Halcyon Yachts

A big project!

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13 hours ago, phillysailor said:

I think Leo decided he liked the boat with rot, tradition and lineage included. He didn’t like the mangled foundations and decided that if he was going to replace the frames, he wasn’t just gonna copy a mistake beaten to a pulp by a shipwreck & repair, he was going to do it perfectly.

Think of this as his opus, his masterpiece that attracts future work. Anyone hiring Leo knows exactly what to expect, and will not be disappointed when he describes the time and cost involved.

Tradesmen will know exactly what kind of a boss he is, and what kind of work they will be doing. Suppliers know not to think him a fool, and sailors know they can trust his ships.

This project will pay dividends his entire career; personal & professional. Furthermore, he has singlehandedly introduced TENS OF THOUSANDS of potential customers to a market they might have otherwise ignored. 

Marvelous marketing. Just awesome. 

I'd have never taken you for a wooden boat romantic - glad to see that you and so many others are.  Is resurrecting an old wooden boat fiscally sound and practical?  Not if your objective is just to move from one spot in the water to another while staying relatively dry.  If your objective is to create a unique experience, to preserve a piece of the past, to indulge a romantic notion?  Well, fiscal soundness and practicality aren't the primary considerations anymore.  

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I’m actually purchasing a 1949 Penn Yan 14’ runabout from my family. The motor isn’t original, having died on us years ago. 

Its been through a couple of major refurbishment episodes, and it’s due for another... transom, ribs, deck beam, planks, steering cables. There is a random puddle of epoxy that may have been used to seal a leak.

Im taking on the opportunity to pour some boat bucks into a piece of my family’s heritage. But my kids love it and we are going to seal the bottom with FG. That will allow me to take it home on a trailer after a day on the water, and since it had a layer in the past I’m not the one offending the “wooden boat purity” sheriffs that populate those threads. 

I have to sell my Norseboat 17.5’ to finance it, know any takers? That will leave me with the outrigger canoe I finished last year for sailing.

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22 hours ago, phillysailor said:

I’m actually purchasing a 1949 Penn Yan 14’ runabout from my family. The motor isn’t original, having died on us years ago. 

Its been through a couple of major refurbishment episodes, and it’s due for another... transom, ribs, deck beam, planks, steering cables. There is a random puddle of epoxy that may have been used to seal a leak.

Im taking on the opportunity to pour some boat bucks into a piece of my family’s heritage. But my kids love it and we are going to seal the bottom with FG. That will allow me to take it home on a trailer after a day on the water, and since it had a layer in the past I’m not the one offending the “wooden boat purity” sheriffs that populate those threads. 

I have to sell my Norseboat 17.5’ to finance it, know any takers? That will leave me with the outrigger canoe I finished last year for sailing.

Good onya for that!    I hope it turns out like you want, and that y'all enjoy the restoration and using it after!  

Edited to add: Great pics!   What kind of OB is on the runabout?  

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21 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Good onya for that!    I hope it turns out like you want, and that y'all enjoy the restoration and using it after!  

Edited to add: Great pics!   What kind of OB is on the runabout?  

The original motor was replaced by a 1960s 30hp Evinrude which died due to a lack of spare parts and a poor pickling job, if I remember correctly. That was some 20years ago. Since then a 90s vintage 20hp Johnson that doesn’t look at all proper has been in service. 

I should have given John Harris (of CLC boats) credit for the pics of Sea Dart, the NorseBoat. He took them during one of the Watertribe Okoumefest races. They were taken in the Wye River & the Eastern Bay.

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2 hours ago, phillysailor said:

The original motor was replaced by a 1960s 30hp Evinrude which died due to a lack of spare parts and a poor pickling job, if I remember correctly. That was some 20years ago. Since then a 90s vintage 20hp Johnson that doesn’t look at all proper has been in service. 

I should have given John Harris (of CLC boats) credit for the pics of Sea Dart, the NorseBoat. He took them during one of the Watertribe Okoumefest races. They were taken in the Wye River & the Eastern Bay.

I thought it looked like Tilghman/Oxford.   When you start - if time permits, a resto-thread would be fun. 

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Hmmm. 

Not sure I’d do that to a sailing site, but here are a couple of “before” shots to get the gist of the project.

I’ve got to say, I’m a bit daunted by the scope of the work necessary, and have a guy in NH lined up to do the restoration. His estimate of $12-15K seems fair and he has experience with these lake boats.

