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Pedagogical Tom

I may have found RBooze!

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Uncooperative Arizonans

 

Apparently, they really don't care much for radar speed trap cameras with automated billing. They toss them in ditches, spray them will Silly String, and do other funny things.

 

This was my fav:

 

One particularly creative scofflaw took to driving around the Phoenix area wearing monkey and giraffe masks. As it turned out, Arizona law requires that tickets be connected to drivers, not just vehicles. Few wildlife photos appear in the Department of Motor Vehicles database, complicating the process of serving the "offending" motorist within the required 90 days. State officials responded with a surveillance operation to identify the dissident; this project almost certainly cost more than they finally extracted.

 

 

Uncooperative people who actually read laws are funny. Guns.

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Boothy is in SoCal working on his boat, the guy in the monkey suit must be some other Anarchist.

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Mike, are you in touch with El Mariachi?

What about his new 1700sf dwelling in AZ, near the border?

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Uncooperative Arizonans

 

Apparently, they really don't care much for radar speed trap cameras with automated billing. They toss them in ditches, spray them will Silly String, and do other funny things.

 

This was my fav:

 

One particularly creative scofflaw took to driving around the Phoenix area wearing monkey and giraffe masks. As it turned out, Arizona law requires that tickets be connected to drivers, not just vehicles. Few wildlife photos appear in the Department of Motor Vehicles database, complicating the process of serving the "offending" motorist within the required 90 days. State officials responded with a surveillance operation to identify the dissident; this project almost certainly cost more than they finally extracted.

 

 

Uncooperative people who actually read laws are funny. Guns.

 

Uncooperative people are counter-productive. They are a pain, an oozing wound which was self-inflicted.

Their loud cynicism generates the rotten fabric of poor citizenship.

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They have too many guns too.

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Mike, are you in touch with El Mariachi?

What about his new 1700sf dwelling in AZ, near the border?

 

Missed SoCal too much. He is back, enjoying life and not thinking about PA. You can find him on Facebook if you want to get in touch.

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Mike, are you in touch with El Mariachi?

What about his new 1700sf dwelling in AZ, near the border?

I didn't ask him about that. He was restoring an Islander Peterson in SoCal last communication, I assume he got it for a song. It had a frozen VW Pathfinder, he rebuilt that, refinished and refit it, the photos I saw were gorgeous. If he sells her now for even $80k, whomever gets it will feel very fortunate I think.

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RBooze is alive and well and on FB and playing with an old Jeep in the past few weeks.

 

I just brought him up because he's the kind of person who would wear a mask like the guy in the story did. I think it's funny.

 

As for the thread topic, I think automated speed cameras out in empty desert can have only one purpose: extracting revenue. It's not about the safety of other drivers when you can look to the horizon without seeing one.

 

As for the topic that Jocal and Sloop can't leave alone... Guns.

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1.Breaking the law in an open expanse of desert is still breaking the law. Even if you're Libertarian. Even if you're Bret Fuckin' Favre.

2.Go ahead and introduce some mysterious subject you won't drone about interminably. That works for us.

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Mike, are you in touch with El Mariachi?

What about his new 1700sf dwelling in AZ, near the border?

I didn't ask him about that. He was restoring an Islander Peterson in SoCal last communication, I assume he got it for a song. It had a frozen VW Pathfinder, he rebuilt that, refinished and refit it, the photos I saw were gorgeous. If he sells her now for even $80k, whomever gets it will feel very fortunate I think.

 

 

Boothy is a BN now?

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1.Breaking the law in an open expanse of desert is still breaking the law....

 

Yes it is. It is just not endangering anyone else, which is the purpose of the law.

 

I got a 1986 Toyota van up to 106 in the Utah desert one day. My passengers made me slow down. What are you supposed to do when you're tired, you get to the top of a little rise, and you see straight, open road with nobody on it to the horizon? Go 55? Yeah, that's what you were supposed to do back then (thanks, Liz Dole).

 

Never cared much for the song but the message is spot on...

 

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1.Breaking the law in an open expanse of desert is still breaking the law....

Yes it is. It is just not endangering anyone else, which is the purpose of the law.

 

I got a 1986 Toyota van up to 106 in the Utah desert one day. My passengers made me slow down. What are you supposed to do when you're tired, you get to the top of a little rise, and you see straight, open road with nobody on it to the horizon? Go 55? Yeah, that's what you were supposed to do back then (thanks, Liz Dole).

 

Never cared much for the song but the message is spot on...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvV3nn_de2k

Tom, catching speeders in the desert isn't just a revenue generator. Those highways are often undivided two lanes, the speeders friggen love them because they can open up their machines. The accidents from both single vehicle and head on are infamous, especially in rough bits where fast vehicles suddenly destabilize.

 

They used to use little Cessnas to do speed patrols, which was fairly affordable, but nowhere near as affordable as those speed cameras. I've no doubt that they make money, but they are a continuation of what has been done since the 1970s.

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Yeah, in Utah I got in the habit of just driving down the middle of the road. That's where the black stripe was so I was far from alone. Not much point staying to one side when it's 20 minutes until you see another car. Guns.

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I drove across Montana not long ago. The semi's were going 85 and 90.

There was just no comprehension of speed cops whatsoever.

The signs at the 6400 ft Continental divide, a hairy ski area, said danger, cliffs, ice, no shoulder, 70MPH.

 

I still remember a hot summer night, 1am, doing 105 MPH across WA farm roads on a one-lung dirt bike.

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I drove across Montana not long ago. The semi's were going 85 and 90.

There was just no comprehension of speed cops whatsoever.

The signs at the 6400 ft Continental divide, a hairy ski area, said danger, cliffs, ice, no shoulder, 70MPH.

 

I still remember a hot summer night, 1am, doing 105 MPH across WA farm roads on a one-lung dirt bike.

 

What kind of single cylinder dirt bike were you on that would run over 100MPH??

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I drove across Montana not long ago. The semi's were going 85 and 90.

There was just no comprehension of speed cops whatsoever.

The signs at the 6400 ft Continental divide, a hairy ski area, said danger, cliffs, ice, no shoulder, 70MPH.

 

I still remember a hot summer night, 1am, doing 105 MPH across WA farm roads on a one-lung dirt bike.

What kind of single cylinder dirt bike were you on that would run over 100MPH??

My single cylinder 4-strokes and 2-strokes topped at about 50 mph ... Admittedly, my back gears were the size of a dinner plate.

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I drove across Montana not long ago. The semi's were going 85 and 90.

There was just no comprehension of speed cops whatsoever.

The signs at the 6400 ft Continental divide, a hairy ski area, said danger, cliffs, ice, no shoulder, 70MPH.

