Jump to content

Flying Dutchman - GE 9 - Restoration Project


Recommended Posts

I hereby introduce you to my Flying Dutchman Restoration Project.



The boat origins are kind off lost in time but after some research it seems to be a Von Kreuzer from the late 50's. It's sail number is GE 9 (which used to be Greece's identification code in the 60's, GR later on and GRE now), property of Thessaloniki Sailing Club. She came into my dad's hands around the late 70's when she traded his newly bought laser for her. As you can realize, she is of great sentimental value. Actually, that's where I firstly sailed when i was around 3 years old.



Therefore for the purposes of my Flying Dutchman Restoration Project I'm into the pursuit of restoration and technical advice in order to give her the second life she deserves.



Here's my dad and sister sailing in the gulf of Thermaikos in Thessaloniki, circa 1997.


post-55891-0-03542900-1488392434_thumb.jpg

post-55891-0-44444700-1488392446_thumb.jpg

post-55891-0-42874600-1488392638_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Will be following your thread with interest. I have found everyone very positive, saving what are going to be rare boats in future decades is always worthwhile, there is nothing that cannot be fixed or remade on a flying dutchman. I am not aiming to have a down to weight competitive boat so that has given me a lot of freedom in my choices and methods. Just pick somewhere on the boat and make it better than it is now, then the next bit, and so on. Best wishes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent. This may help give me some impetus to finishing my 5O5 project as well.

BTW I've always wanted to visit Greece, and do a sailing tour. Wonder if I ever will.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent. This may help give me some impetus to finishing my 5O5 project as well.

BTW I've always wanted to visit Greece, and do a sailing tour. Wonder if I ever will.

You're more than welcomed if you give me a hand with my FD.... :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great new thread (and Randy's is also very interesting). Saving these old dinghies is important for a wide variety of reasons. Of course such projects are not for everyone! FD GE-9 sure sounds like there are some great reasons. Length of time, as others have stated, is not so important. I should know as I have a long-term restoration project of a Thistle built in 1946 underway.

 

By looks of the GE-9 pictures, the hull looks to be hot molded plywood. Correct?

 

What are your plans for dealing with the black sections? I've dealt with similar areas on my Thistle (5 plys of 1/16" veneer) both originating from dry rot and also use of steel staples that rusted and discolored the wood.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great new thread (and Randy's is also very interesting). Saving these old dinghies is important for a wide variety of reasons. Of course such projects are not for everyone! FD GE-9 sure sounds like there are some great reasons. Length of time, as others have stated, is not so important. I should know as I have a long-term restoration project of a Thistle built in 1946 underway.

 

By looks of the GE-9 pictures, the hull looks to be hot molded plywood. Correct?

 

What are your plans for dealing with the black sections? I've dealt with similar areas on my Thistle (5 plys of 1/16" veneer) both originating from dry rot and also use of steel staples that rusted and discolored the wood.

 

Not sure about the built process. The only thing I can say with certainty is that the hull is 4 layers of mahogany veneers with the internal and external ones transverse and the middle diagonal.

 

I will be probably scrapping the first maybe second veneer layer in order to remove those black areas and then will be doing the same from the inside. I'm not definitely sure if this is the right process but... it sounds safe. What do you guys suggest?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great project Dionisis! Glad to see a nice old FD getting a new lease on life!

 

Thank you mate! Hope everything goes according to plan...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Replacing all that veneer sounds like a considerable labour of love. I did cold mould a boat last winter and can say that shaping the pieces was much less trouble than I thought it would be, so don't be afraid of using lots of thin strips. Can see why you want to remove blackened outer layer, but would leave next unless its rotten or damaged. Replacin inside shell veneers feels like a huge job to me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In Greece.... for this kind of work we have a saying... "seeing and doing".... So, I will be probably repairing step by step trying to keep work at minimum possible.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Removing the black (dry rot?) sections of veneer and replacing with new veneer isn't that bad of a job. It takes more time than removing the black sections and filling with something like thickened epoxy but, in my opinion, any wooden dinghy, like this FD, deserves the proper fix.

