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Just now, Boink said:

There you go again......

Clicker built? It'sClinker and Exception (not exception)

And stop trying to reframe your earlier nonsense.

You wrote: "The first clinker-built with rear rudder yacht that is fast will not happen.
Matter of physics."

Do not now change the terms of your statement, to be be a comparison. You made a black and white statement of absolutes. I called you out on that - Deal with it.

Otherwise all your bold claims about your intelligence and knowledge will be cast even further into doubt. (Not that it needs it........)

Thanks for the down vote. So you are both stupid and childish. No one would have ever guessed. 

Non arguments I have a Msc in this subject.
And you?

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Why? Leo has referred to this several times over the years. Technology has changed, but this boat is still being made by hand. However, the imperative and motivation back then, was and is no

I think Leo decided he liked the boat with rot, tradition and lineage included. He didn’t like the mangled foundations and decided that if he was going to replace the frames, he wasn’t just gonna copy

Thanks for all your interest and support, all!

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

 

 

EPISODE 115

After a snow-white turn of the year, Richard braves the cold to cut the engine beds out of some huge pieces of Purpleheart.

These beams will support the engine and connect it to the hull, so they need to be extremely strong and well fastened.

In an unlikely looking white van, we find a large wooden crate - the engine itself!

Having broken it out and stared at it for some time, I discuss how this Parallel-Hybrid Diesel-Electric engine functions, and why I chose it.

 

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Fairly sure that I'm displaying ignorance/stupidity here but, as I watched this episode over coffee this morning, (God, how I love these times), I thought I saw the guys lining the engine beds up on the inside of the hull planks, as if that's where the load would be placed.

Later, I think the beds were bolted to the frames all right.

I just had a moment's dread when I wanted to scream at them, "Nooooo, don't do that, the engine will push through the planks!!!!"

 

(Disclaimer: I know less than 2/10 of F. All about boatbuilding.)

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49 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Did those guys pour keels for the Olson and the SC line of boats?

I was wondering the same thing.  I know keelco did a lot of the SoCal production (and many custom boats), but no idea who did the SCs.

 

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On 1/16/2022 at 3:44 PM, Foiling Optimist said:

If anyone hasn't watched it. they're (mildly) trolling SV Seeker here. 

Doug prolly laughed when he heard his end credits music on Tally.  
 

At least Rowan owned up to not being all that of a welder.  Those legs look plenty strong enough tho.  The bathtub bit is funky can-do.

Never a dull moment in that yard.   Good stuff.

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5 hours ago, Pro looper said:

Yes they did,and Moore's and express's we also got Doug out of retirement to pour a bulb for A TP 52

back in the day

PL.

godfather

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I'm curious about if the structure and therefore strength of cast lead depends on cooling rate.  There did seem to be some weak spots in the old Tally Ho keel but was that temperature or perhaps contamination? When you pour Cerrobend, which is a 50% bismuth, 26% Lead and then tin and cadmium, it's actually weaker, due to large crystal formation, when it cools slowly. So when you pour it in thin walled tubes for bending, you want to pour it, re heat it and then flash cool in the bend area with cold water to get nice small crystals. I imagine this is less of a problem with lead but it'd be interested to hear if it's something they think about. One of the coolest things about these low melting temperature metals is seeing things like steel wrenches just floating on the surface.       

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I can imagine there being a structural advantage to a big chunk of metal bolted to the keelson. otoh, I have never thought about a lead keel this way before. it's really just dead weight isn't it. is there any structure to be had from it?

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I remember the lead pour for the Frers maxi Flyer II at Huismans in Vollenhove in February 1980.  They boiled a huge vat (18 tons) of lead on the dock, then plopped the hull shell into the almost freezing canal.

The lead was poured into the hollow aluminium fin keel and the flowing cold water outside cooled everything and prevented any deformation of the structure.  It was 20mm alloy anyway, so not much danger of that, but a superb method all the same.

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I have been casting lead since the 1970’s, lead levels in my system are at or below normal accepted safe levels.  But precaution is required.  (Good washup after finishing, excellent ventilation and no eating or drinking until after cleanup/washup and proper attire) 

Lead and lead alloys solidify fairly quickly but never think that it cools as quickly as it solidifies.  Pouring up leftover lead is a task that requires the upmost of care.  Also, its pretty important to keep molten lead away from anything that resembles water including sweat.  Steam explosions off of lead is an experience that one does not want to see even the first time.  (The owner of the skin that gets a dose of hot lead quickly gets really pissed)

So, seeing massive amounts of lead poured means extra care.

