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34 minutes ago, Ajax said:

You go, dude.

I worked a 16 hour day supporting a server migration and probably again, today.  Want to help me get out of classified gov't work and find a position that will let me tele-work? I can even afford a pay cut.

Well I took a 100% pay cut because of covid so be careful what you wish for. :D

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Boat sailing  Dog flying 

Patterson Bay Alaska.    

Epic beer can sailing on a Wednesday evening..

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1 hour ago, leuk said:

Being overpowered is not great for the rig, but let's admit that it's fun! And it makes for cool pics!

The boat has an extremely overbuilt Hall carbon rig (to our specs—in the early 90s we had no experience with carbon and were dubious of building too flexible a rig). Means a lot less adjustment can be made with the cap shrouds and backstay than modern boats but more peace of mind. 

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25 minutes ago, Whinging Pom said:

That flappy leech would drive me bonkers!   Give the leech line a tug, pretty please.

Same here, but nothing we could really do about it. Those school boats are mistreated all year long. Sails are exhausted and distorted. Pro tip btw: never buy a used school boat. They're almost worst deals than charters.

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I posted this on the Maine thread, so please forgive, but I think it's a great picture. Vortex to the left, Restive to the right, we had a great day racing on Penobscot Bay in the Castine - Camden wooden boat race.  Vortex is a cold molded Swede 55 built and owned by the president of Brooklin Boat Yard, which also built Restive to an Alden design. 

2132718719_VortexandRestive.thumb.jpg.caabcd4d2cf69612f68e8fbd7fbdd9f9.jpg

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I posted this on the Maine thread, so please forgive, but I think it's a great picture. Vortex to the left, Restive to the right, we had a great day racing on Penobscot Bay in the Castine - Camden wooden boat race.  Vortex is a cold molded Swede 55 built and owned by the president of Brooklin Boat Yard, which also built Restive to an Alden design. 

Gorgeous!  Out of curiosity, is it a race rule that you tow your dink racing?  We don't even put ours in the water except for the couple of weeks a year we're cruising, because of the half-knot or so it costs us towing it.

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I posted this on the Maine thread, so please forgive, but I think it's a great picture. Vortex to the left, Restive to the right, we had a great day racing on Penobscot Bay in the Castine - Camden wooden boat race.  Vortex is a cold molded Swede 55 built and owned by the president of Brooklin Boat Yard, which also built Restive to an Alden design. 

2132718719_VortexandRestive.thumb.jpg.caabcd4d2cf69612f68e8fbd7fbdd9f9.jpg

If this isn’t an advertisement for Maine, Sailing, BBY, Swede, and Alden all rolled into one, I don’t know what it is. WHAT A SHOT

CL: I know you’ve posted about her many times, but is there a quick link to Restive’s plans and photos? I want to indulge my imagination.

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3 hours ago, ChrisJD said:

Gorgeous!  Out of curiosity, is it a race rule that you tow your dink racing?  We don't even put ours in the water except for the couple of weeks a year we're cruising, because of the half-knot or so it costs us towing it.

Yes, for Castine-Camden and Camden-Brooklin. Some boats have kind of abused it by towing what are, essentially, pool toys. For this series BBY loaned me a very nice, low drag, narrow, rowing skiff that could be perched on a stern wave with almost no drag. Some boats have custom carbon dinks. Some pull inflatables right up to the stern so the dink is 90% out of the water. 

The best VHF hail in 2019 was "Otter, Otter, put your dinghy in the water". 

Dinks are not required for ERR. 

It was very subdued compared to past years. There were no shore activities but the caterers took orders for BBQ you could have on your boat. The ribs, chicken and corn were actually quite great. 

3 hours ago, Alaris said:

If this isn’t an advertisement for Maine, Sailing, BBY, Swede, and Alden all rolled into one, I don’t know what it is. WHAT A SHOT

CL: I know you’ve posted about her many times, but is there a quick link to Restive’s plans and photos? I want to indulge my imagination.

