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straightening an aluminum furler extrusion


dacapo

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anything I need to be wary of? a section of extrusion got a kink in it just above the furler...not bent, no creases but makes it harder to use....i was going to heat it up a little and use soft pressure on a vise to straighten...thoughts?

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anything I need to be wary of? a section of extrusion got a kink in it just above the furler...not bent, no creases but makes it harder to use....i was going to heat it up a little and use soft pressure on a vise to straighten...thoughts?

 

Would not use heat.

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Any way to insert a snug fitting tube into that section before you straighten? It would reduce the risk of creating a kink during the straightening process. And I second the "no heat"comment. Annealing works nice for steel, but not aluminum.

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Have to respectfully disagree about heat. I have straightened many masts, booms and poles etc. using heat. The process I've done is using a torch (Gas only .no oxy) blacken the area only to be straightened with carbon. Add oxy to the flame ( a lazey blue heating flame) to reheat the area till the carbon is burned off. After cooling slightly, straighten the area as required. This will work harden the affected area....not to full strength but close.

Most of the repairs done were due to a failure of another system, mishandling or accident. If this was not the case here and the straightening were done cold then the stress levels are too high and the repair area will respond with a "snap" rather than just bending. Just normal use operating at lower stress levels will further the work hardening process. Works many time for me.

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anything I need to be wary of? a section of extrusion got a kink in it just above the furler...not bent, no creases but makes it harder to use....i was going to heat it up a little and use soft pressure on a vise to straighten...thoughts?

One challenge you'll face is not deforming the slots for the luff tape or the headstay...

 

You might need to insert thick wire or tubing to help maintain shape as you straighten. Otherwise you could end up with "straight" exterior, but compressed or kinked slots within the extrusion...

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anything I need to be wary of? a section of extrusion got a kink in it just above the furler...not bent, no creases but makes it harder to use....i was going to heat it up a little and use soft pressure on a vise to straighten...thoughts?

One challenge you'll face is not deforming the slots for the luff tape or the headstay...

 

You might need to insert thick wire or tubing to help maintain shape as you straighten. Otherwise you could end up with "straight" exterior, but compressed or kinked slots within the extrusion...

 

ahhhhhhhhhhhh, never thunk of that.....could I just insert #6 luff tape into the slot to hold the shape as I bend it back straight?

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anything I need to be wary of? a section of extrusion got a kink in it just above the furler...not bent, no creases but makes it harder to use....i was going to heat it up a little and use soft pressure on a vise to straighten...thoughts?

One challenge you'll face is not deforming the slots for the luff tape or the headstay...

 

You might need to insert thick wire or tubing to help maintain shape as you straighten. Otherwise you could end up with "straight" exterior, but compressed or kinked slots within the extrusion...

 

ahhhhhhhhhhhh, never thunk of that.....could I just insert #6 luff tape into the slot to hold the shape as I bend it back straight?

 

Nope that will just compress. You need something like a spring or maybe a FG rod

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