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3 hours ago, Kolibri said:

The Frances 26' is a great design and it sails very well for a "little" boat. It's surprisingly fast for a 26' full keel boat as well. Check out frances26.org for pictures, info, reviews, etc.

Cruising in Hawaii can be pretty casual to pretty extreme. You always need to pay attention to the swell size and direction forecast as well as the wind forecast. The islands create their own weather patterns and there are some major "wind tunnel" areas. Some of the points can be pretty rough where currents collide too. There are a lot of protected anchorages on each island - for at least part of the year. Where on the Big Island are you considering?

Pick up a copy of this book as a starting point. There are several other good guide books and websites to dig through too.

 

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Surprising the Frances is fast, I would not have guessed that. I did look at a bunch but I'll go on the .org on it. I love the canoe sterns/double enders, hence I wound up with a Crealock 37. Thanks for the book idea, I'll grab it!

We're looking in to the Puna District. I know it's a little rough but it's in our budget! I have some friends in Volcano, so that's an option, but mainly looking in a couple neighborhoods to the north down on the coast. Hawaiian recreational shores being the most likely. 1/4 acre lots for in the 15K area, and there's water in that neighborhood, so no catch system needed. As as a good home owners association, which I wouldn't have liked the idea of, but I hear it's a good idea to keep the livestock out of your neighborhood. A lot of the Hawaiians raise pigs. Pahoa I hear has turned into a pretty cool little town too. That neighborhood is also mainly out of the volcano danger zone... but hell, anywhere you go there's danger, driving to the boat is more dangerous than going sailing.

What are you thoughts on the Puna District? Or the Big Island in general?

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Boat sailing  Dog flying 

Ghosting along near Castine.

Bearing away after hoisting the sails for the first time after 3 years retrofit.  Monterey.   

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3 hours ago, WindnCs said:

Surprising the Frances is fast, I would not have guessed that. I did look at a bunch but I'll go on the .org on it. I love the canoe sterns/double enders, hence I wound up with a Crealock 37. Thanks for the book idea, I'll grab it!

We're looking in to the Puna District. I know it's a little rough but it's in our budget! I have some friends in Volcano, so that's an option, but mainly looking in a couple neighborhoods to the north down on the coast. Hawaiian recreational shores being the most likely. 1/4 acre lots for in the 15K area, and there's water in that neighborhood, so no catch system needed. As as a good home owners association, which I wouldn't have liked the idea of, but I hear it's a good idea to keep the livestock out of your neighborhood. A lot of the Hawaiians raise pigs. Pahoa I hear has turned into a pretty cool little town too. That neighborhood is also mainly out of the volcano danger zone... but hell, anywhere you go there's danger, driving to the boat is more dangerous than going sailing.

What are you thoughts on the Puna District? Or the Big Island in general?

The Frances is fast for a 26' full keel boat :-). It's not going to chase down a J Boat, but it is faster than a PSC Dana.

I love the Hilo area as well as the areas north of Hilo. Hilo has a pretty good arts, music, and restaurant scene. Having the university and Gemini Observatory's headquarters there really helps. The old Hawaii architecture throughout town is pretty cool too.

I've only driven through the Puna area and it looked fine to me. Finding a neighborhood that you like is key anywhere in Hawaii. The Captain Cook area is great too. Most places have pretty killer views. Volcano is a cool little town with an interesting vibe. In general I love the Big Island. T

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16 hours ago, Kolibri said:

The Frances is fast for a 26' full keel boat :-). It's not going to chase down a J Boat, but it is faster than a PSC Dana.

I love the Hilo area as well as the areas north of Hilo. Hilo has a pretty good arts, music, and restaurant scene. Having the university and Gemini Observatory's headquarters there really helps. The old Hawaii architecture throughout town is pretty cool too.

I've only driven through the Puna area and it looked fine to me. Finding a neighborhood that you like is key anywhere in Hawaii. The Captain Cook area is great too. Most places have pretty killer views. Volcano is a cool little town with an interesting vibe. In general I love the Big Island. T

Super cool, thanks Kolibri! We would love to move to the Hilo area, but it's definitely out of the budget! I think you're right, just finding a neighborhood that works for you is the key. Good to hear that in general you like the Big Island!

