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2 hours ago, Keysrock35 said:

I find this thing fascinating. Who would think you could pack that much into a 26'. She ugly but she sure can cook, baby.

 

https://duluth.craigslist.org/boa/d/iron-river-for-sale-make-offer-26/6941027471.html

00O0O_bxqmqUNekut_600x450.jpg

01313_kGA6UwmInGi_600x450.jpg

Notice how the cabin floor isn't flat - it looks like it was laid directly on the hull to maximize headroom.  Wonder what sort of support structure the keel has.

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So I bought her. No real issues, other than a easily repairable crack from sitting on the trailer for so long, and it all needs re-assembling or bits replacing - she's not been in the water for a long

Thread drift is one of Cruising Anarchy tradition's, dating back at least to the year 537 AD when a discussion about St Brenan's planned trip to America meandered through a heated debate about the fis

Not sure if bad form to quote ones self but that was me back on June 17th just before my trip to Florida. When I got back I did manage to take a trip to Albany to take a look at this boat and

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3 hours ago, Keysrock35 said:

I find this thing fascinating. Who would think you could pack that much into a 26'. She ugly but she sure can cook, baby.

 

https://duluth.craigslist.org/boa/d/iron-river-for-sale-make-offer-26/6941027471.html

00O0O_bxqmqUNekut_600x450.jpg

01313_kGA6UwmInGi_600x450.jpg

While the theory of getting max living space in a minimum length is admirable, the esthetic result looks like something my daughter drew at 3 years old.    Yes, it is a sailboat, but something that is more mock worthy when splashed in the water.

Maybe adding "Dancing Pancake Girl" will help tip it more towards "Not Mocking"...

- Stumbling

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5 hours ago, Keysrock35 said:

I find this thing fascinating. Who would think you could pack that much into a 26'. She ugly but she sure can cook, baby.

 

https://duluth.craigslist.org/boa/d/iron-river-for-sale-make-offer-26/6941027471.html

00O0O_bxqmqUNekut_600x450.jpg

01313_kGA6UwmInGi_600x450.jpg

Just never look back as you row away.

Or ever try docking in a cross wind.

S2 built something very similar but this one has a nicer finish.

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/s2-80-c

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22 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

A flush-deck 26 footer with all that inside? And it looks like a sailing rig that is at least workable if not giving much performance. I'd take it!

FB- Doug

The remarks about this boat could also apply to the Morgan Out Island 28.

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On 8/17/2019 at 7:48 AM, stumblingthunder said:

While the theory of getting max living space in a minimum length is admirable, the esthetic result looks like something my daughter drew at 3 years old.    Yes, it is a sailboat, but something that is more mock worthy when splashed in the water.

Maybe adding "Dancing Pancake Girl" will help tip it more towards "Not Mocking"...

- Stumbling

It is French Toast Mr. Stumbling 

Details are important with critical historical facts for future generations.  

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7 hours ago, Windward said:

It is French Toast Mr. Stumbling 

Details are important with critical historical facts for future generations.  

I stand corrected.    I went back and ran diagnostics on RAM and Long Term Storage.   All the dendrites and axons came up fine, so the ganglia checked.    I next had the DBA run a consistency check and discovered that there was an index cross-reference to a VWAP entry, thus pancake girl...

I have fired the DBA and the assistant DBA has been warned against further errors.   Thus the problem has been taken care of.

- Stumbling

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Interesting find Tom.

One would expect that a NASA engineer would have done some Aluminium hull.  So, well done for the effort!

Rig shows 1000's of designs that I've not studied, so I should reserve judgement.  I wonder how well it points.

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That spar on top of the mast has to have some sailorly name. Tiptopper or something.

It looks like a bad idea for so many reasons, especially getting clonked on the head by the tiptopper when it tears free.

4 hours ago, Windward said:

Rig shows 1000's of designs that I've not studied, so I should reserve judgement.

That's where I am too. I didn't put it in Mocking Ads because I feel unqualified to mock it.

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2 hours ago, Repastinate Tom said:

That spar on top of the mast has to have some sailorly name. Tiptopper or something.

