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I wonder if being in Pt Townsend will pay dividends in the later stages of the project?  Seems like once the structure is in place, there will be a ton of metalwork required & lots of bits and bobs that can't be fabricated in their shop.  Might be a real benefit to being closer to town at that point.  

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Great to see the boat moved safely.  But the new shed seems sterile and joyless compared with the magic of the old location with dog and parrot I expected that the stars of that episode would be

I think Leo decided he liked the boat with rot, tradition and lineage included. He didn’t like the mangled foundations and decided that if he was going to replace the frames, he wasn’t just gonna copy

That's a good question Southercross. Leo seems to me to be a very bright person who has decided to concentrate on a certain trade and displays the level of knowledge commensurate with his level of int

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How far away is the shop from Port Townsend ?

In terms of time, by car. I don't think the patreons can afford a heli, but you never know.

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32 minutes ago, t.rex said:

How far away is the shop from Port Townsend ?

In terms of time, by car. I don't think the patreons can afford a heli, but you never know.

Hey it's been done before!

 

Large_martinoli_alinghi-013c.jpg

pic from sail world

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On 3/15/2021 at 1:30 AM, MauiPunter said:

I have a chrome plugin that blocks ALL ads from youtube.  I havent seen an ad in years.

image.png.a58e52d11e3632df360fb56d8aba6aae.png

 

btw, I also recommend this plugin to bypass paywalls for the occasional article you want to read.  Obviously, you should subscribe if you read it regularly, but if not, this works really well.
image.png.1cc7b6346feb89cae9461a3234e875e1.png
 

MauiPunter, thanks so much for those plug-ins, the youtube blocker made my day

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17 minutes ago, Cristoforo said:

How long by gaff rig cutter? 

Roughly 25 miles by water.

The first 1/2-mile from the shed to Dungeness Bay might be the most time-consuming part....

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I have almost zero interest in a wooden boat, despite thoroughly enjoying a couple days at the Port Townsend wooden boat show in 2019. But I absolutely love watching Leo's superb work, and had a pleasant visit in 2019 as well, and his is the only YouTube channel for which I am a patron. The only other wooden boat shows I'm currently following are Acorn to Arabella and Sailing Yaba. It's fun to see the different approaches to such a basic thing as planking. Leo's are pieces of art, as usual. AtA steamed theirs and have struggled with two different woods and breaking planks. SY's most recent video is quite something, they are applying the planks in a very different way, and securing them just with large nails (as far as I can tell, by angling the nails at different angles they secure their planks sufficiently?)

 

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Leo is livestreaming the Whisky Plank today! From Facebook:

 

Quote
Join us for a drink! Whisky Plank Live Stream - Tomorrow (Thurs 25 March)
@ 1900 UTC ( 1200 PDT / 1500 EDT / 1900 GMT )
Watch from Sampson Boat Co YOUTUBE CHANNEL

 

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1 hour ago, Dex Sawash said:

Really appreciate the editing and voiceover work that goes in a regular episode.

   +1

Though interesting ,it was a little hard to watch this morning.

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EPISODE 94 In this episode we hang the last of the regular planks and start making “shutter planks” - the planks that fill a gap between already fastened areas of planking above and below. These require more careful patterning, but are extremely satisfying to hammer into place if they fit properly - but will they ?! Before we hang the very final plank (the Whisky Plank!) I trim the plank ends flush with the transom, which really visually transforms the boat. Finally the Whisky plank is hammered into place, and the crew celebrates with a well earned wee dram.

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Jesus effing Christ, have we become so jaded that we can not even appreciate a boatbuilder sharing a major moment in the project live without harping on about video quality?

Like Leo said, he did it himself from his own phone using the patchy cell and wifi connection available to him, while trying to enjoy the moment himself and sharing it with the team. Lest we forget, we are not talking about TV production organizations, but amateurs that have built up some skill in filming and editing short films.

I was happy to share the moment, and raise a glass of whiskey with him on Thursday.

And again on Saturday when the regular video came out.

And yet another time when Peter Knowles of Travels with Geordie witnessed the moment in his video of the week.

Maybe I should stop watching youtube for a while before I run out of whiskey... :wacko::P

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

BONUS TIMELAPSE VIDEO! I took a bunch of photographs from various different angles while we were planking TALLY HO, and intended to create a time-lapse for the previous video - but it was more work than I anticipated and I did not get it finished in time. So I’m releasing it as a short bonus video! I hope you guys like it.

