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In The Pool, Georgian Bay:

Not sailing last weekend in the Fox Island Thoroughfare, Penobscot Bay, Maine. Fall, best light for photos, is here.   

Here is my new one. Definitely not sailing in these pictures. It will be soon. It is my design based off the profile of a Monk designed sloop I restored in the 1970's. 

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On 9/15/2021 at 7:01 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

Gold is nearly twice the weight of lead per volume, and is quite malleable, making it almost an ideal material for a keel. 

Since the keel weighs 10,500 lbs, it's little wonder rainbows seem to follow us around. 

Polish guy topped off his keel with gold before he took off out of here about 25 years ago. Melted down his lifetime supply, cut out some lead, put the gold in and some lead poured over the top, painted bilge paint over it and set out for his homeland.

True story

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2 hours ago, Kolibri said:

Kolibri in Berkeley Marine Center getting the old Volvo MD7A yanked out and replaced with an ElectricYachts QuietTorque motor. 

IMG_4004_cr.jpg

Can you give some details? HP? Battery type? Watt Hours? 

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2 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Can you give some details? HP? Battery type? Watt Hours? 

ElectricYachts QuietTorque 10 motor, ~15Hp. Batteries will be either 4 ePropulsion E80s or 2 E175s. We need to get the diesel fully removed to do detailed measurements to see if the E175s will fit. The E80s will definitely fit based on my rough measurements with everything in the way. The E175's are preferred as it ends up being 350 AHr at 48V vs 320 AHr. Price differential is ~$20. 

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15 hours ago, Kolibri said:

ElectricYachts QuietTorque 10 motor, ~15Hp. Batteries will be either 4 ePropulsion E80s or 2 E175s. We need to get the diesel fully removed to do detailed measurements to see if the E175s will fit. The E80s will definitely fit based on my rough measurements with everything in the way. The E175's are preferred as it ends up being 350 AHr at 48V vs 320 AHr. Price differential is ~$20. 

I have one E80. So far, so good.

Did you use a "consultant" in the design of your set up? Will the battery "talk" with your throttle controller?

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50 minutes ago, Bull City said:

I have one E80. So far, so good.

Did you use a "consultant" in the design of your set up? Will the battery "talk" with your throttle controller?

I did a ton of research on what is out there and talked with reps from OceanVolt and ElectricYacths. OceanVolt was considerably more expensive and not based in the US. ElectricYachts provided some great system sizing engineering. They have also been doing a lot of testing with the ePropulsion batteries along with several installations using those batteries. The "data sync" mentioned on the ePropulsion website is most likely proprietary. The ElectricYachts controller monitors battery SOC, charge & discharge current, temp, etc. 

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On 10/10/2021 at 9:58 PM, Jim in Halifax said:

Finally finished the Dickinson solid fuel stove install. Just in time, as it was 5C (41 F) on this particular night! Not as pretty as some marine fireplaces (like on Kris's boat) but its cozy.

 

Dickinson Newport.jpg

We had a Force 10 equivalent on our Paceship 26.  Many pleasant memories 

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20 minutes ago, Crash said:

It was a big ole moon last night, wasn't it?  Great pic.

I think it was actually full last night.  Helped illuminate my work up the mast - it was very bright - but I still needed a headlamp so that I could see perfectly where I was drilling and to not drop screws in the dark  :-)

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Hey Crash,

how goes out there in beautiful Cali.  Back from ME/NE a few weeks ago and now NB in Winter harbor in Baltimore, Port Covington.   Gorgeous solo sailing all summer “Down East”.    NB now outfitted with Quantum CF main, UK 105 jib, Quantum Code Zero (yummy sail :).

We need to sail together soon…DTB 2013 still my best memory with you and the guys!

 

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On 6/29/2019 at 4:42 AM, Beer fueled Mayhem said:

Here is my boat not sailing.  As a fuck you to cancer, I went and bought a new Yanmar 4JH57 to replace my smoking Perkins Prima 50.  This is us hoisting the new one into the boat!

