Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 859
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I think Leo decided he liked the boat with rot, tradition and lineage included. He didn’t like the mangled foundations and decided that if he was going to replace the frames, he wasn’t just gonna copy

Thanks for all your interest and support, all!

That's a good question Southercross. Leo seems to me to be a very bright person who has decided to concentrate on a certain trade and displays the level of knowledge commensurate with his level of int

Posted Images

36 minutes ago, IStream said:

Quite possible, but I think he'll take care of the hull, get the masts and rigging in decent shape, then sail her home to Cornwall to finish up.

He has so much if the boat that he plans on reusing sitting there in Was that I can't see how he can do that.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, IStream said:

Quite possible, but I think he'll take care of the hull, get the masts and rigging in decent shape, then sail her home to Cornwall to finish up.

Yes but how much will it cost to put her on a truck to the right coast first? Unless he plans an extended cruise around Panama...

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Snowden said:

Yes but how much will it cost to put her on a truck to the right coast first? Unless he plans an extended cruise around Panama...

In one of his videos he was musing about Cape Horn or the North West Passage...

You can bet the boat will be ship-shape before he leaves the US

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Snowden said:

Yes but how much will it cost to put her on a truck to the right coast first? Unless he plans an extended cruise around Panama...

A boat that size would probably require permits the entire way. She is 12 feet wide so would require two lanes.  Very expensive I would guess.  Better to put it on a ship imho. But I agree, I think it will either be in mint condition before it leaves WA, or he gives up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There must be some larger reason to do the work here instead of England, or to do this boat here instead of another boat there, as there are many worthy boats. And they aren't like orphaned nephews where you just have to keep them so it's a concious choice to work here. It's a long way from home to randomly drop into such a project. He's in a good place to stay focused though. Close enough to Port Townsend to access the odd resource and far enough not to get bogged down in the social whirl of PT boat building (as I imagine it). 

Does anyone have a basis to speculate on how much time you'd expect an interior to take vs. a hull?  I was just looking up length vs displacement (and I suppose, cost) and am always daunted by cubic relationships. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Freda is 32 feet and built in 1885.  Restored by Spaulding Boat Works using their student's labor it still cost $500,000 and took 5 years.  Tally Ho is newer and larger at 48 feet according to Wikipedia.  That would scale her as 3.4 times larger by volume.  If everything scales, it will take 17 years and about $2,000,000.

Leo has 30 videos up and gets revenue from Google for those  The web says you earn $2000 per million viewers and he has 30 videos up and they seem to be about 200k views each so roughly 6 million views or $12,000 from ads.  That might cover 10% of his costs. I have a couple of videos in the same order of magnitude and those numbers seem believable. I assume his donors are much more important.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Foiling Optimist said:

There must be some larger reason to do the work here instead of England, or to do this boat here instead of another boat there, as there are many worthy boats. And they aren't like orphaned nephews where you just have to keep them so it's a concious choice to work here. It's a long way from home to randomly drop into such a project. He's in a good place to stay focused though. Close enough to Port Townsend to access the odd resource and far enough not to get bogged down in the social whirl of PT boat building (as I imagine it). 

Does anyone have a basis to speculate on how much time you'd expect an interior to take vs. a hull?  I was just looking up length vs displacement (and I suppose, cost) and am always daunted by cubic relationships. 

I believe the larger reason is that the boat was already on the West Coast and he had friends with land and a shop in Sequim.

Even if the project takes 10 years of full time labor, by the 80/20 rule, he ought to have the seaworthiness up to snuff in far less time. He can then take her back on her own bottom and spend the rest of his adult life fettling with her when he's not chasing his and Cecca's offspring around.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, IStream said:

I believe the larger reason is that the boat was already on the West Coast and he had friends with land and a shop in Sequim.

Even if the project takes 10 years of full time labor, by the 80/20 rule, he ought to have the seaworthiness up to snuff in far less time. He can then take her back on her own bottom and spend the rest of his adult life fettling with her when he's not chasing his and Cecca's offspring around.

Yep I think access to workshop big enough to loft the whole boat plus an enviable array of tools would be a big swing factor. Also, I am not a lawyer but I suspect building that boat shed structure in the U.K. would make you unpopular with your local planning department. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, casc27 said:

My guess is Leo will be at this for a decade or so (if he can keep going, and I hope he can). But he seems to be having fun and doing good work so I hope he enjoys the adventure.

