cockpit since I just removed the pedestal helm last year and reverted to the original tiller...

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3 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I ALMOST have enough balls to install a compass post like that one on my boat but think it would kill the cockpit since I just removed the pedestal helm last year and reverted to the original tiller...

It certainly makes a statement. Does your boat have two perfectly good panels at the front of the cockpit on which to mount a compass that you can ignore in favor of a gratuitous, twee cockpit obstruction that requires annual varnishing?

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

It certainly makes a statement. Does your boat have two perfectly good panels at the front of the cockpit on which to mount a compass that you can ignore in favor of a gratuitous, twee cockpit obstruction that requires annual varnishing?

Yup. Right along with the depth, speed and Yanmar panel.

 

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7 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:
1 hour ago, IStream said:

It certainly makes a statement. Does your boat have two perfectly good panels at the front of the cockpit on which to mount a compass that you can ignore in favor of a gratuitous, twee cockpit obstruction that requires annual varnishing?

Yup. Right along with the depth, speed and Yanmar panel.

Great, it's a no-brainer. Put the binnacle in and move the instruments and Yannie panel to the binnacle too. Next up, ratlines. 

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On 1/17/2019 at 12:11 PM, Bob Perry said:

Sold some Esprit 37 plans to a guy in Brazil ten years ago. I got this email this morning: Nice to see a happy ending to a long project.

“MANI MANI “ ( click on this name)

The story of my sailer , began as follows : I saw the plan in a U.S. nautical magazine and fell in love with it at first sight . I contacted Bob Perry the designer and asked him if he was willing to sell me the plans to build it in Brazil, from wood using the method of cold mold, the Gougeon Brothers’s “West System” to be specific.

Perry, is a guy who likes challenges (agreed to make changes that ultimately achieved the goal – Mani Mani won matches against bigger and lighter vessels) so I bought the designs exclusive for Latin America. Then I went to the U.S. and visited the Gougeons in Bay City in Michigan. I got a lot of information and tips on building my boat, which proved very helpful. They offered me the opportunity to work with them , but I returned to Brazil and began the construction . Due to scarcity of money progress was very slow. I built first few other vessels, afterwards I started making the windsurfing boards and that way I collected the money to finish my boat. 85 % to 95 % of the construction I did it myself for reasons of economy. I worked weekends and holidays for nine years – but it was fine because I would not bitch about someone else’s faults. I did it exactly as I wanted!

What canal you say about this boat? 

Thanx Remy

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/36717

 

 

wow. this guy used to build fantastic wooden hollow windsurfboards back in the day, made of cold-molded cedar and epoxy (west system).

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On 1/17/2019 at 9:11 AM, Bob Perry said:

Sold some Esprit 37 plans to a guy in Brazil ten years ago. I got this email this morning: Nice to see a happy ending to a long project.

“MANI MANI “ ( click on this name)

The story of my sailer , began as follows : I saw the plan in a U.S. nautical magazine and fell in love with it at first sight . I contacted Bob Perry the designer and asked him if he was willing to sell me the plans to build it in Brazil, from wood using the method of cold mold, the Gougeon Brothers’s “West System” to be specific.

Perry, is a guy who likes challenges (agreed to make changes that ultimately achieved the goal – Mani Mani won matches against bigger and lighter vessels) so I bought the designs exclusive for Latin America. Then I went to the U.S. and visited the Gougeons in Bay City in Michigan. I got a lot of information and tips on building my boat, which proved very helpful. They offered me the opportunity to work with them , but I returned to Brazil and began the construction . Due to scarcity of money progress was very slow. I built first few other vessels, afterwards I started making the windsurfing boards and that way I collected the money to finish my boat. 85 % to 95 % of the construction I did it myself for reasons of economy. I worked weekends and holidays for nine years – but it was fine because I would not bitch about someone else’s faults. I did it exactly as I wanted!

What canal you say about this boat? 

Thanx Remy

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/36717

 

 

 

On 1/18/2019 at 3:18 PM, Trovão said:

wow. this guy used to build fantastic wooden hollow windsurfboards back in the day, made of cold-molded cedar and epoxy (west system).

