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The Yacht Club - Do you get value from your dues?


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4 minutes ago, Jackdaw said:

Wayzata YC near Minneapolis is doing pretty OK and is a great deal. $450/year, and dockage rates 1/2 of Lake Minnetonka average ($100 vs $200/foot/year) if you race. And race you can, over 60 races a year, Thursdays drawing an average of 120 boats. Full time, professional PRO, with paid RC personnel. After each race, we tap two kegs and party till its gone. Beer is free. Burgers are 5 bucks. Club is member owned. We own the land and the buildings. Ownership is starting to age a bit, but $95 crew memberships (non-ownership, full club access) keeps new blood coming in. Most 25 year old foredeckers figure they drink 100 bucks worth of beer in their first 2 weeks.

My younger son is a U of MN graduate. Wayzata hosted the MN sailing team when he was a student.  I spent a lot if time st Wayzata during regattas.

I also remember when Wayzata hosted the S2.7.9 nationals. After a full day of one design sailing Wayzata guys were back out on the water for TH night sailing.

Great club. Proves you don't need restsurants, tennis courts, swimming pools, etc if your primary purpose is to sail and race.

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I've always enjoyed the pomp and circumstance and the occasional formal affair.  I'm a vet and this doesn't offend me.  Its not Stolen Valor or anything like that cause no one is pretending to be some

Interesting commentary on "Bowling Alone", I'll have to check this book out.   Kind of ironic that SOCIAL media is breeding incredibly anti-social behavior.   The faux outrage online is out of control

A yacht club is just a high school with a liquor license.

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The other side of the atlantic in the UK many clubs are also having a problem, with reducing membership as we did. Until about 10 years ago when they started a sailing school run by the members. (with all the right qualifications). Now on a Thursday evening we have up to 80 kids learning to sail plus the occasional adult learning.

This is begining to increase the numbers sailing on our normal race day which is Sunday. (plus some Saturdays, and regatta week (this year 28 july to the 4th August.)

The club has only one paid person. the cleaner who comes in the morning after each race day.

 We only have a bar on events, So that's roughly twice a month,  So bar /kitchen /race officer/ rescue boat duties are all volunteers. Even when we have things like plumbing or a lawyer there is someone in the club that can do it.. Last year we had the floating equivalent of a floating tour bus do an emergency stop at the club during a race. We had 3 doctors and a paramedic in the club who went on board for the heart attack victim before the Ambulance arrived.

We run as Two Clubs, the Summer club has about 400 members the winter one has about 50, both invite each others members to their social events. We have dinghy parking on the island (the club takes the enitre tiny island), keelboat moorings around the island, motorboat and yacht moorings across the river.

Fees, (if I can remember them)

Family Membership Summer club £120/ $156

Family Membership Winter club About £80/$104

Mooring fees

27ft Motorboat, About £600/$780 (half that for a same length sailing boat) (for year)

Dinghy £50/ $65for the Summer £25/ $32 for the winter.

We have showers, clubhouse and a car park. The land is owned by a pub, but as a founder of the club was the pub chain owner over 100 years ago we have very secure tenancy..

We are one of the cheapest clubs I know of, 1/3 of the price of the next nearest club to us but they have paid staff.. The bar and kitchen is more expensive too at least twice the price...

The only problem is the "hole " in the membership, lots of people in the sixties and above, then a big gap to the 30 year olds with their children at the sailing school.

So in a week and a bits time I'll spend 7 days on rescue boat duty, as my sailing boat I'm rebuilding this year, we have 2, 1 hour races on the Saturday, 4 on the Sunday. Then depending on what you qualify for 3 to 6 races each day Monday to Friday. Every night there is an event and the only dressing up will be if they have something like a caribean night!!

the regatta in 1908

http://www.archivesenligne.fr/EN/en/chronology/item/1908-Yachting-on-the-Norfolk-Broads

 

and in more modern times

 

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Our club owns12 hectares of land and boasts 2 restaurants 3 bars, 2 reception centres and a motel. It has 2 marinas with 700 berths and huge hardstand area and boat yard. The main activity are Wine nights and car shows.  It costs a over a $1000  a year to be a full member but you can join as a crew or social member for about $200 and the only real difference is full members get a vote.

Most weekends we get about 10 yachts doing the club races. The place has completely jumped the shark. Be careful what you wish for.

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No brainer for me.  Tennis and platform tennis courts a block from my house and I play a lot (all included in membership).  Membership includes launch service to my town mooring (cheap).  Very good kitchen and deck with great views.  Dues 2 and change.  I feel it is a great value for me and my family.