 

From what I read before starting my Thistle project is that if you don't get all of the dry rot it will come back to haunt you at a later time. Unknown is what you find when you remove the outer (hull) or inner (cockpit) ply? Is there also dry rot in the middle 2 plys? On my Thistle, a section of dry rot about 15 mm diameter ended up with a pretty sizable hole once all of the bad plys were removed. Luckily this area was on a relatively flat section of the hull so no big problem with maintaining proper shape.

 

A sharp knife, patience and, of course, a good supply of replacement veneer (I re-attached with epoxy) is necessary. If you are planning to paint the hull / cockpit, the patches do not necessarily need to have a "perfect" fit as they do with a bright finished hull / cockpit.

 

I believe the large WEST / Gougeon Brothers book has a lot of good info:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Gougeon-Brothers-Boat-Construction-Materials/dp/1878207504

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Dionisis

I have not forgotten you. I know I promised to send you the rope diagrams. I will see when I can get it done.

keep it up,

regards

Max

 

 

No worries Max! There's still long way to go. But thank you for your interest and consideration. I will be needing your help shortly.... hopefully!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Removing the black (dry rot?) sections of veneer and replacing with new veneer isn't that bad of a job. It takes more time than removing the black sections and filling with something like thickened epoxy but, in my opinion, any wooden dinghy, like this FD, deserves the proper fix.

 

From what I read before starting my Thistle project is that if you don't get all of the dry rot it will come back to haunt you at a later time. Unknown is what you find when you remove the outer (hull) or inner (cockpit) ply? Is there also dry rot in the middle 2 plys? On my Thistle, a section of dry rot about 15 mm diameter ended up with a pretty sizable hole once all of the bad plys were removed. Luckily this area was on a relatively flat section of the hull so no big problem with maintaining proper shape.

 

A sharp knife, patience and, of course, a good supply of replacement veneer (I re-attached with epoxy) is necessary. If you are planning to paint the hull / cockpit, the patches do not necessarily need to have a "perfect" fit as they do with a bright finished hull / cockpit.

 

I believe the large WEST / Gougeon Brothers book has a lot of good info:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Gougeon-Brothers-Boat-Construction-Materials/dp/1878207504

 

 

I was searching for the book in europe but he price will cost me 2 kilos of epoxy...

 

The process you mention is almost the same with the one I will go with so i will be needing your experience insights in detail.

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 kgs of epoxy is definitely a better deal than a book! I'm sure there are numerous internet references with the same detail of info.

 

The veneer repair requires peeling back the "bad" section with a knife and sharp chisel. If there is damage in the next layer down, you also remove that but then more of the outer layer is removed as whey you replace you use a layer technique so that the outer veneer patch is larger than the next one down.

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 kgs of epoxy is definitely a better deal than a book! I'm sure there are numerous internet references with the same detail of info.

 

The veneer repair requires peeling back the "bad" section with a knife and sharp chisel. If there is damage in the next layer down, you also remove that but then more of the outer layer is removed as whey you replace you use a layer technique so that the outer veneer patch is larger than the next one down.

 

Sounds logical...

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I just got back from shipyard in Chalkida where all the magic happens...

 

For the last month (unfortunately I work once every week for 6-8 hours) I've been working on a rolling bed / jig which will help me with all the flipping maneuvers without harming the boat or trying to find stands while holding it in the air... So here is some of the process and the status so far.

Cutting the demilunes:

DSC 0233

Connecting the demilunes with arced patches:

DSC 0311

 

Ready parts awaiting for boat section trim off:

DSC 0309

DSC 0312

The roller base:

DSC 0290

DSC 0292

DSC 0314

DSC 0315

 

Copying the profile section from the boat onto the demilunes:

DSC 0324

DSC 0323

Cutting off the profile section off:

DSC 0333

DSC 0335

DSC 0336

Testing the demilunes on the rollers:

DSC 0337

DSC 0338

DSC 0339

DSC 0341

DSC 0343

DSC 0344

DSC 0345

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...
On 3/23/2017 at 0:39 AM, jimmydyurko said:

That jig is cool....is it going to be full circle?

