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The Advocate nails it again... https://www.betootaadvocate.com/uncategorized/australia-enjoys-another-peaceful-day-under-oppressive-gun-control-regime/ Australia Enjoys Ano

Tough day. Just laid off 9 staff. All of them are more than my employees, they are like family. But I had to do it if there is going to be a business to come back to when this horror show is over. Kee

I interrupt this broadcast for a brief non-political statement. Thank you all for your kind words regarding my dad. As I suspected it was a hard task but I got through it and the funeral director said

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9 hours ago, Bent Sailor said:

Ah, now it makes sense. The Liberal Party is for sale and the conspiracy theorist was a high bidder...

Senate candidate Gerard Rennick donated $30k to LNP ahead of preselection

 

Is that all it costs? Maybe we could take up a subscription for Meli......

FKT

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Is that all it costs? Maybe we could take up a subscription for Meli......

Apparently, but it's got to be a fire sale of some kind. Turnbull sure paid more than that ;)

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The much-hyped Bob Brown/Greens "Stop Adani" convoy rolled into town today, with red flags and bumper stickers galore.

Well, not really a convoy: over several hours I counted about ten of them, arriving separately, plenty of diesels and not a single hybrid. They're doing their bit to stamp out fossil fuels by burning shitloads of the stuff. 

Poor dears, there wasn't a single camera crew and the pissed Anzac Day crowds ignored them. 

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In other news.

Quote

A vegan café in Australia that levied a tax on male customers is to close after becoming the "punching bag of the internet".

Handsome Her was accused of reverse sexism after opening in Melbourne in 2017.

Its owners provoked debate by offering women priority seating and charging men an extra 18% one week a month.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-48056938

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15 hours ago, mad said:

Meh, attention-seekers didn't like the attention and want to go back to relative anonymity. Nothing new there.

Never heard of them before and doubt, outside this thread, I'll ever hear about them again. 

15 hours ago, The Q said:

Interesting ... Since a gentleman always gives up his seat for a lady, I guess they wanted it both ways..

You live on a world where all men are gentlemen? This your first day in PA?

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On 4/22/2019 at 5:33 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Just how far back are you going in time and how do you know what problems did or didn't evince themselves?

FKT

Because I could afford to rent a two bedroom house in Prahran or St Kilda on a bar maids wage? not a share house, the whole cottage.

Now?

Picture of 77 Bendigo Street, PRAHRAN VIC 3181

$625 pw

My sister has just bought one just like it..for an investment...this will be the third property she owns.

 

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1 hour ago, Shortforbob said:

Because I could afford to rent a two bedroom house in Prahran or St Kilda on a bar maids wage? not a share house, the whole cottage.

Now?

Picture of 77 Bendigo Street, PRAHRAN VIC 3181

$625 pw

My sister has just bought one just like it..for an investment...this will be the third property she owns.

 

3 houses?

Tell her to spend her tax refund wisely. I worked fucking hard for it.

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14 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

3 houses?

Tell her to spend her tax refund wisely. I worked fucking hard for it.

It's something we don't discuss...At least they vote Green or Labor :)

 

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18 hours ago, mad said:

Old news.

They can do as they please IMO. And they're getting out of the biz. Not drawing any connections. Likely just over the whole thing, time for the next project.

I wouldn't have gone there though. Substitute 'male' with 'black', 'gay', 'Muslim', 'Christian' et al and see how it reads. You can always find some reason to justify your discrimination.

FKT

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The Stop Adani travelling circus has left town. Bob Brown flew in for the TV shots of the gathering at the sailing club, a small crowd, and then flew straight out again.

I had a passing encounter with an old truck, painted up as a "Biosphere Rescue Vehicle" which was parked smack in the middle of the taxi rank. It contained a few dreadlocked young persons of both genders, who were a travelling band of eco-musicians. It was smoking like fuck and leaking copious amounts of oil.

I asked them to move, and informed them that the amount of oil they were laying down could easily cause the death of a motorcyclist, and would be washed into the sea by the rain. I also gave them a short talk about the carcinogenic effects of unburned diesel exhaust, and why you should not leave an uncased expensive Maton acoustic guitar lying next to the window in the sun all day.

Nice kids. They were polite, thanked me for the information, and moved on. So much enthusiasm and commitment, so much love for the planet, so little grasp of reality.

They will all make sure to vote, and they will all vote Green. Bugger....

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1 hour ago, Happy said:

The Stop Adani travelling circus has left town. Bob Brown flew in for the TV shots of the gathering at the sailing club, a small crowd, and then flew straight out again.

I had a passing encounter with an old truck, painted up as a "Biosphere Rescue Vehicle" which was parked smack in the middle of the taxi rank. It contained a few dreadlocked young persons of both genders, who were a travelling band of eco-musicians. It was smoking like fuck and leaking copious amounts of oil.

I asked them to move, and informed them that the amount of oil they were laying down could easily cause the death of a motorcyclist, and would be washed into the sea by the rain. I also gave them a short talk about the carcinogenic effects of unburned diesel exhaust, and why you should not leave an uncased expensive Maton acoustic guitar lying next to the window in the sun all day.

Nice kids. They were polite, thanked me for the information, and moved on. So much enthusiasm and commitment, so much love for the planet, so little grasp of reality.

They will all make sure to vote, and they will all vote Green. Bugger....

You're too harsh. These kids probably think their other consumer decisions balance out their leaky truck..and they could be right.

To live a seriously "green" lifestyle you need more money than Madonna. It's why I don't vote green anymore. They have no idea what their visions would cost the unemployed, the pensioners, sole supporting parents of this world..and at least at the grass roots level, in my experience, no interests in listening.  IMHO.

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52 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

You're too harsh. These kids probably think their other consumer decisions balance out their leaky truck..and they could be right.