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8 minutes ago, Beer Can said:

No brainer for me.  Tennis and platform tennis courts a block from my house and I play a lot (all included in membership).  Membership includes launch service to my town mooring (cheap).  Very good kitchen and deck with great views.  Dues 2 and change.  I feel it is a great value for me and my family.

Embarrassed to see that I posted a virtually identical post about six months ago on this very same thread.

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Daughters first day of Junior program was today.  So far looks like the hook is in, helped a lot by her comfort/previous fun swimming, sailing beercans, etc.  So yeah, if we added another lofelong sailor to the roster today I'd say every penny was well spent. 

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On 7/30/2018 at 4:25 PM, LB 15 said:

Our club ... has 2 marinas with 700 berths and huge hardstand area and boat yard. The main activity are Wine nights and car shows.... Most weekends we get about 10 yachts doing the club races.

Wow. That's just ... sad.

More yacht club promo videos below, in no particular order.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I had the privilege of attending an event at Lauderdale YC last night.  Very impressed with the friendly vibe. Impressive grounds-- tennis, swimming, sailing center, harbor, etc.

Also, sounds like they are about to begin a massive $20million remodel!

Cheers,

Mike

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Wrestled with this over the years.  We are a small family and the expense for the club is high.  Around 5K a year membership give or take.  It takes time, like a few years, to  get the most out of it.  But over time you build friends and recognise people and now we would not do without it.   The kids love the club and feel like it is part of their lives in a meaningful way.  It's where we do Easter and Mothers day.    Its where the boat lives.  It' the place with the kids pizza they like, and its a bar that I can drink at and hang out at with my kids, or watch my kids play on the lawn while I watch a sunset with my wife.  When we get older I can absolutely see spending time there more and will have built a base of friendships and acquaintances that we would not have in other ways.  Plus bitching about the food is a fun game for everyone to play!  

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32 minutes ago, beezer said:

Wrestled with this over the years.  We are a small family and the expense for the club is high.  Around 5K a year membership give or take.  It takes time, like a few years, to  get the most out of it.  But over time you build friends and recognise people and now we would not do without it.   The kids love the club and feel like it is part of their lives in a meaningful way.  It's where we do Easter and Mothers day.    Its where the boat lives.  It' the place with the kids pizza they like, and its a bar that I can drink at and hang out at with my kids, or watch my kids play on the lawn while I watch a sunset with my wife.  When we get older I can absolutely see spending time there more and will have built a base of friendships and acquaintances that we would not have in other ways.  Plus bitching about the food is a fun game for everyone to play!  

This sounds extremely familiar! We pay almost the same for full membership, the youth program is a big part of what got us involved.  We live pretty close so we use it a lot.

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Beers / drinks your YC should be NO MORE expensive then the bar across the street, but arguably CHEAPER since you are paying member. CCYC in Chicago certainly understands this philosophy! $3 craft beers, $2 domestic, $2 cocktails. That's cheaper then drinking at home. How do the other clubs line up?

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21 hours ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Beers / drinks your YC should be NO MORE expensive then the bar across the street, but arguably CHEAPER since you are paying member. CCYC in Chicago certainly understands this philosophy! $3 craft beers, $2 domestic, $2 cocktails. That's cheaper then drinking at home. How do the other clubs line up?

PHYC is cheaper

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On 7/30/2018 at 9:21 PM, Svanen said:

 

Wow, love that ad. It makes sailing and the club look fun and exciting.  Unfortunately, that ad absolutely would not fly here in the U.S right now. 

- No people of color

- Contains words "royal" and "yacht"

- Requires "membership"

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I refuse to belong to any club that would have me as a member.

 

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Wow, love that ad. It makes sailing and the club look fun and exciting.  Unfortunately, that ad absolutely would not fly here in the U.S right now. 

- No people of color

- Contains words "royal" and "yacht"

- Requires "membership"

Royal is a great selling point.

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6 minutes ago, doghouse said:

Royal is a great selling point.

It conveys a feeling of exclusivity, which is Bad.  I forgot one:

- No women shown in a position of leadership.

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7 minutes ago, Ajax said:

It conveys a feeling of exclusivity, which is Bad.  I forgot one:

- No women shown in a position of leadership.

it's not bad if your intention is an exclusive club.

There's room on the planet for both.