Yes. The structure is comprised by 4 demilunes; 2 for the bow and 2 for the stern which are connected by additional chipboard parts easily removable to provide access to any boat area.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The old lady has been transferred and laid on the rolling jig

large.DSC_0397.jpg.7e73c0a4dfc6be6c53cdf298484e6f3b.jpglarge.DSC_0396.jpg.043b110b24383ec2bf41f32b5de71af1.jpg

large.DSC_0401.jpg.71391fb85ef6ea51f4212782b68a46ad.jpglarge.DSC_0400.jpg.059fa3367c06f548ea267a807585c66b.jpglarge.DSC_0404.jpg.b4933e5b7c129613cc2d259ef8fbea17.jpglarge.DSC_0402.jpg.1c279a54b010af15b0c0a93607be0d47.jpg

 

Removing old and rotten veneers starting from the area around the side bailers which are going to be totally removed. The veneers are removed layer by layer with a chisel creating steps of 35mm in order to provide enough surface for the new ones to be glued on.

large.DSC_0373.jpg.7c574a458f8644c28908790c8cd69b2b.jpglarge.DSC_0377.jpg.4d9f708525901bd9258aa6b09433f884.jpglarge.DSC_0374.jpg.650a1d90f3cd8542c6965c4d0f1fde4b.jpglarge.DSC_0378.jpg.6596c760f7bbc0fe8efae41bfafbff4a.jpglarge.DSC_0381.jpg.bfea06f841e67c6bf67920e547eca1ce.jpglarge.DSC_0380.jpg.d25101806ee00bce09146bc0560499b6.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

And after doing all the prep work around the bailers, an adjustable custom made frame was fitted inside the boat cockpit in order to support the hull during prep.

large.DSC_0408.jpg.5f01cfbc2b42a771bdbc6700781456e9.jpglarge.DSC_0407.jpg.86061adfdcd7e8ec31f972be091db3d2.jpglarge.DSC_0406.jpg.deb22549ad8a87f3ab9f663fea16867c.jpglarge.DSC_0405.jpg.eb9dd887e0377939dffa55e62639cff9.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good. Do you plan to do anything with the Centerboard trunk? In a couple of the most recent pictures you posted it looks to be in rough shape at least where it is (was) attached to the hull.

That is a neat looking place where you are working given all of the other boats visible.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

The first, in parallel with the second layer of mahogany veneer laid on the hull. Staples used to hold everything in place.

large.DSC_0636.JPG.08e9508e05c0d3da5bcd004e29a3afae.JPGlarge.DSC_0638.JPG.fcea4662628b918c336cbd4582bcadb0.JPGlarge.DSC_0639.JPG.70139cf6fdcc25c1c0ebe3079204ae71.JPG

 

Staples removal... not fun at all takes time and requires nerves of steel...

large.DSC_0642.JPG.3c9d7081cb650ed20131b59c8112faaf.JPGlarge.DSC_0644.JPG.4080a714277994ffdfc51843970589bb.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sanding and smoothing the surface in order to provide good substrate for the 3rd layer

large.DSC_0645.JPG.7b935f3f411a23f785e952be3b9fd820.JPGlarge.DSC_0646.JPG.ab34e4119d926f971591f97354e2347e.JPGlarge.DSC_0647.JPG.d71d14f42b80abc69091fddd71382191.JPG

 

Proceeding with more veneer laying... This time focusing in the holes left by the bailers.
 

large.DSC_0649.JPG.281a8f1c35408dcb50f5b3580fd13de1.JPGlarge.DSC_0648.JPG.0067da7a2f6b8adc32bb32a67e2028c0.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