I recently received a complete set of drawings from her original owner, who also included development drawings showing the design evolution. The bow went through several iterations until the desired balance and aesthetic was achieved.

http://restive-alden-48.blogspot.com/p/restive-adjective-1of-person-unable-to.html

http://aldendesigns.com/recent_designs/1250.html

https://www.jamesgblaine.me/rescue-at-sea-a-series

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My favorite VHF from recent memory was a call from an unnamed boat admonishing "[Name redacted], Salem harbor is a 5mph no wake zone," followed by about five seconds of silence, then a heavily-Boston-accented, anonymous reply, "Nobody likes a snitch."

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On a hot day in light air this week, we were sailing through the Merchant Islands in eastern Penobscot bay. 

With just the Genoa and mizzen raised, our speed was easy on piloting between the rocks.

Buoys are gently pushed aside, a few scrape the bottom and pop out in our quiet wake.

I lost count of the Island passes we threaded our way through.

Sometimes, speed is the enemy.

BA9BF961-7371-4C72-8271-437126D2C36A.thumb.jpeg.93e554bb6a00d1a71291bf6d25c668e1.jpeg

There were many favorite anchorages along our meandering path but we decided on a new spot. 

After 30 seasons I’m still amazed that at the end of the day sailing the coast of Maine, there is always an uninhabited Island - or three, upon which to land and watch the sunset.

 

8CDBB263-BEBA-433F-98A1-DC7D764EB4F0.thumb.jpeg.b4b5bdebd1bdd56de0949e6e7ef289e7.jpeg

 

 

 

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Got a good afternoon sail yesterday on the Chesapeake, 10-16 NE, cloudy and cooler finally.  Tuned the rig a bit with the new lowers.  Wife and son aboard, picnic lunch.

Got a lotta varnish to strip still.

VideoCapture_20200816-085927.jpg

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

After 30 seasons I’m still amazed that at the end of the day sailing the coast of Maine, there is always an uninhabited Island - or three, upon which to land and watch the sunset.

I am aching for this. It's exactly why I want to sail up there. I think I've settled on the month of July for the trip so I can be up there for the hottest part of summer. Hey, only 10.5 months to go!

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On August 16, 2020 at 5:53 AM, Kris Cringle said:

On a hot day in light air this week, we were sailing through the Merchant Islands in eastern Penobscot bay. 

With just the Genoa and mizzen raised, our speed was easy on piloting between the rocks.

Buoys are gently pushed aside, a few scrape the bottom and pop out in our quiet wake.

I lost count of the Island passes we threaded our way through.

Sometimes, speed is the enemy.

 

 

Merchants Row is frequently festooned with pots.

We've found that, if we're doing 7 knots or better under sail, we don't catch pots. Sometimes speed is your friend. Upwind or reaching we hit that in 9-10 kts true.

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I was out for a doublehanded day sail last Wednesday on a nice sunny Newport afternoon when a dockmate was cruising by Castle Hill returning from Marthas Vineyard.  They took this nice picture of us.

VentoSolare-Aug2020.jpeg

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On 8/16/2020 at 5:53 AM, Kris Cringle said:

On a hot day in light air this week, we were sailing through the Merchant Islands in eastern Penobscot bay. 

With just the Genoa and mizzen raised, our speed was easy on piloting between the rocks.

Buoys are gently pushed aside, a few scrape the bottom and pop out in our quiet wake.

I lost count of the Island passes we threaded our way through.

Sometimes, speed is the enemy.

BA9BF961-7371-4C72-8271-437126D2C36A.thumb.jpeg.93e554bb6a00d1a71291bf6d25c668e1.jpeg

There were many favorite anchorages along our meandering path but we decided on a new spot. 

After 30 seasons I’m still amazed that at the end of the day sailing the coast of Maine, there is always an uninhabited Island - or three, upon which to land and watch the sunset.

 

8CDBB263-BEBA-433F-98A1-DC7D764EB4F0.thumb.jpeg.b4b5bdebd1bdd56de0949e6e7ef289e7.jpeg

 

 

 

A truly beautiful area. We just got permission to land and walk around Merchants Island. The owners of Kimball Island gave us a trail map and invited us ashore when we were last at IAH.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Whooo, look at that rooster tail!

And to add a bit of colour, the crew were all newbies except for the chap driving, they were having the fattest time, their smiles makes me smile :).  

Edit; correction, that ones of the newbies driving, she's actually doing pretty good!