 

I still remember a hot summer night, 1am, doing 105 MPH across WA farm roads on a one-lung dirt bike.

What kind of single cylinder dirt bike were you on that would run over 100MPH??

My single cylinder 4-strokes and 2-strokes topped at about 50 mph ... Admittedly, my back gears were the size of a dinner plate.

 

 

Thinking about the bikes that were available at the time, and having a little history in motorcycle land speed racing, I was thinking, but not certain, that most of the air-cooled monsters would top out around 80, and w/a suspension optimized for soaking up bumps, be a bit squirrely at speed. a couple years ago, someone took a KX500 (liquid cooled 2-stroke) modified w/some fairings, skinny tires and VERY tall gearing to 130MPH at the Bubs meet on the Bonneville Salt Flats.

 

If there's better information - I'd be interested in hearing it.

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Yeah, in Utah I got in the habit of just driving down the middle of the road. That's where the black stripe was so I was far from alone. Not much point staying to one side when it's 20 minutes until you see another car. Guns.

You said it exactly whether you realize it or not. Driving a car is often taken for granted, but it requires constant alertness and attention. Good drivers develop good habits and after a while it becomes second nature, but still requires thought. Bad habits can be learned as easily as good habits. When you are in the habit of driving down the middle of the road, speeding and other dangerous things, when your mind lapses, you will automatically revert to habit. The best thing to do is drive sensibly, as much as possible. Of course we like to open it up on a straight road when there is no traffic. Doing it as often as possible probably isn't a good thing. I don't particularly care if you mangle yourself in an accident but if you hit some innocent person because of reckless driving, I have a problem with that. Freedom isn't free when you live in society.

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In other revenue camera news...

Oregon only wants to hear from approved $peaker$ on red light cameras

his research into red light cameras has earned him attention in local and national media—in 2014, he presented his evidence on an episode of "60 Minutes"—and an invitation to present at last year's annual meeting of the Institute of Transportation Engineers.

It also got him a $500 fine from the Oregon State Board of Examiners for Engineering and Land Surveying.



According to the board, Järlström's research into red light cameras and their effectiveness amounts to practicing engineering without a license. No, really. Järlström had sent a letter to the board in 2014 asking for the opportunity to present his research on how too-short yellow lights were making money for the state by putting the public's safety at risk. "I would like to present these fact for your review and comment," he wrote.

Instead of inviting him to present, the board threatened him. Citing state laws that make it illegal to practice engineering without a license, the board told Järlström that even calling himself an "electronics engineer" and the use of the phrase "I am an engineer" in his letter were enough to "create violations."

Apparently the threats weren't enough, because the board follow-up in January of this year by officially fining Järlström $500 for the supposed crime of "practicing engineering without being registered."

Järlström is now suing the state board over that fine, arguing that it's unconstitutional to prevent someone from doing math without the government's permission. He's getting support from the Institute for Justice, a national libertarian law firm....


I'm glad to see the Institute for Justice exercising their corporate first amendment rights by filing a lawsuit in this case.

 

They didn't want to hear from him because he was going to say that decreasing the duration of yellow lights was done to increase ticket revenue and was unsafe, questions that involve biology, psychology and a tiny bit of engineering. Guns.

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Järlström speaks about being fined for doing math without a license
 

Quote

 

This, says Järlström, means that drivers are being ticketed by red light cameras—not just in Beaverton, but around the country—for traffic violations that were effectively outside of their control. "It's a physics problem. It's not anything to do with driver behavior....It's something we need to do on the engineering side."

His findings were strong enough to win him a speaking gig at the 2015 Institute of Traffic Engineers' national conference and a spot on 60 Minutes. He even won over Alexei Maradudin—the very man whose theory he was criticizing.

But he didn't win over the Beaverton city council. Järlström went before them 13 times, but he made little headway. He suspects that wasn't because there was a problem with his equations. "If I come in there and tell them that something is wrong and has been wrong for a long time, you see liability issues, paying back fines, etc.," he says. "So obviously they are fighting with their teeth to get me out of there."

Järlström sued the city of Beaverton for refusing to listen to his theory, but his case was dismissed on the grounds that he didn't have standing. So Järlström turned to Oregon's State Board of Engineering, asking them in September 2014 to look into the City of Beaverton's yellow light timings. Because he referred to himself as an engineer in his letter to the board, it launched a two-year investigation that ended with it issuing a $500 fine.

"They wanted to kill the messenger," Järlström says. "They just wanted to shut me up."

 

 

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On 4/21/2017 at 6:29 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

 

What kind of single cylinder dirt bike were you on that would run over 100MPH??

That 105 mph bike was a Kawasaki KLR 650, entirely stock. It was a street legal dirt bike, a "dual purpose." Too heavy for trail riding, really. It was not squirrely whatsoever at speed.

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2 hours ago, jocal505 said:

That 105 mph bike was a Kawasaki KLR 650, entirely stock. It was a street legal dirt bike, a "dual purpose." Too heavy for trail riding, really. It was not squirrely whatsoever at speed.

I'm guessing that was measured with an overenthuisiastic indicating speedo and not GPS.  Plus a very aerodynamic milk crate.

KTM has/had a single pot LC4 engine that could push their Enduro or Duke over the Ton.

 

Heh in lands where popping rounds at speed/light cameras are frowned upon, it was popular to douse a tyre in diesel, hand it from the offending device, and spark it up.

 

 

hqdefault.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Sportboat Jeff said:

As I recall, the British thought the Colonials, and the Founding Fathers in particular to be most uncooperative.

Do you find this a fair comparison? I find that the only types who act like King George on the forums are the gun bullies.

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24 minutes ago, Sportboat Jeff said:

Yes, I find it a perfect comparison.  You said anyone who break ANY law is an oozing wound and poor citizens.  The people who rebelled against the crown back in 1776 were the worst kinds of citizens..... in the eyes of the Crown.  Yet they were the best kinds of citizens in our eyes.  We even put them on our money and call them heros.  Ignoring the law is bad..... sometimes.

We discuss un-coperative.

Let's compare the British Colonizers' view of their uncoperative colonial subjects, with the view of established law and decorum vs the "uncooperative" types in California. Some recently defied a closed registry (by hiding their AW's, per TR advice, after the felony deadline of June 1, 2017). The Randy Weaver Trail leads to Tim McVeigh via David Koresh. it's not really the same as Paul Revere's noble mission, to repulse a foreign ower.

Tom teaches the mind rot of lousy citizenship (inherent distrust of government, fear of badges :o, lawbreaking at whim, vs good faith public service and respect of LE). Pooplius is not fightting a foreign tyrant here, he is demonizing proper civic values IMO.

You have stature as a leading intellectual, conversant in many subjects. Are you sure you find this a fair comparison?