I happen to like being a member of the Bubba sailing club in West River.. my gf belongs to AYC.

frankly I think she gets more "Value" out of her membership than I do out of mine, Since the club has very little to offer a keel boat sailor anymore. I also, by by virtue of doing one of their longer races as crew, was invited to join the RORC. and contrary to my previous post, took them up on their offer. it costs me less/yr than WRSC, and as long as I keep traveling to the UK as much as I do, I get a lot of value out of that membership, just in terms of lodging in London and Cowes. The London Clubhouse is in a great location for doing touristy shit. And their reciprocity gets me into some cool places that her AYC recip might not.  and vice versa... 

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1 minute ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

it's not bad if your intention is an exclusive club.

There's room on the planet for both.

I happen to like being a member of the Bubba sailing club in West River.. my gf belongs to AYC.

frankly I think she gets more "Value" out of her membership than I do out of mine, Since the club has very little to offer a keel boat sailor anymore. I also, by by virtue of doing one of their longer races as crew, was invited to join the RORC. and contrary to my previous post, took them up on their offer. it costs me less/yr than WRSC, and as long as I keep traveling to the UK as much as I do, I get a lot of value out of that membership, just in terms of lodging in London and Cowes. The London Clubhouse is in a great location for doing touristy shit

West River alas, is a beach cat and dinghy racing club now. Great club, rich history, nice people but the keel boat racers have left, just as you said. It's a shame.

I have nothing against exclusivity. I'm just being a smart ass.

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7 minutes ago, Ajax said:

It conveys a feeling of exclusivity, which is Bad.  I forgot one:

- No women shown in a position of leadership.

It conveys a feeling of not being another example of utterly appalling middle class American homogeneous trash. Which is good.And old. Old is good.

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2 minutes ago, Ajax said:

West River alas, is a beach cat and dinghy racing club now. Great club, rich history, nice people but the keel boat racers have left, just as you said. It's a shame.

I have nothing against exclusivity. I'm just being a smart ass.

West river is a good example of those clubs with a huge age gap.. Juniors and Seniors with nothing in between. Or at least it looked that way at the last GNRL Membership meeting I went to...

I was a tweener when I joined and gettin pretty long in the tooth now.. over the years, I've probably brought in 20+- members in the 25-40 age bracket who've stayed there 3 years or less

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1 minute ago, doghouse said:

It conveys a feeling of not being another example of utterly appalling middle class American homogeneous trash. Which is good.And old. Old is good.

But...but... if we're not homogenous, then we're not all the same. If we're not all the same then someone might be..."better."  We can't have that.  ;)

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9 minutes ago, Ajax said:

But...but... if we're not homogenous, then we're not all the same. If we're not all the same then someone might be..."better."  We can't have that.  ;)

Where's my participation trophy?

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Ajax, never apologize for anything in here.. it'll be taken as a sign of weakness and the jackals will pounce LOL

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40 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

it's not bad if your intention is an exclusive club.

There's room on the planet for both.

I happen to like being a member of the Bubba sailing club in West River.. my gf belongs to AYC.

frankly I think she gets more "Value" out of her membership than I do out of mine, Since the club has very little to offer a keel boat sailor anymore. I also, by by virtue of doing one of their longer races as crew, was invited to join the RORC. and contrary to my previous post, took them up on their offer. it costs me less/yr than WRSC, and as long as I keep traveling to the UK as much as I do, I get a lot of value out of that membership, just in terms of lodging in London and Cowes. The London Clubhouse is in a great location for doing touristy shit. And their reciprocity gets me into some cool places that her AYC recip might not.  and vice versa... 

Totally agree with you on RORC - has been a member for many years and it is super value

Were just staying for 3 days in Cowes this summer - where else can you get a (actually surprisingly large) double room with a balcony overlooking the Solent for around 100 quid?

And the rooms in the London club house are about 1/5 of what a nearby hotel will charge you.

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  • 2 months later...
On 7/11/2017 at 11:08 AM, Ajax said:

Yes, YC/SC is declining. "Membership" in general, is declining across the spectrum, it's not limited to sailing.

This article, "Why Won’t Millennials Join Country Clubs?", essentially corroborates the above. 

The following comment applies to some YCs (e.g., the Royal Canadian Yacht Club): "Many young people are put off by the image of the country club—stuffy and formal, with old-fashioned dress codes and rules about cell-phone use. Not to mention the rich history of racial and religious discrimination that accompanies many such organizations."

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On 9/21/2018 at 10:39 AM, Ajax said:

It conveys a feeling of exclusivity, which is Bad.