It looks like a bad idea for so many reasons, especially getting clonked on the head by the tiptopper when it tears free.

That's where I am too. I didn't put it in Mocking Ads because I feel unqualified to mock it.

It's the lesser-known Drascombe Clubber. Sail insignia here:

500_F_251167993_ufA7OVjOWrqk6nms5pnWy9CO

 

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A shark, a whale and a baby seal walk into a bar.

Bartender says "what'll you have"?

Shark says "A Bloody Mary"

Whale says "Sailor rum"

Baby seal says "Anything but a Canadian Club".

 

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17 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

 

This columbia ad, specifically the cutout for the brochure request really brings back memories. As a boy i collected several brochures in a binder. Eventually I worked up to checking the box for the 50. I guess at the 50 level you get a sales call. I remember my dad handing me the phone to talk to a salesman about my interest in the 50. 

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24 minutes ago, rcbrds said:

This columbia ad, specifically the cutout for the brochure request really brings back memories. As a boy i collected several brochures in a binder. Eventually I worked up to checking the box for the 50. I guess at the 50 level you get a sales call. I remember my dad handing me the phone to talk to a salesman about my interest in the 50. 

I would have loved to see the look on your dad's face.

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6 hours ago, rcbrds said:

 

This columbia ad, specifically the cutout for the brochure request really brings back memories. As a boy i collected several brochures in a binder. Eventually I worked up to checking the box for the 50. I guess at the 50 level you get a sales call. I remember my dad handing me the phone to talk to a salesman about my interest in the 50. 

I still have brochures and I will be 71 next month.:unsure:

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On 9/2/2019 at 8:01 PM, Santana20AE said:

I still have brochures and I will be 71 next month.:unsure:

Me too, unless Mrs. Bull tossed them. I'll be 71 in December. Bonne santé à toi!

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

https://www.cooperss.com/asset-detail.php?name=marine&id=3304

C&C 40 that was struck by lightning. 

$5000 minimum bid and located in Washington State. Engine runs.

Ummm,  methinks that VA is not the same as WA.... jus' sayin'     (There's Vee and Double Vee/You )

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On 8/28/2019 at 4:32 AM, Repastinate Tom said:

I think that one qualifies for the Zombie Fleet.

This one I'm not so sure

I'm not really mocking. It might even be a Coolboat To Admire. I'm just confused.

00G0G_6zM934kjrsX_1200x900.jpg

 

It has a disorienting effect on my mind.   Like the sails are set backwards, being that the large sail should be aft in the main position and the smaller forward as the jib.

- Stumbling

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On 9/8/2019 at 5:32 PM, Bull City said:

Me too, unless Mrs. Bull tossed them. I'll be 71 in December. Bonne santé à toi!

I keep my brochures in my office so Mrs. Hukilau isnt tempted. 

Early last year, I came across them in a drawer and decided to cull them.  One of the brochures was for the Catalina 28.  Hmmmm, thinks I, I sort of remember that boat and that I really liked it when I saw it at the Newport show over ten years ago.  I kept thinking about the boat, and started looking at sailboatlistings and yachtworld for available examples. Nah, I'm happy with my Oday 23.  The Catalinas are too expensive and too far away to look at.  Sure it could be an affordable dream boat, but no.... 

 Until I come across a modestly priced, well-cared for model not 45 minutes from my house.  One month later, I'm the proud new owner.  All because of an old brochure.

I dont pick up a brochure from every boat I board.at the shows anymore.  But I still love the things. 

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3 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

I keep my brochures in my office so Mrs. Hukilau isnt tempted. 

Early last year, I came across them in a drawer and decided to cull them.  One of the brochures was for the Catalina 28.  Hmmmm, thinks I, I sort of remember that boat and that I really liked it when I saw it at the Newport show over ten years ago.  I kept thinking about the boat, and started looking at sailboatlistings and yachtworld for available examples. Nah, I'm happy with my Oday 23.  The Catalinas are too expensive and too far away to look at.  Sure it could be an affordable dream boat, but no.... 