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5 hours ago, IStream said:

Reefed main, rooster tail, but very few whitecaps. Confusing. How hard was it blowing?

It would have been less than 25 knots, I normally don't reef below that and  I'd tucked in the 1st reef a bit earlier than normal due to the green crew. From memory, the max boat speed that day was 14-15, so sadly not as impressive as it looks.  

2 hours ago, longy said:

Momentary interaction of the quarter wave with the swells.

Yep, I think we had opposing wind and tide as it was a little bit more swell than normal. Aside from aberrations from the swell I'd normally have hardly any wake when planing. The water off the transom goes from chattering to a low hiss and aside from the rudders starting their weird cadence song it gets eerily quiet. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, shaggybaxter said:

It would have been less than 25 knots, I normally don't reef below that and  I'd tucked in the 1st reef a bit earlier than normal due to the green crew. From memory, the max boat speed that day was 14-15, so sadly not as impressive as it looks.  

Yep, I think we had opposing wind and tide as it was a little bit more swell than normal. Aside from aberrations from the swell I'd normally have hardly any wake when planing. The water off the transom goes from chattering to a low hiss and aside from the rudders starting their weird cadence song it gets eerily quiet. 

 

 

One of the coolest cruiser-racers on earth.

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On 8/11/2020 at 9:21 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

I posted this on the Maine thread, so please forgive, but I think it's a great picture. Vortex to the left, Restive to the right, we had a great day racing on Penobscot Bay in the Castine - Camden wooden boat race.  Vortex is a cold molded Swede 55 built and owned by the president of Brooklin Boat Yard, which also built Restive to an Alden design. 

2132718719_VortexandRestive.thumb.jpg.caabcd4d2cf69612f68e8fbd7fbdd9f9.jpg

I love it wooden sailboat racing, towing a dingy is ok...

Although we never go that quick towing the dingy is pretty regular.

 

Hope to get to Castine someday had lots of cadets come through the ship from the school. Sounds like a amazing place.

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25 minutes ago, bgytr said:

Nice day on the Chesapeake yesterday.  78 degrees, 8-15 outta NW, sunny, low humidity.  Don't get much better.

VideoCapture_20200831-180631.jpg

We got out as well.  Scooting along pretty good. 

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I'm heading out for 9-10 days, commencing Friday night. Perhaps I'll finally get some photos to contribute to all these photo threads.

The first 4-5 days are supposed to be fab weather.

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Have been getting plenty of short handed and solo sailing in this last 2 months. Managed to get my hands on a Monitor windvane which i am very excited to fit. Also, a new mast to cure my issue with the massive one i currently have

zKgTuQw.jpg

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

I'm heading out for 9-10 days, commencing Friday night. Perhaps I'll finally get some photos to contribute to all these photo threads.

The first 4-5 days are supposed to be fab weather.

Where from/to?

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On 9/2/2020 at 7:08 AM, Ajax said:

I'm heading out for 9-10 days, commencing Friday night. Perhaps I'll finally get some photos to contribute to all these photo threads.

The first 4-5 days are supposed to be fab weather.

Maybe I’ll see you out there. Won’t be heading out until Monday at the earliest though so maybe not. Although I do intend to go south since I just got back from the northern bay. Just need to get back to race to Oxford. 

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On September 2, 2020 at 12:45 PM, bgytr said:

Where from/to?

Someone asked us that as we were untying the other day. 

The answer, of course, was "somewhere else." :rolleyes:

And that's where we are now. Somewhere else, about to go for a hike.

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31 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Can you tell us a bit about what she is and her history?

Sure- she's a 1979 Julian Everitt half-tonner design (Eliminator 32). built by Production Yachts in Glenrothes, Scotland. Julian Everitt also designed the E-boat which also was built there and elsewhere. Launched on the East coast (Royal Tay YC, I've been told) and campaigned in Scotland for a while before going to Northern Ireland in the 90s, then back to Scotland and was raced regularly from Port Edgar (underneath the Forth Bridges close to Edinburgh) until the owner had a fall and had to give up. I thought we were just buying an old boat but i keep meeting folk who remember her being raced, seems she's a tiny little bit of Scottish sailing history!