To live a seriously "green" lifestyle you need more money than Madonna. It's why I don't vote green anymore. They have no idea what their visions would cost the unemployed, the pensioners, sole supporting parents of this world..and at least at the grass roots level, in my experience, no interests in listening.  IMHO.

Agreed. A lot of them are also functionally idiots, because you can tell them the science and engineering behind some stuff until you're hoarse but they still refuse to believe you because it doesn't fit in with what they want to believe. They're as bad as the anti-vaxxers. My basic position is, the difference between wilful ignorance and stupidity is too fine for me to waste time on.

I live in a pretty clean, green part of the world and have no interest in it getting trashed; we're trying to push fish farms away from areas with low tidal flushing for example. I've seen the Parramatta River go from an open sewer/waste repository to be something verging on clean most of the time in my lifetime. I'd like to see continuous improvement in these areas but one has to recognise that there are costs that have to be met. It's the denial that there are any costs that usually pisses me off.

Energy is an interesting one though. I'm very happy that PV panel costs keep dropping but not everyone is. There was a whining article the other day on how dropping prices are ruining the business models of some wind farms et al. Why should they be exempt from the effects of efficiency gains?

FKT

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no, they're not as bad as anti-vaxers.

The key to a cleaner planet IMHO, is raising awareness about where individuals can balance their usage of non renewable anything with alternatives. If you can bike or walk to work, or use PT..do so if you want..if you dont want to, then think about your purchases..do you really need a new Iphone? a new car (that's just as "dirty" as the old one". One can get just as much pleasure buying clothes from Op shops or tools from sunday markets as buying new. Does the council really need to buy 50  ??? new anything.

Also, the producers have to get on board, and the local governments really start thinking about how tokenistic some of their goals and legislation is..The latest "pay for bags" idiocy is ludicrous when you look at the amounts of unnecessary packaging they use and the token 15c for a bag. 

You can balance your carbon footprint over a few years if you just think about it.

 

 

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One Nation's Steve Dickson resigns over strip club footage

I'll admit to being a little surprised about this one. It's a strip club, he's One Nation, exactly how is this a problem with his target demographic. Oh wait, I think I see the problem now...

"I’ve done more Asian than I know what to do with" 

Yeah, that'll fuck up his chances with One Nation supporters. Big time. :rolleyes:

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On 4/27/2019 at 8:45 AM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Old news.

They can do as they please IMO. And they're getting out of the biz. Not drawing any connections. Likely just over the whole thing, time for the next project.

I wouldn't have gone there though. Substitute 'male' with 'black', 'gay', 'Muslim', 'Christian' et al and see how it reads. You can always find some reason to justify your discrimination.

FKT

Takes a while for the news from the old colonies to filter back these days. Sorry. :)

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Are we all electioned out already? I certainly am and it looks like those that contribute on this thread are too. I don't blame us all. I mean this week has been terrible for both major parties with candidates resigning due to stupid social media posts in the past and other discretions. 

I see Laura Tingle has written about the malaise and reported on 7.30 last night...not that I watched it...here is a link to her article for those wanting to read it

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-04/federal-election-candidate-scandals-climate-confusion/11078316

I think I recall hearing something about a number of ALP candidates, and probably a few Lib/Nat candidates too, that may have s44 of the Constitution problems if they get elected. You'd think the major parties would've sorted that shit out wouldn't you? 

I have a suggestion...Stop the prepolling now and hold the election today so that we can all just get it out of the way!!!  Yeah and pigs might fly!!!or just go sailing or cycling...yeah I think I'll do that!!

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48 minutes ago, albanyguy said:

Are we all electioned out already?

Was before they officially called the election date. Nothing much is changing since the message decided last year - Shorten/ALP says it's time to change (with polls seeming to agree), Morrison/Liberals are saying it's too risky to trust anyone but them (with the argument remaining unconvincing), and all the nutters on the sides (Joyce, Palmer, Hanson, etc) trying to take advantage of public disdain for both sides and stepping in their own docks every other day.

I'd be happy to have this over already but Morrison held on as long as he thought he could get away with looking for something unexpected to change the public's mind. That's worked out well for him. :rolleyes:

 

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57 minutes ago, albanyguy said:

I think I recall hearing something about a number of ALP candidates, and probably a few Lib/Nat candidates too, that may have s44 of the Constitution problems if they get elected. You'd think the major parties would've sorted that shit out wouldn't you? 

I missed that one. I saw one about Palmer's party having something like 18 candidates that could be problematic, but I missed either of the major parties (or the Nationals) sharing the problem. 

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1 hour ago, Bent Sailor said:

I missed that one. I saw one about Palmer's party having something like 18 candidates that could be problematic, but I missed either of the major parties (or the Nationals) sharing the problem. 

As i said, you'd hope the majors would've sorted that shit out. UAP is not a major, despite what Palmer thinks. 

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1 hour ago, Bent Sailor said:

Was before they officially called the election date. Nothing much is changing since the message decided last year - Shorten/ALP says it's time to change (with polls seeming to agree), Morrison/Liberals are saying it's too risky to trust anyone but them (with the argument remaining unconvincing), and all the nutters on the sides (Joyce, Palmer, Hanson, etc) trying to take advantage of public disdain for both sides and stepping in their own docks every other day.

I'd be happy to have this over already but Morrison held on as long as he thought he could get away with looking for something unexpected to change the public's mind. That's worked out well for him. :rolleyes:

 

Thing is, just as Tingle commented, despite the apparent lead in polls for ALP the "swing is not on", consistently at least. To me that says the electorate is unconvinced re Shorten and the only reason they're in front is due to general feeling to turf current govt out.

Anyway, time to get ready to race.

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The lack of "the swing is on" feeling is down to your first sentence in post# 3359.

The large numbers early voting point to that as well.

I'm looking forward to my sausage in bread and catching up with the local primary school staff. Kinda the highlight of election day for me.