 Until I come across a modestly priced, well-cared for model not 45 minutes from my house.  One month later, I'm the proud new owner.  All because of an old brochure.

I dont pick up a brochure from every boat I board.at the shows anymore.  But I still love the things. 

:D  <most interesting man in the world voice on> " i don't pick up a brochure for every boat i board but when i do, i buy it"! <most interesting man in the world voice off>

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2 hours ago, Veeger said:

Ummm,  methinks that VA is not the same as WA.... jus' sayin'     (There's Vee and Double Vee/You )

Thanks for pointing that out!  I think I got up too early to see properly

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9 hours ago, Hukilau said:

I keep my brochures in my office so Mrs. Hukilau isnt tempted. 

Early last year, I came across them in a drawer and decided to cull them.  One of the brochures was for the Catalina 28.  Hmmmm, thinks I, I sort of remember that boat and that I really liked it when I saw it at the Newport show over ten years ago.  I kept thinking about the boat, and started looking at sailboatlistings and yachtworld for available examples. Nah, I'm happy with my Oday 23.  The Catalinas are too expensive and too far away to look at.  Sure it could be an affordable dream boat, but no.... 

 Until I come across a modestly priced, well-cared for model not 45 minutes from my house.  One month later, I'm the proud new owner.  All because of an old brochure.

I dont pick up a brochure from every boat I board.at the shows anymore.  But I still love the things. 

I had a SAIL magazine subscription from 1971 to 1983. They use to have a Reader Service Card. As I recall, each ad would say something like "Check Number 51 on Reader Service Card for more information." So I would check the hell out of it and send it in. I'm going to rummage around for those brochures.

During this time, I was in grad school, and a classmate, who was also a sailor, and I collaborated on a statistics project. On punch cards, we entered all of the data from our sailboat brochures and price lists and did a correlation analysis. I recall two discoveries. The closest correlation to price was displacement, which makes sense, and in 1973, a Triscuit  Cracker cost more per pound than a sailboat.

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10 minutes ago, Bull City said:

I had a SAIL magazine subscription from 1971 to 1983. They use to have a Reader Service Card. As I recall, each ad would say something like "Check Number 51 on Reader Service Card for more information." So I would check the hell out of it and send it in. I'm going to rummage around for those brochures.

During this time, I was in grad school, and a classmate, who was also a sailor, and I collaborated on a statistics project. On punch cards, we entered all of the data from our sailboat brochures and price lists and did a correlation analysis. I recall two discoveries. The closest correlation to price was displacement, which makes sense, and in 1973, a Triscuit  Cracker cost more per pound than a sailboat.

The Triscuit is a good cracker.

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

I had a SAIL magazine subscription from 1971 to 1983.

I've still got my Sail mags from back then - back into the 60's actually. Great resource for sailing history.

It was the best on the market back then until it got turned into a trivial waste of paper. I suspect that was in '83.

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14 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I've still got my Sail mags from back then - back into the 60's actually. Great resource for sailing history.

It was the best on the market back then until it got turned into a trivial waste of paper. I suspect that was in '83.

For a while I got SAIL and YACHTING. I dropped YACHTING when they dropped sail boats. I agree with you on what happened to SAIL.

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17 hours ago, Bull City said:

The closest correlation to price was displacement, which makes sense, and in 1973, a Triscuit  Cracker cost more per pound than a sailboat.

Shoot.  Now I'm wondering if you bought Triscuits in 10,000 lbs lots would the price would become competitive with a sailboat.

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5 hours ago, herdingbats said:

Decent condition, other than a rudder that fell off.

Rudder, schmudder.

You can often snatch good deals in Chicago around this time of year: harbors close in 4-5 weeks, and craning out & dry storage is quite expensive. We picked up our 30' Albin for $2300 from owners who'd rather donate it to Boat Angel than pay $1600 winter yard storage &  the next year's $3200 slip fee in Burnham Harbor. We were pretty startled at the prices a certain local yard charged to pull the mast, haul the boat out, and drop it onto a transport trailer. It was nearly $600 to pull a 41' stick. Seems the GLs are an expensive place to sail!