? You are inferring something that is not there.

A club might or might not be exclusive; but that has nothing to do with its "Royal" designation or lack thereof.

On 9/21/2018 at 10:46 AM, Bump-n-Grind said:

I also, by by virtue of doing one of their longer races as crew, was invited to join the RORC. and contrary to my previous post, took them up on their offer. it costs me less/yr than WRSC, and as long as I keep traveling to the UK as much as I do, I get a lot of value out of that membership, just in terms of lodging in London and Cowes. The London Clubhouse is in a great location for doing touristy shit. And their reciprocity gets me into some cool places that her AYC recip might not.

+1. And you receive Seahorse every month.

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Just now, Svanen said:

? You are inferring something that is not there.

A club might or might not be exclusive; but that has nothing to do with its "Royal" designation or lack thereof.

+1. And you receive Seahorse every month.

No, I was gently mocking another poster. I agree that exclusivity might or might not be there and not to judge a club by its name.

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Just finished reading L.Francis Hereshoff's "The Compleat Cruiser" again.  As he shows, different strokes for different folks.  Like others, our club uses initiation fees for major capital expenses: launches, RC boats, OD fleets; and dues & other income for operating expenses.  We just raised our dues because insurance costs have been going up (rising sea levels... medical... ).  There is also an annual assessment for all members to help with long-term projects like dredging,  new docks, replacing fuel tanks, paving parking areas...   We use a separate assessment instead of increasing dues because there is a state tax on dues, but not on assessments.   It is expensive to keep waterfront facilities running.  We keep costs down by not having a pool or tennis courts, and keep member volunteer involvement up by focusing on sailing and not offering "social" or "dining" memberships. To help open the pipeline to younger members, Corinthians (under 27) get reduced rates, including discounts on the initiation fee based on how long they've belonged. With people moving away (or dying), we have room for more members  (our bylaws allow for 290, max.) but we seem to have more than a dozen couples applying each year for new membership.  The group we have seems to think the club is worth it.  

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Paul, it sounds to me like your club is doing a lot of things right.

I suspect that more and more clubs will gradually move away from initiation fees and instead finance capital projects through assessments, perhaps augmented by regular dues. Putting up a large sum is just too risky for many prospective members, especially as society becomes increasingly more mobile (who can say where they will be living/working in five years' time, let alone 10+ years?).

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I'll add a few things for my club summer club, 

We have no joining fee

If you become unemployed after over 2 years membership, then a quiet word with the Secretary means you don't have to pay membership again until you are re-employed.

Once you reach state retirement age, your Membership fee is then fixed at that years level for the rest of your life.

Sunday racing is three or four 1 hour races depending on what classes you qualify for.

We have "beer can" racing every Saturday Afternoon / Evening.

We have a radio control yacht section on one evening a week.

Only the Flag Officers are expected to wear Blazers ETC, but a fair percentage of others choose to. Most of our functions( parties) are "wear what you want", only a couple each year are you expected to dress up for, I wear full formal Highland Dress including kilt. The next time for that will be Burns night though.

To my knowledge we have only one member of African descent, but that's because he's the only one who has applied to join. There are few of African descent within 100 miles of here.

We have many club members of asian descent.

Our first female Commodore, was long before I joined, and that was 40 odd year ago, our next will be in two years time, when she has progressed through the other flag ranks, she'll still be in her low twenties. 

 

Do I think my membership is worth it

 

YES

oh  a link to a video provided to the club by the BBC. which shows our round the cans sailing area.

https://horning-sailing.club/video/horning-sailing-club.mov

 

 

 

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Sounds like a nice club!

1 hour ago, The Q said:

Sunday racing is three or four 1 hour races depending on what classes you qualify for.

We have "beer can" racing every Saturday Afternoon / Evening.... [A] video provided to the club by the BBC ... shows our round the cans sailing area.

That's a pretty small river, and I'm surprised that the club is able to provide any significant racing. No offence intended.

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No offence taken.

Come regatta Week, we get up to 150 boats (about 80 boats in a race) , up to about 10 boats per start at 5 minute intervals,  from Optimists up to 40ft Broads sailing cruisers, in the mile and a half up river from the club. (Most classes have their own trophies, there are some joint trophies).

This added to hundreds of tourists in hire motor boats up to 45ft long, who are asked to file along each bank to pass through the racing.

 Normal summer racing on a Sunday maybe 40  boats in 6 starts round the cans on the river, or the same down river to the pub have lunch and race back 14 miles each way.