 Sat on the hard for a while in PE marine until we bought her (cheaply) in 2016, since then we've caught up a bit on deferred maintenance with new standing rigging, some deckwork to reduce rainwater ingress & simplify the controls and some internal structural repairs.

 We've not raced her (him? she's called Kermit, and always has been AFAICT) and I've put an old Facnor furler on with help from this board to ease handling when sailing short-handed.

 There are a few of them still around- a couple in Ireland (Woofer, Eliminator), one ex-Whitby (Qantro) and one in the middle East (La Buse) but nowhere close to the 30+ that are claimed to have been made...

Cheers,

              W.

Edited by WGWarburton
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Our new to us 1986 Catalina 22 during our Memorial Day Race on Lake Winnebago, WI. 

I know they're a dime a dozen, but she's in fairly nice shape. New sails going on next spring!

50035649661_ea596227bb_o.jpg

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1 minute ago, Sea_Squirrel said:

Our new to us 1986 Catalina 22 during our Memorial Day Race on Lake Winnebago, WI. 

I know they're a dime a dozen, but she's in fairly nice shape. New sails going on next spring!

50035649661_ea596227bb_o.jpg

Those smiles are all that matter.

...and yeah, C-22's are a dime a dozen but not in that condition. Yours is clean and ship-shape.

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5 minutes ago, Sea_Squirrel said:

Our new to us 1986 Catalina 22 during our Memorial Day Race on Lake Winnebago, WI. 

I know they're a dime a dozen, but she's in fairly nice shape. New sails going on next spring!

50035649661_ea596227bb_o.jpg

They are dime a dozen because there are lots of them. There are lots of them because they are darned good boats!

"It's just a boring old Toyota Camry. Never broke down on us, 350k on the clock." 

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6 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Those smiles are all that matter.

...and yeah, C-22's are a dime a dozen but not in that condition. Yours is clean and ship-shape.

Thank you, Ajax. I'm really looking forward to digging into the restoration and updating the sail/rigging package. It'll be a great springboard when we're ready to upgrade to something a little more competitive for our little beer can Tuesday night PHRF fleet.

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39 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

They are dime a dozen because there are lots of them. There are lots of them because they are darned good boats!

"It's just a boring old Toyota Camry. Never broke down on us, 350k on the clock." 

They are great little boats - that was our gateway drug.  Be careful!  Honestly if we didn't have so many damned kids and sailed on a lake we'd still have her.  Unbeatable bang for the buck.  

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10 minutes ago, socalrider said:

They are great little boats - that was our gateway drug.  Be careful!  Honestly if we didn't have so many damned kids and sailed on a lake we'd still have her.  Unbeatable bang for the buck.  

Just looked up production numbers: over 15,000 built! That's amazing for a keelboat.

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53 minutes ago, socalrider said:

They are great little boats - that was our gateway drug.  Be careful!  Honestly if we didn't have so many damned kids and sailed on a lake we'd still have her.  Unbeatable bang for the buck.  

I initially didn't want her, but the more I sailed her the more we fell in love. I've been working on the boat the past 2 years with a friend, so I've had quite a long test drive. I doubt we'll keep it forever, but we'll see. I'm VERY happy with the stability and righting moment of 5' of keel when it's all the way down, and being able to raise the keel and rudder is great for Winnebago. 

42 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

Just looked up production numbers: over 15,000 built! That's amazing for a keelboat.

It's a crazy amount! I would love to see our local club get a one design fleet going with them, we have 4 in the harbor at the moment but two are for sale.

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9 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

If you divide the spinnaker into the main, the result is 4.747883695252116. Coincidence?

Yes the spinnaker, take a lot of flak over the color scheme, maybe Peacefrog can chip in, I think it came from a certain Sarnia loft, but not sure, came with the boat

 

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Hey Y'all,  finally got a shot of us sailing our Crealock 37. We bought her last year off the Ohio River in Louisville. She's been in fresh water for maybe 30yrs. She's in great shape, and we got her for a steal! We trucked her over to the Chesapeake. While we had the masts down we completely rewired them and hung all new Hella brand LEDs, a new B and G anemometer and a VHF/AIS antenna. We also repainted the masts (one coat of primer, two coats of EZPoxy Petit) which came out beautiful, and a list of other sundry projects. She's a cutter rigged yawl with a tiller,.. or  as I was corrected on here once, a two head sail yawl with a tiller. I like the first way, what's the consensus on that?