 

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19 hours ago, Santanasailor said:

I have been casting lead since the 1970’s, lead levels in my system are at or below normal accepted safe levels.  But precaution is required.  (Good washup after finishing, excellent ventilation and no eating or drinking until after cleanup/washup and proper attire) 

Lead and lead alloys solidify fairly quickly but never think that it cools as quickly as it solidifies.  Pouring up leftover lead is a task that requires the upmost of care.  Also, its pretty important to keep molten lead away from anything that resembles water including sweat.  Steam explosions off of lead is an experience that one does not want to see even the first time.  (The owner of the skin that gets a dose of hot lead quickly gets really pissed)

So, seeing massive amounts of lead poured means extra care.

 

You didn't happen to be involved in the pouring of a large keel for a Boothbay Challenger on Oak St just near the Maple Leaf Bar back in the 70's? Probably would be dead now due to the nasty way that was accomplished! I was working for Seemann Plastics at the time and there was a hippie sort of guy who would come in occasionally and buy large quantities of resin, fiberglass and other boatbuilding supplies. Turned out his project was just around the corner from the Black funeral home from my little shotgun apt and he invited me over to check out his progress. That boat was huge and was shoehorned between his shotgun and the funeral home and he had been working on it or years. He started with C-Flex which was our prized product at Seemann and the whole project was astounding. He had the knack for recruiting young twenty somethings from the French Quarter for the nasty lamination work with the promise of a hot meal and some fine smoke at the end of a work session. His wife was a nurse at one of the cancer hospitals and would sneak empty isotope lead containers which were stockpiled under the back porch. When it came time to cast the keel he had the slave labor chop up old car and truck batteries (also salvaged) and it was appalling to see the battery acid just pooling on the ground and even more alarming was the furnace to melt the lead was fueled by years of saved tool cleaning acetone, drums of it! The melting/smelting operation went on for days with a steady flow of volunteer kids all stoned to the max getting exposed to more toxic wastes than I care to remember. The pour went on in batches and each cauldron would get a few of the lead isotope urns thrown is as he claimed that they had a good level of antimony in them. I asked if he was worried about having a radioactive keel but he said that the lead would absorb most of the residual radioactivity and when the boat was in the water that the radiation would be much like the water contained reactors one see pictures of glowing a a deep combat blue. Cobalt was aslo the isotope for the radiation therapy urns in the first place but I don't think anything actually glowed! Worst part was the black clouds of contanimated resin and styrene and acetone billowing from the Rube Goldberg furnace and drifted right down on the funeral home. The polyester resin in the acetone left long dangly strings of burnt crap that would rain down all up and down the street. It got so bad one day when my little place on 200' downwind was inundated by the smoke and drifting ash that I went over to at least sit upwind and watch the process. Of course he thought I was there to pitch in and help but no way I was going to contribute to such an eco disaster! I pointed out how the bulk of the toxic cloud was going right into the old funeral home and he just laughed and said that the residents there were beyond any further harm. 

    He at least had the decency to halt any nasty procedures on Sunday when the Black Funeral Home would have at least of couple of Jazz burial marches to the nearby graveyards. That was always a treat to join in despite any Saturday night hangovers that I might be suffering from. 

http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1503604271/clients/neworleans/jazz_funeral_019_b531fb40-9dcb-4d21-ad82-f2eb4e1e45e3.jpg