 Our Annual long distance race "The 3 Rivers Race" runs from there, down river with around a hundred competing boats, 54 miles under 3 bridges twice, the record is about 8 hours but you only have 24 hours to complete the race, IIRC last year only 16 finished.  The River is tidal you can have 2 or 3 knots of tide up river, more of course down river where is doen't get any wider and of a couple of the legs, a lot narrower, http://www.threeriversrace.org.uk/index.php5?title=Main_Page and http://www.3rr.uk/

We  have not the smallest river that there is a club sailing on the Norfolk Broads, but we are the busiest.

 The Winter club sailing there, on a normal Sunday sailing an expect 10 Yeoman (20ft two man keelboat) and 10 or more dinghies.

Many sea going / big lake sailors are terrified at the thought of our sailing, it  makes for the learning of very precise boat handling skills. Boats sailing six inches apart are a good distance..

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100% agree on the RORC. 

  • Very affordable, especially if you're an overseas (or veteran) member
  • Two great clubhouses, one in the heart of St James's and one in Cowes, both with silly cheap accommodation, good bars and good food.
  • Seahorse mailed to you every month.
  • And you're supporting the development of international ocean racing, including rules (however ridiculous you think they are).
  • Added benefit is that when you check in to the Club (especially London) and go to the small bar for a pint you can guarantee that everyone there is (or was) an offshore racing sailor and you can get into some fascinating conversations.  You never know who you'll meet.
  • I've been a member since 1976.  Best thing I ever did. The London clubhouse is my "home" whenever I visit the UK.
  • Oh, and the membership card gets you guest entry into most other clubs across the planet.
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Went from a club with a great restaurant, slips at the club, great junior program, outstations, etc, was paying about $150/mo.  It was worth it to me.

Moved to Hawaii and now sail off the beach.  We have a section of the County park we have kind of fenced off, own a bunch of Lasers, Sunfish, Cats, couple of Folkboats.  No club house, but there is a good local bar we go to for after racing beer close by.  Ranges from $75/year to $180/year for everyday use of all the boats.  So way cheaper, but it is an all volunteer club.  No stuffy blue blazers.  Only shorts and “slippers”.  Well worth it also.  And sailing in shorts this time of year in a Laser.....Priceless!

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From a layman's perspective, I had been considering joining our local club.

Local club is $400 a year, $150 application fee.

Slip fee is $1 a foot a month, so for me that's a whopping $22 a month.

Membership requires two 4 hour work Saturdays a month. It's a 45 minute drive each way, so that's 11 hours a month.

I don't believe they offer races, it's a power/sail club, with a clubhouse and nothing else for amenities. They haven't updated their calendar or website in 4 years, and don't really return phone calls.

Even if a person only made minimum wage of $10 an hour, the work days would add up to $110 a month or $1,320 a year additionally. If I loaded up on the trailer and only moored there for 6 months out of the year, I'd be looking at a basic total of $532 yearly, plus donating 112 hours a year, and giving up two Saturdays a month.

 

Alternatively, I can pay $110 a month for a marina that is the same distance for me, but about 20 minutes closer to friends and family that join us. If I use it 6 months out of the year I'm paying $660 a year, no hours, no Saturdays lost, and friends and family are coming along more often.

I'm really struggling to see any real benefit from joining the club. 

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The out of date website, failure to return your telephone call and apparent lack of an active race program are turn-offs but not necessarily important (especially the first two).

Clubs do need to maintain their property and perform various tasks. The initiation fees and annual dues are both quite reasonable, and presumably the work requirement is the price to be paid for them. That trade-off could be quite acceptable for a retired person who lives near the club, but it doesn't sound like much of a bargain for you.

The real problem with the work requirement is its inflexibility. For reference, the requirement at my local club is 20 hours per year, to be performed at the member's convenience. That's much easier to handle than two half-Saturdays every month.

Perhaps the requirements and amenities are both more attractive than the (out of date) website indicates. You might try visiting in person and speaking to someone on the membership committee. If it turns out that they have something to offer, you could always join and see how it goes: the $150 application fee is a pretty low financial commitment.

Or you could just arrange to keep the boat part of the year at the marina. That would certainly be simpler.

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  • 3 months later...
On ‎12‎/‎4‎/‎2018 at 11:23 AM, Svanen said:

The out of date website, failure to return your telephone call and apparent lack of an active race program are turn-offs but not necessarily important (especially the first two).