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On 11/4/2020 at 5:11 PM, Kolibri said:

The Frances is fast for a 26' full keel boat :-). It's not going to chase down a J Boat, but it is faster than a PSC Dana.

I love the Hilo area as well as the areas north of Hilo. Hilo has a pretty good arts, music, and restaurant scene. Having the university and Gemini Observatory's headquarters there really helps. The old Hawaii architecture throughout town is pretty cool too.

I've only driven through the Puna area and it looked fine to me. Finding a neighborhood that you like is key anywhere in Hawaii. The Captain Cook area is great too. Most places have pretty killer views. Volcano is a cool little town with an interesting vibe. In general I love the Big Island. T

Do you really want to voluntarily become a "Punatic"????   Rent first.  

 

I was there before the subdivisions went in, & have been thru all of them at various times. Family still there, so my info IS up to date. Check for recent flooding in the area your considering, there have been some massive new floods out there. And if you have problems buying land, can you handle to approximately 35% increase in general cost of living?

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12 hours ago, longy said:

Do you really want to voluntarily become a "Punatic"????   Rent first.  

 

I was there before the subdivisions went in, & have been thru all of them at various times. Family still there, so my info IS up to date. Check for recent flooding in the area your considering, there have been some massive new floods out there. And if you have problems buying land, can you handle to approximately 35% increase in general cost of living?

Umm....like I said, "I've only driven through it...." Never claimed to do a detailed market analysis on the area. I have no plans to move there. That would be WindnCs who is looking at the Puna area. You bring up some great points about the recent flooding events on the Big Island. Then there are the eruptions to consider. 

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Ok, sorry. But the warning stands. Most of that area was sold off sight un-seen to mainland people based on some very mis-leading sales pitches. It was very cheap land - because there had never been a use for it previously. Even at the peak of sugar it was ignored, little to no dirt, and no water. A couple of the subdivisions did put in water & power. the majority put in gravel roads then set up sales offices.

    Depending on location, volcanic danger zones 2 and 3. Three is flows from Kilauea and I would view that as safe. Two is flows from the rift zone, and we've just seen what it is capable of.

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This boat was absolutely hauling ass at the Round the County race earlier this month. It's the schooner Martha and I had heard that it was fast when the wind picked up, but had never seen it. It wasn't pointing high, but close reaching in the low teens in very rough conditions. It was making an impressive cloud of steam that was visible a good 100 ft behind the boat.

Sorry about the lousy photo.

PB070258.jpeg

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With a cruise up to Fiji in 19 we had between 3000 and 4000 hours aboard, but 20 is least amount of time I've been on a boat for the last 35 years.

But I was home alone last sat sooooo. 

Not much wind and I was out to run the motor so I was lazy with the sail area...slipped along though.

 

R2.jpg

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With this year's sailing season being cut short by Covid, I put together a bunch of sailing clips for winter armchair voyaging.

Much of this content has been previously posted.  Some has never been seen.

 

 

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On 11/25/2020 at 4:14 AM, ALL@SEA said:

Maybe shouldn't be on "Cruising Anarchy" as this is coming past Tasman Isl on the last stretch of the recent Maria Isl race. I'm bias, but its a spectacular part of the world. 

 

 

It's a beautiful coast when conditions are like that. Below is the cape you are heading to next. Cape Raoul was even used by the navy for target practice once.

Like you we were in light wind and smooth seas when this pic was taken.

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When it's blowing a bit the coast is  unforgiving as a lee shore. 

le14369362_landfallreturningtoTasmania2011.thumb.JPG.601f5c9fcd7d748caf2e36470dccba7b.JPG

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Just came across this one: 

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Smoke from fires on the west coast making its presence known on Long Island Sound.  Looks like we're doing well in the JAM fleet.

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4 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Boat sailing 

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Dog flying 

1466479730_TommyFlyingGoose2009_.thumb.jpg.58e333ac82012e5d5ad58507d5f9e863.jpg

Dog has obviously been watching the AC preliminaries.

 

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21 minutes ago, PaulK said:

Dog has obviously been watching the AC preliminaries.

 

No foils visible so it is purely ground effect?

