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RING RING RING RING JS "um...cia... errr... pronto!" RC "Jimmy, it's me" JS "Who?" RC "Me mate, your old boss" JS "Fuck you Kiwis all sound the same to me mate, and I've

New Max Sirena interview by Bacci del Buono and Mario Giuffrè for Giornale della Vela. It's a really long interview, almost 2 hours, Max as always is very straight and open to talk about nearly everyt

https://farevela.net/2020/06/03/americas-cup-che-coppa-sara-diretta-4-giugno-2130-ospiti-bruni-e-vascotto-commento-tecnico-dalbertas-pinucci/ Since there are not so much news in these days, here'

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fb.jpg.76aafd5e54d528beb1389d3e4f48f8da.jpg

 

Another pic, more frontal, from Luna Rossa Facebook page. The windshields are clearly visible. Black rudder, no backstays. 

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20 hours ago, Zaal said:

fb.jpg.76aafd5e54d528beb1389d3e4f48f8da.jpg

 

Another pic, more frontal, from Luna Rossa Facebook page. The windshields are clearly visible. Black rudder, no backstays. 

Like the cockpit fairings, looks a lot meaner now!

Looking forward to top down shots to see how wide they are, how clean the area between sail and cockpit is now

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20 minutes ago, OldWoodenShip said:

Anyone notice the latest class interpretation suggests that the supplied running backstays can't be removed?

where are these interpretations found?

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13 minutes ago, bortolo said:

 

At about the 7.40 mark in this clip it appears Luna Rossa put the after burners on and run down the Kiwis? Could be camera angle but sure looked encouraging for Luna Rossa fans.! Of course you can't read shit into some of these videos but for those that believe..! :D

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The control on the jib through tacks and gybes seems way more precise than is ‘Normal’

not a flutter or crease at any point, they did have a questionable set up when they first launched B2 and there have been rule clarifications asked so I wonder?  
 

maybe they just have  it absolutely nailed ? 

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By the way, based on Justin's great videos on YouTube (and his descriptions) it seems that yesterday all boats aligned and raced.

Apparently INEOS and AM even had two full "races" of 6 legs. 

Looks like the new "rule" preventing coordinated sailing at less than 100m for more than 30 seconds does not work. Or has it been allowed?

image.thumb.png.cdea98ecbf573f498235c1c8fcbad59e.png

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5 minutes ago, enigmatically2 said:

I think they generally were at least 100m apart. The telephoto lens' being used makes it look closer- as well as harder to really tell relative performance

Yes, the rule is such that they can still "race" and do speed tests, it seems.

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maybe they will find a way to lower the main without sending a guy all the way to the top of the mast.

If that's the case, i think they pass the rule and would be able to sail without runners.

They may have to reinforce the base of the mast so that it doesnt fall forward somehow (when main down and no runner).

Just a wild guess.

 

Regards,

D.

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Could they have a backstay between the two skins that is completely slack during racing, and then trimmed to keep the mast vertical when they drop the main?

Regards,

D.

 

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2 hours ago, dbeauvar said:

maybe they will find a way to lower the main without sending a guy all the way to the top of the mast.

If that's the case, i think they pass the rule and would be able to sail without runners.

They may have to reinforce the base of the mast so that it doesnt fall forward somehow (when main down and no runner).

Just a wild guess.

 

Regards,

D.

I wonder if I'm missing something, but aren't the running backstays implied as specified in the rig plan (is it publically available even?) and that alone means they can't be removed?

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15 minutes ago, buckdouger said:

I wonder if I'm missing something, but aren't the running backstays implied as specified in the rig plan (is it publically available even?) and that alone means they can't be removed?

What if they're not removed? Perhaps they just run down the back of the mast inside the twin mainsail skins. There is no weight saving, but there's a fair chunk of wind drag gone...

 

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2 minutes ago, NZL3481 said:

What if they're not removed? Perhaps they just run down the back of the mast inside the twin mainsail skins. There is no weight saving, but there's a fair chunk of wind drag gone...

 

This has already been addressed and ruled as non-compliant by interpretation #72.

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There's nothing in interpretation/ruling 72 that prohibits the backstays being kept tucked away between the mainsail skins.

So long as the specified parts (dogbones, ferrule caps, strops and other specified parts) are used and the runners can be adjusted (that does not limit them being adjusted inside the mainsail skins), then it's fine.

Strops can be altered, moved or changed.