Clubs do need to maintain their property and perform various tasks. The initiation fees and annual dues are both quite reasonable, and presumably the work requirement is the price to be paid for them. That trade-off could be quite acceptable for a retired person who lives near the club, but it doesn't sound like much of a bargain for you.

The real problem with the work requirement is its inflexibility. For reference, the requirement at my local club is 20 hours per year, to be performed at the member's convenience. That's much easier to handle than two half-Saturdays every month.

Perhaps the requirements and amenities are both more attractive than the (out of date) website indicates. You might try visiting in person and speaking to someone on the membership committee. If it turns out that they have something to offer, you could always join and see how it goes: the $150 application fee is a pretty low financial commitment.

Or you could just arrange to keep the boat part of the year at the marina. That would certainly be simpler.

It today's age when YC memberships are down can they really afford to offer work credits when they have tax and electric bills to pay? I've been involved in work parties for clubs in the past and while there are a handful of people working hard on X,Y,Z project, there are also others who do little to nothing just the check the box for a discount...

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/13/2017 at 10:19 PM, Great Red Shark said:

How can you put a price on endless dirty looks from the old people crowding the bar ?

This is an opportunity to make new friends. Try introducing yourself, being pleasant, and avoid stereotyping.

"Old people" were young once. Eventually, you will be old yourself. You have more in common than you think!

Young and old together: why kids and the elderly benefit from close relationships.

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On 7/30/2018 at 4:25 PM, LB 15 said:

Our club owns 12 hectares of land and boasts 2 restaurants 3 bars, 2 reception centres and a motel. It has 2 marinas with 700 berths and huge hardstand area and boat yard. The main activity are wine nights and car shows.... Most weekends we get about 10 yachts doing the club races. The place has completely jumped the shark. Be careful what you wish for.

Sounds plausible. The promotional video boasts about "a 250-seat restaurant, a 100-seat auditorium, a very large pre-function area, and a very comfortable seniors' lounge". 

IIRC, you are, or were, one of the club's directors. How did things get to this stage?

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8 hours ago, Svanen said:

This is an opportunity to make new friends. Try introducing yourself, being pleasant, and avoid stereotyping.

"Old people" were young once. Eventually, you will be old yourself. You have more in common than you think!

Young and old together: why kids and the elderly benefit from close relationships.

1.  You assume I'm young -  I'm not.

2. You assume I don't know the bleary old drunks kvetching away at the end of the bar - I do.

It's like a senior daycare center most days,  seriously.  Plenty of young folks about after work or on the weekends but the entrenched clans stake out 'their' territories and make clear they don't care for anyone to interfere with THEIR club.

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You're right: I know nothing about you or your club.

Notwithstanding the "senior daycare centre" reference, it sounds like your complaint has little to do with an age difference. The real issue is apparently that some drunken members are ganging up and making the atmosphere generally unpleasant for you.

I guess your choices boil down to:

  1. focusing on the rest of the amenities and activities (if any) besides the clubhouse;
  2. trying to change things, by bringing in sufficient new blood to outnumber the obnoxious drunks (probably easier said than done);
  3. switching to a different club that has more convivial members.
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2 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

1.  You assume I'm young -  I'm not.

2. You assume I don't know the bleary old drunks kvetching away at the end of the bar - I do.

It's like a senior daycare center most days,  seriously.  Plenty of young folks about after work or on the weekends but the entrenched clans stake out 'their' territories and make clear they don't care for anyone to interfere with THEIR club.

+1

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20 hours ago, Svanen said:

You're right: I know nothing about you or your club.

Notwithstanding the "senior daycare centre" reference, it sounds like your complaint has little to do with an age difference. The real issue is apparently that some drunken members are ganging up and making the atmosphere generally unpleasant for you.

I guess your choices boil down to:

  1. focusing on the rest of the amenities and activities (if any) besides the clubhouse;
  2. trying to change things, by bringing in sufficient new blood to outnumber the obnoxious drunks (probably easier said than done);
  3. switching to a different club that has more convivial members.

and,

4.

20171226_112333_(1).jpg

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On 7/11/2017 at 10:52 AM, stayoutofthemiddle said:

You get a restaurant, bar, generally no gym for your dues, but outside of a Saturday or Sunday most clubs don't have a "scene" unless you live in a small town with nothing else going on. It's also usually the 65+ crowd that can be found in the Sunday Roast buffet line, the "scene" if it is there skews older...