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

You didn't happen to be involved in the pouring of a large keel for a Boothbay Challenger on Oak St just near the Maple Leaf Bar back in the 70's? Probably would be dead now due to the nasty way that was accomplished! I was working for Seemann Plastics at the time and there was a hippie sort of guy who would come in occasionally and buy large quantities of resin, fiberglass and other boatbuilding supplies. Turned out his project was just around the corner from the Black funeral home from my little shotgun apt and he invited me over to check out his progress. That boat was huge and was shoehorned between his shotgun and the funeral home and he had been working on it or years. He started with C-Flex which was our prized product at Seemann and the whole project was astounding. He had the knack for recruiting young twenty somethings from the French Quarter for the nasty lamination work with the promise of a hot meal and some fine smoke at the end of a work session. His wife was a nurse at one of the cancer hospitals and would sneak empty isotope lead containers which were stockpiled under the back porch. When it came time to cast the keel he had the slave labor chop up old car and truck batteries (also salvaged) and it was appalling to see the battery acid just pooling on the ground and even more alarming was the furnace to melt the lead was fueled by years of saved tool cleaning acetone, drums of it! The melting/smelting operation went on for days with a steady flow of volunteer kids all stoned to the max getting exposed to more toxic wastes than I care to remember. The pour went on in batches and each cauldron would get a few of the lead isotope urns thrown is as he claimed that they had a good level of antimony in them. I asked if he was worried about having a radioactive keel but he said that the lead would absorb most of the residual radioactivity and when the boat was in the water that the radiation would be much like the water contained reactors one see pictures of glowing a a deep combat blue. Cobalt was aslo the isotope for the radiation therapy urns in the first place but I don't think anything actually glowed! Worst part was the black clouds of contanimated resin and styrene and acetone billowing from the Rube Goldberg furnace and drifted right down on the funeral home. The polyester resin in the acetone left long dangly strings of burnt crap that would rain down all up and down the street. It got so bad one day when my little place on 200' downwind was inundated by the smoke and drifting ash that I went over to at least sit upwind and watch the process. Of course he thought I was there to pitch in and help but no way I was going to contribute to such an eco disaster! I pointed out how the bulk of the toxic cloud was going right into the old funeral home and he just laughed and said that the residents there were beyond any further harm. 

    He at least had the decency to halt any nasty procedures on Sunday when the Black Funeral Home would have at least of couple of Jazz burial marches to the nearby graveyards. That was always a treat to join in despite any Saturday night hangovers that I might be suffering from. 

Before even finishing your read, I was appalled.  The lead in batteries is contaminated and very dangerous to smelt without proper equipment and protection.  (The acid is another story, equally appalling and even more dangerous) 

I am from North Louisiana and we cast small quantities and do it very carefully.  Life is too short as it is, cancer and lead poisoning both make life painfully shorter.  

My opinion on pouring lead is that the entire pour has to be continuous or you may have a weak joint.  And our lead is tested for hardness and and when it matters our alloys are carefully measured. (The hardness is what is important to us)

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28 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

You didn't happen to be involved in the pouring of a large keel for a Boothbay Challenger on Oak St just near the Maple Leaf Bar back in the 70's? Probably would be dead now due to the nasty way that was accomplished! I was working for Seemann Plastics at the time and there was a hippie sort of guy who would come in occasionally and buy large quantities of resin, fiberglass and other boatbuilding supplies. Turned out his project was just around the corner from the Black funeral home from my little shotgun apt and he invited me over to check out his progress. That boat was huge and was shoehorned between his shotgun and the funeral home and he had been working on it or years. He started with C-Flex which was our prized product at Seemann and the whole project was astounding. He had the knack for recruiting young twenty somethings from the French Quarter for the nasty lamination work with the promise of a hot meal and some fine smoke at the end of a work session. His wife was a nurse at one of the cancer hospitals and would sneak empty isotope lead containers which were stockpiled under the back porch. When it came time to cast the keel he had the slave labor chop up old car and truck batteries (also salvaged) and it was appalling to see the battery acid just pooling on the ground and even more alarming was the furnace to melt the lead was fueled by years of saved tool cleaning acetone, drums of it! The melting/smelting operation went on for days with a steady flow of volunteer kids all stoned to the max getting exposed to more toxic wastes than I care to remember. The pour went on in batches and each cauldron would get a few of the lead isotope urns thrown is as he claimed that they had a good level of antimony in them. I asked if he was worried about having a radioactive keel but he said that the lead would absorb most of the residual radioactivity and when the boat was in the water that the radiation would be much like the water contained reactors one see pictures of glowing a a deep combat blue. Cobalt was aslo the isotope for the radiation therapy urns in the first place but I don't think anything actually glowed! Worst part was the black clouds of contanimated resin and styrene and acetone billowing from the Rube Goldberg furnace and drifted right down on the funeral home. The polyester resin in the acetone left long dangly strings of burnt crap that would rain down all up and down the street. It got so bad one day when my little place on 200' downwind was inundated by the smoke and drifting ash that I went over to at least sit upwind and watch the process. Of course he thought I was there to pitch in and help but no way I was going to contribute to such an eco disaster! I pointed out how the bulk of the toxic cloud was going right into the old funeral home and he just laughed and said that the residents there were beyond any further harm. 

