Jump to content

'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!


Recommended Posts

Well, it's now over 2 months since Irma devastated the Virgin Islands. Nanny Cay was particularly hard hit, no boats survived intact in the old marina, most boats ashore were dismasted or blown over or both.

Triple Jack was literally blown off her mooring as one of the 1" lines severed the front beam, the other broke, chafed? who knows. She landed ashore about 800 yds away, upside down on a concrete bridge, the mast broken in 4 places and the deck heavily damaged. Being on the bridge she was in the way and we were asked if she could be broken up with the excavator to clear the way. Fortunately Nanny Cay are our sponsors and we decided against the demolition job and to try and re-launch her by flipping her 'up and over' and back into the marina. That didn't go well , the stbd sponson was ripped off during the attempt. Plan B was simply to strap the sponson back on the beam and lift/ trundle her upside down onto blocks and out of the way. That went well but then came Maria. She fell of her blocks pushing her primaries through the now shattered deck.

A pretty bleak scene indeed.

 

Steve and I have owned TJ for 25 years, during that time she has never let us down despite some severe beatings both sides of the Atlantic. That includes the last 18 years or so of hard Caribbean racing pushing her ever harder and faster making some very necessary modifications along the way, mostly structural!

Post Irma both our families have evacuated and returned, my roof went, Steve's didn't but in general things have settled down and it's time to glue her back together.

Day one was today, we will keep you posted!

IMG_8745 (1).JPG

IMG_8748 (1).JPG

IMG_8749 (2).JPG

IMG_8365.JPG

IMG_8367.JPG

IMG_8376.JPG

Edited by racinginparadise
got title wrong
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 305
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Well, what a weekend that was! Out of nowhere I get a call from a 44+...number which always gets my attention. It's not my Mum, brothers or sister with a family emergency, it's a guy called

Seeing old boats (especially badly damaged ones) being given a new life is inspiring. She’s a lucky boat to have such a dedicated owner and team looking after her... RESPECT!

Blimey, what a gorgeous day here today on the Irma 3yr anniversary. SO weird not to see a single boat out there...yes we are back under lockdown. Fortunately my business has been granted a 'curfew exe

Posted Images

  • 2 weeks later...

So, on it goes. Sunday was flooding rains again, that's all the VI's seems to get now, what happened to showers?

Anyhow progress was made. The main hull is upside down but level and well chocked. We have decided to repair the port sponson bow problem first, then we'll flip her over.

The cabin roof was shown the short stick, it was that awful powdery foam that has no integrity, not airex like the rest of the boat.

We have secured a carbon mast that was snapped off at deck level on a 54 race boat, it may need a small base splice but we'll make it work.

IMG_8809.JPG

IMG_8813.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hang in there guys! Good to hear you are biting the bullet and doing the rebuild right. Maybe after all the old racing multihulls of the the area get back in their fighting form (TJ, SOMA, VIRGIN FIRE) we can all get together for a special race, the MIMMS Regatta. Maria and Irma Multihull MashupS is my nomination for the name. Any other boats that qualify that you know of?

Link to post
Share on other sites

MIMMS sounds about right but we would rather be picking off Gunboats and HH's in St Barths!

I'm sure Nils will have Soma fixed up and we will be battling again...but we have not raced against Virgin Fire since 1999!

Good progress again this weekend, we got our mast!

It took 9 of us and an hour of crane time but we managed to untangle 63' of relatively undamaged carbon spar on Saturday.

We also have the stump (it was keel stepped and failed just above the gooseneck) should any splicing be required.

The mast is now nestled safely on what was Quantum Sails' balcony before Irma levelled the top floor clean.

Happy days!

 

IMG_8862 (1).jpg

IMG_8863 (1).jpg

IMG_8865 (1).jpg

IMG_8869 (1).jpg

IMG_8872.jpg

IMG_8876.jpg

IMG_8881.jpg

IMG_8888.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

`1999? I was on Virgin FIre for that race! Been that long since she has been raced? Maybe he will get some insurance from his dust up in St Martin and get her back in action. 

     Are you planning on making that carbon spar rotate? Not much point in doing so with that fat aft end that monohull non-rotating rigs use. I got into a huge debate about just this point on a new build. Did your old rig rotate?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another early start for the Sunday TJ team!

We found two 3x12x18 roof beams blown in by Irma from who knows where?