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21 hours ago, t.rex said:

 

BONUS TIMELAPSE VIDEO! I took a bunch of photographs from various different angles while we were planking TALLY HO, and intended to create a time-lapse for the previous video - but it was more work than I anticipated and I did not get it finished in time. So I’m releasing it as a short bonus video! I hope you guys like it.

Plugs next...ugh!

Faring too...

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12 hours ago, familysailor said:

Plugs next...ugh!

Faring too...

Here you go

 

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On 3/1/2021 at 12:12 AM, TwoLegged said:

He's just a wannabe-shit-stirrer.  His malodorous droppings are more rabbit poop than male bovine excrement, and rarely cause a ripple.

If only he had invested in a copy of Shit Stirring for Dummies.

Amazon.com: LookHUMAN Champion Shit Stirrer White 15 Ounce Ceramic Coffee  Mug: Kitchen & Dining

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3 hours ago, TheDragon said:

Here you go

 

They should recruit Mads Dahlke, with his catchphrase "oh glorious sanding"

(Yes, I know, this phase is mostly planing)

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I am ready to have Leo start making the videos twice a week and 5 minutes long. I think he would increase his revenue if he did that as well. He should talk to his YouTube account executive.

Allen

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14 hours ago, allene222 said:

I am ready to have Leo start making the videos twice a week and 5 minutes long. I think he would increase his revenue if he did that as well. He should talk to his YouTube account executive.

Allen

I don't know what's more lucrative but I prefer the current format; I like the long descriptions of these arcane processes that I'll never ever use, and the long time-lapse process videos.  

I could see creating a second pared down version (or two) for folks who just want a quick summary & progress update of each episode.  I wonder if it'd be profitable to hire someone to do the editing work - I have no idea how the economics of this stuff pencil out.  

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I hope he doens't fuck with the format much. I like the roughly half hour videos with all the chattie explanations. 

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On 4/11/2021 at 5:52 PM, Dex Sawash said:

I usually watch them at 1.25 speed on the yt app and it really doesn't seem rushed at that speed. Leo talks pretty slowly.

me, at 1.5x... Leo starts talking quite fast

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Leo's videos are actually some of the few I prefer to watch at 1X. I find them meditative. 

This Old Tony is another, though in that case it's because he's a natural comedian with great delivery timing.

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Leo's video channel is the "This Old Boat" show I've always wanted.

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On 4/22/2021 at 2:01 AM, Cristoforo said:

Corking in some parts of the world.. Same thing  

Only in those parts of the world that can't spell.

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2 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

 

Two things I found disturbing in today's video...

-- none of the guys swinging caulking-hammers had eye protection.  I've seen hammer-on-steel cause eye injuries more times than I'd care to count.

-- and, was that a Mega-30 <shudder> in Port Townsend at the beginning of the video?

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I was just happy to see ear protection.  I’ve been around a little bit of caulking (corking) and after a while it gets pervasively and shockingly loud.  Met a guy once who’s dad had a company that did caulking in all the yards on City Island back in the day.  This fellow was in his 80s when I met him and he had been caulking all his life, and was still at it then.  I wouldn’t have wanted to get in a fight with him, as even at that age there was some power behind the blows.  He  was quite deaf, and that was famously true for all caulkers.

A wooden mallet (the face is wood; the iron ring just keeps it from splitting) on malleable iron I’d not worry too much about.  The mallet the Leo has is a very good one, and not easy to come by.  Gotta say I’m a bit curious as to how he came to have it.

I was disappointed to see the red lead going in the seams.  That’s a tradition I wish would finally die for good.

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5 hours ago, NaClH20 said:

 

I was disappointed to see the red lead going in the seams.  That’s a tradition I wish would finally die for good.

Out of interest, what would you suggest Leo uses instead of Red Lead? 

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 Almost anything else.  Primers and paints have come a long way and there are a lot on the market that are wonderfully capable.  Red lead in caulking seams is one of those things that everybody does only because everybody has been doing it for 150 years (which is, admittedly, as good a reason as any).  With everything available there’s got to be something better.  Red lead now is like 5200... In its place it’s the best thing, but there are actually very few of those places, and it tends to get overused in places that are inappropriate.  Red lead in keel scarfs,  frame futtock joints, other places that will be never touched again for the life of the boat are fine.  Places that will be sanded regularly and distributed to the environment, not fine.  I may be a bit gun shy about it, but I did used to work in a place where the owner of the boats used red lead as a primer on any bare wood, including places that got wooded and painted annually.  It got so that we worker bees would make him do the sanding, as it was a horror show of lead dust blowing around and some of the guys had young kids at home who would rather they didn’t get exposed.  He was running under the assumption that anything that expensive must be the best, without realizing that it was expensive in order to keep people from using the stuff.  We eventually convinced him, after essentially taking over, that other products were better, cheaper, and easier to use (that nasty silver steel primer is actually excellent on wood for well-used commercial boats).  The red lead thing went on for years, and I can’t imagine what the contamination levels for lobsters caught in the area must be like now.