MVIMG_20190521_110930.jpg

How is that Yanmar working out for you?

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Old, stinky, loud version and new, quiet, odorless version. Batteries get installed this week. Once the Volvo was removed we did some very detailed measurements and quickly realized that the ePropulsion battery options wouldn't work. I'm going with 12 Battle Born 12V, 100 Ahr LFP batteries instead.

engine.jpg

IMG_4085.jpg

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34 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Do you know what your run time will be?

~13 hrs at 3.0 kts. ~53 hrs at 2.0 Kts.  is what the ElectricYachts engineer predicts for my boat, motor, and battery configuration. He says his predictions are always on the conservative side. 

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On 11/13/2021 at 8:51 PM, Kolibri said:

Old, stinky, loud version and new, quiet, odorless version. Batteries get installed this week. Once the Volvo was removed we did some very detailed measurements and quickly realized that the ePropulsion battery options wouldn't work. I'm going with 12 Battle Born 12V, 100 Ahr LFP batteries instead.

engine.jpg

IMG_4085.jpg

Have you gotten back in the water yet?

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14 hours ago, Bull City said:

Have you gotten back in the water yet?

Kolibri should go back in the water on 12/2 or 12/3. I'm in Hawaii until 12/6. Hoping to skip out of work 1 day that week to sail back down to my marina. Worst case I sale on Saturday, 12/11. 

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Yes, the blue one is mine.

The scroll work is a piece of cast iron, made to look lile the original scroll work that was inlaid to the planking. I did not know that the underlaying scroll work existed until I had to remove that part of the planking. If i knew that the underlying inlay did exist before removing it I might have tried to restore it...

Here is a more profile view (and still not sailing to stay on topic)

20210915_093245.jpg

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7 hours ago, lakeneuch said:

Today I took the decision to stsy in harbour...

IMG-20211127-WA0000.jpg

Good decision. :D

When it's risky to simply walk down the dock to the boat, staying home is best.

Nice boat BTW.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Me likey!

Van de Stadt?

Thanks! No, but close. It's a Waarschip 725, or 'Kwarttonner' in dutch, so a small plywood quarter ton from back in the day. Diva is from 1974. I think there are at least some hundred or so still around. Not bad for wooden boats from that era. Quite sturdy, pretty undercanvassed, but a good family boat. The helmsman position is very much forward, so you could sit directly behind the sprayhood when sailing alone, but that's still on the bucket list.

20191016_104219.thumb.jpg.3a698079099ca698591da55e6b879685.jpg 

 

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

Anchored inside the reef on NE side of Bora Bora, 1999, and off Maeva Beach, Tahiti.

Maeva Beach, Tahiti.jpg

 

That's a nice awning. What did you use as stiffeners? 

Also, steps to the first spreader? 

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28 minutes ago, Elegua said:

 

That's a nice awning. What did you use as stiffeners? 

Also, steps to the first spreader? 

Two or three folding steps to get above the boom, then fixed steps to the first spreaders. Two reasons: I could free-climb to the first spreaders quickly for coral spotting when required, and I could climb to the first spreaders to make it easier for my 94-pound wife to hoist me the rest of the way to the masthead in the bosun's chair when required.

Small trapezoidal awning over foredeck is just Sunbrella, and is a simple design with no spreaders. The forward cabin is our sleeping cabin, and has a big double-opening hatch as well as a large Dorade vent for ventilation.

The big main awning was a joint design project with Soca Sails in Trinidad, cribbing every good idea from big-boat awnings seen across the Caribbean, but adapted to our 40-foot double-ender.

There is a single wide tubular stainless spreader at the back end, which secures to the aft side of the split backstays at a fixed height. The spreader has ss eye fittings on each end for lashings.

Everything else is just done with tension. At the forward end, the awning lashes around the mast in the middle, and clips onto the vertical shrouds outboard. It has cutouts in the outboard edges to fit around the aft lower shrouds, with short lashings to close the cutouts to enable you to apply fore and aft tension along the outboard edges.

