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So I bought her. No real issues, other than a easily repairable crack from sitting on the trailer for so long, and it all needs re-assembling or bits replacing - she's not been in the water for a long

Thread drift is one of Cruising Anarchy tradition's, dating back at least to the year 537 AD when a discussion about St Brenan's planned trip to America meandered through a heated debate about the fis

Not sure if bad form to quote ones self but that was me back on June 17th just before my trip to Florida. When I got back I did manage to take a trip to Albany to take a look at this boat and

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

It's Rimas with cat

Bite your tongue :P In contrast to Rimas this guy seems to be:

1. Able to plan a route.

2.  Sail the route.

3. Pay for it himself.

4. Keep his boat afloat. 

 

I did a little more digging, he himself doesn't seem to be online, but his name pops up all over the place in references from other sailors.  Looks like he has successfully circumnavigated at least once, possibly up to three times if the dates are accurate, and wrote a interesting piece on the use of a JSD. 

 

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7 hours ago, Ishmael said:
7 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Yes, but he looks a bit like Rimas 

Every white male over 70 looks either like Rimas, Harvey Weinberg, or Yoda. Anything else is makeup.

He doesn't look (to me, at least) like he has that unfocused, unthinking, glazed look of Rimas.Some people call it "the 1,000 yard stare" but I think it's more like "burnt-out light bulb." Maybe th pic caught him at a good moment, but this guy's not wearing a girly blouse and looks like he might have a sense of humor

FB- Doug

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8 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Every white male over 70 looks either like Rimas, Harvey Weinberg, or Yoda. Anything else is makeup.

Well, that's something to look forward to. 

Do I get  choice? Of the 3 I might pick Rimas.

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3 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Not sure if this one belongs here, in Mocking Ads, or possibly in the Zombie Fleet but I like something about the boat so put it here.

https://fortmyers.craigslist.org/chl/boa/d/18-ft-sail-boat-nice-trailer/6575705671.html

I'd stay away from that one. I wonder what disease the PO had, something horribly contagious?

I DONT KNOW MUCH ABOUT SAIL BOAT BUT I ACQUIRED THIS BOAT THRU THE DISEASED OWNER AND HAVE SALES FOR THE BOAT

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1 minute ago, Ishmael said:

I'd stay away from that one. I wonder what disease the PO had, something horribly contagious?

I DONT KNOW MUCH ABOUT SAIL BOAT BUT I ACQUIRED THIS BOAT THRU THE DISEASED OWNER AND HAVE SALES FOR THE BOAT

Hopefully they meant "deceased." If not, I'd recommend the new owner invest in a lot of bleach.

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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

I'd stay away from that one. I wonder what disease the PO had, something horribly contagious?

I DONT KNOW MUCH ABOUT SAIL BOAT BUT I ACQUIRED THIS BOAT THRU THE DISEASED OWNER AND HAVE SALES FOR THE BOAT

I was thinking the same thing. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

1982 Botina H-Boat - $3500 (Tall Timber's Marina) 

condition: good 
length overall (LOA): 28 
make / manufacturer: Botina 
model name / number: H 
propulsion type: sail 
year manufactured: 1982 

Awesome sailing machine!! New roller furling with new jib, new main sail with spare main sail, spin sail and much more!! all lines lead aft for easy single hand sailing! 5hp 4-stroke Nissan outboard.
serious inquiries only!!I will deliver her anywhere on the Chesapeake Bay

https://annapolis.craigslist.org/boa/d/1982-botina-boat/6565295012.html
 

00Q0Q_eAq7tU5XKQ_1200x900.jpg

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9 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

https://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/boa/d/free-boat-1948-egg-harbor-28/6585868036.html

My savior complex is kicking me in the pants right now - I'm resisting temptation... 

I have a nice wooden boat that I wouldn’t wish on anyone and it’s in much better condition as it’s in the water and floats like a cork, unlike that. 

The runaway factor is high

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12 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

https://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/boa/d/free-boat-1948-egg-harbor-28/6585868036.html

My savior complex is kicking me in the pants right now - I'm resisting temptation... 

