Jump to content

Sailors Powerboat


Recommended Posts

48 minutes ago, accnick said:

This is our sailor's powerboat in her native Maine waters. When we found her, she had the same name and much the same interior look as our last sailboat. It was a natural fit.

Love the blue hull!  

Here's our trawler from our 6 week summer Channel Islands cruise.  Wake at 8.5kt cruising speed, and anchored in "our" secret cove on Santa Cruz Island

Wake.thumb.jpg.3b30d6f303b823bdda541e09933412a3.jpg637869241_StaCruz.thumb.jpg.46770da6f5961745647de42571bdfcb3.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1.3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

As a lifelong sailor on the quest for the "perfect" day boat we developed and built our Momentary lapse of Reason:  A 30 ft powercat for Florida waters.  She easily cruises in the ocean at 22-24 kn an

I might as well wade into this thread since it's a subject close to my heart. I'm a sailor and yacht designer and have been considering the sail or powerboat conundrum for as long as I've had to

Sailor's powerboat that I am working on. All carbon. 15 kts with 150 hp. KB PB 7-23-17 by robert perry, on Flickr

Posted Images

This is a pretty cool thread. Nige's tastes are the closest to my own, of corse, but kim's 50 footer having ample power with 400 horsepower is pretty cool. That's less power than lots of 20 footers have nowadays. 

The Bieker 30 footer made from a recycled Ultimate 30 was what got me interested in powerboats. That boat goes a lot of miles every year and the owners love it.

The single outrigger still seems like the best option to me for a single engine multihull, but my brain can handle asymmetry and most people can't. I should have built one for myself instead of another power cat, but I had the hulls and needed a project. The single outrigger in the photo is "experienced". That's a Bolger "Slicer" in the photo too. A really good boat.

DSC_0230.jpeg

PC040102.jpeg

PC040092.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

when I grow up I'd love to cruise a low power, low profile, efficient power boat up here - like Drumbeat or one of Bob Perry's 60'.

In the mean time, the experimenting is fun....

WAY to many boats doing this up here :(. :(

 

 

1102555033_ScreenShot2021-12-14at6_51_15AM.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nigel Irens Ocean Eagle 43. Ok that's not the best shot to see what it looks like.

image.png.936c4c806a75d77b27a6b109129eb686.png

Wave piercing works if you have enough volume. I think this boat could use more.

image.thumb.png.b83974b70b6be0710dacc867a020bde2.png

Better photo of what it really looks like. It's actually an Offshore Patrol Vessel. Designed to keep going in the rough stuff.

image.thumb.png.0c06931ae34571b7154f32f9c413a544.png

His skinnier civilian boats are a bit more sedate but follow the long and skinny theme

image.thumb.png.32847d82f6cea7fa02a6119a40c3265d.png

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Zonker said:

His skinnier civilian boats are a bit more sedate but follow the long and skinny theme

image.thumb.png.32847d82f6cea7fa02a6119a40c3265d.png

Ahh MOLLY BAN... she's been for sale for quite some time, no?  Not as light as Bob's version but extant and available.  

A long skinny moderately powered vessel seems perfect for Pacific Coast passages into or with the swell/wind.  16kts would be a dream if the economy were good enough to maintain a decent range.  Molly Ban claims 14kt @ 8gph or 10kt @ 2.6gph.  36,000lb displacement.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen it. I don't pretend to understand how it works in depth (other than "tip vortices bad") 

Mobius propellers scare me a bit. image.png.7aaae4296690f916f48735c51d461879.png

Testing it against a 14.75x15 and 15x15 is great but were those the best props for the boat? I'm not so sure. Were the conventional props deliberately underpropped? (they all reached top engine RPM) Would a 4 blade been better for getting on plane (probably). The test reads like an advertorial.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

The Bieker 30 footer made from a recycled Ultimate 30 was what got me interested in powerboats. That boat goes a lot of miles every year and the owners love it.