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Election day sausage sizzle..about the only time I get to "bond" with the kids these days..oh and teaching them how to change a tyre ..bloody building sites..that's 2 in 2 months.

Yeah, I'm electioned out already. I think I know why Americans end up with the results they do...feck..18 month campaigns.  You could probably call an election here with 24 hours notice this time round and get the same result.

Re the Facebook shaming...I wonder if there should be a time bar on digging this stuff out.

 

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3 hours ago, albanyguy said:

Thing is, just as Tingle commented, despite the apparent lead in polls for ALP the "swing is not on", consistently at least. To me that says the electorate is unconvinced re Shorten and the only reason they're in front is due to general feeling to turf current govt out.

Anyway, time to get ready to race.

Don't disagree. Have been saying since last year that this election is, barring a surprise Tampa or similar politically unique event, based on the electorate's desire to get rid of the current guys. Which is why both the ALP are running on the same campaign - the ALP means change and the Liberals mean more of the same.

Neither side has anything more to offer nor really wants to. The Liberal "broad church" is eating itself alive whenever they suggest any bold/brave policy to attract voters and the ALP is hoping that the electoral disdain for Liberals is all they need to get over the line (outside major fuck-ups, I suspect they're right).

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JDA Wokman..that has the multi million dollar contract to assist in resettling Manus refugee's has been caught out telling case workers to cook the books.

Just another part of the sorry saga of our Dept of Home Affairs...remember the Paladin/Toll stench .

 

I think it's time for a Royal Commission into the Tendering arrangements re Manus and Nauru.

571c74058150d1cbeb002adf16e0d2b02c4588ac

The amusing bit is the Companies Country Directors name is Terrance Furphy 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-05/refugee-caseworkers-in-png-told-to-falsify-reports-for-australia/11062160

Refugee support workers who were based in Papua New Guinea say they were "directed to cook the books" by one of their managers for an Australian Government audit.

Key points:

  • Australia is currently spending more than $1 billion a year on services for around 1,000 refugees and non-refugees who remain in PNG and Nauru, another asylum seeker processing site
  • Workers in Papua New Guinea say their former employer was not equipped to implement a $44 million contract for the Australian Government
  • They claim they were asked to falsify documentation about their work with former Manus Island detainees to make it look like they were meeting government requirements

 

In some cases, they allege that staff employed to fulfil part of a $44 million contract with the Australian Government were asked to write up files for clients they had not seen.

The ABC has spoken to 14 former staff who say the contracted company was not equipped to do the work.

"It's failing the refugees. It's failing the caseworkers. It's failing the Australian taxpayer. It's failing everybody," said former support worker Desley Quinton.

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Interesting scenario with all these candidates (both sides) dropping out for various improprieties AFTER early voters may have already voted for them. Can you say Disenfranchisement?

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Outstanding News For Non-Aussie Tool Collectors

 

Quote

 

The viability of the Lithgow Small Arms Factory Museum (LSAFM) has been put in jeopardy, volunteers warn, following the introduction of legislation that could see the destruction of 70 per cent of the facility's artefacts.

LSAFM only found out about the new regulation when another regional volunteer-led museum had firearms confiscated in January 2019, and contacted them for advice.

...

According to LSAFM custodian Donna White, there was no consultation with the museum sector, nor was there any advice from the government to museums about the new regulation.

"It's deeply disturbing that governments can introduce a regulation that can destroy collections in museums," she said.

According to LSAFM firearms dealer Kerry Guerin, around 70 per cent of the LSAFM firearms would be impacted and if they were to make these firearms permanently inoperable it would cost significantly, while also destroying the considerable value of the firearms.

"If this regulation cannot be overturned the museum will not be worth operating," he said. 

President Renzo Benedet said they would not be destroying any of their guns because to do so to do so would be contrary to museum policy and practice and would cost several hundred thousand dollars.

"The collection would go overseas before we see it destroyed," he said.

 

I'd like to thank Aussie grabbers on behalf of nutz in the rest of the world.

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1 hour ago, Importunate Tom said:

Outstanding News For Non-Aussie Tool Collectors

 

I'd like to thank Aussie grabbers on behalf of nutz in the rest of the world.

Our main museum used to have a big collection of weapons, from olden days to the 1980's, including a lot of German and Japanese war booty from both world wars.

It disappeared when the museum moved to a new building. Disappointing and an overreaction in my opinion.

Lithgow was the manufacturer of a lot of stuff and still is a supplier to the military.

It's would be a shame if this museum had to fold.

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29 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

It's would be a shame if this museum had to fold.

Look at the bright side, as I do. Australia is better protected from gun violence thanks to common sense gun control and nutz around the world can play with our precious tools. It's a win-win!

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7 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

It's would be a shame if this museum had to fold.

It doesn't have to. It would be choosing to do so because it doesn't want to render guns, that they state won't be used again, inoperable. 

Personally don't see the problem. They can choose to continue displaying inoperable firearms to the public who wasn't allowed to touch them anyway, or they can "preserve their resale value" and send them overseas rather than do what's required to continue showing them to local Aussies.

Their choice and all, but let's not pretend they're being forced to close down. They just don't want to do what's needed to stay open. It's not like other museums need to keep their grenades and bombs operable for their war displays.

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1 hour ago, Bent Sailor said:

It doesn't have to. It would be choosing to do so because it doesn't want to render guns, that they state won't be used again, inoperable. 

Personally don't see the problem. They can choose to continue displaying inoperable firearms to the public who wasn't allowed to touch them anyway, or they can "preserve their resale value" and send them overseas rather than do what's required to continue showing them to local Aussies.

Their choice and all, but let's not pretend they're being forced to close down. They just don't want to do what's needed to stay open. It's not like other museums need to keep their grenades and bombs operable for their war displays.

Just guessing but I think that would depend on what they have to do with the weapon in order to make it inoperable. Museums have a "do no damage" policy ..in other words never, do what can't be undone.