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1 hour ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

I'm guessing that was measured with an overenthuisiastic indicating speedo and not GPS.  Plus a very aerodynamic milk crate.

KTM has/had a single pot LC4 engine that could push their Enduro or Duke over the Ton.

 

Heh in lands where popping rounds at speed/light cameras are frowned upon, it was popular to douse a tyre in diesel, hand it from the offending device, and spark it up.

 

 

hqdefault.jpg

I've always wondered why modern teenagers don't paintball those things.   I guess they are too busy playing video games.

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On 4/29/2017 at 7:11 AM, Uncooperative Tom said:

In other revenue camera news...

Oregon only wants to hear from approved $peaker$ on red light cameras


I'm glad to see the Institute for Justice exercising their corporate first amendment rights by filing a lawsuit in this case.

 

They didn't want to hear from him because he was going to say that decreasing the duration of yellow lights was done to increase ticket revenue and was unsafe, questions that involve biology, accounting, psychology and a tiny bit of engineering. Guns.

FIFU :)

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8 hours ago, Sportboat Jeff said:

Why would you care about single vehicle (assuming single passenger) crashes?  Its Darwinism.  The cost of the cleanup is peanuts compared to the cost of the Social Security and medicare payouts if they lived to old age.  We should encourage that shit.

I have to admit that I'm a huge scofflaw when it comes to speed limits in uninhabited places.  I have lived in NV for many years and there are places you could drive for 30-60 min before ever seeing another car.  What are speed limits really accomplishing other than revenue for the county sheriffs and the state Troopers.  I'm with Tom on this one.   And FTR, I drive fast within both mine and my vehicle's limits.  I would not do the same speed in my Ford SUV as I would in a Porsche on an open stretch of road.  A Man's gotta know his limits.  ;)

Two different things. Any crash that involves innocents is everyone's business.

But for single vehicle, single occupant crashes, that's still everyone's business but for a different reason. Not every road is Ely to Tonopah, even lesser-used roads still have some traffic, presumably driven by people who don't want to wait for two hours to clean up a wreck.

But also, if we're going to have laws, then they need to either be enforced or abolished. The latter just isn't possible in our country right now, because if a State had a no-limit road, then it's essentially telling the drivers on that road that it's safe for high speeds. That opens up all kinds of multi-vehicle accidents, but even with single vehicle accidents, some idiot who turns himself into a paraplegic then will undoubtedly find five accident attorneys who will be happy to take the case that the State shouldn't have allowed unlimited speed on a road that could only safely handle 70 mph.

I'm not sure there is such a thing as a crash that only impacts the driver of the vehicle. Even emergency workers put themselves at risk dealing with crashes, and even a fast, three day, one officer State DOT investigation of the accident will still cost the taxpayers a few thousand bucks.

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The Montana Paradox:

Quote

 

Summary of the effects of no daytime speed limits:

1. Fatal accident rates on these highways reached an all time low in modern times.

2. On 2 lane highways with no posted limits the frequency of multiple vehicle accidents dropped 5 percent.

3. Seat belt usage is up to 91% percent, with only a secondary enforcement law.

4. Posted limits and their enforcement, had either no or a negative effect on traffic safety.

5. As predicted by the engineering models, traffic speeds did not significantly change and remained consistent with other western states with like conditions.

6. The people of Montana and its visitors continued to drive at speeds they were comfortable with, which were often speeds lower than their counter parts on high density urban freeways* with low posted limits.

7. The theory behind posting speed limits on these classifications of highway is to reduce conflicts in traffic flow (caused by speed differential), thereby reducing accidents. On the two lane highways flow conflict accidents (multiple vehicle) decreased when the limits were removed. When added to the Autobahn results and the no change found on Montana’s Interstates, this thesis needs to be rethought because the field data on highways without posted limits doesn’t support it. With the expectation of higher speed differentials, multiple vehicle accident rates declined even when the actual speeds did not change significantly. This suggests the changes are the result of positive motorists behavior (courtesy and due caution).

8. In traffic engineering findings the vehicles traveling faster than average have the lowest accident rates, yet they are the primary targets of speed enforcement. To this we can now add, with speed limits there was no positive correlation between speed enforcement and accident rates on rural free flowing highways, if anything, the highways became less safe.

MONTANA PARADOX: Is that the desired safety effect from posting speed limits was achieved by removing them.

 

 

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It's curricane season so we're done having traffic until October or so but I still think self-driving cars can't come soon enough.

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4 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

I drove those roads last year, diagnally across the entire state up to Canada, and back. Semi's were passing me doing 85 or 90 mph. The sign on the continental divide said  

Quote

DANGER Ice, no shoulder, steep cliffs, 12% grade

70MPH.

Libertarians have no common sense, I find.

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21 hours ago, jocal505 said:

(a response to Jeffie) We discuss un-coperative.

Let's compare the British Colonizers' view of their uncoperative colonial subjects, with the view of established law and decorum vs the "uncooperative" types in California. Some recently defied a closed registry (by hiding their AW's, per TR advice, after the felony deadline of June 1, 2017). The Randy Weaver Trail leads to Tim McVeigh via David Koresh. it's not really the same as Paul Revere's noble mission, to repulse a foreign ower.

Tom teaches the mind rot of lousy citizenship (inherent distrust of government, fear of badges :o, lawbreaking at whim, vs good faith public service and respect of LE). Pooplius is not fightting a foreign tyrant here, he is demonizing proper civic values IMO.

You have stature as a leading intellectual, conversant in many subjects. Are you sure you find this a fair comparison?

Bump. Chalenging an occupying power is not the moral equivalent of  choosing felony behavior, by stashing an un-registered AW anywhere in California today, or by hiding an illegal AW in Florida at some later date. 

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4 hours ago, Sportboat Jeff said:

 

DING DING DING!!  I see that in practice over here as well and it is the speed differential here that seems to cause the vast majority of the accidents.  Its typically not the guy speeding, it the fuckwit doing 20 BELOW the speed limit in the outer highway lanes that cause the crashes and the congestion in general.

20 below in the "outer" meaning the left or the right? If it's the right, pass him. If it's the left, then he's in the passing lane and he's violating the traffic code, at least in my state.

If it's a two-lane, deal with it. Two lanes are full of farm equipment, horses, cyclists and old people, and dealing with that reality is part of driving.

A fast driver who can't deal with some slow drivers without getting into an accident doesn't have control of his vehicle.

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5 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

And the Autobahn is fairly safe.

But Montana is much like Wyoming, with a lot of open, unpopulated areas that aren't used as thoroughfares to other places (unlke Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada.)

It works in these mountain states because people know each other and self-police somewhat. But everywhere else?