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1 hour ago, NaClH20 said:

 Almost anything else.  

Really?.

You do realise Leo is building a planked timber boat , yer?

and,,,

You do understand why Red Lead is used,  yer?

PS.

What would you suggest Leo paints or clads below the water line with?

Not that nasty toxic copper antifouling, you hope, yer?

 

 

 

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On 4/24/2021 at 1:17 PM, sledracr said:

Two things I found disturbing in today's video...

-- none of the guys swinging caulking-hammers had eye protection.  I've seen hammer-on-steel cause eye injuries more times than I'd care to count.

-- and, was that a Mega-30 <shudder> in Port Townsend at the beginning of the video?

Aren't the mallets wood? 

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3 hours ago, blunderfull said:

 

Which shows that the YouTube channel's most important role is to recruit Patreons, which must be providing over $100k per year to keep things going, what with hiring an additional shipwright, etc.

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EPISODE 97 In this episode we work towards sealing up the timber of the hull, inside and out.

First we varnish the interior of the boat, using a traditional varnish that should hopefully hold up for decades.

Then we get a serious workout with some good-old-fashioned “torture-boards”, we glue and trim plugs, and we get a little closer to painting and moving the boat.

We have a bit of a change of crew as David and Rowan head back to the East coast, and we get some great help from some local guys.

Meanwhile Pancho delights in a game of hide-n-seek.

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On 4/26/2021 at 5:10 PM, pusslicker said:

Aren't the mallets wood? 

ayup.. with a metal ring around the end of the business end of the wood. 

 

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Amazing to see the boat getting paint. Wonderful. 

I've often wondered why no one uses copper sheathing on the ship's bottom anymore. Seems that would be best to prevent worms.

 

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FYI, I've asked Leo if he plans to make Tally Ho available for inspection at the Wooden Boat Festival this September and he said he's considering it.

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20 hours ago, Uli Kunkel said:

How far out do we think he is from sailing now? I think it sails next spring.....

My bet is Summer 2023. Still needs a deck, interior, engine, rig, sails, tankage, windlass, electrical (I assume), etc. etc. I think he'll spend Winter-Spring 2023 just getting the finished boat ready for sea.

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34 minutes ago, climenuts said:

My bet is Summer 2023. Still needs a deck, interior, engine, rig, sails, tankage, windlass, electrical (I assume), etc. etc. I think he'll spend Winter-Spring 2023 just getting the finished boat ready for sea.

So your guess is right in line with Leo's two year estimate :)

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Leo seems like one of those people you occasionally meet that seem normal but is really working at the next level.  If he'd have been in hi-tech instead of wooden boats he'd probably have made is first million by now.  His videos are just another sign of his craftmanship.  As long as he doesn't add a cooking segment, I'll keep watching.

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7 hours ago, climenuts said:

My bet is Summer 2023. Still needs a deck, interior, engine, rig, sails, tankage, windlass, electrical (I assume), etc. etc. I think he'll spend Winter-Spring 2023 just getting the finished boat ready for sea.

I think I remember him saying he would get the boat ready enough to sail back home and finish the full fit out there.

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Some future important deadlines are 2025 (100 year anniversary of first Fastnet) and 2027 (100 year anniversary of TH's win). When I emailed him about it ages ago he indicated he was interested in racing in both.

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You're forgetting the 80/20 rule.  The first 80% of the project takes 20% of the time, and the last 20% takes 80% of the time.

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I don't know, I think all the fiddly interior stuff will take most of the remaining time. I don't see Leo needing/wanting the boat interior to be finished beyond a bunk, and head, and a basic galley before setting back off to the UK. I'm guessing that if time is an issue, he'll build up whatever remains that requires large shop tools that he can't take with him and then pack her up and point her for home. 

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8 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

You're forgetting the 80/20 rule.  The first 80% of the project takes 20% of the time, and the last 20% takes 80% of the time.

I believe there is an amendment to this rule for boat projects, where the last 20% takes an infinite amount of time, until you need to start on the first 80% again...

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4 hours ago, SloopJohnB said:

Is it the last 20% of the build takes 80% of the money.

No it's the first 20% of the build that takes 80% of the money.  It goes up from there.  

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26 minutes ago, socalrider said:

No it's the first 20% of the build that takes 80% of the money.  It goes up from there.  

When does the other 320% of the money get spent?

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Judging by their instagram page it looks like they're getting ready to pour some lead. I thought the ballast keel was in decent enough shape to fair and touch-up. He's not going to melt the whole thing down and re-make it, is he?

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IIRC I read quite a while ago one of his wish list things was lead.  I think he chipped a bunch of concrete out of the bilge in the early days.  Maybe he's gonna replace it with lead ingots. 

Tally Ho is the only utuber I've ever sent money to, its a worthwhile project in my view.  Hopefully that donation will get me a ride on it before it leaves the area.

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    I used to build high end vacation homes for rich continentals down in the Caribbean Islands. I previously had built custom yacht interiors and the official job description there was 'interior joiner'. During lunch on an Island Home project, the local form carpenters asked me why I used that expression to refer to my work. I was working on the kitchen cabinets for the home at the time and one guy said that I should just call myself a 'cabinetmaker' and I said that was a good term but didn't cover much of the other skills I had learned over the years. One of the guys on the job who was doing the sheetrock work on that job spoke up and said that he considered himself a 'finish carpenter' and the sheetrock role he was performing on that job really was below his skill level but it still paid the bills just the same. Everyone soon found a job description they were comfortable with and then after a lot of joking around with alternative names the sheetrock/finish carpenter said,

    "Do you know why when building a house or a yacht they call the final stages 'finish work'? Because the money is finished by the time you get around to it!"

    Lots of truth to that.

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Lots of truth. We did a big remodel about 6 years ago, including tons of foundation and slab work, a 30% increase in square footage, all new systems (the house is 100 years old), etc. By the time we got to the end, we were about 15% over budget and it took lots of discipline not to cheap out on the finish work. We sucked it up and spent the money to keep the finish work at the standard of the rest of it and have never regretted it.

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36 minutes ago, IStream said:

Lots of truth. We did a big remodel about 6 years ago, including tons of foundation and slab work, a 30% increase in square footage, all new systems (the house is 100 years old), etc. By the time we got to the end, we were about 15% over budget and it took lots of discipline not to cheap out on the finish work. We sucked it up and spent the money to keep the finish work at the standard of the rest of it and have never regretted it.

   Imagine when building up on the mountainside on a Caribbean Island where you have to do way more excavation work and build cisterns for your water storage. Statesiders freak out when the see a third of their budget gone before they even get to start raising exterior walls! If one is smart you buy your lot on the downhill side of the steep dirt road NOT the uphill side. That way when the first lumber delivery arrives you just let the driver dump the load off the flatbed and when the materials stop sliding down the hill you know just where to start your foundation.

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On 1/6/2018 at 7:39 PM, allene222 said:

I have seen several projects this ambitious.  I just have never seen one finish.  People work for years and then just disappear.

I will be amazed and in awe of this kid if this boat is finished.

I think by now we realize two things.

1. He is not a kid.   This man is a leader, an adventurer and a good story teller.

2. We stand in awe. Not only is the boat going to be finished but the manner in which the job has been done is a combination of vision, organization, determination , personality and hard work.   Sometimes the good guys win through and this is an example of a guy living more in 4 years than most people live in their lifetimes.

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13 minutes ago, EYESAILOR said:

...

a combination of vision, organization, determination , personality and hard work.  

...

You forgot to mention two important bits: art and craftsmanship

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Also luck (i.e. preparation and timing); the internet age (and C19) allows him to monetise his work sufficiently to buy stuff, get volunteers and employ Pete.

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1 hour ago, Fleetwood said:

Also luck (i.e. preparation and timing); the internet age (and C19) allows him to monetise his work sufficiently to buy stuff, get volunteers and employ Pete.

To a certain extent he created his own luck.

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Four years ago; "How much to complete Tally Ho?"

"Two million."

Two years ago; "How much to complete Tally Ho?"

"Two million."

In route to Port Townsend; "How much to complete Tally Ho?"

...

 

 Ah, resources well spent, none the less. Wooden boats are never done anyway.

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