They formed the base of a 'strongback' structure that allowed us to accurately offer up the severed bow section of the port sponson.

It went really well and we are now ready to cut away the damaged laminates and make the repair.

There's one huge advantage of being 'sunny side up'.

Years of bottom paint can be stripped away and it's tempting to fill, fair and long board...we'll see.

We measured up the donor carbon spar and found it to be ample in the length department, no spices required.

Just some adjustment of spreader locations and halyard exits required.

IMG_8984.jpg

IMG_8985.jpg

IMG_8992.jpg

IMG_8994.jpg

IMG_8995.jpg

IMG_8996.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Hey Morpheus, I wonder if that was a series of articles I wrote that featured in 'Multihull International' many years ago? I don't have them anymore but I think the title was 'Off to the Canaries'

So, here is a picture taken during the eye of Irma. We had thought TJ parted from her mooring and flipped during 'Round 2 after the eye.

Not so, she is clearly sunny side up way over on the SE side of the new marina, hard aground. Round 2 blew her back over to the far left and out of the water up onto the bridge.

Soma in the picture is on the LHS of the 40' black antifouled Bowman which is laid over on the Peninsula next to the mound of rubble.

We are all taking a Christmas break but there are some itchy days coming up in 2018!

 

24991078_1944544805865848_3754558357853836369_n[1].jpg

IMG_8365.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

OK, this is going to be a long thread. There's only 9 working weekends until BVI Spring Regatta, there's no way we can get her fixed and rigged before then!

Never mind, 'slowly, slowly catchy monkey' as they say.

Progress has been made. It was surprisingly hard to line up the severed bow section of the port sponson.

However we are ready to laminate now, the core has stripped out with difficulty...anyone who knows late 1970's airex will understand.

It's very 'plastic' and does not like peeling off the laminate.

This Sunday fresh epoxy comes out and the gluing back together really begins!

We have also spent some time 'upside down' designing the new central crew pit that will replace the main cabin!

 

IMG_9325.jpg

IMG_9351.jpg

IMG_9353.jpg

IMG_9297.jpg

IMG_9343.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Niels, thanks for the offer but we already have the carbon 'telegraph pole' we scored from Virgin Gorda.

Don't you need it?

I'll do you a deal, you find us a rudder and I'll use my crane to start tidying up Soma, mast out of the way, save whatever lines we can and maybe even lift her sideways?

I've been trying to get hold of one of those AC45 units like yours but no luck yet.

Maybe one day we'll buy an old AC45 and use the hulls as sponsons, now that would be a turbo package!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

So glad you've got the energy and skills to rebuild Triple Jack.

I well remember her in the UK. I still have all my Multihull Internationals!!

And am still sailing my Kelsall cruiser Aqua Blue, launched '76. Now in El Rompido SW Spain.

Hope the rebuild makes good progress this year!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

I remember this boat being built, Triple Jack back in the UK. It must have been late 1970's. Frank Woods had it built and I think they had to knock a wall out to get her out of the building. Something like that.  She came from NW England. Pretty sure she used to have a swiveling mast to just like Dart 18s have. She did some big events and got dismasted before changing her rig to non swivelling arrangement. Good luck with the restoration job. The trimaran Frank Wood had before that was called Lydia Cardell.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be really cool to see a photo of SOMA because I don't know it. I lost touch with the Caribbean sailing scene a long time ago.

Triple Jack is super cool and a piece of history.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...

OK, leapfrog nearly a whole year.

Progress at last.

Triple Jack had to make way for the new road at Nanny Cay.

That meant some serious head scratching because work had stalled out.

To be honest I was ready to call it a day, post Irma has just been too much with business and house re-building...BUT Mike and Steve persuaded me otherwise.

We now have a nicer carbon spar to use and Nanny Cay have cleared a space for us to use for the rebuild this Summer.

Here's the latest action.

2 cranes used to get her upright.

We were worried that the front beam would suffer or fail with the rest of the boat dangling from it, not a bit of it, not even a GRP groan.

Crane video at iymbvi.com

 

IMG_3464 (1).jpg

IMG_3468 (1).jpg

IMG_3479.jpg

IMG_3489.jpg

IMG_3496.jpg

IMG_3499.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again!

 

Good to see you guys persisting! Watching your video is bringing up memories of racing against Triple Jack on ALIEN before she got spun into bits in an earlier hurricane. Hell, I can't even remember the name of that storm now...