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1 hour ago, Diarmuid said:

Decent condition, other than a rudder that fell off.

Rudder, schmudder.

You can often snatch good deals in Chicago around this time of year: harbors close in 4-5 weeks, and craning out & dry storage is quite expensive. We picked up our 30' Albin for $2300 from owners who'd rather donate it to Boat Angel than pay $1600 winter yard storage &  the next year's $3200 slip fee in Burnham Harbor. We were pretty startled at the prices a certain local yard charged to pull the mast, haul the boat out, and drop it onto a transport trailer. It was nearly $600 to pull a 41' stick. Seems the GLs are an expensive place to sail!

Prolly not too bad of a price to pay ($600).  Relative to the initial investment, sure, it seems like a lot.  That's why there's lots of cheap boat around.... it isn't the purchase price that gets ya!

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14 minutes ago, Veeger said:

Prolly not too bad of a price to pay ($600).  Relative to the initial investment, sure, it seems like a lot.  That's why there's lots of cheap boat around.... it isn't the purchase price that gets ya!

That was just unstepping the mast -- $18 a foot. Unpin, crane out the stick (no furler), coil up & ziptie the wires & toss 'em below, shrinkwrap the running rigging to the mast. Can't believe it took them half an hour.

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1 hour ago, Diarmuid said:

That was just unstepping the mast -- $18 a foot. Unpin, crane out the stick (no furler), coil up & ziptie the wires & toss 'em below, shrinkwrap the running rigging to the mast. Can't believe it took them half an hour.

Dude, when was the last time you prepped a rig to come out?  I did it last year before having my First 310 shipped down from SF Bay to Socal.  I spent an entire day prepping the rig to be pulled (though I had sails to unbend, and dodger, etc to remove).  Assuming all the sails are off the boat, then all that's left is: all the lines (halyards, lifts, etc) have to be pulled and coiled and made off to the mast.  Mainsheet has to come off, vang has to come off, boom has to come off.   Wires thru the deck have to be disconnected and led out thru cabin top and secured.

Then boat positioned, crane positioned, strap to mast (2 guys, maybe 3), then shrouds released and backstay and headstay released.  Then rig hoisted clear. After rig is clear and on the stands, then masthead antenna, windex, etc, removed.  Then, finally, they can wrap the mast with foam, so that when they shrinkwrap the running rigging it doesn't wear/chafe.

Way, way more than 1/2 hour of work...

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7 hours ago, eric1207 said:

Shoot.  Now I'm wondering if you bought Triscuits in 10,000 lbs lots would the price would become competitive with a sailboat.

I suspect a 10,000 lb. sailboat bought in 1973 would have held its value better than Triscuits bought at the same time. I can easily imagine still enjoying the sailboat; the Triscuits, not so much.

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1 hour ago, Crash said:

Dude, when was the last time you prepped a rig to come out?  I did it last year before having my First 310 shipped down from SF Bay to Socal.  I spent an entire day prepping the rig to be pulled (though I had sails to unbend, and dodger, etc to remove).  Assuming all the sails are off the boat, then all that's left is: all the lines (halyards, lifts, etc) have to be pulled and coiled and made off to the mast.  Mainsheet has to come off, vang has to come off, boom has to come off.   Wires thru the deck have to be disconnected and led out thru cabin top and secured.

Then boat positioned, crane positioned, strap to mast (2 guys, maybe 3), then shrouds released and backstay and headstay released.  Then rig hoisted clear. After rig is clear and on the stands, then masthead antenna, windex, etc, removed.  Then, finally, they can wrap the mast with foam, so that when they shrinkwrap the running rigging it doesn't wear/chafe.

Way, way more than 1/2 hour of work...

All lines at mast. No wiring thru deck (all inside mast). No dodger. Sails already off and below. No Windex or masthead antenna. Mainsheet and soft vang attached with snap shackles. One clevis pin on gooseneck, no internal reefing or outhaul lines. Boom is 10' long. Lazy jacks left in situ. Spreaders secure with one pin; ends detach and left clamped on cap shrouds. No foam under shrink wrap -- just 2-3 whips of Saran for transport.