I agree.  I estimated 10 years at least.   Obviously, more bodies, faster turn around.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dennis Holland took up a lot of space around these parts for many years.  When he finally took 'Shawnee' down I felt terrible.  You went down Holiday Road to see the barn and the boat.   The barn's still there, 'Shawnee' dismantled but stored, and 'Pilgrim'  (now called Spirit of Dana Point) sails out of Dana Point. 

https://theenterprisereport.typepad.com/newport/2011/01/sailing-into-a-storm-dennis-holland-and-the-shawnee-you-can-fight-city-hall-and-sometimes-you-should.html

Image result for dennis holland shawnee

Link to post
Share on other sites

My thought was he made a decision to take on Tally Ho, which meant staying in Washington as opposed to finding a different project in the UK, where I am sure there are many worthy craft in need of attention. It's not like he had to do Tally Ho per se, but anyway here we are and it is awesome, albeit terrifying in scale. At least this way he might still be working on it when my kid is out of high school and I'd have more time to go down and volunteer for a while! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/7/2019 at 12:38 PM, casc27 said:

My guess is Leo will be at this for a decade or so (if he can keep going, and I hope he can). But he seems to be having fun and doing good work so I hope he enjoys the adventure.

As EB White put it, “Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” 

On the other hand I know lots of folks who would rather work on boats than sail them. I am not one of those people. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/9/2019 at 7:43 AM, AJ Oliver said:

As EB White put it, “Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” 

Kenneth Graham - "Wind in the Willows", other side of the pond, not EB White (although a keen sailor, father of Joel).

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
2 hours ago, blunderfull said:

Good stuff. I don't buy into the "German engineering is superior" myth in general but these are the real deal.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, IStream said:

Good stuff. I don't buy into the "German engineering is superior" myth in general but these are the real deal.

How do they last around salt water?

I would dig having some ‘Cobra’ pliers. However, I work around pools/boats & my gear gets thrashed fast.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knipex

 

They have their own Tool Museum.  Founded 1882.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest episode has some cool scenes, including the making of this full size pattern for the stern post:

51403757_1128197657353787_3723937504072564736_n.thumb.jpg.d81c71256c953df9675a11cca4c009ee.jpg

Quote
42. Cutting the Stern Post – and some BIG plans!

This episode, while the team keeps on building new frames, I make the templates for the Stern part of the Centerline, from the lofting floor. The ShipSaw gets some love and affection, and the framing of the centre-section of the boat is completed! Kirt and I talk about his really exciting idea about speeding up the next phase of the project, and despite a snowstorm, I make the first few cuts on the Sternpost timber with the Chainsaw Jig.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, overdraft said:

OK, now by a show of hands, how many of you have an internet crush on Cecca?

You’re heading into Rick Springfield territory...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like Leo is learning a lot about project management. He obviously has great skills as a tradesman, but can he effectively train and organize a large workforce? With the skills he is gaining on this boat he will be in demand for projects down the road.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Mizzmo said:

Looks like Leo is learning a lot about project management. He obviously has great skills as a tradesman, but can he effectively train and organize a large workforce? With the skills he is gaining on this boat he will be in demand for projects down the road.

 

One of our good mates is a highly skilled Shipwright, who is in high demand.  One of the local Brewers, now Safe Harbor yards, hires him for complicated modifications or build projects of their affluent boat owners.  I am sure they mark up his rate considerably, but I can think of only a small handful others in the area capable of his work quality.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

EPISODE 43. The yard is full of deep snow, but we have no time to spare! Finn and I cut out all the remaining Stern Assembly pieces from the huge Purpleheart timbers, and then use power-planes, hand-planes, chisels, and a new router sled, to shape them to match the templates as precisely as possible. Then we have to try and assemble this extremely heavy and expensive jigsaw! Once they all fit together, we use the forklift to hoist the whole Stern Assembly upright so we can check all the joinery from both sides.
 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, reminds me of one of the 120VAC power supplies in the lab: an extension cord with the end cut off to expose the hot and neutral wires. Useful in trained hands but just one slip away from disaster.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this project. I've been binge-watching for days. This guy is amazing. I love watching other people work, especially when they know what they are doing like this guy. But I do wonder what's the point of "rebuilding" this boat when so very little of the original remains.  Yes, it has the original lead but little else. I would think it makes more sense to build a new replica than what they are doing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I seriously doubt the original boat was built to a precision of 1/8 inch so I think he is improving on the original -- and paying the price in terms of the project expanding beyond what he imagined when he decided to do it.  He is lucky in that he seems to have a good supply of free labor and some income from donations. I wish him the best of luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Third Reef said:

Then it would just be a replica and not the original boat won fastnet !