DSC_0230.jpeg

I saw Retro for the first time last summer at Lopez Island and chatted with the owners for a bit. Very spartan and not for everyone but it's both unique and special. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a different take on sailors powerboat.  My Dad and I have covered over 6,000 miles.  Mississippi River from Minneapolis to the Gulf.  Missouri River from Yankton SD to St Louis.  Ohio River from Pittsburg to Paducah, KY.  The Tennessee-Tombigbee waterway from the Ohio river to the gulf.  The Flint river from Albany, GA to the gulf.  And I'm sure there are a few more in there.  Not to mention many days spent duck hunting and fishing.

May I present to you M/V Dumarse - 16ft Express aluminum boat with a 4-stroke 20hp Yamaha.  It burns 2 gal/hour cruising at 22-27 knots depending on the push of the current. 

Dumarse.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Zonker said:

I've seen it. I don't pretend to understand how it works in depth (other than "tip vortices bad") 

Mobius propellers scare me a bit. image.png.7aaae4296690f916f48735c51d461879.png

Testing it against a 14.75x15 and 15x15 is great but were those the best props for the boat? I'm not so sure. Were the conventional props deliberately underpropped? (they all reached top engine RPM) Would a 4 blade been better for getting on plane (probably). The test reads like an advertorial.

 

I looked at these a year or so ago but about $5k each put them out of range for me.   If they really are the bees knees I’d consider it, but it seems very risky - making sure you get the right prob could be an expensive iterative process for my little boat...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Lochnerian Tom said:

Depends on the boat. That's about the slowest my Twin Vee will plane. It likes to go 20 knots. It doesn't really like any other speed.

My 'toon boat will go 16 with the throttle wide open, but isn't happy. It seems to like to go 12, less in chop.

My 5,000 lb I/O won't run at 16 knots, 22 is more like the minimum. It's just too heavy to be planing efficiently at that speed. My next boat will be lighter because I like 16 knots a lot better than 22-30.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Our C-Dory 22 was a good, easy to find and inexpensive sailor's power boat. It would plane at 10 knots and 14 knots was it's sweet spot for me. On the issue of twins, with it's ~5° deadrise two lower units in the water helped in a following sea. Very efficient but too slow for most power boaters. They are loved by the people they suite, though.

It was good for multi week outings if you planned every third night at a marina for showers and ice cream.

Coming into the dock at Sequim Bay. Bonus question. Can anyone identify the anchor brand?

6Hy9sNTRawRWdJTkV2HiPuGCPkambqENd6Xf_WbQ

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Autonomous said:

Our C-Dory 22 was a good, easy to find and inexpensive sailor's power boat. It would plane at 10 knots and 14 knots was it's sweet spot for me. On the issue of twins, with it's ~5° deadrise two lower units in the water helped in a following sea. Very efficient but too slow for most power boaters. They are loved by the people they suite, though.

It was good for multi week outings if you planned every third night at a marina for showers and ice cream.

Coming into the dock at Sequim Bay. Bonus question. Can anyone identify the anchor brand?

6Hy9sNTRawRWdJTkV2HiPuGCPkambqENd6Xf_WbQ

I saw one of these (I think it was smaller than yours...) near Rich's Passage by Bremerton.  Name of the boat...Actual Size.  :lol::lol:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, IStream said:

I like them too but they sure are expensive (if you buy new) for what you get.

When I saw my first one at a dealer the price shocked me too. It took a few years before I could appreciate them, they attract mature boaters that know what works. I sold mine earlier this year for $4,000 less than I paid for it 15 years ago. The C-Brats group and site is very good.

The anchor I tried to get you guys to bite on is a HydroBubble. Good anchor for a spare as it breaks down.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, socalrider said:

Ahh MOLLY BAN... she's been for sale for quite some time, no?  Not as light as Bob's version but extant and available.  

A long skinny moderately powered vessel seems perfect for Pacific Coast passages into or with the swell/wind.  16kts would be a dream if the economy were good enough to maintain a decent range.  Molly Ban claims 14kt @ 8gph or 10kt @ 2.6gph.  36,000lb displacement.

She’s my all time #1 “if I won the lottery” boat.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love one of you to share he readers digest of the conv about the aspen's.   My gut tells me there must be some quirky steering/motion trade offs in certain conditions but the efficiency pro's must be strong??