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Removing (and separately storing) the firing pin would work for most if not all old weapons. No big deal.

I am somewhat surprised that this wasn't a requirement years ago. Displaying working military hardware to the public would tempt the occasional fuckwit. As posted above, grenades and bombs are not displayed live.

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54 minutes ago, Happy said:

Removing (and separately storing) the firing pin would work for most if not all old weapons. No big deal.

I am somewhat surprised that this wasn't a requirement years ago. Displaying working military hardware to the public would tempt the occasional fuckwit. As posted above, grenades and bombs are not displayed live.

Nor it is a big deal for a home handy man to manufacture a new firing pin.....

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3 hours ago, Bent Sailor said:

 It's not like other museums need to keep their grenades and bombs operable for their war displays.

Reminds me of the Philippine bomb squad doing an exercise at Manila airport many years ago. Cleared the place and sent the boys in. Mistake was made during the defusing which was a bit of a bugger moment as they used a real bomb. :blink:

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1 hour ago, Happy said:

Removing (and separately storing) the firing pin would work for most if not all old weapons. No big deal.

I am somewhat surprised that this wasn't a requirement years ago. Displaying working military hardware to the public would tempt the occasional fuckwit. As posted above, grenades and bombs are not displayed live.

It's more likely some new regulations thought up by the NSW cops. They have some really idiotic rules that serve no useful purpose.

Example - I have 2 gun safes, one for Cat A/B firearms and a second one for antique long guns. Why? Because one of the people with stored firearms doesn't have an antique arms collector's licence. This makes no sense at all given that person can hold a Winchester 460 Magnum bolt gun on a Class B licence.

Plus I had to do quite a bit of welding to improve security to their new level of satisfaction.

So I don't know what's going on and I understand the desire not to make permanent changes to museum pieces, but sometimes the best thing to do is simply sell the collection and give up.

FKT

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2 hours ago, Happy said:

Removing (and separately storing) the firing pin would work for most if not all old weapons. No big deal.

I am somewhat surprised that this wasn't a requirement years ago. Displaying working military hardware to the public would tempt the occasional fuckwit. As posted above, grenades and bombs are not displayed live.

I guess you didn't read the article. They DID remove firing pins. That wasn't enough for grabbers.

 

3 hours ago, Shortforbob said:

Just guessing but I think that would depend on what they have to do with the weapon in order to make it inoperable. Museums have a "do no damage" policy ..in other words never, do what can't be undone.

FKT is the metals expert but I'm pretty sure there's no "undo" on a weld.

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From the article, for other non-readers.

Quote

Prior to 2017, NSW legislation required privately owned museums with firearm collections to deactivate their firearms by removing the firing pin (called temporary deactivation), along with maintaining a high standard of security.

 

5 hours ago, Bent Sailor said:

It doesn't have to. It would be choosing to do so because it doesn't want to render guns, that they state won't be used again, inoperable. 

Personally don't see the problem. They can choose to continue displaying inoperable firearms to the public who wasn't allowed to touch them anyway, or they can "preserve their resale value" and send them overseas rather than do what's required to continue showing them to local Aussies.

Their choice and all, but let's not pretend they're being forced to close down. They just don't want to do what's needed to stay open. It's not like other museums need to keep their grenades and bombs operable for their war displays.

They were not keeping them operable on display, as readers know.

They just were not permanently damaged, as grabbers want.

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

So I don't know what's going on and I understand the desire not to make permanent changes to museum pieces, but sometimes the best thing to do is simply sell the collection and give up.

I understand the desire but in the end it's a matter of having an authentic, if inoperable, display piece for the people to see or desiring the ability to make/keep firearms capable of operation and not letting the people see them.

If you value people seeing and learning about the firearms on display more than having the option of shooting it someday - you go with the former. If being able to shoot the guns matters more than the public seeing them, you go with the latter. Don't mind which they choose honestly, but don't see the problem. As someone points out above, it's not like someone stealing the pieces as currently displayed can't get the missing piece made for them ALOT cheaper than buying the gun legally. 

On the other hand, I've been awake for over 24hrs in two different hospitals waiting on various specialists and a kid friendly surgeon to work out what they're doing with my boy, so I'll admit I could easily be missing something. The distraction offered by the CA and PA forums isn't the best at keeping the mind "fresh".

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Da Man :D

Keating says he is surprised how ‘threadbare’ the Coalition’s agenda is, saying they have no vision of where Australia fits in the world. All they have to offer is ‘trickle-down economics and a tax cut five years away’, he says. On climate change, Keating says the world will stop using fossil fuels, adding, ‘Here’s the prime minister walking around with a lump of coal, coal is a fossil and the problem is the prime minister is a fossil himself. He’s a fossil with a baseball cap but he’s a fossil.’ He denounces the Liberal party’s commitment to supporting coal, saying, ‘They’re living in the past, they’re policy deadbeats

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/video/2019/may/06/morrison-a-fossil-with-a-baseball-cap-paul-keating-holds-court-at-labor-conference-video

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1 minute ago, Shortforbob said:

Da Man :D

Keating says he is surprised how ‘threadbare’ the Coalition’s agenda is, saying they have no vision of where Australia fits in the world. All they have to offer is ‘trickle-down economics and a tax cut five years away’, he says. On climate change, Keating says the world will stop using fossil fuels, adding, ‘Here’s the prime minister walking around with a lump of coal, coal is a fossil and the problem is the prime minister is a fossil himself. He’s a fossil with a baseball cap but he’s a fossil.’ He denounces the Liberal party’s commitment to supporting coal, saying, ‘They’re living in the past, they’re policy deadbeats

Every bit of that is true.

Unfortunately the leader of the opposition is a lying arsehole with a track record of selling out anyone and everyone in the furtherance of his own career. Nothing he says can be trusted to be correct. He's not equal to Keating in any way at all.