    He at least had the decency to halt any nasty procedures on Sunday when the Black Funeral Home would have at least of couple of Jazz burial marches to the nearby graveyards. That was always a treat to join in despite any Saturday night hangovers that I might be suffering from. 

The problem with smelting lead batteries is that most of the lead has become lead sulfate.  Which when smelted gives off Sulfur Dioxide.  Also two highly poisonous and unstable gases stibine and arsine.  Smelting batteries is not for the faint of heart but unfortunately, it is a highly profitable business in many third world locations.  The population is suffering for it.  

Your neighbor even by 1970 standards has broken just about every law, both legal and moral in all Christendom.  

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30 minutes ago, Santanasailor said:

The problem with smelting lead batteries is that most of the lead has become lead sulfate.  Which when smelted gives off Sulfur Dioxide.  Also two highly poisonous and unstable gases stibine and arsine.  Smelting batteries is not for the faint of heart but unfortunately, it is a highly profitable business in many third world locations.  The population is suffering for it.  

 

You make it sound like a dangerous thing.

There wouldn’t be many Australian country kids of our generation, who didn’t make their own fishing sinkers, diving weights and model yacht keels from old car battery lead.

Splitting the case open and beating the sulphates out of the lead plates , prior to melting, was the dangerous bit, coz ya mum would beat the crap out of you when you got home  for the acid burn holes in your clothes. The fire around the milk powder tin and the pour was the fun bit.

How times have changed.

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Is he going to cast in a long steel frame with long stainless or bronze keel studs to go through the keelson?  Or bolt the ballast keel on with huge bolts from the bottom?  I'd prefer option 1 myself.

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7 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Is he going to cast in a long steel frame with long stainless or bronze keel studs to go through the keelson?  Or bolt the ballast keel on with huge bolts from the bottom? 

That second thing is how it was originally set up, IIRC.  My guess is he'll put the keel under the boat and drill down through the floors, rather than trying to do all the work of positioning j-bolts in the keel so that they line up with the floors.

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

That second thing is how it was originally set up, IIRC.  My guess is he'll put the keel under the boat and drill down through the floors, rather than trying to do all the work of positioning j-bolts in the keel so that they line up with the floors.

 

1 minute ago, Snowden said:

Acorn2Arabella did something in the middle, IIRC? They cut pockets in the lead to slide big nuts into, that the keel bolts then screwed into.

image.jpeg.c4a921e7fe787125b79d440d7c6de79c.jpeg

This is the method used for this era

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7 minutes ago, longy said:

 

This is the method used for this era

undoubtedly true.  But (IIRC) one of the early videos showed him pounding keelbolts out from the inside, and pullng them out from underneath the keel

Edited to add: screen-shot from episode 8...

 

1680670099_keelbolt.thumb.JPG.64828a05725db2d3ca147ad4cf039deb.JPG

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You can pocket the nuts inside the keel (in a 'window') OR RECESS THEM INTO THE BOTTOM OF THE KEEL. (ignore caps) Arabella's keel is taller than Tally's, so my guess is Leo will go thru to underside of keel

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It will be a massive job to drill down through that huge piece of purpleheart.  I really hope they miss the bronze bolts holding the scarf together!  But I suspect Leo has got it all well planned.

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2 hours ago, P_Wop said:

It will be a massive job to drill down through that huge piece of purpleheart.   

And drilling through the lead will be as easy?  It's been done, before, no? 

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2 hours ago, P_Wop said:

It will be a massive job to drill down through that huge piece of purpleheart.  I really hope they miss the bronze bolts holding the scarf together!  But I suspect Leo has got it all well planned.

Every damn thing on that boat is a massive job from my perspective!  

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44 minutes ago, PaulK said:

And drilling through the lead will be as easy?  It's been done, before, no? 

Lead, even alloyed with antimony is quite easy to machine as it's self-lubricating and quite soft.  Remember Leo chainsawing the old keel?

The fun bit will be lifting the boat to slide the lead keel under her, with enough clearance to rebate the holes to get a hefty bronze washer and nut in each one.  The travelift will go in the shed.

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On 2/4/2022 at 3:45 PM, Santanasailor said:

The problem with smelting lead batteries is that most of the lead has become lead sulfate.  Which when smelted gives off Sulfur Dioxide.  Also two highly poisonous and unstable gases stibine and arsine. 