I have two roads near me, one is almost exclusively locals, it doesn't go anywhere of note, just a few very small mountain towns. Traffic is organized and safe on that road, and it's a fairly dangerous road, especially in bad weather.

The other road goes up to Blackhawk, a mountain gambling town, it's also dangerous in bad weather, limited sight lines, only a few passing areas. The road is jammed with rental cars, California plates and all sorts of drivers who don't have a clue what kind of dangerous situations they're making by driving like maniacs. Many already ignore speed limits and double yellows, and drive like absolute idiots in bad conditions.

I've no doubt that the "Montana Paradox" would increase safety on some roads, but only someone uninitiated with driving out here would think it wouldn't actually turn some roads into death traps.

Do you want to get rid of speed limits in Florida? Not my business.

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On April 20, 2017 at 3:41 AM, Dog said:

That's him!

Always best to let sleeping dogs lie. I think Melania Trump said that.

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3 hours ago, Al Paca said:

Always best to let sleeping dogs lie. I think Melania Trump said that.

I think she called Donald a sleeping putska. Is that a breed of dog?

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Yezzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.....

 

Anna wurst also.........................

Wienna snausages I zink dey call dem.

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19 hours ago, mikewof said:

And the Autobahn is fairly safe.

But Montana is much like Wyoming, with a lot of open, unpopulated areas that aren't used as thoroughfares to other places (unlke Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada.)

It works in these mountain states because people know each other and self-police somewhat. But everywhere else?

I have two roads near me, one is almost exclusively locals, it doesn't go anywhere of note, just a few very small mountain towns. Traffic is organized and safe on that road, and it's a fairly dangerous road, especially in bad weather.

The other road goes up to Blackhawk, a mountain gambling town, it's also dangerous in bad weather, limited sight lines, only a few passing areas. The road is jammed with rental cars, California plates and all sorts of drivers who don't have a clue what kind of dangerous situations they're making by driving like maniacs. Many already ignore speed limits and double yellows, and drive like absolute idiots in bad conditions.

I've no doubt that the "Montana Paradox" would increase safety on some roads, but only someone uninitiated with driving out here would think it wouldn't actually turn some roads into death traps.

Do you want to get rid of speed limits in Florida? Not my business.

No. I really hated the 55 mph limit that noted federalist Liz Dole shoved down our throats from on high. We have really boring, flat interstates here and they were designed for higher speeds. Now that it's 70 that's how fast I want to drive anyway so it doesn't bother me.

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3 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

No. I really hated the 55 mph limit that noted federalist Liz Dole shoved down our throats from on high. We have really boring, flat interstates here and they were designed for higher speeds. Now that it's 70 that's how fast I want to drive anyway so it doesn't bother me.

70 is fine, agreed. But above that is where the problems really start to come in, especially with trailers in tow and big commercial trucks.

Back in the 55 years, Montana just had a $5 fine, I think any speed over 55. They didn't want the 55 limit, that's how they handled it. 

The 55 limit, if memory serves, wasn't a change for safety, but rather a response to the Oil Shock, and the desire to save fuel. It does do that. And we had to do something, OPEC had us by the nutsack back then. And now they don't, because of rock fracturing and horizontal drilling.

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On 4/29/2017 at 7:11 AM, Uncooperative Tom said:

I'm glad to see the Institute for Justice exercising their corporate first amendment rights by filing a lawsuit in this case.

They won. Doing math without a license is OK in Oregon.
 

Quote

 

More than three years after it targeted Mats Järlström for, essentially, doing math without a license, the Oregon State Board of Examiners for Engineering and Land Surveying has admitted they were wrong to do so.

...

This week, the state of Oregon conceded that the board had overstepped its authority. "We have admitted to violating Mr. Järlström's rights," Senior Assistant Attorney General Christina L. Beatty-Walters said in court Monday.

In court documents, the state admitted that the board's attempt to silence Järlström "was not narrowly tailored to any compelling state interests." The board has refunded the $500 fine, and it has been enjoined against targeting Järlström again "for his speech about traffic lights and his description of himself as an engineer except in the context of professional or commercial speech."

But the fight might continue. Järlström's lawsuit did not seek any monetary damages, but it asked the state court to issue an order telling the state state board to stop violating Oregonians' free speech rights. The decision handed down this week applies only to Järlström.

 

Well, OK, doing math without a license is legal in Oregon if you're Mr. Järlström

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The Institute for Justice $peak$

Always good to see a corporation exercising its first amendment right to expre$$ itself by filing civil rights lawsuits.
 

Quote

 

Do adults have the right to talk to other adults about what to buy at the grocery store? That’s the question raised by a federal lawsuit filed by the Institute for Justice on behalf of Florida-based health coach Heather Kokesch Del Castillo.

...

In March 2017, Heather received an email from a man named Pat Smith inquiring about her services. Mr. Smith said that he’d seen her website and liked what he saw, and that he’d tried several weight loss programs to no avail. Then he asked what information she would need from him to personalize a weight loss plan and what her program would include.

Heather responded, but heard nothing back until May 2, 2017, when an investigator from the Florida Department of Health arrived at her house to serve her with a cease-and-desist letter ordering her to stop giving dietary advice and fining her $754. It was then that she learned that Pat Smith was an investigator from the Florida Department of Health and that his email to her had been part of a sting operation prompted by a complaint filed by a licensed dietitian.


 

It's not really about a right to talk to other adults about food. Heather can do that in FL all she wants.

Doing it as a paid consultant is engaging in a business. If you're doing that under the protection of the state, the state can say who they will and won't protect. And make you get a license.

If I start advertising my services and giving medical advice, the state might just ask whether I'm a doctor. If I start to do the same thing with legal advice, they might ask whether I'm a lawyer. "Hey, I'm just talking to other adults here" won't cut it.

Heather is a "privately certified holistic coach." Yeah, so am I. Just certified myself a few minutes ago.

I don't think we should license dieticians at all. Given we do, I hope she somehow wins her suit anyway.

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On 6/4/2017 at 6:30 AM, Shootist Jeff said:

I have very mixed feelings on the self-driving car thing.  I enjoy driving.  I enjoy driving fast cars fast, especially on a challenging curvy road.  I wouldn't want to lose that freedom and ability to enjoy that.  However, I HATE driving long distances now - I have a 90 min commute each way to work and I would LOVES me some self-driving Tesla or something that could let me just turn off my brain and deliver me to work or home.  I'm not sure though how you have both be compatible on the roads together.  I know the self-driving safety tech is pretty amazing - better than most humans for reaction times and decision making ability to avoid accidents.  But the evil in me would tempt me into going and messing with the hipster driving in his self driving google car sipping his deconstructed latte and having a kale salad with a side of burlap while his car was driving along at slow hipster socially conscious speeds.  it would be too tempting to make it constantly take avoiding action and make them spill their artisanal kombucha into their crotch.