I know that he says the boat will retain the soul of the original.  But I just don't see it. This is really a new (and perhaps betterboat built the hard way.  As far as I can tell, the only original parts will be the lead and a (very) few planks, perhaps the deck houses. None of this takes away from the builder, however, who is a most amazing man.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Antoine31 said:

I know that he says the boat will retain the soul of the original.  But I just don't see it. 

In ten years when he finishes, it will be interesting to see who agrees with you and who sees it as a copy.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love this project but I'll be curious to see how long the patrons are willing to keep donating. Taking in roughly 3500+ per video at the moment will likely dry up well before the completion of this. The scale is just so massive that I cannot see how it'll survive, even despite Leos damn impressive determination and skill.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Antoine31 said:

I know that he says the boat will retain the soul of the original.  But I just don't see it. This is really a new (and perhaps betterboat built the hard way.  As far as I can tell, the only original parts will be the lead and a (very) few planks, perhaps the deck houses. None of this takes away from the builder, however, who is a most amazing man.

As one of his viewers said,

"The average age of human cells are 7 to 10 years or less, with a few longer-lived exceptions being the neurons in the cerebral cortex and the lenses in the eyes. So a decade from now, I, like Tally Ho, will have almost all my parts fully replaced. And yet, I will still be me.

And so will she."

  • Like 2
  • Downvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting bit at the end that is telling about when he changed from restoring the boat to the way it was to restoring it to the way it should have been.  Almost bit him but he says he is OK. You can see it in this frame where the stern post doesn't line up with the keel - it is off to the left.  Now you are officially a sharp eyed viewer.

He is clearly lucky in that he seems to be getting volunteers from all over the world.  Everything takes longer than he expects.  I always say that every small boat projects take a boat week and there are twelve boat weeks in a year.

That comes from history.  President Kennedy said we would put a man on the moon in 10 years and we did.  How did we do that? What is said is that the head of the project got estimates from all the managers and quadrupled all of them. This project will be no exception to my rule about boat weeks.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe it is to take up the gap so that water doesn't get in there.  It may also help take up the gap that he doesn't have because he is building it like it is a piano. They uses something similar between the lead and my deadwood when I replaced my keel bolts back in 2006.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Is it straight felt or tar felt?

I believe mine had tar involved.  I also think it was thicker than what Leo was using. But it was more than 10 years ago so memory fades as I wasn't the one doing the work.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Is it straight felt or tar felt?

It looked like tar to me and that would make sense. Regular felt would probably tend to wick water in rather then keep it out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought maybe they would glue those big bits together. It seems they will be bolting them, so it will be interesting to watch that. Hope we get an explanation for the tar / felt strips. My dad did a lot of the planing and chiseling that we see. It is a pity he can not watch this. Dearly departed many years ago. While I find it fascinating watching, it makes me really like my Viking 33.

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Unkle Crusty said:

I thought maybe they would glue those big bits together. It seems they will be bolting them, so it will be interesting to watch that. Hope we get an explanation for the tar / felt strips. My dad did a lot of the planing and chiseling that we see. It is a pity he can not watch this. Dearly departed many years ago. While I find it fascinating watching, it makes me really like my Viking 33.

I don't think any glue is up to the forces that stern post is going to see. My little 36foot boat is built the same way -- three pieces with bolts.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, allene222 said:

I was actually surprised he didn't smear real tar on there like he does on the butt joints on the frames.

I was wondering the same thing about the end grain on the tenon..

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

I was wondering the same thing about the end grain on the tenon..

 I think this is all dry fitting to this point right?  He's still gotta drill the holes for bolts & prop shaft, etc.  