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, nige said:

I'd love one of you to share he readers digest of the conv about the aspen's.   My gut tells me there must be some quirky steering/motion trade offs in certain conditions but the efficiency pro's must be strong??

I second that - interested in hearing your impressions.  

My armchair impression: they look great, but seem to be extremely pricey (~$1m base price for the 40' I think)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the steering “quirky” and close maneuvering REQUIRED the thruster. They track as if on rails, but I found the steering very heavy in a turn. We did not buy it (which was good because then we found the Tim Kernan custom monohull which we really like.)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, kimbottles said:

I found the steering “quirky” and close maneuvering REQUIRED the thruster.

Hey any catamaran or "slightly off" catamaran with 1 engine in one hull will be very challenging to dock. With our 40' cat with a single diesel in one hull, if we were docking and the auxiliary outboard on the other hull wasn't working my wife would curse me.

Actually you could do the same on the Aspen - drive it on the inboard diesel 98% of the time and use a small outboard (instead of a thruster) on the other hull as the "get home" engine or just for docking. Also would mess with people's minds because they would only see the little outboard.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/14/2021 at 12:15 PM, Raz'r said:

This IS a really great thread. 

Got better with Russell’s pics of his ideas and that Ultimate 30 mod has me dreaming of a low power consumption powerboat again. I had that Fareast28R that had been dismasted when I bought it. My brother constantly nagged me to put a 15 hp outboard on it and go fishing, but I just couldn’t do it or I’d never sail it or sell it. Dreadnought bow and 9’ beam carried aft would have been fast and stable with no wake.

I bought a new mast and sold the boat instead, but I’ll have to keep my eye open for another potential,  efficient power conversion. Maybe solar electric…

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Waiex191 said:

Powerboats don't really float my, uh, boat.  But I could see building something like this:

pic843-17.jpg

 

https://www.boatdesigns.com/products.asp?dept=721

Oooh... 

I'd look at pairing with something like this https://www.torqeedo.com/us/en-us/products/inboards/deep-blue-100kw-2400i/000-01054.html

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, socalrider said:

That is cool, but I guess there are 3 things that attract me personally to this type of boat:

1) The project.  I am a project sort of person.

2) The looks

3) The sound

So electric propulsion, though cool, would not meet my objective for number 3.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My neighbor - a salty dog of a sailor,  bought this Chris Craft West Indian 36 for mainland cruising down on the west coast of FL - it's up in Canada now -they love living aboard for a season -  but he loves this pic, parked with all the massive sportsfishers in the Carolinas, looking like a toy.

Pau Hana on SF row.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Above 38 feet the choices expand, and the aesthetics are more in line with what I like.  But we don't have that kind of scratch.  So what are the picks for a sailor's powerboat that is under 30', yet has a galley, head, and can sleep 2, with the ability to sleep 4 as a bonus/plus?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Crash said:

Above 38 feet the choices expand, and the aesthetics are more in line with what I like.  But we don't have that kind of scratch.  So what are the picks for a sailor's powerboat that is under 30', yet has a galley, head, and can sleep 2, with the ability to sleep 4 as a bonus/plus?

Under 30 is tough. Budget?  Grand Banks 32 or CHB34 w single engine?  GB32 is a real cutie if you like varnishing. 
 

Ranger Tugs would do the trick under 30 if you have the scratch and don’t like varnishing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I’ll have to keep my eye open for another potential,  efficient power conversion. Maybe solar electric…

There's a part of the Cowmaran tale that isn't emphasized very often.

There are "mistake" hulls. They're 27' long and look just like scaled down models of the actual Cowmaran hulls. Wish I had been there when the builder and cow barn owner met with our other friend, who had to inform them they had misunderstood the drawings.

They don't have much carrying capacity and were just set aside, but they've been drawing ideas like flies.

My idea: a bridgedeck that has two Mirage Drive stations, a really big kite on a pylon, and one of the epropulsion electric outboards that regenerates power when dragged along. Class 6 Everglades Challenge boat.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Lochnerian Tom said:

There's a part of the Cowmaran tale that isn't emphasized very often.

There are "mistake" hulls. They're 27' long and look just like scaled down models of the actual Cowmaran hulls. Wish I had been there when the builder and cow barn owner met with our other friend, who had to inform them they had misunderstood the drawings.