My old company produced high powered GaAs lasers in the fab.  Arsine gas was one of the feedstocks.  The running joke was that arsine gas supposedly smelled like garlic.  Or strawberries.  No one knew for sure, since anyone who had smelled arsine was dead.  

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On 2/8/2022 at 3:13 PM, PaulK said:

And drilling through the lead will be as easy?  It's been done, before, no? 

 

On 2/8/2022 at 3:55 PM, P_Wop said:

Lead, even alloyed with antimony is quite easy to machine as it's self-lubricating and quite soft.  Remember Leo chainsawing the old keel?

Machining may be easy, but drilling holes not so much.

I drilled just 3 bolt holes in my soft lead bulb, and nearly killed my self in the process. Maybe there are special drill bits, a bit like the old flat wood bits, that do the job better.

A quick google found this demo of a small hole, you'll see what I mean.

 

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Even with internal ballast to be added it seems like relatively little ballast for such a massive vessel. It has 17,000 lb (+internal to come). My Bristol 45.5 had something like 15,000 lb and it was all internal with only 5' draft. Perhaps the experts can chime in.

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1 hour ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Perhaps the experts can chime in.

No expert, but he said Tally Ho had something like 4-3/4 tons of external, and ~8 tons of internal, total of (roughly) 26,000 lbs.

By making the new ballast keel 17,000 lbs, he's "only" got to find room for 4.5 tons of internal.  And perhaps less, as the CG will have been lowered by moving ~8k lbs down to the external keel

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I wonder what good old Doug refered to when he said several things were new for him, this time?

That apart from the videoing, telling his story, and leaving a legacy that he nicely mentioned at the end. Top guy!
And well done everybody.

 

 

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Just found this thread.  I think the Tally Ho videos have to be one of the most amazing things on Youtube, frankly, and this lead pour was phenomenal.  I knew the original pour was not going to work and I was surprised that Leo thought it would - I knew the hot lead would drill a hole right beside those boards.  Anyway, this was a really exciting thing to watch, and you could sense the joy and relief in the way Leo edited the final episode, the exhaustion and the fear and the celebration.

I think he probably feels that everything else after this is downhill, even if it's a really long down hill.  He's going to take a long, long, LONG time on that interior, I can see that coming.  I look forward to the standing rig more than anything, I think.  I hope he uses galvanized...

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2 hours ago, sledracr said:

No expert, but he said Tally Ho had something like 4-3/4 tons of external, and ~8 tons of internal, total of (roughly) 26,000 lbs.

By making the new ballast keel 17,000 lbs, he's "only" got to find room for 4.5 tons of internal.  And perhaps less, as the CG will have been lowered by moving ~8k lbs down to the external keel

Leo said they will have much less internal ballast because they have increased headroom, plus they will have more tankage to find places for. It almost sounded that internal ballast will be mainly for trim.

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Leo and the Boys have again knocked it clean out of the park.

Classic and true example of how Good people attract good people. Leo has consistently navigated a shrewed path of doing the right thing and attracting people who gravitate to that ethos, be that Pete, Patrick, Rowan and countless others over the build. Now Doug has in no small part removed the impediment of the largest single piece that will in all honesty be largely overlooked when the Good ship Tally Ho sails again, at least by those who will just marvel at the Hull Deck and Rigging  - as those parts will be front and centre.

But a lump of lead of that magnitude is confirmed by the reaction of Leo himself and all involved at 24:19 in the video. Massive relief and anxiety released.

High stakes and an enormous hurdle has been overcome.

I am massively intrigued by how they will get the Lead demoulded without deformation and get it postioned and then manoeuvred under the hull.

Travel hoist to the rescue I am guessing, whilst playing a giant game of multiple boat shuffle. Both boats out. Lift keel to position, place hull over keel.

Was slightly surprised that no structure was embedded prior to the pour, but Leo has been well advised on all matters. 

Fascinating stuff, superbly done. 

When will we see this series adapted for primetime?

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This might be considered political...?  But it's Sequim so might be part of the history of Leo's Tally Ho project.  It's well written and very interesting.

The Town That QAnon Nearly Swallowed
Right-wing demagogues tried to take over a small town in the Pacific Northwest. Here’s how concerned citizens stopped them.
By Sasha Abramsky, FEBRUARY 7, 2022

https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/sequim-qanon/

Quote

Sequim seems an unlikely setting for a last stand against a local wannabe strongman. Yet, in fact, it’s bitterly divided politically, as is the rest of the county. The political headline for the region in the aftermath of the last presidential election is that Clallam County holds the distinction of being the longest-running presidential bellwether county in the United States.

 

Found from this newscast yesterday: (at 12:57)

 

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That lead pouring was amazing! Doug might have poured my keel too, who knows, but what a tremendous effort and phenomenal job on that keel.

On the Q stuff: maybe those folks did not wear a respirator when they poured lead? The stuff is so bizarre that it is hard to even imagine people go for it. Borat is great in taking it to an extreme. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

EPISODE 120

Having cast the 17,000lb Lead Ballast Keel, we finally break it out of the mould and take a proper look at it!

After trimming the ends and cutting a key with a chainsaw, we have to figure out a way of moving it around, in order to get it underneath the boat.

.

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Not to drift the thread, but we visited the Matthew Turner a few days ago in Sausilito . . 

175 feet of wooden brigantine and a work of art. 

Incredible volunteer effort as well. 

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I think I might have found a bigger project.  Yea, its not wooden.  Yea, its not a sailboat.  Yea, the guy isn't a shipwright.  But, man, what a project.

 

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2 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I think I might have found a bigger project.  Yea, its not wooden.  Yea, its not a sailboat.  Yea, the guy isn't a shipwright.  But, man, what a project.

 

Wasn't this the one that was sitting on a pier in a bay North and East of Richmond, CA or something like that?

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11 hours ago, WCB said:

Wasn't this the one that was sitting on a pier in a bay North and East of Richmond, CA or something like that?

It's still there.

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16 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I think I might have found a bigger project.  Yea, its not wooden.  Yea, its not a sailboat.  Yea, the guy isn't a shipwright.  But, man, what a project.

 

Holy mother of God.  So many questions... The video after this has a brief engine room tour.  5 Maybach gensets pushing electric driven props.  Seems like the main goal is a cosmetic restoration; he mentioned trying to eventually get the boat to the point where it could limp along at 7kts with one of the gensets lit up.  Wonder what the end goal is.  

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59 minutes ago, socalrider said:

Holy mother of God.  So many questions... The video after this has a brief engine room tour.  5 Maybach gensets pushing electric driven props.  Seems like the main goal is a cosmetic restoration; he mentioned trying to eventually get the boat to the point where it could limp along at 7kts with one of the gensets lit up.  Wonder what the end goal is.  

All I could think of is he better have endless money and time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

EPISODE 121

Catching up on all sorts of work that has been going on whilst we were casting the keel - deck strapping, engine bed bolts, bulkheads, and so on!

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On 3/3/2022 at 6:50 PM, MauiPunter said:

I think I might have found a bigger project.  Yea, its not wooden.  Yea, its not a sailboat.  Yea, the guy isn't a shipwright.  But, man, what a project.

 

I really don't see the point either, but I guess he has fallen in love... I mean, someone else will say there is no point to restoring Tally Ho, but as sailors it is hard to agree with that.

Anyway, this has to be in the CA Delta, of course. It is a special place, but the amount of half or completely sunken boats and barges as well as "projects" sitting around all over, is shocking. 

 

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2 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:

I really don't see the point either, but I guess he has fallen in love... I mean, someone else will say there is no point to restoring Tally Ho, but as sailors it is hard to agree with that.

Anyway, this has to be in the CA Delta, of course. It is a special place, but the amount of half or completely sunken boats and barges as well as "projects" sitting around all over, is shocking. 

 

I'll root for him with a morbid curiosity.  He seems to be a metal worker from what I read.  Maybe that's what that boat needs, much like Leo is a wood worker which is what Tally Ho needed.  I'll be watching if it stays the course.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/13/2022 at 8:07 PM, AnotherSailor said:
On 3/3/2022 at 6:50 PM, MauiPunter said:

I think I might have found a bigger project.  Yea, its not wooden.  Yea, its not a sailboat.  Yea, the guy isn't a shipwright.  But, man, what a project.

 

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I really don't see the point either, but I guess he has fallen in love... I mean, someone else will say there is no point to restoring Tally Ho, but as sailors it is hard to agree with that.

Anyway, this has to be in the CA Delta, of course. It is a special place, but the amount of half or completely sunken boats and barges as well as "projects" sitting around all over, is shocking. 