 

My boat, but before my ownership. Hasn´t been on water for 13 years.

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With sailnumber A-1 during Olympics

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1989, photo from photographer Jorma Rautapää

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After stowing the anchor on the morning of August 14, 2020, 3 or 4 knots of wind was just enough to inflate the genoa and draw us out of our anchorage.

A zephyr pulled us off the beaten path and into a maze of islands ahead. 

The stalled genoa pulled us at 1- 2 knots as we trailed a handful of kayakers until we could clear a granite island coming up on starboard.

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Then we pointed up just up enough into a big bight in the island to get the telltales quivering. Telltales don't fly in wind like this but they do tell the tale. 

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Sailing slowly is an acquired taste, I think. I left the main covered, we didn’t want more speed in here. Going slowly, we opened up the hazards, the piloting was easy. 

We passed only one camp on our morning meander. Moving so slowly the sailboat must have been a curious sight because they craned their necks to peer out under the railing. 

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I turned my attention to the lone mizzen on the aft deck. The dog thought we were still anchored and continued his morning nap. 

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Does it make a difference if a telltale streams on the leech of a little 50 square foot sail, pushing 8 tons of sailboat?

Well,… if you take 2 grains out of a half teaspoon of salt, does that change the weight on the end of the spoon? 

You know it does. You don’t have to feel it. So sailors tweak their sails(and take the laundry down to minimize windage).

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 Something worked (and the morning wind always builds), our speed was up.

The light wind put us on various tacks that the islands allowed pathways between.

The sleeping dog awoke. 

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The boat doesn’t make a wake sailing this slowly, it gently tumbles the water over and over, leaving a rolling pattern in its track.

A few hours later, we dropped the anchor again. Looking now on the chart, as the crow flies, we were less than 2 miles from where we started. 

 

 

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  • 5 weeks later...
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D'Entrecasteaux Channel in light air yesterday, imperceptibly southward at 4 knots Just enough to spin our prop.

I've been assured that God doesn't count the time spent sailing against our allotted span.

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10 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Fun sail numbers. I've been thinking of doing mine in Roman numerals.

Do them in Klingon.

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六一三六六 or maybe 陸壹叁陸陸 - special characters for check writing so no one can forge your sail numbers. 

 

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1 minute ago, Elegua said:

六一三六六 or maybe 陸壹叁陸陸 - special characters for check writing so no one can forge your sail numbers. 

 

That's way more interesting than LII.

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On 5/4/2021 at 6:50 PM, LicketysMom said:

Lickety 

FC0683FC-BE51-4849-839E-DFC678EE9E11.jpeg

I'm sure she's a great boat but this old lead mine sailor can't help but think that modern cat designs look like some one put the hulls on upside down by mistake...

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5 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

I'm sure she's a great boat but this old lead mine sailor can't help but think that modern cat designs look like some one put the hulls on upside down by mistake...

I like the look of the wave piercing hulls vs. the earlier cats.  I hope it helps with the motion and the ride.

I like lots of things from an aesthetic standpoint but I don't necessarily want to own them. :)

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9 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I like lots of things from an aesthetic standpoint but I don't necessarily want to own them. :)

Case in point

Medical Matters: Truths among those redhead myths

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30 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Case in point

Medical Matters: Truths among those redhead myths

 

Prime example. Gingers are pure fuckin' evil.  Nice to look at though.

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In honor of Innocent Bystander I'm going to post a few photos of my boats with IB driving.

The first is just after winning the class start in the 2015 Marion-Bermuda.

IMG_4082_mhr.thumb.jpg.5f64fd4da498ed4d0d1ae2afd8187970.jpg

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These were  off Newport at a Herreshoff/Panerai weekendDSC_1870.thumb.jpg.5d55251bdb3a1723f88b000fbb72530b.jpgDSC_1877.thumb.jpg.25dd79757b3a5e571168120b0889423b.jpg

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A blustery start to the 2019 Marion-Bermuda

1987431240_2019start1.jpg.0b032c0fd5b0021cb339b397c2f7cbef.jpg

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You can barely see IB, but he had just won another class start, 2019, and is sailing away from our class. 5.jpg.f2a03c57fbce3a194d9f2b160aff6b63.jpg1.jpg.5ca9a347de53b972a71d5d8335e0ccc5.jpg

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21 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

I don't care what type of boat you're into, that's so nice to look at.