More sanding, and detailing along the veneer endings in order to remove epoxy excess and thus have better matching and rigidity.

large.DSC_0782.JPG.0d9860da10acba5688fe945200c1f02f.JPGlarge.DSC_0783.JPG.cf0885b9bf81dd5c8e218df6a5744ca9.JPGlarge.DSC_0785.JPG.a945109a002b617b8536dbca94366ab6.JPGlarge.DSC_0786.JPG.98622de9625e8fa0e9af9af2564356cb.JPGlarge.DSC_0787.JPG.00a6929fa73941843855eadc9f8b7095.JPG

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

First remove the staples...

large.DSC_0808.JPG.473c8c1519ebaf4efd92bf9c60e7be6c.JPGlarge.DSC_0810.JPG.05100bf2e69c815b94c6c412d218315e.JPG

 

Moving on by preparing the veneer pieces

large.DSC_0811.JPG.3da5925d686a467da708b2e8a5664c01.JPGlarge.DSC_0812.JPG.7577ef1fa00d82407178c53dd08be85e.JPGlarge.DSC_0813.JPG.650c8b26e6a8739d0315db2c72280687.JPG

 

Stapling until the ocean dries up...

large.DSC_0815.JPG.bbeec6fa1c870cca1e280800147a0c11.JPGlarge.DSC_0814.JPG.4f0974698fc847805753effd49937935.JPG

 

And finally admire the results

large.DSC_0816.JPG.ca2d065b327e3085c37a8670b06962f0.JPGlarge.DSC_0817.JPG.116d8d615cba9254dd8dfe0bb200e5db.JPGlarge.DSC_0818.JPG.1185ea4429143cb5b5730b42df63fd59.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, efrank said:

Can you staple through a strap of some sort and then just yank up the strap?

You're absolutely right. That's actually the proper way of doing it. However, It feels like you need another pair of hands and it's not easy to find volunteers in such kind of work...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand what you are saying. My Dad used to say he needed a little arm coming right out of the middle of his forehead:-). 

Great project you have!  You do nice work.  There is a lot of satisfaction in restoring an old boat.  Have always liked the FD, but haven't had a chance to buzz around in one yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, efrank said:

I understand what you are saying. My Dad used to say he needed a little arm coming right out of the middle of his forehead:-). 

Great project you have!  You do nice work.  There is a lot of satisfaction in restoring an old boat.  Have always liked the FD, but haven't had a chance to buzz around in one yet.

I've never though about it that way... but it's totally true!!! A third arm would have been so useful!

Link to post
Share on other sites

The strap method will work well to hold down the veneer while the epoxy dries (with wax paper or some other release material between strap and veneer) but I think "ripping up the strap" would risk damaging the veneer when the staples come out. Maybe not a problem on an inner ply or if the outer ply is going to be painted.

 

again, great looking work!

Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Alan Crawford said:

The strap method will work well to hold down the veneer while the epoxy dries (with wax paper or some other release material between strap and veneer) but I think "ripping up the strap" would risk damaging the veneer when the staples come out. Maybe not a problem on an inner ply or if the outer ply is going to be painted.

 

again, great looking work!

I've been looking into re-veneering the hole outer layer in order to have a nice varnished natural wood finish but I don't feel confident enough to go for it. I would also like to avoid realizing that all my work is not good enough to be varnished and therefore paint the whole thing. Consequently I will go straight to paint and invest time in good surface preparation and in a good professional hand to the job. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems reasonable. I know that with wooden Thistles some people have re-veneered the entire outer layer to do just as you say but the time required is great. That said, your work looks very good and I am sure you could do this and come up with a very beautiful result! On the other hand, a professional paint job can look just as nice.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Alan Crawford said:

Seems reasonable. I know that with wooden Thistles some people have re-veneered the entire outer layer to do just as you say but the time required is great. That said, your work looks very good and I am sure you could do this and come up with a very beautiful result! On the other hand, a professional paint job can look just as nice.