Wow, that could be a great boat..... I know a bunch of people who love-love-love the Egg Harbors.

But unless you have a LOT of time and money to throw at it, you are wise to resist temptation.

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, paps49 said:

As he says, great boat for a wooden boat school.

Yes, a very realistic "free boat" advertisement. He even offers to pay to move it. And it is a cool old boat, but...

00303_jDD1S5BV2Y8_1200x900.jpg

Its kinda ugly. Something about those round windows in that box forward, I don't know. Ask Bob P why it's ugly. I just know it is, and that's sorta surprising considering the maker. It's a pretty hull if you just look from the rubrail down.

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4 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Yes, a very realistic "free boat" advertisement. He even offers to pay to move it. And it is a cool old boat, but...

00303_jDD1S5BV2Y8_1200x900.jpg

Its kinda ugly. Something about those round windows in that box forward, I don't know. Ask Bob P why it's ugly. I just know it is, and that's sorta surprising considering the maker. It's a pretty hull if you just look from the rubrail down.

The cabin and wheelhouse styling is typical of the era. IMO, it's a bit awkward, but not terribly so. A restoration could restyle it to be a bit more attractive, or retain it for originality. I don't have strong feelings either way in this case. If it was some ultra unique boat going into a museum, then obviously keep it original. But if the boat is to be used, then altering it a little bit is nbd. I rather like the boat, it would be nice if someone has the $ and ability to save it. 

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8 minutes ago, RKoch said:

The cabin and wheelhouse styling is typical of the era. IMO, it's a bit awkward, but not terribly so. A restoration could restyle it to be a bit more attractive, or retain it for originality. I don't have strong feelings either way in this case. If it was some ultra unique boat going into a museum, then obviously keep it original. But if the boat is to be used, then altering it a little bit is nbd. I rather like the boat, it would be nice if someone has the $ and ability to save it. 

You never know that the hull might have been the base design and someone else did the house structure or added it after the fact.   That could explain the feeling that the top just does not fit quite right with the hull.

- Stumbling

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3 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:

You never know that the hull might have been the base design and someone else did the house structure or added it after the fact.   That could explain the feeling that the top just does not fit quite right with the hull.

- Stumbling

The cabin windows look very much like early Egg Harbor styling. The wheelhouse windows don't, but they could have been a later alteration. Egg Harbor first opened in 1946, so a 1948 model would be a very early boat. Worth saving, if possible. The 28' size def makes it more feasible than if it was much larger.

Pic of more recent vintage...late 50s maybe?

 

image.jpeg

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They were out of business for a while, at some point merged with Pacemaker?  I'm not sure about current status. There were some pretty cool powerboats built in Jersey way back when.

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12 hours ago, RKoch said:

The cabin windows look very much like early Egg Harbor styling. The wheelhouse windows don't, but they could have been a later alteration. Egg Harbor first opened in 1946, so a 1948 model would be a very early boat. Worth saving, if possible. The 28' size def makes it more feasible than if it was much larger.

Pic of more recent vintage...late 50s maybe?

 

image.jpeg

I'm surprised they were FREE even then

colon, bracket

 

 

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They are cool boats and there are plenty of 33’s around the Jersey Shore at reasonable prices. If the Chesapeake Guy wants a floating wood boat, he can come get my Morton Johnson Hardtop Sedan. It needs 2 new engines and work and is as free as wind to the first looker /taker as I’m too busy to get to.

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37 minutes ago, Grey Dawn said:

Not if you have lots of money....lots and lots of money.

Seller doesn't seem to know what it is. Perhaps a 30-square?  Price is too much, even free is too much. Basically starting from scratch. Does have gorgeous lines. 

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That would give you a lead keel and a main beam with the numbers carved into it - then you can call your new construction a "restoration".

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That kind of looks like a 1920’s Crowningshire. Long overhangs and 4’ sitting headroom

Definitely a zombie at best. I’d light it up and get the metal scrap

 

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1 hour ago, RKoch said:
2 hours ago, Grey Dawn said:

Not if you have lots of money....lots and lots of money.

Seller doesn't seem to know what it is. Perhaps a 30-square?  Price is too much, even free is too much. Basically starting from scratch. Does have gorgeous lines. 