They don't have much carrying capacity and were just set aside, but they've been drawing ideas like flies.

My idea: a bridgedeck that has two Mirage Drive stations, a really big kite on a pylon, and one of the epropulsion electric outboards that regenerates power when dragged along. Class 6 Everglades Challenge boat.

Did you say, ‘kite?’ As it happens, I’m selling a Culp Outleader. Was for my F27GS

 

C86A8916-003E-439C-9EE5-9A17A78AA3CF.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, socalrider said:

Under 30 is tough. Budget?  Grand Banks 32 or CHB34 w single engine?  GB32 is a real cutie if you like varnishing. 
 

Ranger Tugs would do the trick under 30 if you have the scratch and don’t like varnishing. 

I know it is, right?  That's sorta why I asked, as I haven't necessarily hit on the answer yet.  Budget is an "it depends" kinda situation.  When the boy (last kid) goes off to college in the not too distant future, we are outta SoCal and most likely headed back to the Chesapeake Bay.  We have a small condo at the top of the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia (at Wintergreen) that we will live in part of the year, and are talking either a small house (condo/townhouse) somewhere on the coast on the water, and a powerboat for cruising and a smaller daysailer for racing/daysailing.  So the the budget depends alot on location/price of the house on the coast.  Lets use 100k for both powerboat and daysailer.

I'm the kinda guy that likes making things look good, so I actually don't mind varnishing...and it might help keep me busy whence I'm retired :rolleyes:

I like the look of the Nordic Tugs better than the newer Ranger Tugs.  Found the Cape Dory 28 ft Cruiser and the Grand Banks...but both of those are a question of finding one that has been well cared for by it's POs...

Of course, I really like the downeast look of the Hinckley Picnic Boats, the MJM's, the Black Cove's, etc. but to get the desired cruising accommodations means a much bigger boat and budget goes thru the roof...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Over 20 years ago I worked with some Nova Scotia builders trying to drum up yacjt biz. The costs were low due to weak CD$. But difficult to make a sale. Workboats jave a very narrow yacht market. Rosborough had some success at it. But I was not invilved.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Over 20 years ago I worked with some Nova Scotia builders trying to drum up yacjt biz. The costs were low due to weak CD$. But difficult to make a sale. Workboats jave a very narrow yacht market. Rosborough had some success at it. But I was not invilved.

Nothing wrong with a tug 

 perhaps contract the   sailing club  for work herding optimists 

 

 

2FA51D5C-0521-427E-A78C-1319BEC10F36.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Crash said:

Above 38 feet the choices expand, and the aesthetics are more in line with what I like.  But we don't have that kind of scratch.  So what are the picks for a sailor's powerboat that is under 30', yet has a galley, head, and can sleep 2, with the ability to sleep 4 as a bonus/plus?

 If 2' isn't a deal breaker look at the Nordic Tug 32. Well regarded and hold their value. 

Ranger Tugs have lots of styling but aren't in the same league on several fronts, IMO.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/16/2021 at 6:12 AM, Max Rockatansky said:

Did you say, ‘kite?’ As it happens, I’m selling a Culp Outleader. Was for my F27GS

 

C86A8916-003E-439C-9EE5-9A17A78AA3CF.jpeg

Yes, that's the kind of thing I had in mind, but you're skipping a few steps ahead, the first one being to convince the owner to pursue my plan. Pretty unlikely.

 

9 hours ago, Autonomous said:

Ranger Tugs have lots of styling but aren't in the same league on several fronts, IMO.

The dealership where I worked sold them for a while. The 21 footer had an amazing boat show effect. Every year, we brought a Sun Cat to the Fort FatGrifter show, a predominantly powerboat venue. It was a hit every year, attracting lots of attention. Then we put it next to a Ranger Tugs 21 and it was like we had put an invisibility cloak around the Sun Cat.