I'd kinda like to stock up a self-driving camping pickup and tell it to head to Yellowstone and let me know when you are at 1/4 tank.

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On 6/4/2017 at 2:57 AM, Shootist Jeff said:

DING DING DING!!  I see that in practice over here as well and it is the speed differential here that seems to cause the vast majority of the accidents.  Its typically not the guy speeding, it the fuckwit doing 20 BELOW the speed limit in the outer highway lanes that cause the crashes and the congestion in general.

In general, your content is fluffy opinion. And in general our 911's can pass a car cleanly and be back in the lane n 2.3 seconds.

You need cites some day. Where are your statistics that say that slow drivers are more dangerous? From my own perspective, speeding  (some of it my own) causes some problems for safer drivers, while breaking the laws. YMMV in Fluffyville.

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The TN Haircut Police

They're making sure that only high school grads can cut hair.
 

Quote

 

Tennessee's requirement that would-be barbers graduate from high school is not some relic from a by-gone era. The law was passed in 2015.

Before then, obtaining a barber's license (technically called a "certificate of registration as a master barber") required an applicant to show that he or she had completed the 10th grade. In other words, when Zarate dropped out of school in the 12th grade in 2008, he would have been eligible for a barber license. By the time he sought the license, in 2017, he was not.

...

The closer you look, the less sense it makes. You can become a licensed emergency medical responder in Tennessee without a high school diploma—indeed, you can do it with far less work than is required to become a barber. Getting an EMR license in Tennessee requires only that an applicant can "read, write, and speak the English language," according to Tennessee Department of Health guidelines.

"You can restart the heart of a pulseless, unbreathing person without a high school diploma, but you cannot cut hair," says Braden Boucek, director of litigation at the Beacon Center, a Nashville-based think tank.

 

 

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On 12/8/2017 at 8:33 PM, dogballs Tom said:
Quote

But the fight might continue. Järlström's lawsuit did not seek any monetary damages, but it asked the state court to issue an order telling the state state board to stop violating Oregonians' free speech rights. The decision handed down this week applies only to Järlström.

 

Well, OK, doing math without a license is legal in Oregon if you're Mr. Järlström

And now doing math without a license is legal for any Oregonian
 

Quote

 

Those regulations and enforcement actions, Beckerman ruled, are unconstitutional violations of the First Amendment. The judge directed the board to remove the definition of "engineer" from its rules and to limit its enforcement to individuals who falsely claim to be a "professional engineer."

The ruling means that "thousands of Oregon engineers are now free to describe themselves—truthfully—as 'engineers,' without fear of government punishment," says Sam Gedge, an attorney with the Institute for Justice, a libertarian law firm that represented Järlström in the lawsuit against the board.

"The regulation of the title 'enginneer' is more burdensome than necessary to protect the public from the unlicensed practice of engineering," wrote Beckerman. "The record demonstrates that the threat to free expression is not merely hypothetical."

 

Yes, of course it was those wacky libertarians at the IJ who pressed the silly notion that doing math without a license is not a real injury to the public. I apologize again on behalf of my elk.

BTW, for anyone who wonders and can't figure it out for himself, Boozy is doing fine and it seems to crack him up when I post pics of my dog destroying things.

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Unlicensed Tire Engineering

Quote

Company runs auto service centers across the southeast U.S. under the name "Tire Engineers." Mississippi Board of Licensure for Professional Engineers & Surveyors: Change your name. Consumers might think licensed Professional Engineers are changing their tires. Fifth Circuit: Most people who don't work for engineering licensure boards probably realize that the word "engineer" can mean lots of different things. And under the First Amendment, the board can't use speech bans to impose its "preferred definition" of words on the public at large.

Leading me to wonder: how did that get all the way to a circuit court?

Quote

The district court found that  “[Express’s]  use of the name ‘Tire Engin-eers’ is ‘inherently likely to deceive’ Mississippi consumers to believe that the services performed at Tire Engineers are performed by tire engineers or under the supervision of tire engineers.”  The court ruled for the Board based on “sub-stantial  evidence”  that  tended  to  show  “the  term  ‘tire  engineers’  is  used  by  courts,  universities,  tire  manufacturers, tire  manufacturers, general  periodi-cals, specialized periodicals, and the general public to refer to actual engineers who have expertise in the manufacture, selection, and repair of tires.”

Oh. "Tire Engineers" huh?

The name at the top of the lawsuit:

Quote

EXPRESS OIL CHANGE, L.L.C.; TE, L.L.C., doing business as Tire Engineers

So this is "inherently misleading" because the general public is likely to believe that people involved in manufacturing tires are working at the Jiffy Lube?

And a court bought that idea and issued a summary judgment based on it?

Wow.

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On 1/22/2018 at 4:36 AM, Contumacious Tom said:

The TN Haircut Police

They're making sure that only high school grads can cut hair.
 

 

 

On 1/22/2018 at 4:36 AM, Contumacious Tom said:

The closer you look, the less sense it makes. You can become a licensed emergency medical responder in Tennessee without a high school diploma—indeed, you can do it with far less work than is required to become a barber. Getting an EMR license in Tennessee requires only that an applicant can "read, write, and speak the English language," according to Tennessee Department of Health guidelines.

"You can restart the heart of a pulseless, unbreathing person without a high school diploma, but you cannot cut hair," says Braden Boucek, director of litigation at the Beacon Center, a Nashville-based think tank.

Probably more about social engineering... well meaning types trying to get more people to finish high school, since doing so is associated with numerous benefits to society (reduces criminal activity, earnings potential, etc).

But I love the quote “You can restart the heart of a pulseless, unbreathing person without a high school diploma, but you cannot cut hair," that makes sense to me. Having anyone qualify for a course in how to think/act/stay safe in an emergency is smart. Restrictions should be as few as possible.

I always ask students” What is the worst thing that can happen in a code?” (when a patient’s heart is stopped and we are getting out the crash cart)

They invariably say “the patient dies.”

I respond, “nope. The patient started out dead. But in trying to help, someone could get stuck with a needle and have to go through a prophylactic anti-HIV transmission regimen or they end up with Hepatitis.”

 At the scene, EMTs are always taught to make sure they are safe. How you approach a scene, park your car, look for wires doesn’t require a HS diploma, but could save your life. 

Keep your eyes out of the boat!