Thanks CL.

 

Thanks SB. Innocent Bystander passed away last Saturday, he was one of my dearest friends and favorite sailors. The next day, Sunday, my first grandchild was born. This has been an emotional rollercoaster. 

 

image000000.thumb.jpg.4ab350e078a7ab2d5951c40f99e33cb8.jpg

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59 minutes ago, Slick470 said:

Congrats on becoming a granddad CL. I have a feeling you will spoil them. 

Moi? I don't have to, Beth is already doing a fine job.

I do plan on teaching this little girl how to sail, ski, flyfish, play guitar, etc. 

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15 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Moi? I don't have to, Beth is already doing a fine job.

I do plan on teaching this little girl how to sail, ski, flyfish, play guitar, etc. 

I'm sure that you'll do a fine job of all of the above. 

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Thanks SB. Innocent Bystander passed away last Saturday, he was one of my dearest friends and favorite sailors. The next day, Sunday, my first grandchild was born. This has been an emotional rollercoaster. 

 

image000000.thumb.jpg.4ab350e078a7ab2d5951c40f99e33cb8.jpg

I'm not a particularly spiritual person but I have noted many times that when one great soul leaves this world, another comes into it. Congrats, CL.

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Thanks SB. Innocent Bystander passed away last Saturday, he was one of my dearest friends and favorite sailors. The next day, Sunday, my first grandchild was born. This has been an emotional rollercoaster. 

 

image000000.thumb.jpg.4ab350e078a7ab2d5951c40f99e33cb8.jpg

Best quote ever about grandbabies;

"If I'd known being a grandparent was this much fun I'd have done it first"

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3 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

You can barely see IB, but he had just won another class start, 2019, and is sailing away from our class. 5.jpg.f2a03c57fbce3a194d9f2b160aff6b63.jpg1.jpg.5ca9a347de53b972a71d5d8335e0ccc5.jpg

I've done that beat out of BB at the start of the M-B race more than a few times. You can pretty much  win or lose the race in that first 20 miles.

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

 

image000000.thumb.jpg.4ab350e078a7ab2d5951c40f99e33cb8.jpg

She's really cute. Name? Weight? Serial number?

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55 minutes ago, Bull City said:

She's really cute. Name? Weight? Serial number?

You forgot to ask what she rates.  :P

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19 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

You can barely see IB, but he had just won another class start, 2019, and is sailing away from our class. 5.jpg.f2a03c57fbce3a194d9f2b160aff6b63.jpg1.jpg.5ca9a347de53b972a71d5d8335e0ccc5.jpg

Did you win the class finish?  The start in a 700 nm ocean race is kinda.. so what?

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16 minutes ago, bgytr said:

Did you win the class finish?  The start in a 700 nm ocean race is kinda.. so what?

Not when the start is a 20-mile beat it isn't. It is the only time in that race that all the boats will be in the same patch of water in the same conditions for 635 miles.

You can only control what you do in your class in a long ocean race. Overall is out of your hands because weather may favor larger or smaller boats on handicap.

But to win overall, you first have to win your class. In a race like Marion Bermuda, where current, wind velocity, and wind direction come into play getting out of Buzzards Bay, if you sail smart you can hammer your class beating out of the bay. If the rest of the race is a reach in some form, that beat out of the bay may be the only time where round-the-buoys tactics come into play in the conventional sense.

I've lost first overall in two races to Bermuda by a total of less than 10 minutes, so every mile of the race can be pretty important. If you don't have at least a decent start, you may get buried and have a hard time breaking clear and executing your initial strategy, depending on where you stand speed-wise in your class.

Newport-Bermuda is a bit different, as the start is typically less than five miles to windward--usually only two tacks--before bearing away to a starboard-tack reach. The Marion race is typically a true beat for close to four hours after the start. That's plenty of opportunity to put a lot of time on boats that aren't yet in "racing" mode.

And yes, local knowledge has a huge impact beating out of Buzzards Bay in virtually any conditions of wind and current.