Good thing is that I do remember the good times with our crew!

Image result for alien 2001 trimaran

    What was that girls name???

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again!

 

Good to see you guys persisting! Watching your video is bringing up memories of racing against Triple Jack on ALIEN before she got spun into bits in an earlier hurricane. Hell, I can't even remember the name of that storm now...

Good thing is that I do remember the good times with our crew!

Image result for alien 2001 trimaran

    What was that girls name???

The hurricane was Marilyn. The girl was Katy from Scotland. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

More progress today.

For the first time since Irma all the parts are the right way up.

With the severed sponson back near the boat it's 100% easier to plan the re-attachment.

Now it's time to build a roof, that sun hot down here.

IMG_3589.jpg

IMG_3591.jpg

IMG_3596.jpg

IMG_3598.jpg

IMG_3599.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Sunday morning warriors were out in force today.

The mission to shade 32'x16' with any old lumber that came to hand.

A good friend had left over 2x4's after his house rebuild...happy days.

It's amazing how quickly you can knock up a structure with torx drive screws and impact drivers, I mean can anyone still hammer nails??

Anyhow, job done, tin on next Sunday and on we go.

 

IMG_3683.jpg

IMG_3688.jpg

IMG_3697.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a bad Sunday Morning today.

We managed to align the stbd sponson back into its  original position.

No roof yet, that will come next week, today was all about seeing her back looking like a trimaran again!

We had all sorts of plans and advice on how to re-attach the sponson.

The fwd beam was severed as a double wrapped 1" bow line ripped through during Irma.

The aft beam connection fell apart as she was being moved post Irma.

Between the two events we had plenty of 'markers' allowing us to accurately get it all back in place.

The fwd beam is a GRP 'I' beam with box section walls.

Unidirectional glass top and bottom 3/8" thick, walls approx. 1/4"

We have decided today that it's best to do all the repairs in place.

Access cut thro decks and aft beam, we'll be checking the port side too.

More to follow as things progress.

 

IMG_3819.jpg

IMG_3820.jpg

IMG_3822.jpg

IMG_3823.jpg

IMG_3825.jpg

IMG_3826.jpg

IMG_3821.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, shade project mostly completed, we have more diagonals than 'My Song's' cradle! 

Working without shade is just a non-starter here, we now have a nice wind acceleration zone across the decks...shade with breeze!

Now we are looking at getting repairs done before any tropical waves decide to get over excited.

All that old tin has to come off if anything threatens but at least the lumber can stay and better still, there are sand screws all around the boat to nail her down.

The fwd beam shot clearly shows where the 1" doubled up lines went clean through during Irma.

IMG_3897.jpg

IMG_3898.jpg

IMG_3899.jpg

IMG_3900.jpg

IMG_3901.jpg

IMG_3902.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see her facing the ocean...   :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, another Sunday has passed, it has been a week of good progress.

Today the 2 Paul's assisted by long time TJ admirer Mark conjured up a superb workbench, with underside secure storage to boot!

Steve and I occupied ourselves by getting the final alignment of the stbd sponson nailed down.

Next out came the fein cutter and the more animal metal cutting discs. In short order we had cut access panels to all the pertinent repair sites.

To be honest we were both a little surprised that the sponson had not parted company with the main hull earlier in her checkered career.

We are mindful that this 1979 airex/polyester structure has made it thus far by bending rather than breaking before Irma forced the issue.

Having said that we are 100% confident that our repairs will be 'stronger than original, we just have to watch out not to make any part 'too strong' by creating hard points that could fail. 

The big news this week is securing a dream carbon fiber mast.

It's a 'King Composites' spar from a 40' racing mono, complete with step, spreaders and all rigging.

(Rod that we will not be using)

We already have 3 masts in hand.

Earlier in this thread you will find us salvaging the J54 carbon rig from Virgin Gorda.

It was long enough and a real telegraph pole. It was also a great day out post Irma to go up there mob handed for the extraction.

The alarm bells went off when we tried to lift the new acquisition up onto the roof/floor where the old Quantum loft used to be.

It was HEAVY. Looking at the wall thickness we realized that this spar was magnificent but was designed for a brutish mono, not a 4 ton multihull.

The 2 pictures below show wall thickness and a jumble of spreaders.

Never assume just because it's carbon it's going to be lighter. Talking to riggers it's a common 'mistake', the carbon upgrade can turn out to be a heavier, albeit stiffer spar.