If I had to pick my preferred outcome, it'd be 70 ALP, 70 Lib/Nat and 10 independents in the lower house and about the same proportions in the upper house.  The Lib/Nats deserve to lose for sure, but Shorten doesn't deserve to win. Having him form government in coalition with the Greens again would be salutary for everyone. With an Upper House that wasn't owned by either the Lib/Nats or ALP/Greens the worst policies would wither & die.

Unless the then Govt wants to try another double dissolution election anyway. They're always entertaining. Worked so well for Turnbull.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Unfortunately the leader of the opposition is a lying arsehole with a track record of selling out anyone and everyone in the furtherance of his own career. Nothing he says can be trusted to be correct. He's not equal to Keating in any way at all.

None of which really seems to matter though. The Liberals have been hammering that message over, and over, and over... yet the only poll movement seen is the same poll tightening we get every election, even in the so-called "landslides".

Both sides are running the "if you vote for them, you get them instead of us" and it's really not changing anything.

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8 hours ago, Bent Sailor said:

As someone points out above, it's not like someone stealing the pieces as currently displayed can't get the missing piece made for them ALOT cheaper than buying the gun legally. 

So you can't have museum guns under security with firing pins removed because someone might just breach the security and steal the gun and manufacture a firing pin and go on a rampage, huh?

I see. Makes sense now.

And the part about failing to notify museums that their collections must be permanently damaged or shipped overseas also makes sense. I mean, if you talk to nutz, you might end up having to actually listen to nutz. The need to avoid that created a legislative emergency requiring suspension of normal rules of debate here in NY State a few years back, so I can see the need.

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11 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Nor it is a big deal for a home handy man to manufacture a new firing pin.....

You're a lot handier than I am if you think so.

Unless you're talking about doing it with the help of the 14th most dangerous man in the world.

In which case you'd be a lot dweebier than I am.

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47 minutes ago, cmilliken said:

Just cause I thought it was funny..  I honestly wish Australia the best.

It is funny and sad at the same time, cos truth can hurt. Kind of like SNL sketches of Trump really. Same kind of right-wing nutter gets upset by it too ;)

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2 hours ago, Bent Sailor said:

None of which really seems to matter though. The Liberals have been hammering that message over, and over, and over... yet the only poll movement seen is the same poll tightening we get every election, even in the so-called "landslides".

Both sides are running the "if you vote for them, you get them instead of us" and it's really not changing anything.

Yeah, we'll just have to wait for the polls to close. Pox on the lot of them even moreso than usual as far as I'm concerned.

If I get tired enough of it all I can always go to the UK for a while & visit my daughter. Or do more sailing except it's starting to get cold down here. Might have to head north soon and not in the boat, not this year at least.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Importunate Tom said:

You're a lot handier than I am if you think so.

Unless you're talking about doing it with the help of the 14th most dangerous man in the world.

In which case you'd be a lot dweebier than I am.

You could do it if you needed to.

If you can cut a straight line 3 inches long, and work a file you're half way there.

 

Though, if your 10/Dogballs ain't already fully auto, you may be right about your metal working skills....

 

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50 minutes ago, Importunate Tom said:

You're a lot handier than I am if you think so.

Given your total inability to design and/or build a simple bridge across a pond, that's not exactly a high bar to get over.

My care factor for this bit of angst is minute, however.....

I could make replacement firing pins that were the equal of the originals.

I could cut out welds and restore a gun to functional condition. Or make new parts from raw stock. A barrel would be a PITA but I could do it if I wanted to.

Few others could. Those who can prefer to stay out of jail for the most part so it rarely happens. There have been cases in Sydney and Melbourne that I know of and recently a pen-gun apparently was found here in Hobart, but these are rare exceptions.

Not the point though as I could quite easily build a full auto sub-gun quicker & easier than restoring something thoroughly disabled. IMO the main point of disabling display firearms is to ensure that the time/effort needed to restore one to working condition is greater than the time needed to build one from scratch. I could weld up almost any firearm in a manner that wouldn't show for a static display piece but would be very, very difficult to undo outside a well equipped workshop - and even then, the heat treatment of critical parts would be compromised to the point that *I* most certainly wouldn't fire it.

I gave up working on guns over 20 years ago and don't plan on starting any time soon. If I didn't need a rifle or 2 for pest control I wouldn't own any guns these days, not interested in shooting paper or anything else except feral cats (well maybe possums after I see what they've done to one of my fruit trees).

FKT

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2 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Given your total inability to design and/or build a simple bridge across a pond, that's not exactly a high bar to get over.

My care factor for this bit of angst is minute, however.....

I could make replacement firing pins that were the equal of the originals.

I could cut out welds and restore a gun to functional condition. Or make new parts from raw stock. A barrel would be a PITA but I could do it if I wanted to.

Few others could. Those who can prefer to stay out of jail for the most part so it rarely happens. There have been cases in Sydney and Melbourne that I know of and recently a pen-gun apparently was found here in Hobart, but these are rare exceptions.

Not the point though as I could quite easily build a full auto sub-gun quicker & easier than restoring something thoroughly disabled. IMO the main point of disabling display firearms is to ensure that the time/effort needed to restore one to working condition is greater than the time needed to build one from scratch. I could weld up almost any firearm in a manner that wouldn't show for a static display piece but would be very, very difficult to undo outside a well equipped workshop - and even then, the heat treatment of critical parts would be compromised to the point that *I* most certainly wouldn't fire it.

I gave up working on guns over 20 years ago and don't plan on starting any time soon. If I didn't need a rifle or 2 for pest control I wouldn't own any guns these days, not interested in shooting paper or anything else except feral cats (well maybe possums after I see what they've done to one of my fruit trees).

FKT

I good handy man should have little trouble throwing together a Sten gun lookalike.

As you say, the barrel is the more difficult part

 

A slamfire dogballs could be knocked up in less than a day.....