This was a simpler rig (as purchased) than our crappy little SJ21 in current dress. Now... *Re-rigging* this Albin is likely to be vastly more complex. Halyards added, controls led aft, new furler, masthead instruments and VHF, two jiffy reefs. Hoping to do most of that rigging ourselves, tho.

I do understand easy jobs pay for hard ones, when pricing is by-the-foot. 

 

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On 9/11/2019 at 11:15 PM, Bull City said:

I suspect a 10,000 lb. sailboat bought in 1973 would have held its value better than Triscuits bought at the same time. I can easily imagine still enjoying the sailboat; the Triscuits, not so much.

Cheese.

The answer is a lot of cheese

FB- Doug

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On 9/11/2019 at 9:28 PM, Keysrock35 said:

No, just Chicago. Join CCYC and you can use the gin pole for free and DIY. Way better deal.

The PO used to tramp this boat all the way up to Sheboygan in search of affordable haul out & winter storage.

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4 hours ago, bmiller said:

Damn! Tempting, as I've just started snooping around tenders for our Albin. But the boat & outboard are both much larger than we need, we already have a trolling motor, and the trailer is of no use. Guess we could buy it, sell the pieces individually (have you priced used outboards? Absurd what people think they are worth), and use the money to buy more suitable gear. But instead, lets allow someone else to grab the bargain & be happy. :) It is a tremendous opportunity for someone.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Maine craigslist usually has an awesome range of sailboats to click through, thankfully this one is too far from me to be tempting.  The ask of 24K seems high with the work needed...but does a Hinckley Sou'wester falls into classic plastic price?

https://maine.craigslist.org/boa/d/spruce-head-30-hinckley-souwester-sloop/6957095488.html

https://haloakes.smugmug.com/CALYPSO-30-Hinckley-Souwester/i-RDccRgv

 

00707_ec6opq2E3od_1200x900.jpg

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22 hours ago, Slick470 said:

there aren't that many of them and they don't typically stay on the market that long so tend to hold their value pretty well. 

Yup. The quality counts in this case. You can get a Bunter or Catalina a little lower for its age But? Better resale too. Don't expect it to last on the market like Slick says. 

 

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44 minutes ago, pseudocrow said:

After seeing several restored Spidsgatters at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival last month, and then reading Kaci Cronkhite's 'Finding Pax,' this ad is especially sad. She looks like someone raised the roof of the cabin to get more headroom - not the most elegant modification. spids.thumb.jpg.82f4659ccf0026fa59a4c9080641dba6.jpg

I saw that yesterday.  Spidsgatters are gorgeous, gorgeous.  Yeah, that cabin. mod, not so good.   That boat will eat money like there's no tomorrow but sheesh....

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Only a boat part, but this complete SSB setup has been lingering for many weeks. Includes tuner and pactor modem. Seems like a good deal? Unless HF is truly already dead.  I know, I know... Once those glorious high-density satellite networks go on-line, you won’t be able to give this stuff away.  Just around the corner for twenty years and counting...

https://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/bpo/d/portland-icom-ic-m802-ssb-marine-hf/6993665561.html

 

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I have too.  They were designed by Jim Taylor, so there's some nice pedigree there.  I've always thought that a deep draft one, that was appropriately rigged with good sails and some deck gear updates would make a great Wed Night beer can boat, and nice little weekend overnighter all in one.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/28/2019 at 8:57 AM, Norse Horse said:

Somehow the Coronado looks stately with that green hull :)

Not sure about stately.  
The Seilester is a 25' Coronado, someone change the interior layout before I got her.
She was owned by Rose (Gibsons, BC)
Then by me (Gibsons,BC
then Tim (Vancouver, BC
and then @Vaeredil and now ????

I still miss her.... a little small, a little slow, but oh so much fun sailing around Howe Sound
 

seilaster 2.jpg

seilaster.jpg

seilasterat rest.jpg

DSCF0020A.jpg

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I kinda think this has been posted before but....