Having sidelined that we found 54' of Lagoon 450 spar for 'not a lot'.

That one is a big fat section and is a splice and lots of gear away from being a solution.

Then along comes a gorgeous brand new but broken Swan 42 rig.

Again that one would need 2 splices and a bunch or halyard gate/spreader and hounds re-configuration.

To cut a long story short, we now have a rig that is within inches or being perfect in every department, just a few feet to chop off the bottom.

More pictures when it comes out of the mast rack, just 200' away from TJ, some things just fall into place!

Having the mast in hand is a real boost to this project, happy days!!

Nearly forgot, check out the innovative cycle-powered beer cooling system.

Just a mock up for now but it looks promising, ice will be a thing of the past on board!

IMG_4003.jpg

IMG_4005.jpg

IMG_4017.jpg

IMG_3971.jpg

IMG_3972.jpg

IMG_4010.jpg

IMG_3721.jpg

IMG_3722.jpg

IMG_3992.jpg

TJ emerges.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

2 Sunday's worth of progress to report.

Last Sunday was mild progress concentrated around finishing up the 16x8 workbench with secure storage underneath and shade up top.

Today was more brutal, and a real taste of what is to come.

Steve focused on prepping the mating surfaces around the front beam to sponson connection. After much thought we are have come up with a laminate plan that we think will work.

Paul removed the crushed Lewmar 80 hatch up front and started attacking what we call 'the bubble of bullshit'.

This 'mound' is essentially a mast step that has been added to over the years. We reckon there's a good 50+ llbs of useless material there.

The new mast came out of a keel stepped mono so we have plenty to play with. The new step will be mounted at deck level.

Paul's attempts with a sawsaw were unsuccessful. On Tuesday evening we are getting out the chainsaw.

I attacked the forward main hull decking, there are still seams of shitty foam up there that need to go.

Very soon new glass will be going in, we are looking forward to that!

IMG_4090.jpg

IMG_4092.jpg

IMG_4142.jpg

IMG_4145.jpg

IMG_4146.jpg

IMG_4148.jpg

IMG_4150.jpg

IMG_4015.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm enjoying this thread. I like the chop & channel and piecing bits back together part. I have done a fair amount of rough and ready work and miss it now that I'm anally retentive and have to vacuum up after every step. I hope your boat goes on to have another long life. I'm also curious about your interest in ultra-light power cats. Are you willing to show any photos? I built a 15 hp 20 footer and am now building a 23 footer. I use them for long distance camp-cruising and commuting. What do you do with yours?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

so Russel, to briefly answer you question wrt. power cats...

We worked on the drawings by O H Rodgers for a 28'x 10' power cat and built from scratch a 30'x 12' prototype, 'Innovation'

It was meant to be the most economical way to transport groups of up to 15 people around the Virgin Islands.

We built from scratch, lofted the frames on a strongback, built the plug with clear pine lathes followed by bondo and tooling gel, built a split mold over the plug,  followed by 2 beam molds.

A whole heap of work but many hours later out came a finished hull #1

We ran it for a year, took it to St.Martin with 2 50HP tohatsu's leaping from wave to wave just to see the Heineken regatta...

To cut a long story short there was a lot of interest but no buyers.

We sold it for a song to a St Thomas power boat charter company.

Innovation 2 slowly followed.

The aft beam got stronger and no longer sat up above the aft beam.

The transoms came up 5" to take 30' outboards and we made a solid front deck.

Once again lots of interest but we ended up selling #2 to the same charter outfit who loved #1.

That was 6 years ago, both boats are doing great and will probably never wear out.

Epoxy, triaxial, vacuumed decks, they are tough!

They use 70HP outboards and can be seen all over the Virgin Islands with happy punters on board whilst sipping petrol.

They wanted #3 but production costs prohibited any more builds.

'take the molds and build one in STT' I said, still no # 3.

That's the end of the story, the molds flew away in Irma.

I didn't lose my shirt but that's enough of new boatbuilding for me.

The whole adventure probably deserves another thread!

inno 2.jpg

inno 3.jpg

inno.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyhow, back on topic, it was 'Chainsaw Tuesday'.

The chainsaw did great for about 5 minutes, after that the chain was blunt.

Identifying weak glue between the many layers of plywood proved to be more effective.

The late 1970's 'resourcinal' (?) glue was past its sell by date and the layers of plywood separated out quite easily.