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3 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

IMO the main point of disabling display firearms is to ensure that the time/effort needed to restore one to working condition is greater than the time needed to build one from scratch.

Given that, do you think that requiring museums to weld their collections or export them is common sense gun control?

 

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7 hours ago, Importunate Tom said:

Given that, do you think that requiring museums to weld their collections or export them is common sense gun control?

 

A large number of laws, regulations et al in all fields display a singular lack of common sense. New Zealand's laws on marine safety requirements for yachts come to mind.

I prefer to avoid or subvert them rather than tilt at windmills.

FKT

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20 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

He's good in the pub, not on the big stage. Figuratively....

You know IMHO we have been manipulated to care far too much about the person and not enough about the output. 

 

This ain’t Big Brother

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1 hour ago, dreadom said:

Back on track....,

Anyone catch Shorten on Q&A last night? I was reasonably surprised and actually impressed by the guy for the first time. 

Had the rerun (ABC iview) running this morning whilst dealing with the weekend's email backlog. Won't say I was "impressed", but he didn't step on his dick; so just showing up and only avoiding every other question puts him head and shoulders above Morrison. At least, that's how I think it'll play out.

It would be one thing had he fumbled an answer and there was something NewsCorp could spin as a major fuck-up; but Shorten was "competent" whilst Morrison was "missing". That's not a good look.

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39 minutes ago, dreadom said:

You know IMHO we have been manipulated to care far too much about the person and not enough about the output. 

 

This ain’t Big Brother

I think people often need to be reminded that in Australia we vote for the policy of a party ...not a person...fortunately we have ways to dispose of duds. :)

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2 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

A large number of laws, regulations et al in all fields display a singular lack of common sense. New Zealand's laws on marine safety requirements for yachts come to mind.

I prefer to avoid or subvert them rather than tilt at windmills. 

FKT

Ah, another fan of "boating accidents." Me too, just not real ones that damage any boats.

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5 hours ago, dreadom said:

Back on track....,

Anyone catch Shorten on Q&A last night? I was reasonably surprised and actually impressed by the guy for the first time. 

I haven't watched it yet, mainly coz i can't stand listening to him, but i did read a bit of commentary how he handled the franking credit refund issue. From what i recall of the article he was talking about a refund being a gift.

I'm sorry Bill but it ain't no gift. It's tax the company has paid that is refunded to a taxpayer whose tax rate is lower than the company tax rate.

Why should a member in pension phase in an industry or retail super fund, who doesn't qualify for the aged pension, get the franking credit benefit credited to their account whereas a SMSF member in pension phase not? 

It's inequitable just because of the vehicle that their super funds are invested.

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31 minutes ago, albanyguy said:

I haven't watched it yet, mainly coz i can't stand listening to him, but i did read a bit of commentary how he handled the franking credit refund issue. From what i recall of the article he was talking about a refund being a gift.

I'm sorry Bill but it ain't no gift. It's tax the company has paid that is refunded to a taxpayer whose tax rate is lower than the company tax rate.

Why should a member in pension phase in an industry or retail super fund, who doesn't qualify for the aged pension, get the franking credit benefit credited to their account whereas a SMSF member in pension phase not? 

It's inequitable just because of the vehicle that their super funds are invested.

Because they are different?

Howard and Costello should not have made the change in 2001. Giving a tax refund to those with no tax liability? Fucking rort?

Howard and Costello pursued a policy of attacking industry funds since their inception. It was ideology not economics then.

Now it's time to fix that loophole for the few for the good of the many

 

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11 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Because they are different?

Howard and Costello should not have made the change in 2001. Giving a tax refund to those with no tax liability? Fucking rort?

Howard and Costello pursued a policy of attacking industry funds since their inception. It was ideology not economics then.

Now it's time to fix that loophole for the few for the good of the many

 

ETS that change was made in 2000 as compensation for the imposition of the GST. Everyone seems to forget that. Irrespective why penalise a pension member in a SMSF but not a pension member in an industry or retail fund? No one seems to be able to answer that question.

You know what will happen if this change gets up? I can guarantee the government will not recoup $5bn in "taxes lost". What will happen is the smart SMSF pensioners will transfer their Australian held shares into retail wrap type accounts or Industry Funds that allow direct shareholdings and keep the rest of their investments in their SMSF. In the meantime the $5bn in "extra revenue" will be allocated to other expenditure yet there will be a lot less revenue collected leaving a hole in the budget. I hope the cross bench Senators understand this when it gets to the Senate and it gets knocked down. 

On another matter I see the Independent members and a number of Independent candidates have banded together to produce an ad selling their story. Good move I reckon and I hope they hold the balance of power in the House of Reps. Link to story here - https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-07/independents-advert-takes-on-political-parties-laura-tingle/11084804

 

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42 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Yes I've noted the journo's seem to have forgotten about that history lesson. Plus the fact that when dividend imputation was introduced, by Keating, it was recommended by Treasury to do it in 2 stages. Stage 1 was without the franking credit refund but stage 2 was to introduce it. It was introduced by Costello partly to compensate self funded retirees for the introduction of the GST because they didn't get any income tax relief.

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47 minutes ago, albanyguy said:

Yes I've noted the journo's seem to have forgotten about that history lesson. Plus the fact that when dividend imputation was introduced, by Keating, it was recommended by Treasury to do it in 2 stages. Stage 1 was without the franking credit refund but stage 2 was to introduce it. It was introduced by Costello partly to compensate self funded retirees for the introduction of the GST because they didn't get any income tax relief.