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Well, cleaning it up entails replacing a bunch of ribs, rebuilding the transom, repairing the deck cross beam and recaulking and repairing the deck. Then flip the boat and replace a bunch of planks against the rotten sections. Then strip, FG and paint the hull. Flip it back and strip the varnish, revarnish the deck and interior. 

At that point, rebuild the steering system and install a new bilge pump.

i guess I might be able to do all that. But I’ve actually never steam bent ribs or caulked a deck, and my woodworking skills are merely adequate. I’ve never been good at creating a lovely varnish finish. 

I think I’d rather go sailing. 

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Just happened to be looking at Slocum's "Sailing Alone Around the World,"  where he's rebuilding the derilict "Spray."   As he points out: "Now, it is a law in Lloyd's that the Jane repaired all out of the old until she is entirely new is still the Jane."   I guess that settles it. 

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On 3/5/2019 at 9:35 PM, Presuming Ed said:

Interesting talk. About 100? people there.  Beards > women.

He touched on the whole rebuild vs repair thing, and relofting the whole boat. Said that one of the things that swayed him was that the shape was so unfair on the port side after the repair after running aground that it would be a great shame to do all that work and end up with a boat looking that unfair and wrong.

He hopes to be able to use some of the planking.

1/3 of the talk was on the boat, 1/3 on his story, and 1/3 (but hurrying it along) about the restoration. Then some questions. About 2 hrs all in.

There was a camera at the back, so no doubt it will all go up on YouTube sometime.

The finger was from the parrot.

When's he going to finish? In 2 years... ask again in 2 years time.

Would like to do the 2025 centenary Fastnet, or 2027 - centenary of Tally Ho's win.

Use after she's finished? He was talking about some sort of charity/non profit use. Getting people afloat.

 

 

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EPISODE 47. Now we enter the final week of intensive Frame Production, with the team of volunteers going at full swing to finish reframing the entire stern of TALLY HO before our deadline. Spirits are high, and we celebrate by throwing a party in the workshop, and then organizing a very small dinghy regatta in the nearest bay. The fully-framed stern of the boat looks amazing, and it’s time for a short break - so after all the volunteers have left I pack up my own things and head back to the UK for a couple of weeks. Featuring; Kirt (In spirit -USA), Finn (UK), Arnaud (Belgium), Thom (UK), Pat (USA), Max (USA), Robert (UK), Glenda & Bill (USA). Featuring LIVE MUSIC from my friends at Sweater Weather String Band http://soundcloud.com/sweaterweathers...

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So his plan is to use the old boat for firewood to heat the shop while he builds an entirely new boat from scratch?

WTF?  Am I missing something?  There's nothing left of that boat to save!  It doesn't even look like I has any original hardware....

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1 hour ago, Tempest said:

Am I missing something? 

Yes. Everything, it appears. 

This is page 5, after 47 episodes, and you write this. Watch and read all of it. Then, from your armchair, make commentry.

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3 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Is it wrong to be just a little jealous?  

No, not at all....

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Reminds me of the boat that dismasted my boat although this one is even bigger. Brings back memories nonetheless.

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22 hours ago, Boink said:

Yes. Everything, it appears. 

This is page 5, after 47 episodes, and you write this. Watch and read all of it. Then, from your armchair, make commentry.

I watched a couple episodes and I'm not going to read 1000 posts just like this one.

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6 hours ago, Tempest said:

I watched a couple episodes and I'm not going to read 1000 posts just like this one.

So you won't read, can't count and yet you get your nose out of shape when called out........

You are the person missing out on a fabulous series of films that both inform and entertain; as well as restore the faith in people who do the right thing, not becuase it is easy, cheap or lucrative.

Can't help people who won't help themselves. Your Tag line, including the "don't misquote me" seems most ironic, yet very telling all the same about you as an individual. 

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10 hours ago, Boink said:

So you won't read, can't count and yet you get your nose out of shape when called out........

You are the person missing out on a fabulous series of films that both inform and entertain; as well as restore the faith in people who do the right thing, not becuase it is easy, cheap or lucrative.

Can't help people who won't help themselves. Your Tag line, including the "don't misquote me" seems most ironic, yet very telling all the same about you as an individual. 

You have problems dude.  Talk about misinterpreting and projecting.

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Yeah, we all have problems, yet don't bitch or denegrate about others good work.

You have stated you wont read the posts - claim there are thousands - this is post 425 - so you cannot count.

And you watch 2 episodes of 47, yet put the project down, asking WTF? What am I missing - Again; Everything

Your tag references shitheads and misquoting - yet I am the one who misinterprets and "projects" - Keep up your own sense of self worth pal, for You are the outlier here.

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9 minutes ago, Boink said:

Yeah, we all have problems, yet don't bitch or denegrate about others good work.

You have stated you wont read the posts - claim there are thousands - this is post 425 - so you cannot count.

And you watch 2 episodes of 47, yet put the project down, asking WTF? What am I missing - Again; Everything

Your tag references shitheads and misquoting - yet I am the one who misinterprets and "projects" - Keep up your own sense of self worth pal, for You are the outlier here.

Take it easy dude. The snowflake forums are down the hall on the left. 

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On 5/5/2019 at 10:30 PM, Boink said:

Watch and read all of it. Then, from your armchair, make commentry.

Then from your armchair, eat a dick.

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On 5/7/2019 at 12:50 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Is it wrong to be just a little jealous? 

gotta call Leo on not being there to win .....................................:rolleyes:

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On 5/8/2019 at 8:37 AM, MR.CLEAN said:

Then from your armchair, eat a dick.

You are a ball bag who continues to meet all expectations. 

Just because professionally you are in the knob gobbling game; doesn't mean that the rest of us would ever stoop to such behaviour. 

And stop stalking me

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On 4/27/2019 at 12:16 AM, Presuming Ed said:

Interesting talk. About 100? people there.  Beards > women.

He touched on the whole rebuild vs repair thing, and relofting the whole boat. Said that one of the things that swayed him was that the shape was so unfair on the port side after the repair after running aground that it would be a great shame to do all that work and end up with a boat looking that unfair and wrong.

He hopes to be able to use some of the planking.

1/3 of the talk was on the boat, 1/3 on his story, and 1/3 (but hurrying it along) about the restoration. Then some questions. About 2 hrs all in.

There was a camera at the back, so no doubt it will all go up on YouTube sometime.

The finger was from the parrot.

When's he going to finish? In 2 years... ask again in 2 years time.

Would like to do the 2025 centenary Fastnet, or 2027 - centenary of Tally Ho's win.

Use after she's finished? He was talking about some sort of charity/non profit use. Getting people afloat.

 

 

And here it is. Or at least part 1.

 

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Wow!  This is probably  the most inspiring, interesting and compelling yachting stories I've  ever seen.   More please. 

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This should put to rest the questions of why he didn't decide to build a new boat instead and is it really the same boat.

Today is the Master Mariners Regatta and for the first time in more than a decade I am not racing but watching Youtube videos instead.  Mixed feelings. There really isn't anything like owning a wood boats (both good and bad) and this was a particurally interesting episode for me personally. I particurally resonated with the line that was in response to the question of why not build a new boat instead of restoring an old one.  He said if you want to be sensible, don't even think of owning a wood boat, just get a fiberglass one.

I tell people you have to either be crazy or in love to own a wood boat and it is of great help to be both.

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Humanity thanks you and your kind, Allen.

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     He admits to helping install a new deck on the schooner 'KELPIE" which had a long period sailing around SoCal.

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I own one of the sisterships to Allene222's boat and, like Allene222, am skipping the Master Mariners today.

Someone who asks how much of the original boat must remain for it to be the "same" boat is sort of missing the point of a restoration. Someone who asks how "original" to the design and materials of the time of construction it must be is sort of missing the point. Is it necessary to do a restoration by candlelight in order to satisfy these purists? One suspects they have not actually done a restoration. By all means do a restoration yourself with your own money in a fashion that satisfies you. However, sitting on the sidelines casting aspersions because you don't agree with another person's restoration is distasteful.

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Be a lot less complicated to build a replica from scratch.

Nothing of original note will make the journey to sail again.

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unsurprisingly Leo has outlasted the nay sayers  :)

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Though he did almost get squished in the process...

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The volume of discarded timber and offcuts must be huge. I presume offcuts go in the shop stove/burn barrel. What happens to the old stuff that probably has stuff applied that shouldn't be burned? 

He's 4-6 weeks away from planking?

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He's still gotta re-frame the front of the boat and the PNW summer is about to kick into high gear. I wouldn't be surprised if he takes a break after framing, heads into the mountains with his lovely companion, and saves the planking for Autumn. 

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Channel surfing yesterday and was stopped by the background photo.

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I took a close look and I don't think that's Tally Ho but that's pretty funny.

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I have a stupid question...

I know it is a stupid question, but I am going to ask it anyway. :D

Was it normal practice at the time the boat was built (more than a century ago) to make timber pieces fit EXACTLY and PERFECTLY as Leo is doing here? It looks like he is shaving a quarter of ONE millimeter here and there to make it perfect. It looks more line fine cabinetry than boat building to me...

OK, flame away!

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2 hours ago, Laurent said:

I have a stupid question...

I know it is a stupid question, but I am going to ask it anyway. :D

Was it normal practice at the time the boat was built (more than a century ago) to make timber pieces fit EXACTLY and PERFECTLY as Leo is doing here? It looks like he is shaving a quarter of ONE millimeter here and there to make it perfect. It looks more line fine cabinetry than boat building to me...

OK, flame away!

I get the sense that the same care was not generally put into the building back then. Wood boats were more or less considered disposable, and were not expected to last forever. I'm sure they built it in half the time or less than Leo is taking. 

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3 hours ago, Laurent said:

I have a stupid question...

I know it is a stupid question, but I am going to ask it anyway. :D

Was it normal practice at the time the boat was built (more than a century ago) to make timber pieces fit EXACTLY and PERFECTLY as Leo is doing here? It looks like he is shaving a quarter of ONE millimeter here and there to make it perfect. It looks more line fine cabinetry than boat building to me...

OK, flame away!

Not stupid at all. I have the same question.  I had no idea these boats were built with such care. This one for sure is intended to last forever. 

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It's all a question of budget, then just as much as now.

If you're willing to spend the resources for that kind of craftmanship, you get the quality.

Luckily Leo's resource is his own time, so he can build the project to his own exacting standards.

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Next question:  How did he arrive at this level of skill?   It really is rather spectacular. 

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45 minutes ago, Mark Set said:

I get the sense that the same care was not generally put into the building back then. Wood boats were more or less considered disposable, and were not expected to last forever. I'm sure they built it in half the time or less than Leo is taking. 

Different project but when the Acorn to Arabella guys took apart Victoria (which was a c. 100y old boat they bought for spares), they found a pretty slapdash construction with half of the deck beams shimmed to get the deck above seated properly.

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"if you cant see it from 30 feet away in the dark, its fine"

- old scenic carpenters adage

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I'd suspect that over time, water, warping and rot make the initial effort appear alot less perfect than perhaps it was when built too.

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2 hours ago, Antoine31 said:

Next question:  How did he arrive at this level of skill?   It really is rather spectacular. 

If you go through his videos he has one explaining how got to where he is today.

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22 hours ago, luminary said:

I'd suspect that over time, water, warping and rot make the initial effort appear alot less perfect than perhaps it was when built too.

That was actually the second part of my question. My only GUESS (I am NOT a traditional wooden boat type of guy) is that if you built it with perfect fit, and tar in the right places, the water ingress on the end grain of each piece of timber is nil, or greatly reduced, or greatly delayed, which may have an impact on the life of the boat.

So you can slap it together quickly and have a boat that will last 20 years before a major refit, or take great care and accuracy and have a boat that will last 100 years before a major refit? Just  speculation on my side.

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Probably true but who pays for 100 year assets except for govt entities buying bridges?

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

Probably true but who pays for 100 year assets except for govt entities buying bridges?

Are you looking for a sound financial rationale for the reconstruction of a trashed 100 year old wooden sailboat?

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2 hours ago, Laurent said:

That was actually the second part of my question. My only GUESS (I am NOT a traditional wooden boat type of guy) is that if you built it with perfect fit, and tar in the right places, the water ingress on the end grain of each piece of timber is nil, or greatly reduced, or greatly delayed, which may have an impact on the life of the boat.

So you can slap it together quickly and have a boat that will last 20 years before a major refit, or take great care and accuracy and have a boat that will last 100 years before a major refit? Just  speculation on my side.

I expect it’s a variety of things- not just accurate joinery, but appropriateness of design, understanding how stresses are distributed, how wood moves over time, and how to avoid water accumulating in places that could cause decay. And quality and appropriateness of materials.

 

2 hours ago, IStream said:

Probably true but who pays for 100 year assets except for govt entities buying bridges?

Fortunately there are those who value and deliver craftsmanship for its own sake, doing work that will outlive them. 

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Acorn 2 Arabella is a flat-out cool story.  Stephen’s comments as he strolls thru the woods around his family’s land really warms things up.

Generations of his family planted the Oaks he’s using for his boat. His observations about stewardship of the trees, so that future generations will have the same resources should they build boats or homes, always seem genuine and carefully considered.

Wooden boat builders Rock.

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On 7/8/2019 at 12:23 PM, Blitz said:

If you go through his videos he has one explaining how got to where he is today.

I've seen all the videos and understand his training.  But the way he works seems to be a cut above normal wooden boat building. He is incredibly precise  and careful.  He seems to aim for perfection. Perhaps that's just his character. 

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EPISODE 52. A worrying thunder-shake in the new stem means I have to make and install a large graving piece. After making some wedges and cutting notches in the scarph joints, we assemble the Stem, Knee, Forefoot and Mast Step in the bow of Tally Ho… lifting the gigantic stem overhead with the forklift is quite an amazing sight! After a tiny bit of trimming we drill and counterbore the holes for the bolts, and then cover everything (including ourselves, of course) with a thick layer of tar before putting it together for the final time and bolting it up - the centreline is complete!

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On 5/7/2019 at 1:55 AM, Boink said:

So you won't read, can't count and yet you get your nose out of shape when called out........

You are the person missing out on a fabulous series of films that both inform and entertain; as well as restore the faith in people who do the right thing, not becuase it is easy, cheap or lucrative.

Can't help people who won't help themselves. Your Tag line, including the "don't misquote me" seems most ironic, yet very telling all the same about you as an individual. 

 

On 5/7/2019 at 12:17 PM, Tempest said:

You have problems dude.  Talk about misinterpreting and projecting.

 

On 5/7/2019 at 6:31 PM, bodega87 said:

Take it easy dude. The snowflake forums are down the hall on the left. 

 

On 5/7/2019 at 6:37 PM, MR.CLEAN said:

Then from your armchair, eat a dick.

 

On 5/18/2019 at 5:45 AM, Boink said:

You are a ball bag who continues to meet all expectations. 

Just because professionally you are in the knob gobbling game; doesn't mean that the rest of us would ever stoop to such behaviour. 

And stop stalking me

Where is that Fiji-Anus when we need him? 

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Tremendous progress, and the rest of the frames are scheduled to be done in a month. 

Leo summarizes thusly, only half-joking I think: Two years in so only two years to go...

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1 minute ago, IStream said:

Tremendous progress, and the rest of the frames are scheduled to be done in a month. 

Leo summarizes thusly, only half-joking I think: Two years in so only two years to go...

Think it's a running joke that the project will be finished in two years.... it's always two years from the time he's speaking, not from when he last said so :-)

 Cheers,

                W.

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Just now, WGWarburton said:

Think it's a running joke that the project will be finished in two years.... it's always two years from the time he's speaking, not from when he last said so :-)

 Cheers,

                W.

Checks out.

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The man is an amazing craftsman. Fast, works clean, accurate, driven. I wish him all the success he deserves. 

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33 minutes ago, Alcatraz5768 said:

The man is an amazing craftsman. Fast, works clean, accurate, driven. I wish him all the success he deserves. 

Absolutely, he has obviously done his time with a great craftsmen like we used to have in NZ. Sadly the itchy sticky stuff is what most boat builders know, even monkeys on the end of a chopper gun get to call themselves boat builders!

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I can call myself a boatbuilder (I did my time as one) but compared to Leo, I am a ham fisted monkey with a club foot. I know a few guys like him though, Richard Wilson, Kerry Alexander, Don Adolf to name a few guys who could bend timber to their will. 

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8 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

Think it's a running joke that the project will be finished in two years.... it's always two years from the time he's speaking, not from when he last said so :-)

 Cheers,

                W.

Then his punchline is "Eventually, I will finish two years early."

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It gets to a point where it would have been simpler, quicker, and cheaper to get copies of the original plans and build new.  But that might not elicit as much interest, excitement and support.  

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15 hours ago, IStream said:

Tremendous progress, and the rest of the frames are scheduled to be done in a month. 

Leo summarizes thusly, only half-joking I think: Two years in so only two years to go...

Looks about 85% complete to me.....

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36 minutes ago, Third Reef said:

Lol

Freda had a very similar rebuild here is San Francisco Bay.  It is only 32 feet long so Tally Ho is probably 3x the job given it is 50% longer and boats scale by volume rather than length. That rebuild took 8 years and $500,000. A lot of the labor was from a local boat school so pretty hard to scale but a rough guess would put an estimate on Tally Ho of at least 10 man years. If he averages 2 1/2 total effective crew, then his estimate of 2 more years might happen. But it will depend on how much help he gets. And of course, my estimate might be way off especially if the boat school labor was not part of the $500,000.  We also don't know what level of finish Leo is planning for the interior. That could be a huge project by itself. I would also estimate 1/2 man year to build the mast based on the estimate I got to rebuild mine. I went aluminum but I am guessing Leo is going to stick with wood. Regardless, 85% complete is not anything I would bet on.