It secures to the running backstays about halfway along the outboard edges, and has lashings down to the lifelines all along the edges. The main halyard is used on the centerline bridle, which applies vertical tension at three eye points along the reinforced centerline seam.

There are opening flaps in the drop sides at the p&s boarding gates. Those can be closed. There is also a roll-up panel across the back. 

Material is Stamoid, which is vinyl-coated polyester, completely waterproof, and opaque.

This awning withstood a number of 40-knot squalls without a problem. The key was strong fabric, multiple fastening points with plenty of reinforcement, and tension. Lots of tension.

For some reason, the guy I sold the boat to apparently discarded the awning, as he wasn't interested in cruising in the tropics.

That's a shame. A lot of thought and effort went into it.

A good awning is a valuable piece of equipment in the tropics, where shade and breeze make life tolerable.

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2 hours ago, accnick said:

Two or three folding steps to get above the boom, then fixed steps to the first spreaders. Two reasons: I could free-climb to the first spreaders quickly for coral spotting when required, and I could climb to the first spreaders to make it easier for my 94-pound wife to hoist me the rest of the way to the masthead in the bosun's chair when required.

Small trapezoidal awning over foredeck is just Sunbrella, and is a simple design with no spreaders. The forward cabin is our sleeping cabin, and has a big double-opening hatch as well as a large Dorade vent for ventilation.

The big main awning was a joint design project with Soca Sails in Trinidad, cribbing every good idea from big-boat awnings seen across the Caribbean, but adapted to our 40-foot double-ender.

There is a single wide tubular stainless spreader at the back end, which secures to the aft side of the split backstays at a fixed height. The spreader has ss eye fittings on each end for lashings.

Everything else is just done with tension. At the forward end, the awning lashes around the mast in the middle, and clips onto the vertical shrouds outboard. It has cutouts in the outboard edges to fit around the aft lower shrouds, with short lashings to close the cutouts to enable you to apply fore and aft tension along the outboard edges.

It secures to the running backstays about halfway along the outboard edges, and has lashings down to the lifelines all along the edges. The main halyard is used on the centerline bridle, which applies vertical tension at three eye points along the reinforced centerline seam.

There are opening flaps in the drop sides at the p&s boarding gates. Those can be closed. There is also a roll-up panel across the back. 

Material is Stamoid, which is vinyl-coated polyester, completely waterproof, and opaque.

This awning withstood a number of 40-knot squalls without a problem. The key was strong fabric, multiple fastening points with plenty of reinforcement, and tension. Lots of tension.

For some reason, the guy I sold the boat to apparently discarded the awning, as he wasn't interested in cruising in the tropics.

That's a shame. A lot of thought and effort went into it.

A good awning is a valuable piece of equipment in the tropics, where shade and breeze make life tolerable.

Thanks for the detailed explanation. Why you would throw it away even if you're not in the tropics is beyond me.  Awnings turn your cockpit into a comfortable veranda.  When we lived in Singapore, we had a landed house and the whole first floor could be opened to the deck and garden with no screens (close to zero mosquitos in Sing).   

We need to up our awning game, bigly. We have this sad little postage stamp of an awning made by some long-defunct CT sail loft. It is supported by PVC tubing and ties to the boom, runners and our "roll-bar".  If it rains, it is vaguely waterproof; just pull the sides down to the weather cloths.  Despite its modest spec's, it makes the cockpit a comfortable place to spend time.  Works for Maine, but probably not anywhere south. 

AM-JKLUmF3sDYTTdnC2PRQ3fu1JSIH1p3V0pzkoE

 

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11 hours ago, accnick said:

 

A good awning is a valuable piece of equipment in the tropics, where shade and breeze make life tolerable.