While what you say makes sense, a cite wouldn't harm your comments

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

Who's had their Flu vac this year?

yep , cheap as chips at Chemist Warehouse 

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So, the political news of the day in Oz was how NewsCorp fucked up. Tried to take a pot-shot at Shorten through spinning the telling of his mother's story and ended up making Shorten more relatable & stealing oxygen from Morrison instead of else whatever it was they had been hoping to accomplish. Even prompted a minor social media trend (#mymum) keeping the story bubbling to the top of the news feed regardless of whatever the Liberals were trying to say,

Could all change tonight if he drops the ball during the debate; but my prediction is that the untimely shot at Biil's mother is going to make Scott a little hesitant to go at him hammer and tongs. He's from a marketing background and knows the danger of attacking too early after the target has engendered sympathy in one's target demographic. A lot of fifty-plus year old women will be identifying with the plight of Mother Shorten, including a few disgruntled Liberals. 

Personally didn't make me think any more or less of Shorten myself. Most people love their mother and would have reacted similarly. The difference here is Shorten is constantly in the spotlight and every other media organisation was happy to run with the sympathetic angle to differentiate themselves from the Daily Tele's piss-poor judgement.

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5 minutes ago, Bent Sailor said:

So, the political news of the day in Oz was how NewsCorp fucked up. Tried to take a pot-shot at Shorten through spinning the telling of his mother's story and ended up making Shorten more relatable & stealing oxygen from Morrison instead of else whatever it was they had been hoping to accomplish. Even prompted a minor social media trend (#mymum) keeping the story bubbling to the top of the news feed regardless of whatever the Liberals were trying to say,

Could all change tonight if he drops the ball during the debate; but my prediction is that the untimely shot at Biil's mother is going to make Scott a little hesitant to go at him hammer and tongs. He's from a marketing background and knows the danger of attacking too early after the target has engendered sympathy in one's target demographic. A lot of fifty-plus year old women will be identifying with the plight of Mother Shorten, including a few disgruntled Liberals. 

Personally didn't make me think any more or less of Shorten myself. Most people love their mother and would have reacted similarly. The difference here is Shorten is constantly in the spotlight and every other media organisation was happy to run with the sympathetic angle to differentiate themselves from the Daily Tele's piss-poor judgement.

I have no idea what the rag said about Shorten's mother, whether it was accurate or a tissue of lies. Nor do I care.

I care about policy and how much I trust a politician to carry through with their policies. Needless to say, on those scores Shorten is pretty low down. WRT actually carrying through on some of them, if he doesn't, that may well be a good thing. But not what he gets elected to do.

Senate blocking is of course a get out of jail free card.

Must vote early. I'm over it already.

FKT

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6 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I have no idea what the rag said about Shorten's mother, whether it was accurate or a tissue of lies. Nor do I care.

I care about policy and how much I trust a politician to carry through with their policies. Needless to say, on those scores Shorten is pretty low down. WRT actually carrying through on some of them, if he doesn't, that may well be a good thing. But not what he gets elected to do.

As I said, it didn't change my mind about Shorten one bit and NewsCorp making low-blows trying to score points is nothing new. I'm merely commenting on how it was received and discussed throughout the day. The editors at NewsCorp misjudged or didn't expect Shorten to pull off a believable sympathetic figure to those who, unlike us, get swayed by the day-to-day trivialities of the election. Sadly there are a lot of them and, unfortunately for Morrison, those that could be swayed to emotion or sympathy were doing so for Shorten.

Polls show that near one in four voters are undecided and Shorten's personal unlikeability was something the Liberals have been campaigning on. The Daily Tabloid fucked that up for them on a day when they really could have used the clear air (and an opportunity to ram it home in the debate tonight). They aren't campaigning for my vote or yours (we made up our minds before they started their campaigns) - they're after the undecided voters who shift with the wind and they do care.

 

6 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Must vote early. I'm over it already.

May as well. I doubt there was going to be anything in the last week that would change your mind. Last week of the election is generally wall-to-wall bullshit adverts and little in the way of policy talk anyway.

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51 minutes ago, Bent Sailor said:

May as well. I doubt there was going to be anything in the last week that would change your mind. Last week of the election is generally wall-to-wall bullshit adverts and little in the way of policy talk anyway.

No TV. Don't listen to the radio. All my mail goes to a PO box and the post mistress has instructions to bin all mail not personally addressed to me.

I don't see/hear any of their ads thank God, except that fat toad Palmer who spams my mobile phone with texts. Much good that'll do him; I'll preference the Socialist Alliance or even the religious nutcases ahead of him. If it would be fair to say that I despise Shorten, I'm not sure if there's any word in the English dictionary that adequately expresses my loathing for Palmer.

Nice interview with Penny Wong the other day. She says she's not moving to the lower house, which demonstrates just how sensible she is. I may disagree with some of her policy positions but I have a lot of respect for her. I expect she'll make a good foreign minister.

FKT

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On 5/6/2019 at 6:16 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:
On 5/6/2019 at 10:35 AM, Importunate Tom said:

Given that, do you think that requiring museums to weld their collections or export them is common sense gun control?

 

A large number of laws, regulations et al in all fields display a singular lack of common sense. New Zealand's laws on marine safety requirements for yachts come to mind.

I prefer to avoid or subvert them rather than tilt at windmills.

FKT

I've been wondering about this.

How could a museum avoid or subvert the confiscation of their collections?

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2 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

No TV. Don't listen to the radio. All my mail goes to a PO box and the post mistress has instructions to bin all mail not personally addressed to me.

I don't see/hear any of their ads thank God, except that fat toad Palmer who spams my mobile phone with texts. Much good that'll do him; I'll preference the Socialist Alliance or even the religious nutcases ahead of him. If it would be fair to say that I despise Shorten, I'm not sure if there's any word in the English dictionary that adequately expresses my loathing for Palmer.

Nice interview with Penny Wong the other day. She says she's not moving to the lower house, which demonstrates just how sensible she is. I may disagree with some of her policy positions but I have a lot of respect for her. I expect she'll make a good foreign minister.