I chose Not Mocking because it's such a nice boat even though it needs a lot of time spent on it.

It's been on the market for quite a while so I imagine an offer of 20 or less would be snapped up - I know what the market for project boats is like around here (poor).

image.png.cd7b5ce6be75365fa151b2697bd283a9.png

https://vancouver.craigslist.org/van/boa/d/vancouver-cc-40-project/7002285093.html

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On 9/10/2019 at 9:23 PM, Bull City said:

I had a SAIL magazine subscription from 1971 to 1983. They use to have a Reader Service Card. As I recall, each ad would say something like "Check Number 51 on Reader Service Card for more information." So I would check the hell out of it and send it in. I'm going to rummage around for those brochures.

During this time, I was in grad school, and a classmate, who was also a sailor, and I collaborated on a statistics project. On punch cards, we entered all of the data from our sailboat brochures and price lists and did a correlation analysis. I recall two discoveries. The closest correlation to price was displacement, which makes sense, and in 1973, a Triscuit  Cracker cost more per pound than a sailboat.

Great minds think alike, I did a similar analysis and had the results printed in an article in a Canadian sailing mag. now long gone. As well as displacement I found that sail area had a strong correlation with price. I also came up with y = mx + b equations for each x. (displacement, SA, LOA, etc). Plug in the waterline length for example, and it told you the price. Started with the then  current idea that a new boat cost $1000 a foot.

And before someone else says it, I know that fools seldom differ.

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18 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Great minds think alike, I did a similar analysis and had the results printed in an article in a Canadian sailing mag. now long gone. As well as displacement I found that sail area had a strong correlation with price. I also came up with y = mx + b equations for each x. (displacement, SA, LOA, etc). Plug in the waterline length for example, and it told you the price. Started with the then  current idea that a new boat cost $1000 a foot.

And before someone else says it, I know that fools seldom differ.

y = mx + b. It has a vaguely familiar ring to it, but now I haven't the foggiest idea of what it means. I'm kinda surprised you found a high correlation between LWL and price. You can have wildly different displacements packed into the same LWL, a Venture 17 vs. a Cape Dory Typhoon comes to mind.

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I did not find a good correlation with LWL. The two I got were displacement and sail area. Displacement is reasonably obvious but it took me some time to figure out SA. The way it seemed to. work was that you got more sail area with a heavier boat but also with a more performance-oriented boat that was lighter but had the cost of a more hi-tech build.

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16 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I did not find a good correlation with LWL. The two I got were displacement and sail area. Displacement is reasonably obvious but it took me some time to figure out SA. The way it seemed to. work was that you got more sail area with a heavier boat but also with a more performance-oriented boat that was lighter but had the cost of a more hi-tech build.

Makes sense.

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On 10/18/2019 at 7:38 PM, anthonysc said:

Not sure about stately.  
The Seilester is a 25' Coronado, someone change the interior layout before I got her.
She was owned by Rose (Gibsons, BC)
Then by me (Gibsons,BC
then Tim (Vancouver, BC
and then @Vaeredil and now ????

I still miss her.... a little small, a little slow, but oh so much fun sailing around Howe Sound
 

seilaster 2.jpg

 

 

 

I see that your bowman pre-positioned his/her's supplies on the bow.    Can never have enough cold beer for post maneuver recoveries!

- Stumbling

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Here is a pleasant departure from our normal local CL listings

https://eastnc.craigslist.org/boa/d/oriental-tartan-37/7004636816.html

Tartan 37 - $53000 (Beaufort)

1

Well-kept looking. Maybe pricey depending on sail inventory etc.

The only thing that I wonder about is the "Entire hull below waterline peeled, re-laminated and barrier coated 2001." 

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Why are trophies usually so tacky ugly? Even the solid silver ones BITD were usually pretty beastly.

Lake sailing?

Those look to be generic trophies with a sailboat decoration attached at the top.   Pretty standard fare.

- Stumbling