The thing about the 21, cute though it may be, is that the whole boat is a water collector that's one bilge pump failure away from sinking. I like self bailing cockpits.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A smaller option is the Camano Troll. Not a looker, but well built and efficient

image.png.9429a1218c754d4dfb77ce3bc2b46fce.png

Both Aspen cats and Ranger tugs are going to outboard power for most of their models. I can see lot's of advantages, but a big issue is the loss of the swim step as a great place for the dingy. Ranger has a tilting rack that holds the dink over the motors, it works but looks clunky.

The Aspens have two outboards, with the one on the smaller hull having lower HP. To my mind this kind of defeats the advantage of the asymetrical layout with just one inboard in the big hull.

A friend has an inboard Aspen, it is a nice boat but backing up is a bit of an adventure. It is one of the smaller models which puts the engine partly under the cabin so it is quite loud inside underway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I might as well wade into this thread since it's a subject close to my heart.

I'm a sailor and yacht designer and have been considering the sail or powerboat conundrum for as long as I've had to motor my 5kt $hitbox back to port on a windless/blowing stink/cold/rainy/dark/hot/day/night. Still love sailing, but if I want to get somewhere comfortably, it'll be on a powerboat.

In the last few years, I started thinking of a smaller powerboat- a day or weekend boat. A boat that could be trailered and stored for the winter, like our 26' sailboat. So she needed to be relatively lightweight, efficient,  max length and beam for trailering, and a reasonable cruise speed in the low 20's. The Tombolo 28 was originally designed for cedar-strip & plywood custom construction. The design was published in a few magazines and now it seems to have a little momentum. https://www.siewertdesign.com/Portfolio/Production_Boat_Designs/tombolo_28.html

Many production boats the size have what I call "feature creep", and try to do too much to appeal to everybody. They have too many and overly complicated systems, which weigh more, which require more horsepower, which weighs more...etc.

The Tombolo 28 is a relatively simple boat, a sailors' boat that I thought you might enjoy.

SD-28-Pocket-Cruiser-Plan-&-Profile-2000.jpg

SD-28-Tombolo-28-Exterior.3-2000.jpg

SD-28-Cruiser10-3-adjusted-2000.jpg

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Cheap Beer said:

I might as well wade into this thread since it's a subject close to my heart.

I'm a sailor and yacht designer and have been considering the sail or powerboat conundrum for as long as I've had to motor my 5kt $hitbox back to port on a windless/blowing stink/cold/rainy/dark/hot/day/night. Still love sailing, but if I want to get somewhere comfortably, it'll be on a powerboat.

In the last few years, I started thinking of a smaller powerboat- a day or weekend boat. A boat that could be trailered and stored for the winter, like our 26' sailboat. So she needed to be relatively lightweight, efficient,  max length and beam for trailering, and a reasonable cruise speed in the low 20's. The Tombolo 28 was originally designed for cedar-strip & plywood custom construction. The design was published in a few magazines and now it seems to have a little momentum. https://www.siewertdesign.com/Portfolio/Production_Boat_Designs/tombolo_28.html

Many production boats the size have what I call "feature creep", and try to do too much to appeal to everybody. They have too many and overly complicated systems, which weigh more, which require more horsepower, which weighs more...etc.

The Tombolo 28 is a relatively simple boat, a sailors' boat that I thought you might enjoy.

SD-28-Pocket-Cruiser-Plan-&-Profile-2000.jpg

SD-28-Tombolo-28-Exterior.3-2000.jpg

SD-28-Cruiser10-3-adjusted-2000.jpg

Very nice!

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Feature creep is essentially every production powerboat. Horrible waste of resources.

I am rather proud of the fact that I batted feature creep away from the SLIVER project. It wasn’t easy, all sorts of well meaning people had suggestions of features that “you need” or “must have”. So far we have kept her quite simple.

 

7486D2D9-FAE6-4086-A911-75000DCB0B2E.jpeg

CAD4ACAE-763A-4AC1-9A33-F7BDE6E5B63B.jpeg

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cheap Beer said:

The Tombolo 28 was originally designed for cedar-strip & plywood custom construction. The design was published in a few magazines and now it seems to have a little momentum. https://www.siewertdesign.com/Portfolio/Production_Boat_Designs/tombolo_28.html

Nice boat.  I mentioned it in another thread here 1.5 years ago:

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ranger Tugs are all about feature creep. There's almost nothing optional. Thrusters, radar, giant screen, air conditioning, etc, etc, it's all standard.