No, I would think R-boat and not a Herreshoff. Too much cabin to be a 6M.

Most Herreshoffs that I am familiar with put the ballast more square to the waterline, to get the CG lower. Nevins, maybe?

But definitely far enough gone that you are getting an idea, an ID, and perhaps a few castings including the ballast.

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Pretty badly hogged. You're buying lead and firewood.

00i0i_jAqqaZdBFZv_1200x900.jpg

Waaaay past the 'Use By' date.  You're 10 years too late...

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

No, I would think R-boat and not a Herreshoff. Too much cabin to be a 6M.

Most Herreshoffs that I am familiar with put the ballast more square to the waterline, to get the CG lower. Nevins, maybe?

But definitely far enough gone that you are getting an idea, an ID, and perhaps a few castings including the ballast.

FB- Doug

I think you may be right...R-boat, not 30 square. Boom is too long to be a 30 sq. I'm pretty sure it's not a Herreshoff,  framing looks too widely spaced.

Heres a fg reproduction of an R-boat for $35K...would cost many times that to restore boat in ad.

 http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1927/R-Class-40-2945132/Toronto/Canada#.Wvj2QvT3aJI

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57 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

John Alden Q Class?

4 cabin lights, long overhangs, wood

Can’t make out the name on the transom

 

 

B5D6FED3-2A72-493B-B4D9-015285BA79B1.jpeg

Gorgeous boats, all the "Letter Classes"

The Q class was around 60 feet IIRC, smaller than the M; the boat in the ad appears to be around 35 ft. There were lots of smaller ones, some national and some local. The "R" was sort of national, or at least there were some in New England and some on the West Coast; I don't know if the class was active on the Great Lakes BITD but some of the boats found their way there. The "Letter Classes" got their start with the Universal Rule in the early 1900s, about the same time as the International Rule which produced the Meter Classes.

Decades ago I "restored" a 1920s 6-Meter, not really a true restoration because we took a lot of short cuts and put a salvaged aluminum rig on it. At least we got it sailing for a few years, dunno where it is now. At the time I pored over what was available on boats of that era, never did find a lines plan for that particular boat

FB- Doug

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The ad says 38’. I’m not sure I go with that number. Those 5’ boat stands look pretty far apart and obviously not enough to support and distribute the load. They should be every 10’...

how about this Lawley? Or the Herreshoff with the wishbone

Maybe I’ll contact the seller and ask them to read the builder’s plate that seems to be on the port bulkhead...

7879C6DD-1963-40C2-98E2-E981DF6DA73F.jpeg

F6E19ED0-3A41-471F-AE49-80153BE6DF99.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

John Alden Q Class?

4 cabin lights, long overhangs, wood

Can’t make out the name on the transom

 

 

B5D6FED3-2A72-493B-B4D9-015285BA79B1.jpeg

Yup,  I think  you've got it.  Boom looks similar too.

Nice looking boat (when the sheer is intact....)

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8 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

That square cabin top with the square lights looks like Herreshoff

It does, but that style was fairly common 100 years ago. I think Steamer is correct, that it's an R boat. I don't think it is a Herreshoff, they used lighter frames, closely spaced. Boat looks to have more robust frames, widely spaced. Have no idea who designer is.

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    I had my heart set on a nice Grinde sloop in the VI that an old Vet lived on. Maybe 'slept on' would be a better term as he hung out in the bar from opening to close. He was a hell of a sailor though and every month on the night of the full moon when the rising moon rose over the mountain and started shining into the most open air bar he called home (The BackYard) he would invite all the girls that happened to be in the bar to sail to St Croix (35 miles). When? the girls would ask and his reply would be 'As soon as the bar closes! That was around 2AM which would give just enough time to sail to Christiansted and go right to the Comanche Club on the waterfront there for an excellent Brunch. Some girls would ask, 'Where will we sleep?' and the answer was 'No Sleep, we drink the whole time!' After an extended brunch and repro for the boats liquor locker they would make sail and be back in Cruz Bay before sunset. He had the timing down to a science and would show the girls the best time for an old fart. 

    As his health declined I started making offers on the boat but he wouldn't think of giving it up and eventually after not showing up at the Backyard for a few days someone stopped by the boat and he had died peacefully in an alcoholic slumber. The outpouring of grief for the old warrior was astounding and his sister who came down to make the burial arrangements let it be know the boat could be had for a bargain. It had been a while since I had gone on one of his moonlight sails and I wasn't sure what the harsh light of day would reveal but a stiff on a small boat after days in the tropic sun was all it took to keep me looking elsewhere for a Grinde.

RIP Ski

1666685706_Skigrinning.jpg.7d0b47f4527fc8395b39122cd6cf9cc2.jpg

RIP BACKYARD.jpg

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5 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Hah! Most of the "don't lowball me" warnings seem to be on ridiculously overpriced boats but this one is quite valid:

Quote

Don't bother low balling, if you're over 16 and can't afford $650 for a solid boat you should seriously consider a carreer/life change.

 

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Especially as brittle blue, green and red That bronze has become over the last 90 years. Good for scrap, just like the he lead. That’s good lead with antimony

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On 5/19/2018 at 1:53 PM, Bull City said:

^^ Another temptress.

Still my Platonic ideal of sailboat shape.  The Albin Ballad is very consciously modeled on its lines, especially from that angle:

9532256733_5b35ee8982_o.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Diarmuid said:

Still my Platonic ideal of sailboat shape.  The Albin Ballad is very consciously modeled on its lines, especially from that angle:

9532256733_5b35ee8982_o.jpg

 

What's the idea here? Park a San Juan 21 next to your other boat, so it looks ravingly beautiful by comparison?

You don't need to do that, it's a pretty boat already (not the SJ, I mean)

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Still my Platonic ideal of sailboat shape.  The Albin Ballad is very consciously modeled on its lines, especially from that angle:

9532256733_5b35ee8982_o.jpg

 

I always wondered what a Prairie schooner was.

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3 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Still my Platonic ideal of sailboat shape.  The Albin Ballad is very consciously modeled on its lines, especially from that angle:

9532256733_5b35ee8982_o.jpg

 

Nice boats - no wheel!

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28 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

1200px-2013_Augustiner_Weissbier_Munich_

Just started carrying that in our area again after 25 years.

The price is the same as it was in the early 90’s. I don’t know how I was able to afford that beer back then...

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

What's the idea here? Park a San Juan 21 next to your other boat, so it looks ravingly beautiful by comparison?

You don't need to do that, it's a pretty boat already (not the SJ, I mean)

FB- Doug

The SJ21 is for sailing now.  The Ballad is for working on, and dreaming.

 

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2 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

The SJ21 is for sailing now.  The Ballad is for working on, and dreaming.

 

We had a SJ21 entered in our clubs annual memorial race yesterday..... this is a distance race, because it commemorates Dunkirk among other things, and we try to make it a bit of a challenge. This year it ran 22 miles zig-zagging up & back a river/estuary, around a couple of shoals and thru/under a hiway bridge. The SJ21 was sailed by a man & wife, in the spinnaker class.... they turned in the 2nd best elapsed time but due to the exigencies of handicapping they got a 3rd overall (16 boats entered).

They're not pretty boats, to my eye..... matter of taste. But they can sail pretty well. I've sailed them a lot, actually, just never owned one...... so, take my seemingly-snarky comments with a grain of salt, if you can

FB- Doug

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Maybe this should have gone in Mocking but.....it's a Swan - I can't imagine there's ever been one cheaper.

Looks like a good project for a special person.

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1981/Swan-42-3211508/Deltaville/VA/United-States?refSource=standard listing#.WwOplyAh2Uk

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I noticed that - I don’t think there was ever much interior on that one. Right next to it is this wonderful looking vessel 

http://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1983/Ron-Holland-Wood-Laminate-42-3211558/United-Kingdom?refSource=standard listing#.WwOvsxbTWEc

 

Sadly it’s with “The world’s worst yacht broker” (tm) and so has a bafflingly meaningless description.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Ed said:

I noticed that - I don’t think there was ever much interior on that one. Right next to it is this wonderful looking vessel 

http://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1983/Ron-Holland-Wood-Laminate-42-3211558/United-Kingdom?refSource=standard listing#.WwOvsxbTWEc

 

Sadly it’s with “The world’s worst yacht broker” (tm) and so has a bafflingly meaningless description.

 

 

Half an hour in bed with my best friend gives us some answers: Double Thyme, strip plank build by an interesting Sunderland timber merchant with some claim to be an inventor of the Speed Strip system. I was in the same shed as her one winter and she’s a fine looking girl. Fitout is a bit homemade but the hull looks great. 

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Maybe this should have gone in Mocking but.....it's a Swan - I can't imagine there's ever been one cheaper.

Looks like a good project for a special person.

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1981/Swan-42-3211508/Deltaville/VA/United-States?refSource=standard listing#.WwOplyAh2Uk

far too many bodies needed .

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On 5/21/2018 at 4:29 PM, Steam Flyer said:

We had a SJ21 entered in our clubs annual memorial race yesterday..... this is a distance race, because it commemorates Dunkirk among other things, and we try to make it a bit of a challenge. This year it ran 22 miles zig-zagging up & back a river/estuary, around a couple of shoals and thru/under a hiway bridge. The SJ21 was sailed by a man & wife, in the spinnaker class.... they turned in the 2nd best elapsed time but due to the exigencies of handicapping they got a 3rd overall (16 boats entered).

They're not pretty boats, to my eye..... matter of taste. But they can sail pretty well. I've sailed them a lot, actually, just never owned one...... so, take my seemingly-snarky comments with a grain of salt, if you can

FB- Doug

Oh no, I'm aware of both their virtues and their shortcomings.  A light-air ghoster designed for tooling around Union Lake was maybe not the best choice for a place where 60mph wind events are a common thing, but we haven't died yet. We very much enjoyed dragging it out to SoCal a couple times & taking it around Catalina Island. A moderate ocean jaunt feels adventurous in a 1400lb boat. :)

I rather like the looks of the Mk1 (doghouse) model; it has a pugnacious, Dutch scow attitude. The flush deck versions are more practical but look like the unloved runt of the Cal litter. They are nice boats to learn on.

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2 hours ago, RedRyder said:

Reminds me of the poster:

 

368_8.jpg?itok=mjsewPkG

Silo is the upwind mark. Water we may lack, but it's blowing 25 out there right now.  Just waiting for the lake to get above 45F....

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2 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

I like the look of this one, the largest sharpie I have seen listed out here.

What say thou?

https://seattle.craigslist.org/skc/boa/d/41-cat-ketch-cabin-sharpie/6594502306.html

01616_aY33GMusda7_1200x900.jpg

I was perusing the listing pictures and it has the distinct look of heading to the zombie anchorage.  

First and foremost, the Volvo MD6a, only fit to be the leading weight for a mooring.  Everything else looks tired and in need of attention.   Who knows what rot lurks in her heart and bones.

I am impressed by the look of the vintage sailing instruments and the pressurized diesel/Kero heating stove.

- Stumbling

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If it were near the East Coast, it would be gone. Classic Chesapeake style and several feet longer than the one I posted a few weeks back in Mocking.

That boat could be easily restored and has full kneeling headroom

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4 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

I like the look of this one, the largest sharpie I have seen listed out here.

What say thou?

https://seattle.craigslist.org/skc/boa/d/41-cat-ketch-cabin-sharpie/6594502306.html

01616_aY33GMusda7_1200x900.jpg

 

Hmmm...... could be a lot of fun. If it were near us, I'd think seriously about it. Don't kid yourself that it's going to be a money pit though. I see no evidence of sails or rigging that are worth saving for painters tarp/clothesline. Is the basic equipment of the boat going to be any better? Structure?

But that would be a great boat to have around here. Looks like it could be fast, and shallow water +++

Big sharpies were apparently common in Long Island Sound before/around the turn of the last century.

FB- Doug

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In light wind and smooth water, that beauty would turn on it’s chine and race to the windward mark like a bullet.

Lead sleds would eventually drift to the same mark

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