Thanks for the info on felt - agree, hope he goes into the details.  The project scope seems utterly overwhelming to me; I am amazed at his persistence.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, pusslicker said:

Looks like he got a fucking Lie-Nielsen sponsorship or he has a lot more cash than he lets on.

You made me go look at the hand plane I got from my dad.  Bailey #5  patented 1902.  Probably from Edison's shop when my great grandfather worked there. It looks like it was bought last year. 

17 minutes ago, Antoine31 said:

One thing  I learned from these videos is how much precision goes into a build like this.  I guess I always thought it was "close enough," rather than "exactly."  Something to see, really. 

I think Leo is asking for an unreasonable precision.  The wood will change with the seasons not to mention what is going to happen when the boat goes in the water. But things have to fit together exactly and Leo is certainly knows how to do that.  When they did the new floors on my boat, Steve used templates just as Leo is doing it is just that Steve fit the templates to the boat and not to any plans. When the maststep went in it had to be a perfect fit to the six floors it rests on so the weight will be distributed properly to the hull. The floors on an L-36 were not strong enough as built.  They all broke. By all, I mean some broke on every boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Not only is he personally working hard on the project, he has to organize tools/materials/living/etc for the frame gang coming in, and has to have the boat ready for that team push.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Antoine31 said:

Chap is looking kinda tired these days, don't you think? 

Wait until you see him on episode 145.

OK, another snarky reply.  I must be having a bad day.  I have been maintaining a wood boat for 30 years doing most of it myself.  Even though I leave the kind of stuff Leo is doing to others, there is always more to do than I really think there should be.  Today I looked at the failing paint on parts of the hull and wondered if I would paint those sections or just take it to a boatyard and give someone all my money to do it for me. I had sort of hoped I would die before it needed painting again.

Someone once asked me if it was true that for every hour I sailed I spent two hours working on the boat.  My reply was, "wouldn't that be great".

You have to be either crazy or in love to own a wood boat and it is a huge help to be both.

All this said, I love the videos.  Also, in this one, our questions about tar were answered.

Allen

Link to post
Share on other sites

Will be interesting to see how much longer Leo produces his videos.   The editing alone he has mentioned as a big demand on his time.

Steve & Alix @ Arabella recently brought on two f/t employees to manage video editing & web site fulfillment.   It’s their first build and they want to amp up their time on actual boatbuilding.

It’s all good.   Great work from both.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the scope of the project, I suspect Leo has no choice but to keep making the videos to fund it. I wouldn't be surprised if after all the ribs are replaced and the nature of the work shifts from structural to finish, he goes back to working solo or with just a helper or two and the videos become less frequent.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2019 at 11:21 AM, IStream said:

Given the scope of the project, I suspect Leo has no choice but to keep making the videos to fund it. I wouldn't be surprised if after all the ribs are replaced and the nature of the work shifts from structural to finish, he goes back to working solo or with just a helper or two and the videos become less frequent.

I cold be wrong but Leo did mention that has someone helping him with the logistics of the project. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2019 at 12:21 PM, IStream said:

Given the scope of the project, I suspect Leo has no choice but to keep making the videos to fund it. I wouldn't be surprised if after all the ribs are replaced and the nature of the work shifts from structural to finish, he goes back to working solo or with just a helper or two and the videos become less frequent.

yes to both. 

 

Of course he's reliant on the patrons to help fund this. He's raking in at least 3600 per video, call it an even 4k from the higher up supporters. The videos also bring in the volunteer workforce which is hugely helpful for the heavier lifting he's still involved with. This will be important to the project for some time still. Will be curious to see how much gets done now that warmer weather is here. I reckon it'll be pedal to the metal all summer long. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A meeting to set up a charitable trust to rescue the Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter Frolic from the threat of the chainsaw has unearthed an unexpected find when grandson of the 1930s owner Charles Crosthwaite trekked to Cardiff to share family photo albums and the treasured Cock of the Channel winners' cup from the inaugural race in 1936.

The 1905 sailing pilot cutter was at the cutting edge of design for boats that have been described as the best sailing boat design ever, for speed and manoeuvrability, handled by just two crew to drop pilots onto ships destined for ports in the testing waters of the Bristol Channel.