At least 80 llbs of useless weight gone, happy days!

 

IMG_4204.jpg

IMG_4205.jpg

IMG_4206.jpg

IMG_4207.jpg

IMG_4209.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that. I really love slippery, low-horsepower motorboats. It seems like it's a lot harder when you have to carry lots of passengers and be legal, etc. I'll post some photos of what I did and what I'm doing now. Not sure why, but after a life of sailboats, the low-horsepower motorboats are really fun for me. Really like watching the progress on Triple Jack.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Russ,

    The paint shop at Nanny Cay repainted a pair of Hobie 18 hulls for a friend of mine from St John. This was ages ago and the guy didn't come pick them up for a couple of years. Now this was in the Land of Manana but the paint shop guys told him that they were going to sell the hulls and my friend asked that I pick them up as deck cargo on my Cross trimaran when I went to BVI Spring Regatta. I did so the afternoon after the first race and continued racing the rest of the weekend. Sunday when I got ready to sail home, I noticed that my boat was overrun by ants! The Hobie hulls had laid in the grass and dirt back of the paint shed for a couple of years with the stern plugs out and ants had taken residence in the hulls. They found flaws in the inner FG skins and had dug out a veritable ant farm in the low density foam core of the hulls. It took a couple of weeks of bombing my boat to get rid of the ants once they got on my boat and I was so pissed at the H-18 owner that he told me to keep the hulls and come pick up the beams, mast and rest of the boat for my troubles.

    The decks seemed to have been pretty riddled by the ants, seems they got into the core through the cutouts for the inspection holes. I never trusted the integrity of those hulls to even bother putting the rig back on but I did bolt up the beams and put the tramp on and made a nacelle of sorts and motor mount for a Yamaha 2 stroke 15 and used it as a motormaran for years in the VI. I put plenty of miles on that rig as a surf scouting boat and cruised the nude beaches and generally had a blast with it for years. I served as the photoboat for an article that Wooden Boat Magazine did on the big day charter catamarans that Gold Coast was building, I'm sure you have seen the article, your Dad wrote it! I gave him a ride in the motormaran and he just loved it.

     Years later, I made a visit to Key West with the head honcho from Gold Coast to one of their biggest customers for both the sailing cats and the wave-piercing ferries and was introduced to our host. He just laughed and said he knew me from the photoshoot as I had given him a long ride on the motormaran Hobie in some really rough conditions while he shot the big cats sailing out in front of Caneel. The Gold Coast guy was a bit taken aback when the fellow told him that he gave me full credit for being the actual genesis of the wave-piercer with that castaway Hobie! 

    Gold Coast ended up in a long court battle with INCAT, the builder of the big fast ferries down in Tasmania but only won the rights to the trade term 'wave piercer' even though Gold Coast had applied and been granted a patent. Don't think that they ever got a dime out of that though.

    I designed a 65' powercat for Gold Coast that still runs between Fajardo and Vieques but can't find a decent photo of it. 

 

Incats ferries. The are now building these under the name AUSTAL in Mobile, AL.

Image result for Austal wave piercer

     

Link to post
Share on other sites

I want photos of your motormaran, Rasputin. One of the many names given to my motormaran is "Film Waster', because everyone takes photos of it, so I have lots of photos. Quite a bit of fun was had...

DSC01377.jpg

DSC00631.jpg

sc0001788d.jpg

27920002.jpg

sc000153c0.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

...my friend asked that I pick them up as deck cargo on my Cross trimaran when I went to BVI Spring Regatta. I did so the afternoon after the first race and continued racing the rest of the weekend.      

Interesting. How did it perform as a pentamaran? :p

Link to post
Share on other sites

Itch and scratch Sunday with multiple grinding centres in action.

The remaining layers of mast step plywood chiseled away, more nasty core removed from the main hull bow and the stbd front beam 'peg' is now ground, feathered and ready for uni directional glass.

I removed year's worth of rear beam to sponson wall repair laminates, it revealed torn original laminates next to the airex.

I guess that's what 40 years of 'pulsing' followed by 'the big bang' does!

We have decided to enlarge the main hull coachroof out to the aft beam inner bulkheads. That will take out the vertical wall that marked the start of the coachroof.

We will need some fore and aft inner stringers under the roof to replace the structure...but are hoping for a cleaner, stronger, more modern look.