Might I just add that building a cold-molded Esprit 37 in 9 years seems an amazing achievement? 9 years of weekends and holidays has led me to achieve approximately a -58% result in cleaning my basement (it's currently at least 58% more cluttered with things I don't need than it was 9 years ago...)

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It probably took him that long to steam the wood necessary to shape that stern.

That must have been a nightmare to laminate.

He sure did a nice job on that boat - so much for the "home brew" pejorative.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Holey rail is great stuff - as long as you're not rail meat.

This generation of C&C's were a little better, they have a low area in the deck next to the rail so the main deck is closer to the same height as the toerail.

This pic is random, but it shows the details.

FBR9HEY.jpg

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Holey rail is great stuff - as long as you're not rail meat.

I think t-track is a nicer compromise, a lot nicer to sit on and you can put hardware anywhere along it.  I’m not sure why more boats don’t do it that way?  Two of mine have. 

I would have taken either option when I had a boat with bow to stern wooden toe rail. 

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5 minutes ago, Alex W said:

I think t-track is a nicer compromise, a lot nicer to sit on and you can put hardware anywhere along it.  I’m not sure why more boats don’t do it that way?  Two of mine have. 

I would have taken either option when I had a boat with bow to stern wooden toe rail. 

I love my holey rail but I must admit I was admiring your T track before we met up at your boat the other day. 

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15 hours ago, Ishmael said:

This generation of C&C's were a little better, they have a low area in the deck next to the rail so the main deck is closer to the same height as the toerail.

This pic is random, but it shows the details.

FBR9HEY.jpg

Same height yes. Still hurts to hike on. Been there. 

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We had pool noodles that were cut lengthwise and then zip tied to the toe rails on the C&C mkIII I raced on. On my Olson 911 the deck ramps up aft of the shrouds so that it is a bit higher than the toe rail and the gap is only a couple inches between where the ramp ends and the toe rail. Much nicer on the legs. 

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48 minutes ago, Bull City said:

This was taken today. Low 60s and sunny. Note newly sanded and painted bottom!

Do y'all think I should do a "Go Fund Me" to pay for a Torqeedo Pod Drive?

1030784735_Tonic2019_0226.thumb.jpg.25e64dc1bd59d3c117d7a354829ff6ce.jpg

That's not how it works. First you gotta install some POS homebrew electric drive consisting of an old washing machine motor and some secondhand golf cart batteries. Make a half dozen videos showing you scratching your head at every stage of execution. Then take it out and "accidentally" burn it up, causing a small fire that you easily extinguish off camera. Then make another video titled "Electric Drive Burns, ALMOST SINKS THE BOAT". 

Then setup your Go Fund Me drive.

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32 minutes ago, IStream said:

That's not how it works. First you gotta install some POS homebrew electric drive consisting of an old washing machine motor and some secondhand golf cart batteries. Make a half dozen videos showing you scratching your head at every stage of execution. Then take it out and "accidentally" burn it up, causing a small fire that you easily extinguish off camera. Then make another video titled "Electric Drive Burns, ALMOST SINKS THE BOAT". 

Then setup your Go Fund Me drive.

Do not, under any circumstances, buy an off-the-shelf solution. It's like guys who build their own jib furler out of things they've found at the dump.

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22 minutes ago, chester said:

You'll need to wear a bikini.

I don't think that will work for the promo thing.

To give you an idea of rain around here, the lake level has increased by about 13 feet since Valentine's Day, with more expected. Already, it is is a wet walk to our floating dock. And the water is cold!

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

This was taken today. Low 60s and sunny. Note newly sanded and painted bottom!

Do y'all think I should do a "Go Fund Me" to pay for a Torqeedo Pod Drive?

1030784735_Tonic2019_0226.thumb.jpg.25e64dc1bd59d3c117d7a354829ff6ce.jpg

I, too, had a beauty of a classic with a 10 HP!!! hanging off like that.  You get used to it and mostly don't get to look at it much 'back there'.  Pod drive would be good IF you can also do a feathering prop.  With the advent of cameras everywhere, sometimes you might actually get to see the excrescence back there!  That should motivate.   As for the GoFundMe, well,  I doubt that you have to ACTUALLY install a piecemeal system and let it burn up.  Good creative writing should elicit the appropriate emotions that force folks to reach into their wallet for you.  Being actually legit in your hard luck story is so....unnecessary!

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