National Historic Ships regard Frolic as a historically significant boat, and if she returns to Wales will bolster the lowly 3% of the UK's registered historic ships that are currently in Wales.

The Frolic rescue campaign hopes to rescue Frolic from a jetty on an island near Bergen, Norway, and bring her back to Cardiff for a public restoration, so the people of city can discover her story and follow her journey back into pristine condition. The pilot cutter is then hoped to become an icon of the Welsh capital in Cardiff Bay, as an attraction and education resource.

Present at the rescue brainstorming session included representatives from the Bristol Channel Pilot Cutters Owners Association, Old Gaffers Association, and the Heritage and Cultural Exchange.

But the highlight was Charles Crosthwaite Eyre driving from Andover to Cardiff Bay Yacht Club with the Lucinda Grace trophy for former pilots in the inaugural Cock of the Channel Race in 1936 for former Bristol Channel Pilot Cutters.

"It was not quite the done thing to have professional help in those days, so Frank Trott, the legendary retired pilot had to be smuggled on board. But once on the helm, that is where he stayed, and won the cup in 1936," Charles said. His father was also on board as an eager university student who as a school boy had sailed with his father all over Northern Europe his during school holidays.

As well as bringing an album with photos of Frolic in the 1936 and elsewhere in the 1930s, Charles brought news that the family would like to get involved in a successful rescue mission.

For more information to get involved in forming a trust to rescue Frolic contact Will Loram 07918 736140 or email frolic1905rescue@gmail.com.

From Sailworld 

4E00B2FC-AAB3-4ED7-9B53-FAE76900AFF8.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

EPISODE 46. After weeks of hectic preparation, we begin the big push to re-frame the stern of Tally Ho! For these 3 weeks, we have 10 people (including myself) working full-time on the boat; Kirt (USA), Finn (UK), Arnaud (Belgium), Thom (UK), Pat (USA), Max (USA), Robert (UK), Glenda & Bill (USA). After a few days spent training all the new members of the team, we get into full-swing frame production, and are able to achieve our goal of getting one pair of frames made and bedded per day! There is a great sense of camaraderie in the yard, and after making 7 frames we celebrate our progress by taking our little gaff-rigged dinghy out for a lazy Sunday sail.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I am impressed.  He might even finish if this Kurt guy stays on the team. It is no small task to 1) orginiae 10 people who you also have to train and 2) get the people.

On the Youtube income. It is about $7.50 per 1000 viewers which historically has been about $1400 per video but this video has been up half a day and has over 40,000 views. The historical average is about 180,000 views. I will be very curious how this compares to the average.

If he gets more viewers and figures out how to organize more production projects like this he might even finish in my lifetime. Again, I am totally impressed for the first time.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

For the first time?  You're a hard man to impress!  

I agree though, moving from a 1 or 2-man operation to a 10-man operation is a massive step, and could have been a total disaster.  I'm sure there was a ton of work done behind the scenes.  Want to send this video to anyone bitching about "kids these days..."  Go Leo!  

6 hours ago, allene222 said:

OK, I am impressed.  He might even finish if this Kurt guy stays on the team. It is no small task to 1) orginiae 10 people who you also have to train and 2) get the people.

On the Youtube income. It is about $7.50 per 1000 viewers which historically has been about $1400 per video but this video has been up half a day and has over 40,000 views. The historical average is about 180,000 views. I will be very curious how this compares to the average.

If he gets more viewers and figures out how to organize more production projects like this he might even finish in my lifetime. Again, I am totally impressed for the first time.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, socalrider said:

For the first time?  You're a hard man to impress!  

 

The thing is I have been around wood boats for a long time. Mine is 63 years old and the people who work on her have done amazing things to keep her going over the 30 years I have owned her.  I have also seen many people with big plans for their wood boats and they typically don't end well.  I would have put long odds that Leo would never finish but this episode changed my thinking.  Good job Leo and crew.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On a boat like this, how far along do you think he is?

He has completed:

Significant deconstruction of ribs and planking,

Lofting the lines

Keel and Stern post.

Majority of ribs.

 

Still to start:

Planking

Deck

Internal Fit out

Rig - mast bowsprit and associated standing and running rigging.

Does that make him almost 50% there, or more like 25% there?

What other outstanding items have I missed?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Tunnel Rat said:

On a boat like this, how far along do you think he is?