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37 minutes ago, Contumacious Tom said:

"

  • Allegation: Motorcyclist flees from aggressive driver but after a quarter of a mile realizes for the first time that it's the cops. He pulls over. A LeFlore County, Okla. deputy drives into the motorcycle, flinging the cyclist into a ditch. A second officer strikes the unresisting cyclist, breaking his face. After he's cuffed, the second officer repeatedly knees the cyclist in the ribs. District court: Qualified immunity for ramming the cyclist into the ditch. Tenth Circuit: But no qualified immunity for the second officer.

 

Ouch.

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21 hours ago, phillysailor said:

But I love the quote “You can restart the heart of a pulseless, unbreathing person without a high school diploma, but you cannot cut hair," that makes sense to me. Having anyone qualify for a course in how to think/act/stay safe in an emergency is smart. Restrictions should be as few as possible.

I think restrictions on any business should be as few as possible.

So would it be possible for a mere high school grad to cut hair?

I think some might be able to manage it.

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3 hours ago, Contumacious Tom said:

I think restrictions on any business should be as few as possible.

So would it be possible for a mere high school grad to cut hair?

I think some might be able to manage it.

 

A person has 'died' - you restart their heart - they live - you're a hero.  Even if they wanted to die, you are a hero because the crowd has no empathy with someone who 'wanted to die' being resurrected.

A person needs a hair cut - you do it poorly or miss some social cue - they're emotionally distraught - you're a villain.  People wrap their entire psyche into appearance and if you've damaged it, you're accountable.  The simple truth is the crowd does place disproportionate value on appearance and therefore, you have to do it right or be held accountable.

So just tie it to the price of the hair cut?  Don't go to a $10 dollar Best Cuts for something that matters so much?  Poor people don't have much money but they deserve equivalent outcomes so..... voilà!  1000 hours of vocational training to cut people's hair.  So why isn't pay commensurate with training?  Because for the vast majority of patrons, their hair DOESN'T matter.  It's not tied to their sense of self-worth.  The $10 / cut is all it's worth.   Equality of outcome means that hair stylists spend 1000 hours training so they can give $10 dollar hair cuts.  It actually is logical if you add up all the driving factors - ultimately inefficient and a bit weird - but logical.  Poor people who are studying 1000 hours to give out cheep haircuts end up subsidizing poor people who are getting haircuts that should probably cost more $10.  But you can see how we get there and why it doesn't change.

Why do people actually sign up for such a bazaar scam, spending 1000 hours in classwork to get a job that pays marginally above minimum?  Because it's generally easy, flexible, moderately social, and universal - you can cut hair anywhere, including the vast middle of the country where they're aren't as many opportunities.

 

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First off, I love the phrase “bazaar scam”, it makes total sense in this usage.

Secondly, don’t interpret my soliloquy on safety at codes and the benefits of society from having as many folks complete EMT training as taking any stand on hair cutting.

The trades have always sought to monetize the standards necessary to join their ranks, from the age of guilds. Although the initial impulse behind creating standards are in the public good, eventually it becomes rent seeking.

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On 6/3/2017 at 6:31 AM, jocal505 said:

That 105 mph bike was a Kawasaki KLR 650, entirely stock. It was a street legal dirt bike, a "dual purpose." Too heavy for trail riding, really. It was not squirrely whatsoever at speed.

I'm a couple years late in noticing this post. Yeah, the Mighty, Mighty KLR 650 could probably do that easily ... as long as the road was glass smooth. That KLR stretches the term "dual sport" to mean 98% paved road, 2% some dirt on a paved road.

It's a very good bike, but way too heavy for anything technical unless you're Andre The Giant's chiropractor.

 

Just an aside, since this thread now seems a catchall ... I've had a tiny sliver of glass in my foot for about 30 years from stepping into it in my kitchen. I have no way to identify its precise location or get it out. I still feel it a couple times a week.

I went to a new sushi chef last week (I was unfaithful) and he gave me a little mint leaf called Shiso. Anyone ever tried it? It was wildly complex, incredibly addictive.

What's the deal with the VW Pathfinder engines? Can you really get parts for them at the auto stores? Does it use unmarinized components?

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12 hours ago, cmilliken said:

 

A person has 'died' - you restart their heart - they live - you're a hero.  Even if they wanted to die, you are a hero because the crowd has no empathy with someone who 'wanted to die' being resurrected.

A person needs a hair cut - you do it poorly or miss some social cue - they're emotionally distraught - you're a villain.  People wrap their entire psyche into appearance and if you've damaged it, you're accountable.  The simple truth is the crowd does place disproportionate value on appearance and therefore, you have to do it right or be held accountable.

So just tie it to the price of the hair cut?  Don't go to a $10 dollar Best Cuts for something that matters so much?  Poor people don't have much money but they deserve equivalent outcomes so..... voilà!  1000 hours of vocational training to cut people's hair.  So why isn't pay commensurate with training?  Because for the vast majority of patrons, their hair DOESN'T matter.  It's not tied to their sense of self-worth.  The $10 / cut is all it's worth.   Equality of outcome means that hair stylists spend 1000 hours training so they can give $10 dollar hair cuts.  It actually is logical if you add up all the driving factors - ultimately inefficient and a bit weird - but logical.  Poor people who are studying 1000 hours to give out cheep haircuts end up subsidizing poor people who are getting haircuts that should probably cost more $10.  But you can see how we get there and why it doesn't change.

Why do people actually sign up for such a bazaar scam, spending 1000 hours in classwork to get a job that pays marginally above minimum?  Because it's generally easy, flexible, moderately social, and universal - you can cut hair anywhere, including the vast middle of the country where they're aren't as many opportunities.

 

Well, OK, but shouldn't this be in Hair Braiding Anarchy? ;)

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On 2/24/2019 at 2:04 PM, mikewof said:

Just an aside, since this thread now seems a catchall

It was supposed to be about license plate readers.

The ACLU has just released a ton of documents about them.

Lots of correspondence about FOIA requests then some government standards for plate readers then I got bored.

But here's an article about it.
 

Quote

 

...

Maintained by Vigilant Solutions, the system contains billions of location points now available to the agency on a $6.1 million contract.

"ICE has long embraced technology to target immigrants," writes ACLU attorney Vasudha Talla. "Now it's taking surveillance to an unprecedented level to target vulnerable communities—and sweeping up everyone else in the process."

Law enforcement agencies have shared approximately 1.5 billion records on driver whereabouts, obtained via covert cameras that snap license plate numbers in order to track criminals or those who have committed traffic infractions. Affixed to police squad cars or positioned on road signs and bridges, the automated license plate readers photograph and capture location information on all passing vehicles. And a staggering 5 billion more come from an elaborate network of private businesses, which were collected by Vigilant and sold to ICE.

The database is continuing to grow at a rapid pace, with an average of 150 million to 200 million unique license plate snapshots added per month. Derived from the most populous cities across the country, it gives the enforcement agency a detailed roadmap of people's comings and goings over the course of several years.