 

IMG_4243.jpg

IMG_4244.jpg

IMG_4247.jpg

IMG_4248.jpg

IMG_4250.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/10/2019 at 5:59 AM, racinginparadise said:

so Russel, to briefly answer you question wrt. power cats...

We worked on the drawings by O H Rodgers for a 28'x 10' power cat and built from scratch a 30'x 12' prototype, 'Innovation'

It was meant to be the most economical way to transport groups of up to 15 people around the Virgin Islands.

We built from scratch, lofted the frames on a strongback, built the plug with clear pine lathes followed by bondo and tooling gel, built a split mold over the plug,  followed by 2 beam molds.

A whole heap of work but many hours later out came a finished hull #1

We ran it for a year, took it to St.Martin with 2 50HP tohatsu's leaping from wave to wave just to see the Heineken regatta...

To cut a long story short there was a lot of interest but no buyers.

We sold it for a song to a St Thomas power boat charter company.

Innovation 2 slowly followed.

The aft beam got stronger and no longer sat up above the aft beam.

The transoms came up 5" to take 30' outboards and we made a solid front deck.

Once again lots of interest but we ended up selling #2 to the same charter outfit who loved #1.

That was 6 years ago, both boats are doing great and will probably never wear out.

Epoxy, triaxial, vacuumed decks, they are tough!

They use 70HP outboards and can be seen all over the Virgin Islands with happy punters on board whilst sipping petrol.

They wanted #3 but production costs prohibited any more builds.

'take the molds and build one in STT' I said, still no # 3.

That's the end of the story, the molds flew away in Irma.

I didn't lose my shirt but that's enough of new boatbuilding for me.

The whole adventure probably deserves another thread!

inno 2.jpg

inno 3.jpg

inno.jpg

Definitely not the the only OH powercat design.    He came up with a 15' fishing design boat that maximized the use out of 4x8 marine plywood and achieved 1kt/hp efficiency.   Basically it was a tunnel cat with a center console.    A reusable building jig was created so that folks could borrow it and build their own.

This was before internet and I was plugged into boat trader and other such publications and bird dogged a Johnson triple looper for the prototype.

Said boat achieved all objectives, 65hp johnson, 65kts on flat water.    Only problem was it was very unnerving to drive.   straightline was great, just trim the motor out and go, but think about a turn and you could feel the boat wiggling and just itching to hook.    You had to have had prior experience on a performance/racing hulls, like a tunnel hull or ModVP to feel comfortable with that.    The boat was a very fishable boat, just had to be really tuned in to drive it safely.

Hell, OH Rodgers deserves a thread of his own....

- Stumbling

Link to post
Share on other sites

Steady progress today.

We laminated the front beam connection, the first laminations since being craned back upright.

We would have liked to get the base and walls done in one visit but that would have been 8-10 laminations, uni's  and 45/45.

Even with slow cure that would/could have been an 'exotherm'.

I'm not a great fan of extra slow cure (Hawk resin in this case).

It takes so long to cure, even down here, that the resin tends to bleed out of the verticals and puddle. The last time I used it I swear it took 9 days to cure enough to work it.

Also even the extra slow mixes can 'exo', especially if knocked up in a big fill. Been there.

We were happy to get half the laminate thickness sorted today and peel plied.

Just in case anyone was in doubt how much grinding is still required I marked all required grinds with a marker spray.

Our post laminate discussion was based on how to build and shape the new coachroof and what core to use.

It looks like we have settled on 1" H80 Divinycell, plain sheets. We will saw draft whatever extra flexibility is needed rather than going for a diced core.

Lay it out over a timber framework, lam the top, tape some joints below and then remove and turn upside down for 'inside' lams and stringers.

It will be a challenge to blend the new in with the old angular shapes, we'll figure that out as we go along.

IMG_4314.jpg

IMG_4315.jpg

IMG_4316.jpg

IMG_4318.jpg

IMG_4319.jpg

IMG_4322.jpg

Lunch off Orcombe.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cracking on today before the first decent tropical wave passes by the VI tomorrow.

The forecast is for some good rain but check out the new TJ water supply truck, 150 gallons and 40psi belt driven 12v pump.

Some 3/8" H80 divinycell core went in on the aft beam to sponson frames.

One lamination of biax in first to give the core something to bite on, then 4 on top.

Happy days, the boat is becoming whole again.

Another milestone was us deciding to remove the triangular SS welded chainplate.

We have been staring at it for years wondering what lay beneath the surface, all was revealed today!

To be honest once we had cut it out there was some significant corrosion but it didn't look likely to fail any time soon.

However, it's nearly 40 years old, being SS it will slowly degrade until it fails with no warning and we lose the new mast.

The triangle was HEAVILY laminated to the bulkhead, about 1" of heavy roving 'iron mat' either side.

It certainly was not about to be ripped out, it was just crevice SS corrosion that bothered us.

We will be making new chainplates off the boat by pulling uni around a 5/8" SS tube webbing out onto a new bulkhead that we will glass in place.

The new shrouds will be lashed around a 5/8" clevis pin, see pic attached here.

It's a lot of work but we would be foolish not to do it whilst the access is so good!

Video coming up in a couple of days.

IMG_4399.jpg

IMG_4400.jpg

IMG_4402.jpg

IMG_4404.jpg

IMG_4409.jpg

IMG_4410.jpg

IMG_4411.jpg

chain plate.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 2 months later...

OK, the thread is not dead!

Shortly after that last post of mine on July 29th it was time to visit the fossils back in the UK.

While we were away Dorian became a cat 1 as it passed the BVI's and Steve, Mike and Paul had to remove the entire roof over the project.

Once off it was just not practical to put it back up until 'November Remember'.

Hey ho, it was a break from the grind and I managed to fix up my old Nissan Patrol that got Irma'ed too.

Now the roof is back on and we are at it again.

The current project, now all 3 hulls are 75% re-attached, is to come up with a new coachroof.

In her pre Irma condition we had a Spruce pole in the centre of the salon that propped up the middle of the coachroof.

When pressed hard it was not uncommon to see a 1" gap pulsing away between 'top of spruce' and the coachroof as the rear beams squashed it upwards!

It was time to re-design this load bearing roof and at the same time create a more modern look.

This is what we are up to.

IMG_5597.jpg

IMG_5667.jpg

IMG_5670.jpg

IMG_5673.jpg

IMG_5722.jpg

IMG_5724.jpg

IMG_5725.jpg

IMG_5727.jpg

IMG_4378.jpg

IMG_4489.jpg

IMG_4529.jpg

IMG_4862.jpg

IMG_5004.jpg

IMG_8224.JPG

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

A good day today, the coachroof is now taking it's final shape.

There are 5 fore and aft 'rafters' that have identical camber following the new curve that we cut out of the aft bulkhead wall.

Their forward edges are anchored 'in space' on a similar curve formed by a 14' 1x4

We have not quite figured out how the new roof will join the flat slabs that come up from the foredeck around the centre board casing.

At the moment the pine lattice 'sticks' are there to make sure we have a fair curve, they will be replaced by 1/4" ply pinned into the rafters.

That will make the structure strong enough to work on along with a few mid rafter uprights from the floor.

Then my plan, currently still in the 'committee stage', is to put plastic over the ply, core on top of that and then 1 or 2 laminates over the lot.

When cured, temporarily tab in upper 'upside down' rafters that run alongside their partners below running fore and aft.

Add transverse 2x4's to form a flat 'bed' that locks the shape...and crane the whole lot off to flip upside down onto a trailer.

Now, with gravity on our side, the inner laminates go in along with the structural stringers after the lower rafters, ply and plastic have been removed.

Then, once that lot has cured it can be flipped over, the upper rafters and 2x4's go and the whole roof can be faired/laminated and 'finished'.

While this has been going on there's a whole bunch of work that needs to happen back on board before the new coachroof assembly joins the boat.

New salon structural floors, port and starboard fwd bulkhead modifications to meet the new roof and some Irma crush injuries to the aft beam mid bulkheads that this new roof will mate to.

Sounds simple eh?

 

IMG_5759.jpg

IMG_5761.jpg

IMG_5762.jpg

IMG_5763.jpg

IMG_5765.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Steady progress again this week.

Time was spent on the forward face of the new coachroof, shaping inserts so we can remove the 1x4 we used to get the basic shape.

With them now in place we can now more easily figure out how we join the foredeck 'ramps' to the new coachroof.

There are a two options we are looking at.

A full width 'step' across the deck or smaller 'side steps'.

Each solution has its merits, it's just a case of mocking up both to see what works best.

We also carried on the 'we must laminate' regime by laying 5 layers on uni along the fwd beam top bridging the break.

For the coachroof we have decided to glue and screw down 1/4" ply over our 'rafters'.

Sorting the coachroof is proving to be both tricky and enjoyable, there are so many variables to consider...it's a break from the 'grind and lam' of which there's still plenty to do!

IMG_5861.jpg

IMG_5862.jpg

IMG_5864.jpg

IMG_5866.jpg

IMG_5867.jpg

IMG_5868.jpg

IMG_5859.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A gorgeous day here today in the BVI's, temperatures are down to 27 from 28 and there's a bit of N in the tradewinds.

The crane guy flew in for a visit to check out the repairs.

All the battens are off the coachroof now, Paul and I spent the morning making the final cut in the aft bulkhead to accept the 1/4" ply sheets that will cover the roof.

Having 'sistered' that aft bulkhead many moons ago it was refreshing to see how solid it still is.

More so when it becomes connected to the new structural coachroof.

Mid week we'll get the outer roof panels on too and the whole lot covered in plastic.

After that it's core and top laminates.

Then the crane!

On Monday mornings I go to work for a rest and to sort out the inevitable car full of tools!

Off topic but of interest...since Irma and Triple Jack's temporary lay up, 6 new to the BVI trimarans have showed up!

A Farrier 31, 2x F27'S, 2 new Corsair 760's and a Corsair 24.

4 were out racing yesterday, fun was had!

When TJ gets back on the racing scene there will be some lively competition, looking forward to that. 

IMG_5741.jpg

IMG_5974.jpg

IMG_5975.jpg

IMG_5976.jpg

IMG_5978.jpg

IMG_5981.jpg

IMG_5983.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, steady as she goes today... the weather has changed and the Xmas trades, accompanied with spicy squalls are pulsing thro the BVI's.

The coachroof mock up is finished and covered in plastic. Good thing with rain coming across the peninsula horizontally!

Now we have to decide on a laminate schedule for the inner and outer skins.

We are set on using either 3/4 or 1" divinycell H80.

We are leaning towards using unscored and just saw drafting where required, the curve is very slight.

The roof measures roughly 14'x8' so 2 laminates on top and 3 below equals nearly 50yds of material, basically a whole roll.

When we built our daggerboard we used an entire roll of 50" wide uni, 55yds so we know what that means in weight.

It's tough for 2 guys to lift.

The coachroof looks like it's going to be the same or slightly heavier, once all the underside fore and aft stringers are attached...and no core where the primaries and jib tracks locate.

The first 2 laminates on top are going down by hand, no vacuum, just peel ply.

After that the thing is craned off and turned upside down.

The lower laminates may well be vacuumed.

'Add less weight' they say. Hmmm, maybe one biax on top followed by 10oz cloth and only 2 down below...?

we'll see.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_6067.jpg

IMG_6068.jpg

IMG_6070.jpg

IMG_6074.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Might be an idea to laminate some strips on Uni [or biax tape] onto the bottom of your foam before you lay it onto your mold.

Even with a couple of layers of biax on the top, the thing will get all out of shape when you flip it off of your former, the laminate on the bottom will lock in the shape.

 

 

P

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

To keep the shape the whole structure is going to be lifted off, rafters and all.

Once the 2 biax laminates have cured on top I'll be adding the left over shapes from cutting out the rafters.

They will pin into their sisters below.

The rafters are only notched into the fore and aft bulkhead walls so they are ready to pop out and upwards.

It all sounds a bit complicated but pics will tell the tale soon enough!

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

One of those days today where the pictures don't show much progress...

Not true, we managed to come up with a plan to join the new curved coachroof to the flat foredeck 'ramps' that house the centerboard casing.

Initially we looked at removing the ramps completely but instead we have come up with a compromise that means building in a step with a short vertical wall.

It's a good place to have a step so transit from the foredeck aft is made easier.

A slight downside is this wall becoming a dam to waves that will sometimes meet it!

It was always going to be tricky but we are happy with the solution and it's going to be easy to install.

The decider was finding that the sound airex core we chopped out from the sides of the aft beam top can be used to make the step.

 

IMG_6146.jpg

IMG_6147.jpg

IMG_6148.jpg

IMG_6149.jpg

IMG_6150.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Here's another post that, on the face of it, shows little work has been done.

Rubbish! The coachroof mock up and associated structures are now complete.

There's $5000 worth of core, Coosa board, Biax and marine ply at the port.

That