He has completed:

Significant deconstruction of ribs and planking,

Lofting the lines

Keel and Stern post.

Majority of ribs.

 

Still to start:

Planking

Deck

Internal Fit out

Rig - mast bowsprit and associated standing and running rigging.

Does that make him almost 50% there, or more like 25% there?

What other outstanding items have I missed?

My gut feeling says he has completed 40 % in terms of items to be done, but much  more than  50 % in terms of  mental effort and dedication. He now knows he has all the skills, all the tools and support he needs.  Not only that, I think most of the heavy and risky  items which will hold the boat together are done. The rest might take time but they will be peanuts for him.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Omer said:

My gut feeling says he has completed 40 % in terms of items to be done, but much  more than  50 % in terms of  mental effort and dedication. He now knows he has all the skills, all the tools and support he needs.  Not only that, I think most of the heavy and risky  items which will hold the boat together are done. The rest might take time but they will be peanuts for him.

This. Once the structural stuff is done, the rest is plug and chug. Granted, there's a lot of work to do and a lot of it will be fiddly but once you've got the new bones in place you've turned the corner in the tunnel and can see the other end no matter how far away.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Never doubted he wouldn’t finish.

He seemed to have had a practical and real grasp of the job before he started and probably wouldn’t have taken it on unless he felt it was within his means to finish it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Hank Bollard said:

Love following these videos. What are they keeping? Seems like everything is being re-built from new material. Would it still be considered the same boat?

It has been discussed ad nauseum earlier in the thread.

Image result for beating dead horse animated

 

Top of Page #3 will get you started.   Leo also addressed this in a few of his earlier videos.

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, IStream said:

This. Once the structural stuff is done, the rest is plug and chug. Granted, there's a lot of work to do and a lot of it will be fiddly but once you've got the new bones in place you've turned the corner in the tunnel and can see the other end no matter how far away.

My rule of thumb for smaller wooden boat building is that the hull is about 30% of the total time - the interior fit out will take ages. Despite this the corner is definitely turned and it will be all “smooth sailing” from that point.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not the same boat but a fabulous replica.  At one point in the UK not  so long  ago you could buy an exact part-for-part replica of a Maserati 250F Grand Prix car from 1954.  It won the Argentine race of that year, driven by Juan Manual Fangio . I believe those replicas are  eligible for historic races. these days. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Antoine31 said:

Not the same boat but a fabulous replica.  At one point in the UK not  so long  ago you could buy an exact part-for-part replica of a Maserati 250F Grand Prix car from 1954.  It won the Argentine race of that year, driven by Juan Manual Fangio . I believe those replicas are  eligible for historic races. these days. 

Back in the days when tires were skinny and drivers were fat...  

It's an arguable, and ultimately almost theological point, but I'd contend that there is a level of continuity to what Leo is doing that makes it much more than a replica. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I once saw a beautiful immaculate Cobra at a car show.  It was pearlescent white.  Prettiest car I had ever seen.  They had pictures of it before they restored it.  The car had hit a concrete bridge embankment at 100 MPH head on or something like that.  If it wasn't a Cobar it would have been a total.  But since the serial number was intact, they rebuilt it. I seriously doubt any piece of the original car remained but it had the SN so it was that car.

What I object to with what Leo did was when he decided it should be a piano instead of a boat so he decided it wasn't exactly the shape he thought it should be and expanded the project to build to how the boat should be instead of how it was.  My boat is more out of shape that Tally Ho was but I would never consider "correcting" the shape of the hull. That said, my primary objection was that it increased the possibility he would never finish the project, not that it would not be the same boat when he was done.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In my industry, we have what we call the "radiator cap rebuild" (said tongue in cheek).

It is for big truck mounted high pressure pump units and similar equipment.

Step 1: unscrew the radiator cap of the truck and set it aside.

Step 2: replace EVERYTHING underneath the radiator cap.

Step 3: put back the original radiator cap

You have a "rebuilt" unit...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Oceanconcepts said:

Back in the days when tires were skinny and drivers were fat...  

It's an arguable, and ultimately almost theological point, but I'd contend that there is a level of continuity to what Leo is doing that makes it much more than a replica. 

OK, possibly Platonic. 

Link to post
Share on other sites