Has anybody told him about the SS United States?

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32 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Has anybody told him about the SS United States?

The Aurora is in his backyard.  So, probably was a major consideration.  SS United States is in PA.  Hell of a commute for weekend projects.  :D

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EPISODE 123

At last, it’s time to bolt the ballast keel to the bottom of the boat - before we sail off without it!

Auger bits get welded, counterbores get sharpened, and a series of huge holes are drilled through hardwood and lead before Aluminium-Bronze bolts are driven in.

In other exciting news, we lift the engine into the boat, paint the engine beds and bilge, cut an access hatch, and fit the staunchions - it’s been a busy couple of weeks!

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2 hours ago, t.rex said:

 

 

EPISODE 123

At last, it’s time to bolt the ballast keel to the bottom of the boat - before we sail off without it!

Auger bits get welded, counterbores get sharpened, and a series of huge holes are drilled through hardwood and lead before Aluminium-Bronze bolts are driven in.

In other exciting news, we lift the engine into the boat, paint the engine beds and bilge, cut an access hatch, and fit the staunchions - it’s been a busy couple of weeks!

Best thing on the internet.  Every episode is just jaw dropping.  

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I guess that's why there aren't many comments in here - anymore - about the build. the crowd has been rendered speechless.

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I love the final detail where the tar squudged out between the keel timber and the lead ballast, showing that the join was completely closed and completely fair.  Wonderful artisanship.

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About $6,000 worth of keel bolts there.  It is amazing the money that can be generated from YouTube. This project is as much a production set and source of online content as it is a reasonable boat building project. By that I mean the cost of building this boat by any measure is way out of line with the value of the finished boat. But as a production set and source of content for these videos, it is pure gold. I can't believe I have watched all of these things. I cut maybe two short but the hours...

As a wood boat owner it is really interesting. As far as the comment about keeping everything plumb, it would be bad to be off by 2 degrees and probably disastrous to be off by 4.

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On 2/3/2022 at 9:49 AM, floater said:

I can imagine there being a structural advantage to a big chunk of metal bolted to the keelson. otoh, I have never thought about a lead keel this way before. it's really just dead weight isn't it. is there any structure to be had from it?

It's been a while since I read this thread, but I did want to respond to the question.  Yes lead can be structural.  I think L. Francis Herreshoff designed some of his boats without a wood keel.  A rabbet was cut and planking screwed directly to the lead. I don't remember what they did with frames, but lead is pretty soft and cuts nicely with woodworking tools so you could probably let the frames in as well.  I think the Neria was designed this way.  Also you don't have to bolt through the lead, you can use lag bolts, which would make floor/frame attachment easier.

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The key with weak materials is to spread the stress out, so screwing lots of frames to small keel that's rabbeted into the lead and held with lots of fasteners is not necessarily a crazy idea, especially for something like a race boat. Lead can be a pain in the ass in situations where you need 10-20mm sheets, as in many nuclear medicine and radiotherapy applications, because it often doesn't support itself, so you need to encase it in steel etc. We like to use thicker steel sections instead of lead, and that works for some types of radiation like X-rays and PET, but for certain energies of gamma rays, you just need that high atomic number. it looks like with Tally Ho they have about one bolt every 24" (assuming the keel is about 30' long) but the keel is 24" deep so the stress cones should all overlap nicely. 

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22 minutes ago, Foiling Optimist said:

The key with weak materials is to spread the stress out, so screwing lots of frames to small keel that's rabbeted into the lead and held with lots of fasteners is not necessarily a crazy idea, especially for something like a race boat. Lead can be a pain in the ass in situations where you need 10-20mm sheets, as in many nuclear medicine and radiotherapy applications, because it often doesn't support itself, so you need to encase it in steel etc. We like to use thicker steel sections instead of lead, and that works for some types of radiation like X-rays and PET, but for certain energies of gamma rays, you just need that high atomic number. it looks like with Tally Ho they have about one bolt every 24" (assuming the keel is about 30' long) but the keel is 24" deep so the stress cones should all overlap nicely. 

That is interesting. My boat has 11 bolts through the lead spaced at 13 inches. The spacing was so that a 6 pack of beer would fit between the floors. But most of the bolts are side by side. Only the front one is single. I had not noticed that his bolts are just on the centerline. His are way bigger in diameter.