Even here in Maine, any awning/bimini is valuable these days. We wouldn't be able to tolerate the afternoon heat even on the water. IMG_2984.thumb.jpeg.dea0b25f4d96737f4a4dc8e21fba0674.jpeg

 

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4 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Even here in Maine, any awning/bimini is valuable these days. We wouldn't be able to tolerate the afternoon heat even on the water. IMG_2984.thumb.jpeg.dea0b25f4d96737f4a4dc8e21fba0674.jpeg

 

Too true. We have a big bimini over the flying bridge on our powerboat in Maine, and have been thinking about a permanent cockpit cover.

We had a bimini on our last sailboat, and it connected to the dodger with a zip-in connector piece. The bimini also had two removable back drops that zipped on: one of solid Sunbrella, the other of Textilene to allow air flow and light. In practice, the Textilene drop was the one used most.

That bimini was rarely stowed, even in bad conditions, where the additional protection was really appreciated. It could be folded back and lashed to the backstays, and had its own zip-on fitted storage cover.

On passages in the tropics, when you might spend days or weeks on end broad-reaching in relatively benign conditions, we kept the connector installed, but zipped open enough to accommodate the bridgedeck mounted self-contained mainsheet purchase (deathtrap!:D).

We only did that when the preventer was on.

We went a little nuts on the canvas on that boat, but after spending most of my adult life frying in the sun on sailboats, we were--and still are--trying to save what is left of our skin. Neil Thurston in RI made most of the canvas except the big awning. That included sail covers, a zip-on "condom" for the carbon fiber spinnaker pole, and a big on-deck gear bag that held the original roll-up dinghy.

In NZ, we made covers for all the varnished Dorade boxes, as well as a non-skid padded sailing cover for the deckhouse cabin sole, which was subject to a lot of abuse offshore. We also made covers for the varnished  rail caps.

Some of that canvas is still in use on the boat today, but it must be falling apart by now.

If we hadn't had so much varnish, we could have had far fewer covers for it. The design brief for the next boat we designed--but never built--started with "no on-deck wood".

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Even here in Maine, any awning/bimini is valuable these days. We wouldn't be able to tolerate the afternoon heat even on the water. IMG_2984.thumb.jpeg.dea0b25f4d96737f4a4dc8e21fba0674.jpeg

 

Huh?

That's a nice cool afternoon by my standards. I'd be wearing long pants and possibly a flannel shirt.

- DSK

 

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No dodger on Hukilau, but the bimini is a must-have.  It's up from June through September here in Connecticut.  I have no idea how I survived on my last boat without one.HukilauJune2.thumb.jpg.abcbc7ce58f53cd69224b636f5dd8181.jpg

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22 hours ago, IStream said:

I do too, but there's no denying that the yellow had a freakish charm. 

"Freakish" being the operative word...

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5 minutes ago, gn4478 said:

Fortunately there was a happy ending..She is better than new.

 

613914877_onthebeach.jpg

Yeah, sand is a wonderful thing. Might have been a different story in Maine.

Didn't realize you have in-mast furling. 

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2 hours ago, Elegua said:

Whoa...what's the backstory to this, if I may ask? 

Hurricane Isaiah. Ripped out a Helix that was over 20 feet down. No water down below. Floated off on the next high tide. I am the luckiest most unlucky guy I know

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3 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Yeah, sand is a wonderful thing. Might have been a different story in Maine.

Didn't realize you have in-mast furling. 

It works very well. I was concerned about it but happy to have it. The old Hood system.

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3 minutes ago, gn4478 said:

Hurricane Isaiah. Ripped out a Helix that was over 20 feet down. No water down below. Floated off on the next high tide. I am the luckiest most unlucky guy I know

That is amazingly good bad luck. 

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19 minutes ago, gn4478 said:

It works very well. I was concerned about it but happy to have it. The old Hood system.

I had one on my Hinckley, never had a problem. I've got in-boom on this boat, works fine, as well. 

Those Baltics are well made boats. A lot of lesser builds might not have had such a happy ending. 

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5 hours ago, gn4478 said:

Fortunately there was a happy ending..She is better than new.