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On 5/7/2021 at 6:16 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

I do plan on teaching this little girl how to sail, ski, flyfish, play guitar, etc. 

thought you just filled em up with sugar and red cordial and sent em back to their folks ... :)

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4 hours ago, Mid said:

thought you just filled em up with sugar and red cordial and sent em back to their folks ... :)

You have a devious mind. I like that, but just how is she supposed to learn a slow blues while sugared up?

 

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52 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

You have a devious mind. I like that, but just how is she supposed to learn a slow blues while sugared up?

 

Quickly.

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

You have a devious mind. I like that, but just how is she supposed to learn a slow blues while sugared up?

 

You gotta learn to play fast before you can learn to play slow... that only comes after appreciation...

- DSK

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The yawl in the foreground was Hobnob, my 47.5'/14.5m Lawley-built converted Class Q sloop from 1923. Just rounding Fort Adams at the entrance to Newport, RI, probably on the way back from Block Island around 1976 or so.  I would have been in my late 20s then.

Me standing up steering, my first wife trimming the headsail as we start to come up after sailing around the little Cal in the background like she was standing still.

She was converted to a yawl for ocean racing after 1925. The famous yachtsman who owned her then (Dudley Wolfe) declared her to be a submarine, and built a big  (61 ft) cutter named Highland Light to replace her to continue a distinguished career of offshore racing until he was killed attempting to climb K2. Highland Light was the antithesis of this boat, which was beat to crap after a few  years of ocean racing, for which she was totally unsuited. 

Hobnob had a varied and colorful ownership history before we got her in 1974. One story is that during prohibition, the copper water tank under the cockpit was filled with gin rather than water. We sold her in 1985 as part of a divorce settlement before I went on to build my next boat.

You can look at our wave pattern here  to see that the boat was going just about as she could go, despite the sail trim (or lack thereof).

The 5 1/2 ton lead keel of that boat sits somewhere on the bottom of Long Island Sound. The last I knew, the transom hung over a bar on Connecticut. Anything else that remained of the boat has probably been pounded to smithereens after her sinking during a blustery fall race about 20 years ago, long after I owned her.

We sailed her all over southern New England without an engine for a year,  about the time this picture was taken.

That's the year I really learned how to sail. The yawl rig was really helpful for an engineless boat.969493156_Hobnob1976.thumb.jpg.40d8204c04bb6c1b559b56da320d94e5.jpg

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28 minutes ago, accnick said:

The yawl in the foreground was Hobnob, my 47.5'/14.5m Lawley-built converted Class Q sloop from 1923. Just rounding Fort Adams at the entrance to Newport, RI, probably on the way back from Block Island around 1976 or so.  I would have been in my late 20s then.

Me standing up steering, my first wife trimming the headsail as we start to come up after sailing around the little Cal in the background like she was standing still.

She was converted to a yawl for ocean racing after 1925. The famous yachtsman who owned her then (Dudley Wolfe) declared her to be a submarine, and built a big  (61 ft) cutter named Highland Light to replace her to continue a distinguished career of offshore racing until he was killed attempting to climb K2. Highland Light was the antithesis of this boat, which was beat to crap after a few  years of ocean racing, for which she was totally unsuited. 

Hobnob had a varied and colorful ownership history before we got her in 1974. One story is that during prohibition, the copper water tank under the cockpit was filled with gin rather than water. We sold her in 1985 as part of a divorce settlement before I went on to build my next boat.

You can look at our wave pattern here  to see that the boat was going just about as she could go, despite the sail trim (or lack thereof).

The 5 1/2 ton lead keel of that boat sits somewhere on the bottom of Long Island Sound. The last I knew, the transom hung over a bar on Connecticut. Anything else that remained of the boat has probably been pounded to smithereens after her sinking during a blustery fall race about 20 years ago, long after I owned her.

We sailed her all over southern New England without an engine for a year,  about the time this picture was taken.

That's the year I really learned how to sail. The yawl rig was really helpful for an engineless boat.969493156_Hobnob1976.thumb.jpg.40d8204c04bb6c1b559b56da320d94e5.jpg

Now -THAT- is a boat I covet. I envy you the experience of owning and sailing her, sir

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

The yawl in the foreground was Hobnob, my 47.5'/14.5m Lawley-built converted Class Q sloop from 1923. Just rounding Fort Adams at the entrance to Newport, RI, probably on the way back from Block Island around 1976 or so.  I would have been in my late 20s then.

Me standing up steering, my first wife trimming the headsail as we start to come up after sailing around the little Cal in the background like she was standing still.

She was converted to a yawl for ocean racing after 1925. The famous yachtsman who owned her then (Dudley Wolfe) declared her to be a submarine, and built a big  (61 ft) cutter named Highland Light to replace her to continue a distinguished career of offshore racing until he was killed attempting to climb K2. Highland Light was the antithesis of this boat, which was beat to crap after a few  years of ocean racing, for which she was totally unsuited. 

Hobnob had a varied and colorful ownership history before we got her in 1974. One story is that during prohibition, the copper water tank under the cockpit was filled with gin rather than water. We sold her in 1985 as part of a divorce settlement before I went on to build my next boat.

You can look at our wave pattern here  to see that the boat was going just about as she could go, despite the sail trim (or lack thereof).

The 5 1/2 ton lead keel of that boat sits somewhere on the bottom of Long Island Sound. The last I knew, the transom hung over a bar on Connecticut. Anything else that remained of the boat has probably been pounded to smithereens after her sinking during a blustery fall race about 20 years ago, long after I owned her.

We sailed her all over southern New England without an engine for a year,  about the time this picture was taken.

That's the year I really learned how to sail. The yawl rig was really helpful for an engineless boat.969493156_Hobnob1976.thumb.jpg.40d8204c04bb6c1b559b56da320d94e5.jpg

Excellent story,  thanks for sharing that. 

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Now -THAT- is a boat I covet. I envy you the experience of owning and sailing her, sir

FB- Doug

Here is that same boat about five years later checking the wind up the first leg before the start of a race around Conanicut Island. The guy in the middle of the boat in the dark shirt and white visor, looking aft with the stopwatch in his hand calculating time to get back to the starting line, is the late Jeff Spranger, part of the crew of the first fiberglass boat to win the Newport Bermuda race in the 1960s.

The guy on the bow is Ed Adams, multiple-time Star-class world champion and  Star class Olympic sailor. We all worked together back then.

That's me on the tiller, with my bearded face just to the left of the mizzen, with my wife crouched on the afterdeck behind me, wishing she were driving.

That is still the best-balanced boat I have ever steered in 50 years of serious sailing. If you looks closely, you can see the tiller just forward of the mizzen mast and virtually dead center on the boat even on a power reach in a decent breeze. 

A boat like that spoils you. And she always seemed to be in a hurry to get to wherever we asked her to go.

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On 5/6/2021 at 12:03 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

Thanks SB. Innocent Bystander passed away last Saturday, he was one of my dearest friends and favorite sailors. The next day, Sunday, my first grandchild was born. This has been an emotional rollercoaster. 

 

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I've always said that the people who have suffered the greatest losses, also understand and feel the greatest joys...

Pretty sure IB is smiling down on you.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 5/6/2021 at 9:32 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

You can barely see IB, but he had just won another class start, 2019, and is sailing away from our class. 5.jpg.f2a03c57fbce3a194d9f2b160aff6b63.jpg1.jpg.5ca9a347de53b972a71d5d8335e0ccc5.jpg

what a nice belly

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race1-sig.thumb.jpg.cce55923382eaac59432f09ea94e644d.jpg

Taken in Western Long Island Sound, prior to the start of an EBYRA (RIP) Wednesday Night Race.

It says: "To Edd, Richard, and the crew of the Enterprise - Make me proud - Good luck! William Shatner" 

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On 5/30/2021 at 1:10 PM, CaptSayWot said:

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Taken in Western Long Island Sound, prior to the start of an EBYRA (RIP) Wednesday Night Race.

It says: "To Edd, Richard, and the crew of the Enterprise - Make me proud - Good luck! William Shatner" 

Did he serenade you with a song? :-)

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  • 2 weeks later...