To be honest, a generic paint job is inferior to natural wood and varnish... On the other hand, I would like to pay more attention to structural reinforcement and rigidity which requires some serious engineering and consequently wood crafting skills which I'm actually more interested in looking into and learning. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Staple through nylon packaging strap. The epoxy doesn't stick to the strap, and the strap spreads the staple load so reduces damage to the veneer. Once you have a sealed hull you can vacuum the final layer on, which gives a better bond and no damage at all to the surface. Needs care when applying the vacuum, but a few staples on the keel line is usually enough to keep the veneers in place. I've built windsurfers like this, and laid teak decks onto curved surfaces, it should work for your hull?

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, hump101 said:

Staple through nylon packaging strap. The epoxy doesn't stick to the strap, and the strap spreads the staple load so reduces damage to the veneer. Once you have a sealed hull you can vacuum the final layer on, which gives a better bond and no damage at all to the surface. Needs care when applying the vacuum, but a few staples on the keel line is usually enough to keep the veneers in place. I've built windsurfers like this, and laid teak decks onto curved surfaces, it should work for your hull?

There are multiple ways to prevent damaging the veneers, but in any case it requires really advance skills and professional equipment or a lot of practice and experimentation.

Regarding the vacuum, I will agree with you, its the best practice to follow. However, regardless the technique know-how, it is significantly costly where I'm trying to keep cost, logistics and crafting skills in a balance in order to reach my goal safely without any surprises which might cost me both money and time.

In any case, I would like to see your work on these boards. Sounds very intriguing!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/07/2017 at 9:24 AM, klavdious said:

In any case, I would like to see your work on these boards. Sounds very intriguing!

It was 30 years ago, we used a vacuum pump out of a plastic vac-forming machine, and big plastic bags that took the entire board, having tried stapling and waterbags with limited success. I don't have any photos, but I think one of the boards still exists at my parents house, though I'm not sure in what state.

An eductor vacuum pump is cheap if you have an air supply already, and a roll of bag tape and some plastic would cost less than the epoxy you would save by vacuuming the veneers down.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...
1 hour ago, Alan Crawford said:

Happy New Year! Looking great! 

Thank you Alan. There's actually more progress to share. It just takes time to organize all photos and restoration phases.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

@klavdious How is the rebuild project going? I had to look this thread up because I picked up a classic International 14 and I was curious about veneer replacement in the event that my boat will need it. I remembered that you had done some so I looked up your thread for some learning.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A quick question.   Was the boat originally hot moulded with resorcinol glue or was it epoxy?    I am evaluating a couple of project boats and I am trying to find out information on resorcinol vintage boats and the viability to repair using epoxy.

Great work on your restoration and can't wait to see the final results!

- Stumbling

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:

A quick question.   Was the boat originally hot moulded with resorcinol glue or was it epoxy?    I am evaluating a couple of project boats and I am trying to find out information on resorcinol vintage boats and the viability to repair using epoxy.

Great work on your restoration and can't wait to see the final results!

- Stumbling

What kind of project boats?

I am restoring a Thistle built in 1946. Hot molded hull using resorcinol and held together with a million staples that are a mix of bronze and steel. I've done some extensive veneer repair  (not as extensive as @klavdious) using West epoxy with zero issues. There are many, many wooden Thistles still going strong after almost 75 years. In the case of wooden Thistles (and probably holds true for other wooden dinghies), where resorcinol is not trusted after 50-70+ years is where it was used for bonding (with wood screws) all other components to the hot molded hull. In this case standard procedure is to remove all wood components and rebound with epoxy. The old resorcinol in these applications becomes brittle and crumbles to dust. I guess the resorcinol bonded hot molded hulls hold up so well (despite the modern epoxy bonded veneer repairs here and there) given the large, monolithic 3D structure of the hull. 

Yes, looking forward to see pictures of FD GE-9 sailing!

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Alan Crawford said:

What kind of project boats?

