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Crew Overboard Drill Requirement


TJSoCal

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From World Sailing SER 4.1.2, required for all categories (Ocean, Coastal and Nearshore):

 

"Annually, two-thirds of the boat's racing crew shall practice man-overboard procedures appropriate for the boat's size and speed. The practice shall consist of marking and returning to a position on the water, and demonstrating a method of hoisting a crewmember back on deck, or other consistent means of reboarding the crewmember."

 

Curious if people actually do this...

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If you get on a boat and go offshore without being confident that everyone onboard could come get you, then you shouldn't be on that boat.

 

Good point, but the requirement isn't for knowledge or skill, it's for performing an actual on-the-water drill on an annual basis. And applies equally to offshore races as well as the local Wednesday night Lido fleet.

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If you get on a boat and go offshore without being confident that everyone onboard could come get you, then you shouldn't be on that boat.

 

Good point, but the requirement isn't for knowledge or skill, it's for performing an actual on-the-water drill on an annual basis. And applies equally to offshore races as well as the local Wednesday night Lido fleet.

 

We do the drill annually.

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yes, even the beer can racers are required to do it.

round here on entry to a series, the skipper has to sign off confirming the drill has been undertaken in the past 12 months.

is it actually policed? not that i know of

you'll be happy it's been practiced though if it turns out you're the one in the water.

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I do it twice a year and I'm not even required to.

 

Drills are by far the most effective training and preparedness method available.

 

"Requirement", that's funny. There's really something wrong with the mentality on a boat that feels a burden by this type of "requirement".

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I'm not sure why it's not done. It's actually kind of fun. I got to be a designated MOB once. I was in a wetsuit, life jacket, and had a VHF just in case. I waited until the most inconvenient time, pointed at the crew member who "fell overboard," then jumped over the side. That crew wasn't allowed to do or say anything.

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Required by US Sailing SER for all offshore,nearshore and coastal racing.

 

Transpac requires that they drill be video taped, with date, and submitted as part of the entry.

 

After seeing how hard it really is to get someone on board, it does make sense to understand the process and the tools available (if any) on each boat you sail on.

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We used to do it every year, required for the Chgo-Mac. We actually would do two versions - one with owner/driver at helm, and then one where O/D was MOB - so some other crew member would have to grab helm and direct the MOB recovery.

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It is actually not that easy - especially on a smaller keel boat with, say, only two on board.

 

You have to be able to stop the boat right where the MOB is without using the motor.

 

Does indeed take practice.

 

Man-Overboard-2.jpg

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Good lord, where did that maneuver come from? Two jibes?

 

Look closer at the wind direction and the mainsail in the drawing. One tack, no jibes.

 

Although the drawing does look funny, the idea is not to go much beyond DDW on the downwind leg.

 

Better drawing and descriptions of some alternative maneuvers here.

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Good lord, where did that maneuver come from? Two jibes?

 

Look closer at the wind direction and the mainsail in the drawing. One tack, no jibes.

 

Although the drawing does look funny, the idea is not to go much beyond DDW on the downwind leg.

 

Better drawing and descriptions of some alternative maneuvers here.

 

I did look closely. That S-shaped orange arrow, relative to the wind direction, implies two jibes. Or you're at least by the lee for a while, and that seems potentially quite dangerous.

I've been teaching the Figure 8 for 16 years, and we never go deeper than a deep broad reach.

When my crew and I do our practice, I prefer a Quick Stop.

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Yes, we did it. You can break the drill into 2 parts.

 

Nav back to a point

 

Recovering a crew

 

As the MOB, the lifesling took 3 tries for the crew to get proficient. Was glad I had a dry suit, and we did it at the dock.

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I do only one race a year and yes I have the crew out and we practice sailing MOB recovery. That said, since it's an overnight race, if anyone went overboard at night, I'd do a quick stop, crank the iron genny to go get them, and call it a night.

 

No use risking loosing sight of them at my level racing for one race a year.

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There is no excuse for not doing this drill...especially if going offshore. I normally split the drill into two parts and practice separately

 

1. Handling of boat to return to MOB

 

Cue 20 million posts on the best way to pick MOB up! Before this gets too heated a debate ("My way is better than your way!") let's just remember that there are many good ways of doing it.

 

I personally think that many people 'overthink' this part. Each time I've had to recover an MOB for real, we have always used a modified method to suit the conditions. The main part, is that everyone has a few techniques in the back of their minds which they can draw upon in the heat of the moment.

 

2. MOB Egress

 

Many people underestimate the 'egress' part. Taking a dead-weight body is hard. It needs to be thought of in advance. The method will depend on the size and design of boat.

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There is no excuse for not doing this drill...especially if going offshore. I normally split the drill into two parts and practice separately

 

1. Handling of boat to return to MOB

 

Cue 20 million posts on the best way to pick MOB up! Before this gets too heated a debate ("My way is better than your way!") let's just remember that there are many good ways of doing it.

 

I personally think that many people 'overthink' this part. Each time I've had to recover an MOB for real, we have always used a modified method to suit the conditions. The main part, is that everyone has a few techniques in the back of their minds which they can draw upon in the heat of the moment.

 

2. MOB Egress

 

Many people underestimate the 'egress' part. Taking a dead-weight body is hard. It needs to be thought of in advance. The method will depend on the size and design of boat.

 

Well put. I got a surprise a couple of years ago. Joined the crew of a heavy CCA style K/CB, rudder on a skeg style boat for an ocean race. Doingthe required drills, it took me a couple of tries to put that boat where I wanted it as it didn't turn well at slow speed and the carry was very significant. I grew up on this style boat but lots of years of fin keels, efficient spade rudders and light boats lulled me into the mode of quick stop, tight turning radius and ability to kill speed quickly.

 

Even very experienced sailors need to do the drill regularly, particularly if they sail different style boats on occasion.

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