More than 9,000 ICE agents have access to the information, raising concerns over the privacy and civil liberty implications—not only for the immigrants tracked by ICE, but also for the millions of drivers whose personal details are at their disposal.

The agency does not use information to find individuals "who have no connection to ICE investigatory or enforcement activities," ICE spokesman Matthew Bourke tells The Washington Post. But police departments—which can also buy access to the database—have famously abused location data in the past to track acquantainces, lovers, and journalists, among others.

...

Jose Sigala, mayor of Tulare, California, issued a statement last week after the ACLU furnished records showing that his city, too, collaborated with ICE. He called the sharing "inadvertent." And Tulare Police Chief Wes Hensley has apologized, saying the department doesn't facilitate immigration enforcement.

"It's inconsistent with community-based policing philosophies, and it's incongruent with state law SB 54," Hensley tells the local ABC affiliate. "We are a community that's pretty diverse, and we do have a lot of folks that could be targeted, and we won't have any part of that."

 

Heh. I like contumacious Mayors.

"Folks that could be targeted" is one way of saying "people who are in violation of the law."

But when the law lacks the support of the community, you wind up with contumacious officials. We've seen Contumacious Sheriffs elsewhere.

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The license plate readers have been around for a long time, I remember Port Authority set them up around their B&Ts.

I have no problem with it. The license plate is a public tag, it's whole purpose is for public consumption. We agree to label our private property when used in a public space like that. We don't need to tag the car when we take it to a privately owned road.

Similarly, when a public resource (like a deer) wanders into our private land, we don't own it, and we often need a tag or permission to kill it. If we want to eat a privately-owned animal on private land, then I believe no permission is necessary.

Rather than complain about ICE's creepy tactics, the bigger issue is that We The People don't sufficiently value our immigrants, and we think of them as criminals rather than valued and profitable guests who need to be enticed to stay and contribute.

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21 hours ago, mikewof said:

Rather than complain about ICE's creepy tactics, the bigger issue is that We The People don't sufficiently value our immigrants, and we think of them as criminals rather than valued and profitable guests who need to be enticed to stay and contribute.

I've been known to think of them as the people.

But I do have some problems with plate reader databases.

Quote

The agency does not use information to find individuals "who have no connection to ICE investigatory or enforcement activities," ICE spokesman Matthew Bourke tells The Washington Post. But police departments—which can also buy access to the database—have famously abused location data in the past to track acquantainces, lovers, and journalists, among others.

Specifically, with oversight, if any.

 

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On 4/21/2017 at 7:14 AM, jocal505 said:

 

Boothy is a BN now?

BN is beer near in hashing language.  Please don't tease.

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16 hours ago, hasher said:

BN is beer near in hashing language.  Please don't tease.

If you really don't know, be content.

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Texas Bans Revenue Light Cameras

Quote

A bill to ban red light cameras has passed the Texas Legislature and is heading to Gov. Greg Abbott's desk. He's expected to sign it.

Oops. Red. Revenue. I knew it was an R word.

Quote

But there's actually very little evidence that red light cameras actually improve public safety. Study after study often says the opposite, and some communities have stopped using them without being directed to by their state governments.

 

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Two years on and Tedious Tom still has no fucking clue where RBooze is but hey there’s a thread that needs bumping...

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On 5/21/2019 at 4:25 AM, Fakenews said:

Two years on and Tedious Tom still has no fucking clue where RBooze is but hey there’s a thread that needs bumping...

I have a very specific theory about why El Mariachi left, suddenly. Were you around late 2015 to early '16?

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4 hours ago, Repastinate Tom said:

Burrowing owls are cool birds. The proof:

 

That's an awesome video :)

 

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4 hours ago, Repastinate Tom said:

Burrowing owls are cool birds. The proof:

 

Seems owls are actually smarter than buffalo. :ph34r:

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1 hour ago, jocal505 said:

I have a very specific theory about why El Mariachi left, suddenly. Were you around late 2015 to early '16?

No and I don’t care.

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2 hours ago, jocal505 said:

I have a very specific theory about why El Mariachi left, suddenly. Were you around late 2015 to early '16?

 I've always speculated incarceration or rehab. Which was it?

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14 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

Oh the mystery is too much!!

Pray tell!!! 

Hi Gouv. 

Boothy was a fan of black-on-black gun violence. And he blessed shooting certain perps in the back.  

You are a fine community person who lapped it up, while remaining silent. What was up with that?

A serious question here. Should such a person be a Federal Firearms Licensee, in your opinion?  

 

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On 8/12/2019 at 3:48 AM, Bluto said:

 I've always speculated incarceration or rehab. Which was it?

Have you considered the looney-bin?

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In another corner of the Internet: 

 

Posted Yesterday and copied  by me from  @DaveKO ‘s discussion about cheap  brake discs 

RBooze wrote

 

Have them checked and/or turned anyways, Dave---you might just be amazed at how un-good Chinese shit can be........

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On 1/4/2019 at 5:55 AM, Hypercapnic Tom said:

Now it seems that the unlicensed math was actually accurate.
 

Quote

 

In 2017, the Institute for Justice (IJ) partnered with Mats to file a lawsuit after he was fined $500 by the Oregon State Board of Examiners for Engineering and Land Surveying for publicly suggesting that yellow lights should last for slightly longer to accommodate cars making right turns. Two years later, citing the engineering board’s “history of overzealous enforcement actions,” a federal judge entered a permanent injunction securing Mats’s rights to speak freely about his traffic-light theories. The court also invalidated Oregon’s restriction on the title “engineer” as “substantially overbroad in violation of the First Amendment.”

With that injunction in place, Mats continued to research, write, and talk about his theory that yellow lights are too short for drivers to safely make turns through an intersection (and avoid getting red light camera tickets). This year, Mats teamed up with a group of drivers advocates, engineers, and others to formally challenge the 54-year-old guidance governing the timing of traffic lights. This summer, the ITE agreed to convene an expert panel where Mats and others testified. And late last month the panel returned its findings to the ITE: It found that the current equation for yellow light timing should be reconsidered.

“The First Amendment protects Americans right to speak regardless of whether they are right or wrong,” said Sam Gedge, an attorney at IJ, which represented Mats. “But in Mats’ case, the ITE committee’s decision suggests that he not only has a right to speak, but also, that he was right all along.”

 

Hooray for mathematicians in pajamas! Whoop whoop!

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On 12/8/2017 at 8:33 PM, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

They won. Doing math without a license is OK in Oregon.
 

Well, OK, doing math without a license is legal in Oregon if you're Mr. Järlström

And now comes the case of Greg Mills, who also wishes to do math without a license but this time it's in Arizona.
 

Quote

 

...

Greg’s resume reads like a veritable who’s-who of Arizona tech experts. After years of climbing the ranks within Phoenix-area tech and aerospace companies, he decided to set out on his own and started Southwest Engineering Concepts (“SOENCO”), an engineering consulting firm building circuits for small businesses and startups. For more than a decade, SOENCO was a success. But in May, government regulators from the Arizona Board of Technical Registration (ABTR) threatened to shut Greg down and impose thousands of dollars in fines—and maybe even jail time—all because they said Greg didn’t have a professional engineering license.

...

To get a license, Greg’s only option is to shut down SOENCO and get a job as an apprentice to a state-licensed engineer for eight years—just so he could then get back to doing what he has been doing for decades. But that’s not an option.

Depriving someone of their right to earn an honest living violates the Arizona Constitution, which is why Greg has partnered with the Institute for Justice (IJ), a nonprofit libertarian nutjob law firm, to file a lawsuit challenging the ABTR’s ability to regulate any and all engineering activity. The lawsuit, filed in state court, seeks to protect Greg’s right to call himself an engineer, as well as his right to continue to design, analyze, test and build circuit prototypes.

“The Board’s definition of engineering is so vague that nearly anyone designing or building anything in Arizona could conceivably require a burdensome and unnecessary license,” said Paul Avelar, managing attorney of the Institute for Justice’s Arizona office.

...

 

Engineers who work for a manufacturing firm are exempt but Mr. Mills' firm doesn't manufacture anything beyond prototypes. The government wants him to serve an 8 year apprenticeship to get back to doing what he did for decades at manufacturing firms.

It's absurd overreach. I hope Arizona is forced to allow him to get back to doing math without a license.

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I guess I should apologize to the forum for the deceptive title of this thread.

With any luck, a mod will come along and change it to "Facial Recognition Anarchy" or something like that.

Or maybe this topic won't...ahem...trigger such a response.

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In red light camera news,

The Illinois Comptroller Will Cease Collecting Red Light Camera Fines Amid Corruption Scandal
 

Quote

 

The Illinois Comptroller's office will no longer help cities collect fines from red light cameras due to a pay-for-play investigation involving contractor SafeSpeed.

In 2017, ABC7 and the Chicago Sun-Times discovered that most of the drivers cited for running the light were actually making right turns, some even doing so after making a complete stop. In 2019, ABC 7 also found that the Chicago intersections that racked up the most fines had shorter timed lights, giving drivers less time to pass through legally. The investigation identified one intersection where the green and yellow lights were only up for a combined 20 seconds.

"As a matter of public policy, this system is clearly broken. I am exercising the moral authority to prevent state resources being used to assist a shady process that victimizes taxpayers," Comptroller Susana A. Mendoza announced in a press release.

The final straw, the press release indicated, was a federal investigation into red light contractor SafeSpeed.

Both the Sun-Times and the Chicago Tribune have reported on SafeSpeed's chumminess with local officials, including connections to a county commissioner's chief of staff as well as a former police chief; the latter was fired from his job in the police department after his relationship with the company came to light. These local officials worked as consultants to negotiate SafeSpeed's presence in various communities. At least one of the officials went on record saying that he received a kickback for every fine paid in certain communities.

 

 

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He doesn't seem to care that no-one cares what he has to say.

You've chosen to ignore content by Plenipotentiary Tom. Options

You've chosen to ignore content by Plenipotentiary Tom. Options

You've chosen to ignore content by Plenipotentiary Tom. Options

You've chosen to ignore content by Plenipotentiary Tom. Options

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10 hours ago, view at the front said:

Wait. . . wasn't this thread somewhat related to RBoothie?

We had great interchanges about rural Mexico.  He get's it.

Not really I was kidding about Boothy being responsible for vandalizing cameras in the topic post. Just sounded like something he might do.

The thread title is misleading but was intended to be a joke. Sometimes helpful moderators fix that problem.

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Facial Recognition and the Danger of Automated Authoritarianism
 

Quote

 

Clearview AI, a tech startup, has created an app that enables law enforcement agencies to match photographs to its database of over 3 billion photos scraped from millions of public websites including Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, and Venmo. For comparison, the FBI's photo database contains only 640 million images. According to The New York Times, some 600 law-enforcement departments, including federal, state, and local agencies, have already used Clearview AI's technology.

...

The current Clearview AI app works basically as an investigative tool helping police identify perpetrators or victims after a crime has occurred. The company is, however, developing facial recognition software that would make it possible for wearers of augmented-reality glasses to ID folks walking down a street in real-time. Of course, such a technology could easily be harnessed to networked surveillance cameras so that government agents could track where a citizen is and with whom that citizen is interacting.

"Facial recognition is the perfect tool for oppression," write Woodrow Hartzog, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University, and Evan Selinger, a philosopher at the Rochester Institute of Technology. It is, they persuasively argue in Medium, "the most uniquely dangerous surveillance mechanism ever invented." Real-time deployment of facial recognition technologies would essentially turn our faces into ID cards on permanent display to the police.

"I've come to the conclusion that because information constantly increases, there's never going to be privacy," Clearview AI investor David Scalzo told The New York Times. "Laws have to determine what's legal, but you can't ban technology. Sure, that might lead to a dystopian future or something, but you can't ban it."

In fact, several cities have already banned police use of facial recognition technologies. And members of Congress are also now waking up to how the widespread use of this technology could impair our civil liberties.

...

 

This makes me wonder how I'd look in a burka?

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On 4/20/2017 at 1:01 PM, SloopJonB said:

They have too many guns too.

How many is too many ?

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On 12/13/2019 at 1:47 AM, Plenipotentiary Tom said:
Quote

I guess I should apologize to the forum for the deceptive title of this thread.

With any luck, a mod will come along and change it to "Facial Recognition Anarchy" or something like that.

Or maybe this topic won't...ahem...trigger such a response.

dogballs = no Boothy in the Boothy thread.

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(giggle giggle, snickering) I guess I should apologize to the forum for the deceptive title of the suicide thread.

Our readers will find this under "Hidden Costs of Gun Violence."  And btw, around here, our silly string comes from guess whom.

Two dogballs on a blue blankie with my morning coffee, hmmm.

Mr. flowers in guns (in two colors)...

Time machine bright lines? 

Good ole Mr. purple hat got moderated upon, in the land of no moderation, for his "Virginia Boating Safety" thread.

Ah, to be bonded at the hip with Lawrence Tribe, Adam Winkler, and Scalia---in the same breath

The silliness goes racial, by featuring Judge Taney, like clockwork

Mr. "assault sombrero" can't tell the truth when it is easy to tell. dogballs.

The Tom Ray Assault Sombrero.jpg

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