No Cunningham on the mizzen yet, and only an upper luff down haul/tensioner/Cunningham on the main so the sail shape leaves a little to be desired, but ya... we're getting her there slowly for her second sea trial. She has a lot of mysteries about her as she was basically a boat condo for many years on Kentucky Lake, and then the owner we bought her from didn't know much about her either. Some bastardization on her for sure in regards to the standing rigging and the spars but the puzzle is working it's self out.

 

Peace ~ WindandCsAnarchy_Resize.thumb.png.91545b06e0e1940990d140e0ff95c4da.png

Edited by WindnCs
Wanted to add more to the post :)
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3 hours ago, WindnCs said:

She's a cutter rigged yawl with a tiller,.. or  as I was corrected on here once, a two head sail yawl with a tiller. I like the first way, what's the consensus on that?

There is no "consensus" on that, only right & wrong.

A cutter is a specific rig, as is a yawl - and ketch and sloop and schooner etc.

A cutter has a single mast with two headsails and a mast set well aft - almost amidships.

A yawl or other two masted rig with two headsails is called a double headsail yawl (or ketch or whatever).

Can you imagine a "cutter schooner"? :rolleyes:

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On 9/8/2020 at 3:34 PM, WindnCs said:

Hey Y'all,  finally got a shot of us sailing our Crealock 37. We bought her last year off the Ohio River in Louisville. She's been in fresh water for maybe 30yrs. She's in great shape, and we got her for a steal! We trucked her over to the Chesapeake. While we had the masts down we completely rewired them and hung all new Hella brand LEDs, a new B and G anemometer and a VHF/AIS antenna. We also repainted the masts (one coat of primer, two coats of EZPoxy Petit) which came out beautiful, and a list of other sundry projects. She's a cutter rigged yawl with a tiller,.. or  as I was corrected on here once, a two head sail yawl with a tiller. I like the first way, what's the consensus on that?

No Cunningham on the mizzen yet, and only an upper luff down haul/tensioner/Cunningham on the main so the sail shape leaves a little to be desired, but ya... we're getting her there slowly for her second sea trial. She has a lot of mysteries about her as she was basically a boat condo for many years on Kentucky Lake, and then the owner we bought her from didn't know much about her either. Some bastardization on her for sure in regards to the standing rigging and the spars but the puzzle is working it's self out.

 

Peace ~ WindandCsAnarchy_Resize.thumb.png.91545b06e0e1940990d140e0ff95c4da.png

Had she been sailed on the Ohio River? That seems like a lot of boat for that body of water. Just curious.

She will probably feel happier on the Chesapeake.

Very handsome boat.

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Friend sent me this of us this past Saturday.  Photo quality is a bit low res, but it's the only pic I got so far sailing from off the boat.  We were racing so in violation of the cruising anarchy boards... but it was the cruisey non spin class.

NASS2020pic.jpeg

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1 minute ago, bgytr said:

1258224787_Screenshotfrom2020-09-2209-21-41.thumb.png.7122b67e6a2c088dc3526b547113716d.png

blasting upwind out of the Chester River on the Chesapeake this past Sunday.

Ah, fantastic. We've sailed all the way to Chestertown, just once. The wind was from a direction that allowed us to navigate all the twists up as far as "Devil's Reach" just shy of Chestertown.  I just love it up there.

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1 minute ago, Ajax said:

Ah, fantastic. We've sailed all the way to Chestertown, just once. The wind was from a direction that allowed us to navigate all the twists up as far as "Devil's Reach" just shy of Chestertown.  I just love it up there.

Ya I've only gone up to Chestertown once by boat as well.  It's a long friggin way up there, and no place to anchor.  But fun to do once.

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On 9/15/2020 at 8:29 AM, bgytr said:

Friend sent me this of us this past Saturday.  Photo quality is a bit low res, but it's the only pic I got so far sailing from off the boat.  We were racing so in violation of the cruising anarchy boards... but it was the cruisey non spin class.

NASS2020pic.jpeg

Thought that might be you. I was admiring your boat when we were pre-start. Really nice!

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