I am restoring a Thistle built in 1946. Hot molded hull using resorcinol and held together with a million staples that are a mix of bronze and steel. I've done some extensive veneer repair  (not as extensive as @klavdious) using West epoxy with zero issues. There are many, many wooden Thistles still going strong after almost 75 years. In the case of wooden Thistles (and probably holds true for other wooden dinghies), where resorcinol is not trusted after 50-70+ years is where it was used for bonding (with wood screws) all other components to the hot molded hull. In this case standard procedure is to remove all wood components and rebound with epoxy. The old resorcinol in these applications becomes brittle and crumbles to dust. I guess the resorcinol bonded hot molded hulls hold up so well (despite the modern epoxy bonded veneer repairs here and there) given the large, monolithic 3D structure of the hull. 

Yes, looking forward to see pictures of FD GE-9 sailing!

I am looking at a couple of Thistles as possible victims for re-animation/mutation/restoration.   My intent do up a boat for longer distance adventure racing, using a hull that is not good enough for one-design racing, but could be salvaged.

The hull lasting so much better than the glued in components may be that the resorcinol in the molded hulls does not get the sun/air so it does not break down.   Likewise, the heat and pressure may cure it better than all of the components that are glued in.

I had read in some places that epoxy does not bond well with resorcinol.

I will not be able to start this until I am done with some project work and am back in my home swamp.   At this point I am gathering the info.    I hope to be able to pull the trigger on this by mid-summer.

- Stumbling

Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless containing severe hull rot other serious damage, any neglected wooden Thistle is more than capable to be restored to full racing condition given the proper amount of time and money. As for compatibility of resorcinol and epoxy, that's a good question but of no concern as any traces of resorcinol are removed prior to rebonding with epoxy. Your comment about the hulls seem quite reasonable.

Do what you wish with a wooden Thistle, but future resale will be greatly diminished if you make mods that get away from the one design rules and are difficult to reverse. There seems to be presently a "strong" demand for wooden Thistles capable of full restoration.

 

End of thread hijack

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2019 at 10:35 PM, WCB said:

@klavdious How is the rebuild project going? I had to look this thread up because I picked up a classic International 14 and I was curious about veneer replacement in the event that my boat will need it. I remembered that you had done some so I looked up your thread for some learning.

Good morning! It's going actually pretty good. I know i have stopped posting in Sailing Anarchy because the User Interface and Interaction is totally annoying! Especially posting photos. Anyways. The full progress is on facebook therefore, if you have an account I could add you as a friend and you could have a look. And by the way my latest work was the veneering of the deck. I have found multiple tips and tricks!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...
9 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

Any updates

Hi Dex, you can see the whole restoration process, along with the end result in facebook where you can find me as "Dionisis Klavdianos". Sorry for the inconvenience but uploading photos in the forum is a nightmare.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

very informative to watch your extensive process.  I have a Bob Hoare that was restored around 2005 and then kept indoors.  It has a ferocious subfloor leak that I can't yet find, and of course it is likely CB trunk related.  I am hoping that I don't have similar glue wash out in the CB trunk hull area.  I will get to it in a couple of weeks after I finish a partial restore on a Herreshoff replica.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Coquina012 said:

very informative to watch your extensive process.  I have a Bob Hoare that was restored around 2005 and then kept indoors.  It has a ferocious subfloor leak that I can't yet find, and of course it is likely CB trunk related.  I am hoping that I don't have similar glue wash out in the CB trunk hull area.  I will get to it in a couple of weeks after I finish a partial restore on a Herreshoff replica.  

Check the lamination around the CB. The delamination of mine was initiated exactly at this point!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I think, after several weeks, I havefound the leak.  It LOOKS LIKE the the garboard strips have split away from the keel at the forefoot. The trailer has a 4" wheel up front, and so wen the boat is off the hitch, it sits angle bow down to the floor.  My guess is the prior owner let it sit with rainwater or lakewater like that, until it swelled and split.  It's going to be a tough repair.  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...