 

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What impresses me most about his project is the speed of the progress. A lot of people take on a big project like this but rarely have the time or money to finish it. I have high confidence that he will be done in 2-3 more years.

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For anyone wondering why he's restoring this boat by replacing essentially every piece of wood, go back and read the thread or watch the videos to understand. It will be interesting to see how much planking they are able to save, either as planking or perhaps for the interior. Regarding the high level of accuracy, it might seem slow and painstaking but in the long run it might actually be quite a bit faster. If the stem to stern measurements are within 1/8" it means every other part you take off the lofting floor will be right the first time, reducing the need for site fitting and other fiddling around. Holy smokes though, that graving piece is an absolute tour de force of accurate joinery. Back up the thread somewhere I compared Leo to a young surgeon, ie not so young in reality but seemingly young for a guy excising brain tumours. I stand by that assessment of his quality. 

 

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I want to visit Leo just so I can sniff his wood shavings.

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regardless of training and being an understudy, its a natural gift leo has, and it's obvious. we were all born to do something, he was definitely born to do this. i am so impressed with how thorough he is, willing to learn and the best part is, giving people wanting to learn, a shot, and in-turn all the help receives. i have really enjoyed watching this project take shape.

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On his website he mentions that at this point he is not looking for further applications for volunteers. I read that as he's fully crewed up for the foreseeable future. 

So it doesn't look like manpower is an issue 

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17 hours ago, allene222 said:

Freda had a very similar rebuild here is San Francisco Bay.  It is only 32 feet long so Tally Ho is probably 3x the job given it is 50% longer and boats scale by volume rather than length. That rebuild took 8 years and $500,000. A lot of the labor was from a local boat school so pretty hard to scale but a rough guess would put an estimate on Tally Ho of at least 10 man years. If he averages 2 1/2 total effective crew, then his estimate of 2 more years might happen. But it will depend on how much help he gets. And of course, my estimate might be way off especially if the boat school labor was not part of the $500,000.  We also don't know what level of finish Leo is planning for the interior. That could be a huge project by itself. I would also estimate 1/2 man year to build the mast based on the estimate I got to rebuild mine. I went aluminum but I am guessing Leo is going to stick with wood. Regardless, 85% complete is not anything I would bet on.

 

Just curious - do you have the basis of estimate for the mast build? 

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23 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Just curious - do you have the basis of estimate for the mast build? 

My 40 foot mast was quoted at $40,000 but it was a wag from there.

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6 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Apologies - I intended to ask about the 1/2 man year estimate - 1000 hours? 

(40,000 / 100) * 2.5 

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37 minutes ago, allene222 said:

(40,000 / 100) * 2.5 

What is that?  (cost/hourly rate) * some labor constant? 

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6 minutes ago, casc27 said:

What is that?  (cost/hourly rate) * some labor constant? 

Exactly.  It is (dollars / dollars per hour) * estimate of ratio of task.  All three numbers are WAGs so the result is clearly indefensible, just my estimate as I said.

I got the ratio of the task by the cube of the length of the two boats. (48/36)^3 = 2.4 so should be 2.4 instead of 2.5 but close enough. It also assumes the cost of the wood and bronze is insignificant compared to the labor so that is an error.  Might be way off.

My boat weighs 12,000 pounds and Tally Ho 66,000, a ratio of 5.5. But my boat is unusually light for a wood boat. 2.5 might be way off but it is the best guess I have.

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16 minutes ago, allene222 said:

Exactly.  It is (dollars / dollars per hour) * estimate of ratio of task.  All three numbers are WAGs so the result is clearly indefensible, just my estimate as I said.

I got the ratio of the task by the cube of the length of the two boats. (48/36)^3 = 2.4 so should be 2.4 instead of 2.5 but close enough. It also assumes the cost of the wood and bronze is insignificant compared to the labor so that is an error.  Might be way off.

My boat weighs 12,000 pounds and Tally Ho 66,000, a ratio of 5.5. But my boat is unusually light for a wood boat. 2.5 might be way off but it is the best guess I have.

Materials for mast,  rig & sails will scale as the righting moment & rig height, which may not be quite to the cube of length, but may end  up closer to the square assuming similar designs.  The labor won't necessarily be proportional except for varnishing, as the larger spar will use larger sections, and similar number of fittings & joints. 

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