We watched family sailing yesterday. After our mobo delivery the day before, I was content to be on land. Our daughter took a new friend and his dog (both non-sailors) sailing in our 9'6" Nutshell. They had to install the thwarts and truck it down to the launch ramp first, which delighted me. 

 

With the typical 10 knot Southerly breeze blowing into Rockport, it was a beat out for the little dinghy. It took MJ a few tacks before she got the little boat going nicely in the chop. 'Tony' (the dog), weighs about 60+ pounds moved forward. That helped.

They made a dozen or more tacks which took them out to the lighthouse where the little sail was just a red speck. Then she jibed and let Tom (friend) take the tiller for the sleighride home. No one has ever capsized this little sailboat (our tender) in it's 28 years of extensive use. 

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All the while, our son loaded NAMO the $1 dollar sailboat with 4 more adults and left the public docks with their 12' peapod log in tow. He set the %100 working jib on the furler and left with a full main. After motoring beyond the inner moorings, they set off on their first tack. We watched the two boats going to windward.

 

All boats seem to take a tack or two out of our harbor before they catch their stride and begin to stretch their legs (why is that?). 

 

Soon, NAMO was biting off large chunks of water to windward sailing flat, fast, nice. Once far enough outside, they cracked off and disappeared behind Indian Island. 

 

2 hours later he sent a pic, (parents of millenials will also have these ongoing family dialogues vibrating in their pockets), of NAMO (below) anchored off Vinalhaven Island, 12 NM to the east. This revealed the need of the 12' peapod in tow. They were at a party of local kids on the island. 

 

I sent back 'impressive sailing, NAMO is no 4ktsb'. 

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I asked him 'is the boat well anchored, are you staying the night?', and he turned me off his phone(too many questions from dad). Little bastard, I'm used to that. 

Our daughter never shuts me off,.... She left the dinghy rig in the boat to use again today. She sent this shot walking home.

Coastal Maine weather shuts sailors off at dusk. 

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6 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Relaxing sail on Sunday.

Hey, I can see my office!

I loved sailing in Boston Harbor when we were in SailTime: so much to do and see in a small space, and the Harbor Islands are fantastic to anchor off of and feel like you're in another world. I love sailing around Cape Ann these days, but day sails are pretty much just sail 15 miles out, then tack and sail 15 miles back; the coast line is gorgeous to look at but it loses some of the excitement.

Combining with the Boat Pets thread, this is my second mate watching Gloucester drift by yesterday:

 

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Sunday was her first sail after being christened.  The old name no longer exists on board or has been redacted from any documents still on the boat, drank copious amounts of champagne and treated the gods equally.  Yes we did follow the ceremony.

"Fool's Errand"  lives and breathes...

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On 11/24/2020 at 6:59 PM, Panope said:

With this year's sailing season being cut short by Covid, I put together a bunch of sailing clips for winter armchair voyaging.

Much of this content has been previously posted.  Some has never been seen.

 

 

Very cool video! Thanks for posting. Many of your camera angles are creative and KICK ASS!

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On 6/14/2021 at 2:43 PM, Marcjsmith said:

Sunday was her first sail after being christened.  The old name no longer exists on board or has been redacted from any documents still on the boat, drank copious amounts of champagne and treated the gods equally.  Yes we did follow the ceremony.

"Fool's Errand"  lives and breathes...

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When we rechristened our previous boat it was extremely emotional for the family, as we named her for a much beloved black Lab that we had lost, greatest dog we ever had.

She was a great boat, lived up to her name in every way. In we return we treated her as a beloved family pet with indoor heated storage, where she could talk all winter to the other spoiled boats, and brag about having a kid onboard and all the places she took us. 

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On 6/14/2021 at 2:22 PM, ChrisJD said:

Hey, I can see my office!

I loved sailing in Boston Harbor when we were in SailTime: so much to do and see in a small space, and the Harbor Islands are fantastic to anchor off of and feel like you're in another world. I love sailing around Cape Ann these days, but day sails are pretty much just sail 15 miles out, then tack and sail 15 miles back; the coast line is gorgeous to look at but it loses some of the excitement.

Combining with the Boat Pets thread, this is my second mate watching Gloucester drift by yesterday:

 

968461615_Boatpets.png

How far is P-Town?

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