 

613914877_onthebeach.jpg

Beautiful Baltic.  Is that the 43?

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48 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I believe it's a 51

Friends of mine have a very nice 51 for sale right now. All the bells and whistles, including new in-boom furling and electric winches. They are in their 70s and double-hand it all the time, but it is a bit much at times, I would think.

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2 minutes ago, accnick said:

Friends of mine have a very nice 51 for sale right now. All the bells and whistles, including new in-boom furling and electric winches. They are in their 70s and double-hand it all the time, but it is a bit much at times, I would think.

I think I counted 7 winches on a side...  I thought mine was excessive with 4/side...

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3 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

I think I counted 7 winches on a side...  I thought mine was excessive with 4/side...

Depending on how you sail it, you can get along with three or four power winches: main halyard, two primaries, and mainsheet.

Other friends of mine of similar age double-hand their Oyster 53, but it was set up from the start for this, with power everything.

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

Depending on how you sail it, you can get along with three or four power winches: main halyard, two primaries, and mainsheet.

Other friends of mine of similar age double-hand their Oyster 53, but it was set up from the start for this, with power everything.

My Hanse 505 is super easy to sail single or double handed as long as the autopilot is working.  I have contemplated installing a redundant one below the active one for that once in a blue moon when the shit hits the fan.

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9 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

My Hanse 505 is super easy to sail single or double handed as long as the autopilot is working.  I have contemplated installing a redundant one below the active one for that once in a blue moon when the shit hits the fan.

A good autopilot is at least as useful as another crewperson.

It never gets tired, it doesn't need sleep, and you don't have to feed it.

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3 hours ago, accnick said:

A good autopilot is at least as useful as another crewperson.

It never gets tired, it doesn't need sleep, and you don't have to feed it.

On the other hand, applying electricity to a crewperson can really make them hurry.

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I'm new to actually posting, have been reading and enjoying for years. Here's my two boats - Razzmatazz has entertained me for the past 7 years:

2D0C9F66-A6DF-4D5B-9B2B-AADEBB84BD59.thumb.jpeg.7b36044b4413b0358ad1a2751411970d.jpeg

Spice is waiting for me to pick her up and bring her home in the spring:

IMG_6282.thumb.JPG.39d9274290bceb270d2b1e7c8a4ca81c.JPG

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15 hours ago, accnick said:

Friends of mine have a very nice 51 for sale right now. All the bells and whistles, including new in-boom furling and electric winches. They are in their 70s and double-hand it all the time, but it is a bit much at times, I would think.

I took a look at her listing on yachtworld. Very nice indeed. I like the layout with the expanded galley into what on mine is a port upper/lower guest cabin.  Somehow they shoe horned a generator in over the engine. Not sure how they had room. I'm looking to do that, but can't seem to make it fit. I'd love to know what yard did that.

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15 hours ago, Raz'r said:

I think I counted 7 winches on a side...  I thought mine was excessive with 4/side...

I have 15 winches. Just a bit of maintenance.... And at times, it seems we are one short when racing.

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29 minutes ago, gn4478 said:

I took a look at her listing on yachtworld. Very nice indeed. I like the layout with the expanded galley into what on mine is a port upper/lower guest cabin.  Somehow they shoe horned a generator in over the engine. Not sure how they had room. I'm looking to do that, but can't seem to make it fit. I'd love to know what yard did that.

The generator is a complicated installation, since they had to build a mounting arrangement over the main engine. 

I think the generator installation was done before my friends bought the boat.

Not sure which yard did the work. The boat is now stored at Great Island in Harpswell, which is a really good yard, but definitely not a do it yourself yard.

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11 hours ago, accnick said:

The generator is a complicated installation, since they had to build a mounting arrangement over the main engine. 

I think the generator installation was done before my friends bought the boat.

Not sure which yard did the work. The boat is now stored at Great Island in Harpswell, which is a really good yard, but definitely not a do it yourself yard.

It looks like the main engine is more forward than mine. That makes a bit more room. 

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