FKT

Well Newscorp shot themselves in the foot. Australians actually seem to like a man that can shed a tear over his mum...or Daughter :D

The famous tears of Hawke must be before these youngsters time.:rolleyes:..Glad to see Australia still holds it's ground. Don't go after family.

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On 5/7/2019 at 3:59 PM, Ease the sheet. said:

While what you say makes sense, a cite wouldn't harm your comments

 

 

OK been a bit busy today so finally had a few minutes to have a bit of a look. 

Quite quickly I found this

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dividend_imputation#Refund

Quote

A franking credit on dividends received after 1 July 2000 is a refundable tax credit. It is a form of tax paid, which can reduce a taxpayer's total tax liability, and any excess is refunded. For example, an individual with income below the tax-free threshold ($18,200 since 2011/12) pays no tax at all and can get the franking credits back in full, after a tax return is lodged.

Prior to 1 July 2000 such excess franking credits were lost. For example, an individual at that time paying no tax would get nothing back, they merely kept the cash part of the dividend received.

However there is no specific cite for this entry, but note the date, 1 July 2000...same date as introduction of GST.

Then I kept looking and found a paper by the Australian Centre of Financial Studies titled "Dividend Imputation and the Australian Financial System: What Have Been the Consequences" dated October 2015. There is a timeline of the history of franking credits where it's noted that on 1 July 2000 that "refunds on unused franking credits introduced".

Link here - https://australiancentre.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/FAF3-Imputation-paper.pdf

I'm sure I could find more if I keep looking.

 

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Have to say, it's a brave/bold move to release costings this early. Not saying it's a smart move, but definitely a risk giving the other side more time to pick apart your costings when you can't do the same and giving them a week is definitely brave. From the pressers today, it would appear they think they can counter criticism with a "show us yours then, gutless" style response but that will only take them so far.

FWIW, I think costings & policies should be released within a week of starting the campaign for all parties. None of this "dribbling it out over several weeks" bullshit. It's hard enough to get politicians to stick to policies when they write them down and sign their name to it BEFORE a campaign. Policies the parties come up with as gotcha's and "me too" responses during the campaign have little chance of surviving past the first hurdle they face after the election, so why bother? Get the entire platform out early, allow time to debate the balance of cost/benefit across demographics and then let the people decide on an informed basis.

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Had to laugh when I read this......

 

Jacinda Ardern for Aussie PM? Kiwi leader ranked Australia's most trusted politician

10 May, 2019 8:24am

 2 minutes to read

It's official. Kiwi Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has taken the title of Australia's 'most trusted' politician just two weeks out from the Australian general election. Photo / Getty

NZ Herald

Kiwi Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has taken the title of Australia's "most trusted" politician, just two weeks out from the Australian general election.

First it was pavlova, Russell Crowe and Crowded House - and now it seems the Aussies are after our leader to run their country.

Australians were asked who they trusted when it came to relevance, integrity and commitment, with Ardern polling as Australia's most preferred prime minister.

Research company Millward Brown polled 1400 Australians asking them to score 12 politicians, including the leaders of the Coalition, Labor, the Greens, Pauline Hanson's One Nation and the United Australia Party.

ADVERTISEMENT

Advertise with NZME.

A score out of 100 was allocated to each politician based on the ratings respondents gave them for performance in six key areas: relevance, integrity, shared values, commitment, affinity and follow through.

Former Australian prime minister Tony Abbott came in with a meagre rating of 36 out of 100, while current leader Scott Morrison received a score of 43.

Controversial One Nation leader Hanson scored 44, compared with former Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop - who rated third in political believability with a score of 52.

But out in front was our very own Jacinda Ardern who scored a believability rating of 77 out of 100.

A quarter of respondents said they weren't impressed with any of the listed politicians.

In 2018 Australia's highest profile New Zealander, then Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce, received the second-most nominations for 2018 New Zealander of the Year.

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On 5/8/2019 at 11:23 PM, albanyguy said:

OK been a bit busy today so finally had a few minutes to have a bit of a look. 

Quite quickly I found this

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dividend_imputation#Refund

However there is no specific cite for this entry, but note the date, 1 July 2000...same date as introduction of GST.

Then I kept looking and found a paper by the Australian Centre of Financial Studies titled "Dividend Imputation and the Australian Financial System: What Have Been the Consequences" dated October 2015. There is a timeline of the history of franking credits where it's noted that on 1 July 2000 that "refunds on unused franking credits introduced".

Link here - https://australiancentre.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/FAF3-Imputation-paper.pdf

I'm sure I could find more if I keep looking.

 

There's some evidence that the changes to dividend imputation were part of a tax "package" that included the GST yet nothing that considers it "compensation".

Either way, I'm happy for it to go, just because I think that any tax refund shouldn't be greater than any tax liability.

 

Politics aside. If a SMSF has a member that's not in pension phase, say a adult child in a family fund, it's my understanding that the fund would still get franking credits. Is this correct?

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1 hour ago, Ease the sheet. said:

There's some evidence that the changes to dividend imputation were part of a tax "package" that included the GST yet nothing that considers it "compensation".

Either way, I'm happy for it to go, just because I think that any tax refund shouldn't be greater than any tax liability.

 

Politics aside. If a SMSF has a member that's not in pension phase, say a adult child in a family fund, it's my understanding that the fund would still get franking credits. Is this correct?

To the extent that the tax on the contributions equals the amount of franking credits, ie if only $1,000 in contributions then 15% tax = $150. If franking credits say $10,000 then only $150 gets refunded plus tax on profit of funds attributed to accumulation member/s

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29 minutes ago, albanyguy said:

To the extent that the tax on the contributions equals the amount of franking credits, ie if only $1,000 in contributions then 15% tax = $150. If franking credits say $10,000 then only $150 gets refunded plus tax on profit of funds attributed to accumulation member/s

So that's a situation where franking credits cannot exceed tax liabilities? And that's the present arrangement?

 

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