That's pretty much what you see at one yacht club nearby.  Many don't even own boats.  It's more of a social club for the retired and well-heeled. 

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I am a huge fan of all three of my clubs:

Grenada Yacht Club, St George’s, Grenada. I won a life membership for winning the New Years Day ‘Round the Island Race, 1977, as sailing master on Blackfin: Hard to argue with free for life, and the girls were wonderful, all a 19 year old could ask for.

Waikiki Yacht Club, Waikiki Hawaii. Spent my summers growing up at the club. We save more than the dues on the bar tab. A wonderful place to spend the day, the night. Friday night racing (jointly with the equally wonderful Hawaii YC) every single Friday: if you don’t go, you simply have no idea what you are missing. Epic, every time.

Cabrillo Beach Yacht Club, Los Angeles. We have more fun more often in more ways with more people than anywhere else ever.

I would skip utility payments before dues.

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Two more YC videos, both from Down Under:

 

'And now for something completely different'. The Royal Thames YC is one of the world's elite clubs, with a fine sporting record especially in team racing. The club also hosts many social events, including an annual opera dinner coming up later this month (April 24th). Video of the 2017 evening appears below.

What is going on at 0:44-0:49 (fellow on the right appears to be doing some varnishing!)? 

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39 minutes ago, carcrash said:

Grenada Yacht Club, St George’s, Grenada. I won a life membership for winning the New Years Day ‘Round the Island Race, 1977, as sailing master on Blackfin: Hard to argue with free for life, and the girls were wonderful, all a 19 year old could ask for.

Slightly related: there are (or at least used to be) many expats who are posted to Hong Kong who join the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club. I joined when I lived there from '97-'99, and like many, many others it was the center of my (non-work) life. It is far and away the most active Yacht Club for with three beautiful stations throughout the territory for racing everything from dinghies to 4knsb to Etchells to Hobie Magics (these were narrow, overpowered three on the wire keelboats that were super fun  - not sure if the fleet still exists) to maxi ocean racing and sailing related activities most days of the week. In addition, the main clubhouse has a swimming pool, bowling alley, several very fine restaurants and bars, a full service boatyard and the most interesting people on the planet. So an invaluable one-stop-shop for anyone with an interest in the water.

Anyway, the salient point is that when a member leaves the territory (as, sadly, most do when work takes them elsewhere) you can pay a fixed (reasonable) fee to become a lifetime non-resident member which is a very, very great deal. You have reciprocal privileges with essentially every yacht club in the world, and your membership privileges are reinstated instantly whenever you return to HK on business or pleasure. Cannot recommend highly enough.

39 minutes ago, carcrash said:

Waikiki Yacht Club, Waikiki Hawaii. Spent my summers growing up at the club. We save more than the dues on the bar tab. A wonderful place to spend the day, the night. Friday night racing (jointly with the equally wonderful Hawaii YC) every single Friday: if you don’t go, you simply have no idea what you are missing. Epic, every time.

I would skip utility payments before dues.

Waikiki YC is awesome. Great FNR and possibly my favorite swimming pool on planet Earth. Every time I have been to Oahu we have split our time between Outrigger Canoe Club, Waikiki YC and Kaneohe YC. I can't think of too many other places on Oahu where I would want to go...

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33 minutes ago, Svanen said:

The Royal Thames YC is one of the world's elite clubs, with a fine sporting record especially in team racing.

Yes, but not just that: the London clubhouse is startlingly perfect. 44 Knightsbridge is next door to the Mandarin Oriental and across the street from Harvey Nick's and the Sheraton Park Tower (with a great piano bar) so perhaps the perfect location in all of London. The accommodations (cabins they call them) are a bit spartan, certainly, but very inexpensive and perfectly serviceable if you are traveling by yourself on business or leisure when one needs little more than a bed and WiFi in a convenient spot. At breakfast you overlook Hyde Park with a view for which the neighbors at One Hyde Park have a starting price of 20 million pounds.

Some might call it stuffy as ties are required for gentlemen (even at breakfast) and trousers are forbidden for ladies (at least this was the case until recently), but one is in central London on a weekday so I consider these features not bugs.

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12 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Yes, but not just that: the London clubhouse is startlingly perfect. 44 Knightsbridge is next door to the Mandarin Oriental and across the street from Harvey Nick's and the Sheraton Park Tower (with a great piano bar) so perhaps the perfect location in all of London.

+1. Excellent wine list, too.

The cabins have been refurbished within the past three or four years, and are now considerably more comfortable than you recall.

12 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Some might call it stuffy as ties are required for gentlemen (even at breakfast) and trousers are forbidden for ladies (at least this was the case until recently), but one is in central London on a weekday so I consider these features not bugs.

Happily, as of July of last year the dress code is now ‘smart casual’.

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12 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Slightly related: there are (or at least used to be) many expats who are posted to Hong Kong who join the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club. I joined when I lived there from '97-'99, and like many, many others it was the center of my (non-work) life. It is far and away the most active Yacht Club for with three beautiful stations throughout the territory for racing everything from dinghies to 4knsb to Etchells to Hobie Magics (these were narrow, overpowered three on the wire keelboats that were super fun  - not sure if the fleet still exists) to maxi ocean racing and sailing related activities most days of the week. In addition, the main clubhouse has a swimming pool, bowling alley, several very fine restaurants and bars, a full service boatyard and the most interesting people on the planet. So an invaluable one-stop-shop for anyone with an interest in the water.

Sounds great! Certainly a good example of what this thread is about.

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On 4/4/2019 at 2:04 PM, Justa230Cal said:

So far I have found that new members at work oriented yacht clubs tend to cannabalize new members with excessive pressure to contribute way too much of their time. 

how many clubs have you found this to be the case at? 1?

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On 5/29/2018 at 10:05 AM, Mark Set said:

yes, those "yearly" dues look more like monthly dues numbers.

I think those are the JR. member dues.  When I went to join when I was up their frequently the number was well north of that. 

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Belong to a local community club, $350 year, have to help out, but there is weekly Sunday dingy racing and they supply the fleet of boats.  If you would like to moor your own boat then there is an additional fee.  Very low key and they supply the beers after each race.  We all take turns bringing down snacks of food.  On the N. Shore of LI so has to be the best deal in the country. 

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3 hours ago, QBF said:

We have relaxing, informal gatherings at the club

To each his/her own, but IMO there’s nothing wrong with an annual sailpast provided that nobody takes it, or themselves, at all seriously.

For some inexplicable reason, some clubs go waaaaay overboard with this stuff and incorporate a half-assed, quasi-military element. What pretentious twaddle!

 

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12 hours ago, Svanen said:

To each his/her own, but IMO there’s nothing wrong with an annual sailpast provided that nobody takes it, or themselves, at all seriously.

For some inexplicable reason, some clubs go waaaaay overboard with this stuff and incorporate a half-assed, quasi-military element. What pretentious twaddle!

 

That picture was posted as a joke. I didn't think I needed to use the sarcasm font.

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On ‎4‎/‎5‎/‎2019 at 8:03 PM, Svanen said:

To each his/her own, but IMO there’s nothing wrong with an annual sailpast provided that nobody takes it, or themselves, at all seriously.

For some inexplicable reason, some clubs go waaaaay overboard with this stuff and incorporate a half-assed, quasi-military element. What pretentious twaddle!

 

I have always found is strange, cringe worthy, and even disrespectful when I see YC members in dress "whites". I feel uniforms should be saved for the military who earned that respect, not paying members of a country club by the sea. Curious what others think about that....

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I've always enjoyed the pomp and circumstance and the occasional formal affair.  I'm a vet and this doesn't offend me.  Its not Stolen Valor or anything like that cause no one is pretending to be something they aren't.  If these were actual naval uniforms I would feel differently.

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43 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

I'm a vet and this doesn't offend me.  Its not Stolen Valor or anything like that cause no one is pretending to be something they aren't.  If these were actual naval uniforms I would feel differently.

+1.

Silly? Perhaps. Disrespectful or offensive? No.

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  • 6 months later...
On 4/3/2019 at 1:32 PM, SF Woody Sailor said:

Slightly related: there are (or at least used to be) many expats who are posted to Hong Kong who join the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club. I joined when I lived there from '97-'99, and like many, many others it was the center of my (non-work) life. It is far and away the most active Yacht Club for with three beautiful stations throughout the territory for racing everything from dinghies to 4knsb to Etchells to Hobie Magics (these were narrow, overpowered three on the wire keelboats that were super fun  - not sure if the fleet still exists) to maxi ocean racing and sailing related activities most days of the week. In addition, the main clubhouse has a swimming pool, bowling alley, several very fine restaurants and bars, a full service boatyard and the most interesting people on the planet. So an invaluable one-stop-shop for anyone with an interest in the water.

 

And lets not forget those Moonlit strolls...

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