The ruling is largely centred around whether the runners have to be in-situ altogether (yes) and they have to be rigged so they can be 'adjusted'. Whether you choose to operate/adjust the runners is another thing altogether.

Play on Luna Rossa...

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9 minutes ago, NZL3481 said:

There's nothing in interpretation/ruling 72 that prohibits the backstays being kept tucked away between the mainsail skins.

So long as the specified parts (dogbones, ferrule caps, strops and other specified parts) are used and the runners can be adjusted (that does not limit them being adjusted inside the mainsail skins), then it's fine.

Strops can be altered, moved or changed.

The ruling is largely centred around whether the runners have to be in-situ altogether (yes) and they have to be rigged so they can be 'adjusted'. Whether you choose to operate/adjust the runners is another thing altogether.

Play on Luna Rossa...

Doesn't the rig plan specify where the chain plates are and that runners must be connected. Is your idea therefore that with a huge strop you keep them connected at both ends but there's tons of slack to route it through the skins still?

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1 hour ago, buckdouger said:

Doesn't the rig plan specify where the chain plates are and that runners must be connected. Is your idea therefore that with a huge strop you keep them connected at both ends but there's tons of slack to route it through the skins still?

Exactly. Then you're class compliant.

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10 hours ago, fish7yu said:

 

Did I miss something here? In this video after each tack/gybe there's someone changing sides, none of that in the earlier videos of LR. LR stopped using two helmsmen?

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4 hours ago, buckdouger said:

Doesn't the rig plan specify where the chain plates are and that runners must be connected. Is your idea therefore that with a huge strop you keep them connected at both ends but there's tons of slack to route it through the skins still?

Can someone observe if they still have to send a man up the mast every time they hoist the mainsail, to remove a temporary backstay, and conversely when they lower it?

 

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17 minutes ago, huib said:

Did I miss something here? In this video after each tack/gybe there's someone changing sides, none of that in the earlier videos of LR. LR stopped using two helmsmen?

Pietro Sibello has always switched side after each tack/gybe. He trims the main sail. Bruni/Spithill stay put on port/starboard.

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14 minutes ago, Xlot said:

Can someone observe if they still have to send a man up the mast every time they hoist the mainsail, to remove a temporary backstay, and conversely when they lower it?

 

Backstays on while under the crane, at least.

BTW: video title does not make sense, IMHO.

 

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2 minutes ago, bortolo said:

Pietro Sibello has always switched side after each tack/gybe. He trims the main sail. Bruni/Spithill stay put on port/starboard.

OK I missed that. I even re-watched the entire AM-LR race from the Xmas races but the camera didn't stay with one boat long enough to see the whole crew procedure in action.

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25 minutes ago, bortolo said:

Backstays on while under the crane, at least.

 

Thanks. It remains to be seen whether those are the official supplied parts or temporary ones, to be removed as soon as the mainsail’s up

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34 minutes ago, huib said:

OK I missed that. I even re-watched the entire AM-LR race from the Xmas races but the camera didn't stay with one boat long enough to see the whole crew procedure in action.

Try watching one of the stern cameras on YouTube. Full race without cuts. Plus you get full crew audio. You can get a complete view of crew movement and coordination  from these videos. 

 

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3 hours ago, Mozzy Sails said:

Try watching one of the stern cameras on YouTube. Full race without cuts. Plus you get full crew audio. You can get a complete view of crew movement and coordination  from these videos. 

 

I had not noticed before the annoyed comments by Bruni on the SW issues, with cursing in Italian, after they won race 1 (32:00).

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Philippe Presti in Tip and Shaft

 

 

At 55, Philippe Presti, who rose to prominence through Olympic sailing (Soling, Finn and Star), is now one of the best French specialists in the America's Cup arena. One week before the start of the Prada Cup (January 15-22 February, see program), the sailor from Arcachon who is now a coach at Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli, talks to Tip & Shaft about the 36th Cup which is to be raced on the new AC75.

What are the main lessons that you have learned for the Italian challenge from the recent America's Cup World Series?
In my opinion, the truth is that The World Series is completely different from what we are going into and so all the lessons we could learn from it are obsolete today. Especially since the AC75s are great boats but complicated in terms of balance, so that the smallest stability deficit can greatly affect the performance of the boat and hide its true qualities. For example, we saw the English in difficulty in particular because of problems with their canting control system for the of foil. And because of this we didn't really show what they had under the hood. And correspondingly we haven't shown our last foils yet, we have three mainsails that are going to arrive, full of developments in progress ... What counts here is how the teams will move forward and the rate and magnitude of their progress over the coming weeks until the last round which is the one to win. You have to manage to progress to reach the absolute peak of development at exactly the right time.  

What areas for improvement have you noted for the Prada Cup?
They are everywhere ! For example, we didn't feel super at ease in the strong breezes, so we took advantage of the Christmas period to work on these points and we feel we have made good progress. Clearly, when we see our performance today and that of a month ago, there is an improvement of 10-15%, or even more, we imagine that the others are in the same scenario.

"It's great working with Jimmy"

Will you be continuing with two helmsmen (Jimmy Spithill and Francesco Bruni)?
Yes, certainly, that's the way we work and we're pleased with it. It allows us to be flexible and react quickly in terms of tactics and strategy and in particular in close contact racing. This causes a big challenge communicating with one another, so that the one not on tack, who is in charge of the foil can concentrate on how the boat flies, while having a good idea of what it will be like when he is back at the helm.
 
Can you describe the link you have with James Spithill?
I have known him since before Sydney 2000. He did some Soling, while we were preparing for The Games with Jean-Marie Dauris and Pascal Rambeau; one morning, we trained with a youngster. That was Jimmy! We established a good relationship between 5 and 7 in the morning before he went to school. We then got together in the Cup in 2003, when I was at the helm of Areva and he was skipper of OneWorld. After that campaign, when he was hired by Luna Rossa, he did what he could for me to join him to helm the second boat. I was a sparring-partner, and gradually, I became a coach, like a trainer-player. When he joined Oracle in 2007, he asked me to help him win the Cup in 2010 on the big trimaran (USA 17), and I stayed there for the next two. So it was quite natural that I remained with him for this new adventure. We work well together and trust each other delegating responsibility. It's great working with him, because we really have the impression that I am working WITH him and not for him.

"Our goal is clearly to win the Prada Cup"

What are the keys to success when racing an AC75?
What is really important is the ability to move to something else quickly. For example upwind, the VMG (velocity made good) can be obtained by either sailing faster at a lower angle, or by sailing more slowly at a tighter angle. What is going to be very important is the ability to move from one mode to another to find the puffs of air and shifts to cover the opponent. On faster boats this ability is even more important. The fact that you start upwind also means that the start is more important than in the previous edition. If you set off windward with a slight lead, there is a strong chance that you can control the situation at least until the windward buoy, which means the first quarter of the race. Another key element is that you have to avoid breaking anything. These are complicated boats, which may have technical problems that affect overall performance. We saw in a race against American Magic that Team New Zealand had a hydraulic problem which clearly handicapped them. Finally, the ability to continue to learn throughout the competition to reach the optimal level in terms of development as late as possible will also be a key element, remembering however that you have to get through the first rounds.
 
The Prada Cup starts on 15th January. Are you feeling a lot of pressure in the Italian team?
When you compete in the Cup, it is to win it, so obviously, the pressure is on, and if you are allergic to that, you don't do this job. Our goal is clearly to win the Prada Cup. We can possibly cope at the start and then win at the end, but that could have an impact on the development phase, as if we are forced to spend ten days in the semi-finals, we won't have the time to focus on the tests and try new components afterwards, so it is better to do well from the outset.
 
After the ACWS, the NZ media seemed fairly confident in the chances of the defender. What do you think?
In the World Series, the Kiwis seemed to be at the right place in their programme, which started earlier, as they came up with this type of boat. They are bound to be a bit ahead, but will they manage to continue to develop their boat like the others? That is the key to success in this event. They do have a talented team relying on people who won the last Cup, real talent like Pete (Burling), Blair (Tuke), Glenn (Ashby), Finn world champions as grinders... Among the sailors, there aren't many you would not want if you were setting up the dream team. But we have no reason to be jealous and I think we can prove that out on the water.

"What motivates me is working with others and sharing things"

Over the past 20 years, you have become a real expert in the Cup. Why are you so attached to it?
Firstly because I love team sports and for me the Cup is the ultimate team sport: you have to find the funding, get people working on a project, design a boat that performs well that will then be built by a team of technicians and after that the sailors take over. It is a huge challenge in terms of leadership and management. Apart from that it is really exciting technologically. I am incredibly lucky to be part of the generation that got boats flying. If we had stuck with the Class America heavyweights, I probably would not be so enthusiastic. We went from 25 tonne boats sailing at 9 knots to planes flying at 50. this new way of sailing is incredible.
 
France is known for its ocean racing. You have never been tempted?
My only experience was the Tour de France sailing race with teams from Aquitaine, in particular with the sailor who is leading the Vendée Globe (Yannick Bestaven) and his technical director, Jean-Marie Dauris. Apart from that, after the 2010 Cup, I thought about doing some Figaro racing and called Michel Desjoyeaux for some advice. Franck Citeau lent me a boat, and I sailed for a month in La Grande Motte, but I soon stopped. It's not so much that it was offshore, but more because it was solo sailing. What motivates me is working with others and sharing things. I did some work with Thomas (Coville) before his Jules Verne Trophy and I felt more at ease in a project like that. When looking offshore, that aspect interests me much more.

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11 hours ago, bortolo said:

Pietro Sibello has always switched side after each tack/gybe. He trims the main sail. Bruni/Spithill stay put on port/starboard.

On short tacks Sibello sometimes stays where he’s at but yes, he usually switches not long after a turn. 

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8 minutes ago, Stingray~ said:

On short tacks Sibello sometimes stays where he’s at but yes, he usually switches not long after a turn. 

Bruni said in his interview with Shirley Sibello swaps sides when it's possible, but it's perfectly able to trim from leeward 

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3 hours ago, Zaal said:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9sQY_xDkaRw

bulbrudder.png.4f7196569045095ea9fd123a5f92e6fb.png

Screen from the NZSP video. Interesting "bulb" on the rudder. 

Nice catch.

Seems counterintuitive to me.

I thought the purpose of the bulb was to assist flow around the point of intersection of the stabs with the rudder.

But this is significantly above that point of intersection.

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1 hour ago, jaysper said:

Nice catch.

Seems counterintuitive to me.

I thought the purpose of the bulb was to assist flow around the point of intersection of the stabs with the rudder.

But this is significantly above that point of intersection.

i see something like this1236857352_canvas(2).thumb.png.91c5cfc5cdae9fa77d3bbbc435154721.png

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10 minutes ago, buckdouger said:

i see something like this1236857352_canvas(2).thumb.png.91c5cfc5cdae9fa77d3bbbc435154721.png

And that would intuitively make sense to me.

But the photo shows it higher than that (I think).

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One of the best performance upgrades on Luna Rossa is the exchange of helms. After seeing the helmsman (and mainsail trimmer? Flight controller?) on the other boats running around the back (Frackers and Trumpists) and front (emirati) it just looks too precarious. Also a major distraction with the speed and changing of boat to boat tactics required. Too easy to miss a trick whilst all the time the handbags are just sitting comfy and concentrating on the developing situation. Presti also points out that the redundant helm becomes the flight controller to leeward which gives him a good feel of how the boat is balanced and flying before not too long he is back on the helm.

It will be interesting if one or more of the other three teams adopt the same set up. 

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8 hours ago, winchfodder said:

One of the best performance upgrades on Luna Rossa is the exchange of helms. After seeing the helmsman (and mainsail trimmer? Flight controller?) on the other boats running around the back (Frackers and Trumpists) and front (emirati) it just looks too precarious. Also a major distraction with the speed and changing of boat to boat tactics required. Too easy to miss a trick whilst all the time the handbags are just sitting comfy and concentrating on the developing situation. Presti also points out that the redundant helm becomes the flight controller to leeward which gives him a good feel of how the boat is balanced and flying before not too long he is back on the helm.

It will be interesting if one or more of the other three teams adopt the same set up. 

following you naming theme, how about the Sheepfckrs, don't they have the same problems.

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2 hours ago, The_Alchemist said:

following you naming theme, how about the Sheepfckrs, don't they have the same problems.

I didn’t know that Wales had a boat in the AC 

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Bump. Also, if boats are going to be officially measured on Wednesday, we should know one way or the other

2 hours ago, weta27 said:
 ... all four teams will have practice races on Monday and Tuesday before the challengers' boats are officially measured on Wednesday ahead of the Prada Cup opening round robin starting on Friday.
 

 

On 1/8/2021 at 4:46 AM, buckdouger said:

Doesn't the rig plan specify where the chain plates are and that runners must be connected. Is your idea therefore that with a huge strop you keep them connected at both ends but there's tons of slack to route it through the skins still?

 

On 1/8/2021 at 9:40 AM, Xlot said:

Can someone observe if they still have to send a man up the mast every time they hoist the mainsail, to remove a temporary backstay, and conversely when they lower it?

 

 

On 1/8/2021 at 9:56 AM, bortolo said:

Backstays on while under the crane, at least.

 

 

On 1/8/2021 at 10:21 AM, Xlot said:

Thanks. It remains to be seen whether those are the official supplied parts or temporary ones, to be removed as soon as the mainsail’s up. Or, are they rerouted inside the mainsail as soon as it’s up and the mainsheet is connected?

 

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14 hours ago, weta27 said:

Looks more like a change of mind, sit-down and think again

Yeah maybe you are right. I reckon would be a good move to be able to do though, especailly if we are going to be having close racing. They do the rounding and tack at the bottom mark which is similar, guess they have a bit more boat speed to be able to pull it off.  Has anyone been practising maneuvres that could be described as a dummy/double tack?

 

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Vittorio & Pietro on the runners question: thoughtful as usual, but to me they seem uncharacteristically skittish about the possibility that LR painted itself into a corner - unlikely, no? For some reason they do not consider the obvious (to SA pundits) solution of stuffing the runners inside the mainsail

Anyway, we should know by Wed if the boat has been measured, or not

 

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17 minutes ago, Xlot said:

 

Vittorio & Pietro on the runners question: thoughtful as usual, but to me they seem uncharacteristically skittish about the possibility that LR painted itself into a corner - unlikely, no? For some reason they do not consider the obvious (to SA pundits) solution of stuffing the runners inside the mainsail

Anyway, we should know by Wed if the boat has been measured, or not

 

They did mention a luff pocket for the stays,  I assume you are thinking of tucking them into the leach.

Seems to me running with the stays slack wouldn't be the end of the world. Re-cutting all the light air gear, well,  they might not really need it until match time...so best get cracking.

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2 hours ago, Xlot said:

 

Vittorio & Pietro on the runners question: thoughtful as usual, but to me they seem uncharacteristically skittish about the possibility that LR painted itself into a corner - unlikely, no? For some reason they do not consider the obvious (to SA pundits) solution of stuffing the runners inside the mainsail

Anyway, we should know by Wed if the boat has been measured, or not

 

I think the issue with that is that runners attachment point is outside ofnthe double skin and I understand that you have to hoist the main with runners on. So (maybe) it's not that easy

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14 hours ago, 17mika said:

I think the issue with that is that runners attachment point is outside ofnthe double skin and I understand that you have to hoist the main with runners on. So (maybe) it's not that easy

Another option could be to trim them to be directly behind the main stays.  Not perfect aerodynamically, but at least in already disturbed airflow.   The hard part would be how to get them out to the spreader tips.     Perhaps as this is sub optimal it would become better to just use them and have better control over sail shape?

 

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https://www.oasport.it/2021/01/americas-cup-luna-rossa-migliora-laerodinamica-senza-volanti-e-spunta-il-nuovo-timone/amp/

Interesting article, worth a Google Translation. Main points are

- MS told them someone tried to force LR to use the backstays, but they still can sail without them if they meet certain conditions

- The author thinks they can put the backstays inside the double main 

PS: what will be the initials of Checco Bruni here on SA ? CB for his nickname, “Checco” Bruni ? Or FB for his real name, Francesco Bruni ? :) 

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4 hours ago, Zaal said:

- MS told them someone tried to force LR to use the backstays, but they still can sail without them if they meet certain conditions

Force feeding stays...poor Max.

What conditions can they leave them out?

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7 hours ago, Zaal said:

https://www.oasport.it/2021/01/americas-cup-luna-rossa-migliora-laerodinamica-senza-volanti-e-spunta-il-nuovo-timone/amp/

Interesting article, worth a Google Translation. Main points are

- MS told them someone tried to force LR to use the backstays, but they still can sail without them if they meet certain conditions

- The author thinks they can put the backstays inside the double main 

PS: what will be the initials of Checco Bruni here on SA ? CB for his nickname, “Checco” Bruni ? Or FB for his real name, Francesco Bruni ? :) 

FCB? 

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On 1/7/2021 at 6:23 AM, bortolo said:

By the way, based on Justin's great videos on YouTube (and his descriptions) it seems that yesterday all boats aligned and raced.

Apparently INEOS and AM even had two full "races" of 6 legs. 

Looks like the new "rule" preventing coordinated sailing at less than 100m for more than 30 seconds does not work. Or has it been allowed?

 

It's official Prada cup practice, they are allowed to race one another.

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2 hours ago, crashtack said:

It's official Prada cup practice, they are allowed to race one another.

Obsolete now, but my comment was last week. Before the practice days. Cheers. 

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During the presser today Max suggested the backstays ruling is still under discussion. That made me remember a comment posted by someone (happens to be a 35-yr commercial airline pilot) during TE’s latest webcast, where he made a possibly off-the wall comment on the subject..

Could LR, in burying the stays inside the rig, be going after a ‘gurney’ type wing control feature? 

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18 minutes ago, Stingray~ said:

During the presser today Max suggested the backstays ruling is still under discussion. That made me remember a comment posted by someone (happens to be a 35-yr commercial airline pilot) during TE’s latest webcast, where he made a possibly off-the wall comment on the subject..

Could LR, in burying the stays inside the rig, be going after a ‘gurney’ type wing control feature? 

Does @weta27 or one of the other superb NZ photogs have detailed shots of the mast head on any teams boat with the runners attached? Or even better of LR with or without the runners connected at deck level.

While I understand "every little bit helps" I just think this whole backstay thing is a bit of a show. Similar to the jumperless rigs in the IACC v5 boats in Valencia. BMW Oracle had dummy jumpers during the lead up, but shed them once it counted- ultimately the team had tried to be too tricky with their equipment, and the gear wasn't reliable and didn't pay off. And with LLPR we have seen early engineering fail in the form of the foil arms, bow, and I'm sure lots more we will never hear about. I hope they keep their eyes on the prize and not get caught up in being too fancy...

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1 hour ago, Stingray~ said:

During the presser today Max suggested the backstays ruling is still under discussion. That made me remember a comment posted by someone (happens to be a 35-yr commercial airline pilot) during TE’s latest webcast, where he made a possibly off-the wall comment on the subject..

Could LR, in burying the stays inside the rig, be going after a ‘gurney’ type wing control feature? 

Doubt it. A Gurney flap (with capital G after F1 and Indy racer Dan) assumes one could place precisely a 1-2% orthogonal strip on the leech, windward side. But mainly, its effect would be yes a significant increase in profile lift, but at the expense of an even more significant increase in drag

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As always, the Italian team looks the business. Looking forward to the racing this afternoon.

2B8E0D88-9ADA-473E-B793-EDA78EA3FBC5_1_105_c.jpeg

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Have we seen any photo or video evidence of this 'offset' grinding set-up LR are supposed to have. Fucked if I can find the reference anymore but I'm sure there was talk of the LR grinders having an assymetrical/offset handle position to improve efficiency....

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Luna Rossa's crew work, like their boat, looks fantastic, but will it be fast?

Helm and flight controllers, two most important roles, have half the real l world experience, will this count against them?

 

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39 minutes ago, I ride bikes said:

Smallest. Joystick. Ever. 

I shorten sticks down to min for drone racing too..and obviously they learned the pinch method of manipulation.

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56 minutes ago, Xlot said:

Apologies if I’ve missed it with the abundance of other news, but has a final ruling been issued on the removed runners?

 

Yes, here the links. No good news for LR. They must race with the backstays on, and they can't hide them inside the double mainsail. 

https://docs.google.com/a/acofficials.org/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=YWNvZmZpY2lhbHMub3JnfGFjMzYtb2ZmaWNpYWwtbm90aWNlYm9hcmR8Z3g6MWYxN2U5MmIzYjNmOTc2OQ

https://docs.google.com/a/acofficials.org/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=YWNvZmZpY2lhbHMub3JnfGFjMzYtb2ZmaWNpYWwtbm90aWNlYm9hcmR8Z3g6NzJlMzIxZDdmMjk5MWQ1NA

 

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On 1/14/2021 at 9:58 PM, Mozzy Sails said:

Luna Rossa's crew work, like their boat, looks fantastic, but will it be fast?

Helm and flight controllers, two most important roles, have half the real l world experience, will this count against them?

 

Cool video.

Fun to watch the onboards. It was almost as interesting as the main feed today. 

The bottom mark rounding followed by a tack is what they call JK, but what does it stand for?

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20 minutes ago, barney said:

Cool video.

Fun to watch the onboards. It was almost as interesting as the main feed today. 

The bottom mark rounding followed by a tack is what they call JK, but what does it stand for?

Jon Kosteki, he called those bottom gate tacks to JS on the OR AC72 in big SF breezes. 

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