I'm not a yuge fan, as one of my rules of boating is that the smallest, simplest boat that can do what you want to do will result in the best work to play ratio. They kinda went the opposite way.

As mentioned, I sold them for a while at a dealership. Customers LOVE standard stuff and do not like poring over lists of expensive options. Not my style, as I said, but if I had to sell one of those with every option priced separately or sell one like they do, it's an easy choice. LOAD IT UP!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/14/2021 at 10:15 AM, socalrider said:

Have you outboard efficiency nuts seen the Sharrow Propeller?  This test just came out (literally hit my inbox a few min ago) & looks quite promising.  ~16% speed & efficiency improvement, pretty rigorous independent test from what I can tell.  

Humph.

First, note that it only works at lower speeds, and is worse at higher speeds. It is at higher speeds when load is maximized that cavitation happens and tip losses become significant, not at mid range speeds.

At lower speeds, more blades work better, and this has always been known, nothing new here.

This is effectively a six bladed prop being compared to a three bladed prop, so the results are not at all unexpected.

A better comparison would be against a six bladed prop without the connections between alternating blades.

Tip loss on a prop is not like tip loss on a wing, where winglets certainly work. No helicopter uses winglets. That is because a rotating wing approaches the fifth power better efficiency with span, so increasing span always wins.

The real problem with reaching best efficiency with this specific (heavy, high drag) boat is that it needs bigger diameter props than can be fitted on those outboards. Better to improve the lower unit to support bigger props in order to gain better mid range efficiency.

Remember that the reason outboards use small props is because gas engines don't have much torque at low speeds. Outboard manufacturers, like all engine manufacturers, don't want you to overload the engine at low speeds to avoid having you blow up your engine. Overloading so the engine simply can't turn faster than the torque peak is the way to get maximum fuel efficiency, and everyone knows that. But it also causes engines to blow up, and everyone knows that too.

It does look cool.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

That outboard looks too big for that boat.

I'm not sure a boat has ever gotten that reaction from me. If you look at hours on the water, I'm definitely a powerboater who also sails and paddles.

Cruising up the harbor yesterday at 20 knots, an offshore fishing type cruised right by doing about 35. My wife commented that we were losing the race. I told her that boat was cruising near our top speed.

Got to the ramp and the boat in question was helping a disabled boat at the mouth of the harbor. About 24' long. The engine? A 400! I grinned. DIdn't look too big.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know how closely some of you are watching the outboard motor market but it is brutal. Guys have brand new boats with no motors and no idea when they will come in. Year long waiting lists, etc.

I just got notified my new build was imminent (whatever that means), I thought it would be late spring.

A bit of panic as a specific motor needed to be sourced pronto. Called and surfed around with the same result, 'we can put you on a list.' Finally found just the one I wanted, probably the last one in the area.

It's better to be lucky than good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nimbus looks like it makes good candidates for a Sailor's Powerboat.  Solid economy at low speeds with ability to go fast, Swedish built.  Pricey.  

I've seen a couple in person and think they look great in profile.  The asymmetry is off-putting when viewing from the bow or stern.  

https://boattest.com/boat/nimbus/365-coupe-2020

image.thumb.png.8fd9d40ba5474eb77e24f1bf62a461e3.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Lochnerian Tom said:

I like the tower but it looks a bit hard to get up and down in the boat's rocking.

What is that white pedestal thing in the cockpit?

Rocket launcher for rods or a fighting chair mount?

Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread could use updated Cowmaran pictures and I happened to swipe some from the owner's FB page, so...

With the brand new Suzuki 20's. That T-Top is a pretty cool carbon fiber structure on its own.

Cowmaran2021Suz.jpg

And a look down under the bridgedeck.

CowmaranBridgedeck.jpg

The beams that support the bridgedeck are 4 x 4 carbon fiber posts with very thick walls. They're way too strong and heavy for the purpose, but were leftovers from one of his kids. The first time I drove it through really steep harbor chop, one of those took the top of a wave off. Felt like we hit something really solid.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites