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In The Pool, Georgian Bay:

Not sailing last weekend in the Fox Island Thoroughfare, Penobscot Bay, Maine. Fall, best light for photos, is here.   

Here is my new one. Definitely not sailing in these pictures. It will be soon. It is my design based off the profile of a Monk designed sloop I restored in the 1970's. 

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2 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

Rigging the Christmas lights? No other good reason to be up the stick this time of year...

Nope - cutting a hole for backing plate for removable Solent stay fitting.  
 

Trust me, on this coast, in late fall/winter/early spring, in the very infrequent interludes between winter rain (or occasional snow), if you gotta do outside work on the boat, you fit it in *whenever*! :-). Took me four trips up the mast on the weekend, in mostly (but falling) daylight to scope it out, measure and then finally mark things out.  (Took four trips because not long each time after I  got up there, cold winter rain would start!) I got home from work yesterday, there was only a threat of snow, so, fuck it, up I went to cut the hole :-). A bit of finishing work left to do, mark and drill bolt holes, then install backing plate.  Then get wire stay made up and install.  
 

The goal is to measure for and order sails first week of January to get a jump on the rest of winter sailing.  And, it’s a slow time for sailmakers.  (Ordered mainsail too late in the new year last year - took 5 months to arrive: not making that mistake again this year.)

Get’er done...no stick too high, no night too dark, no winter too cold :-)

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Nope - cutting a hole for backing plate for removable Solent stay fitting.  
 

Trust me, on this coast, in late fall/winter/early spring, in the very infrequent interludes between winter rain (or occasional snow), if you gotta do outside work on the boat, you fit it in *whenever*! :-). Took me four trips up the mast on the weekend, in mostly (but falling) daylight to scope it out, measure and then finally mark things out.  (Took four trips because not long each time after I  got up there, cold winter rain would start!) I got home from work yesterday, there was only a threat of snow, so, fuck it, up I went to cut the hole :-). A bit of finishing work left to do, mark and drill bolt holes, then install backing plate.  Then get wire stay made up and install.  
 

The goal is to measure for and order sails first week of January to get a jump on the rest of winter sailing.  And, it’s a slow time for sailmakers.  (Ordered mainsail too late in the new year last year - took 5 months to arrive: not making that mistake again this year.)

Get’er done...no stick too high, no night too dark, no winter too cold :-)

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 It's nice to see a decent radius on that opening.

For cutting openings like that, I have taken to using a hole saw with the diameter of the width of the opening, using that hole saw to cut the top and bottom of the opening, then joining those two holes with a straight saw cut on each side.

I have a small fortune tied up in carbide hole saws, most of which rarely get used these days.

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14 minutes ago, accnick said:

 It's nice to see a decent radius on that opening.

For cutting openings like that, I have taken to using a hole saw with the diameter of the width of the opening, using that hole saw to cut the top and bottom of the opening, then joining those two holes with a straight saw cut on each side.

I have a small fortune tied up in carbide hole saws, most of which rarely get used these days.

That would’ve been the ideal scenario, indeed (I.e., with the mast down —which I was desperate to avoid the cost and complexity of, and wait until spring for.)  Problem was that the forestay was exactly in the way of drilling straight.  :-). So, I had to use a 90 degree bit attachment.

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2 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

That would’ve been the ideal scenario, indeed (I.e., with the mast down —which I was desperate to avoid the cost and complexity of, and wait until spring for.)  Problem was that the forestay was exactly in the way of drilling straight.  :-). So, I had to use a 90 degree bit attachment.

Up the mast? Freezing cold? Failing light? Of course it was in the way!

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3 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

That would’ve been the ideal scenario, indeed (I.e., with the mast down —which I was desperate to avoid the cost and complexity of, and wait until spring for.)  Problem was that the forestay was exactly in the way of drilling straight.  :-). So, I had to use a 90 degree bit attachment.

Something is always in the way of the "best" method of doing something on a boat.

That is as axiomatic as: "the one screw you can't get out is the one screw that must come out."

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9 minutes ago, accnick said:

Something is always in the way of the "best" method of doing something on a boat.

That is as axiomatic as: "the one screw you can't get out is the one screw that must come out."

All corollaries of Murphy's Law.

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The new motor, batteries, charge controller, etc are all in. Head hoses will be replaced on Monday along with the solar vent in the head. Kolibri will be in the water again shortly after that. I will post photos and details of the electric repower in early January. 

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On 12/28/2021 at 10:12 AM, Elegua said:

So nice of the builder to leave you lots of room for the aft lifting strap. 

Ya there's a few places to put that aft strap, always a bit of consternation getting it set ok to haul out.

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1 hour ago, bgytr said:

Ya there's a few places to put that aft strap, always a bit of consternation getting it set ok to haul out.

The non v-drive H38's have a similar issue. Some put the strap around the bottom of the keel. 

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45 minutes ago, Elegua said:

The non v-drive H38's have a similar issue. Some put the strap around the bottom of the keel. 

Yup, we have had it hauled with the strap there at the very aft end of the little "keel" fairing as well.  Also have had it hauled immediately forward of the rudder which I prefer.  But it seems a challenge to keep the aft strap setting there properly without the strap hooking on the prop.  Also the LCG is quite forward and putting the aft strap between the prop and the rudder usually means the fwd strap is too far aft if the travel lift doesn't have enough spread between the two straps.  Often it is a challenge coaxing the travel lift guy where to set it up- they seem to have the "don't tell me how to do my job" attitude, so I try not to get confrontational with em, as long as the boat doesn't get damaged.  

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Just now, bgytr said:

Yup, we have had it hauled with the strap there at the very aft end of the little "keel" fairing as well.  Also have had it hauled immediately forward of the rudder which I prefer.  But it seems a challenge to keep the aft strap setting there properly without the strap hooking on the prop.  Also the LCG is quite forward and putting the aft strap between the prop and the rudder usually means the fwd strap is too far aft if the travel lift doesn't have enough spread between the two straps.  Often it is a challenge coaxing the travel lift guy where to set it up- they seem to have the "don't tell me how to do my job" attitude, so I try not to get confrontational with em, as long as the boat doesn't get damaged.  

My forward strap needs to go about where the forward hatch is.  People often under estimate how much of the boat's weight is in ballast. I have stickers on the hull "strap".  Same yard for 10+yrs, so they put them on and they follow them. 

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3 hours ago, Elegua said:

My forward strap needs to go about where the forward hatch is.  People often under estimate how much of the boat's weight is in ballast. I have stickers on the hull "strap".  Same yard for 10+yrs, so they put them on and they follow them. 

I hear ya, my ballast is 13,500 pounds out of 26,000 pound displacement.  The fwd extent of ballast is at about the middle of the fwd hatch, about a foot aft of the fwd edge of the cabintop.

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I went to my marina today to install a couple of hooks in TONIC's cabin, and noticed this little schooner has arrived. Not fully rigged, seems to have an inboard engine, needs some cosmetology, but still fascinating.

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6 hours ago, Bull City said:

I went to my marina today to install a couple of hooks in TONIC's cabin, and noticed this little schooner has arrived. Not fully rigged, seems to have an inboard engine, needs some cosmetology, but still fascinating.

12F638F2-DB1B-4B45-8056-2C066143475A_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.fdaa123ebc2eaea0754f9dd6b6078ebe.jpeg

Is that a schooner rigged Sea Sprite?

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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Is that a schooner rigged Sea Sprite?

The deck house kind of resembles one, but the hull shape and stem are wrong. Also the Sea Sprite 23s had teak cockpit coamings, not FG.

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On 12/30/2021 at 5:52 PM, Bull City said:

I went to my marina today to install a couple of hooks in TONIC's cabin, and noticed this little schooner has arrived. Not fully rigged, seems to have an inboard engine, needs some cosmetology, but still fascinating.

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Hull looks like a 22' schooner rigged Chuck Paine design. It was and open daysailer. Maybe cabin added later for pocket cruising. Only a guess.

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11 hours ago, rstone said:

Apparently a cuddy version was offered.

Built by Mark Marine.

That looks like the one.

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15 hours ago, rstone said:

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Looks like a fun boat in this form (once you get past the idea of having to drag your little outboard through the water all the time)

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1 hour ago, oldsurfer said:

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A ‘more’ fun little boat— just not for taking your friends out…

 

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1 hour ago, Veeger said:

A ‘more’ fun little boat— just not for taking your friends out…

Depends on how crazy your friends are........

 

1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

Tri radials look sweet!

Thanks to Russell and Randy!

 

Bucket List:

3 Bridge Fiasco

Delta Ditch

R2AK

 

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43 minutes ago, oldsurfer said:

Depends on how crazy your friends are........

 

R2AK

 

 

When the sad day comes that the Admiral cannot or will not go sailing with me, then the Trinado is my vessel of choice and the R2AK would be on my bucket list as well…

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/11/2021 at 7:12 PM, bstrdsonofbtl said:

We have one locally with the rig cut down 7' and the keel chopped appropriately.

Not quite that much, and the reasoning was actually the other way around: The story I got from Bill Abbott Jr. is that the original owners, who were good friends of designer/builder Bill Sr., moored the boat in the Sault (Sault St. Marie). Their marina was shallow enough that the boat would get stuck in the mud for several weeks each year. So the Abbotts modified the boat to provide shallower draft, removing six inches off the keel and then trimming the rig appropriately to balance things out.
Basically, they nipped off the fractional portion of the rig above the forestay (5.25'), so the mainsail is smaller but the foresails all the same. Which means it doesn't need the checkstays anymore. All of which is great for cruising and single-handed racing, but less great during light-air races (not that we have any of those around here, haha). It has an ORC GPH of 656.8 as modified (2021 certificate). It's a super fun boat to sail either way, and very well behaved.
And now that I've posted in this thread, I suppose I should add the obligatory (non-sailing) photo ...
 

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Here’s a shot a few months back of my new boat on the day of the sea trial. Still debating what to do about the cocktail lounge on the back of the boat.   Yet to sail her   Can’t wait  

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What's the boat?

That is one elaborate and expensive looking poop deck extension. Takes the concept of COTB in a whole new direction.

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5 minutes ago, Student_Driver said:

Still debating what to do about the cocktail lounge on the back of the boat.

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11 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

What's the boat?

That is one elaborate and expensive looking poop deck extension. Takes the concept of COTB in a whole new direction.

Hallberg Rassy 49. Completely refit by last owner.  New auxiliary, new genset new sails etc etc  

 

have no idea what they were thinking when they added the cocktail lounge 

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Not technically my boat, though I did help pay for it...USS Kitty Hawk heading off to the scrapper (credit to Atomic Aerials): 

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More shots here: 

 

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On 11/28/2021 at 5:27 AM, lakeneuch said:

Yes, the blue one is mine.

The scroll work is a piece of cast iron, made to look lile the original scroll work that was inlaid to the planking. I did not know that the underlaying scroll work existed until I had to remove that part of the planking. If i knew that the underlying inlay did exist before removing it I might have tried to restore it...

Here is a more profile view (and still not sailing to stay on topic)

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7 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

Hallberg Rassy 49. Completely refit by last owner.  New auxiliary, new genset new sails etc etc  

 

have no idea what they were thinking when they added the cocktail lounge 

Someone at the yard unrolled the drawings for the radar arch sideways?

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18 hours ago, IStream said:

Not technically my boat, though I did help pay for it...USS Kitty Hawk heading off to the scrapper (credit to Atomic Aerials): 

nq47xoeldzb81.jpg?width=2640&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4cdba2b0e9970226c0ba12da83cfbf28e5e57e7c

More shots here: 

 

DEfinitely a sailboat. Not very good VMG upwind when in "cold iron" status.

That's gotta be a spooky trip for the crew

- DSK

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On 1/15/2022 at 11:51 PM, Student_Driver said:

Here’s a shot a few months back of my new boat on the day of the sea trial. Still debating what to do about the cocktail lounge on the back of the boat.   Yet to sail her   Can’t wait  

A918D907-0EED-453E-B4B8-F581A696376A.jpeg

Is there enough room back there for a zero gravity chair?

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

DEfinitely a sailboat. Not very good VMG upwind when in "cold iron" status.

That's gotta be a spooky trip for the crew

- DSK

And she's going the long way around to Brownsville. Too big for the canal.

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Flying 25 Capricia II (34') one-off (sitting-room cabin).  Cold-molded mahogany & resorcinol 1968.  Tall rig added for Chesapeake Bay, here Spa Creek.

It does move along, see the avatar.  New crew were sometimes frightened rising away a plane, a little below 20 knots wind on a broad reach.  One (same shape, but 1/2 the displacement) constructed recently in Australia of modern materials and with a slick keel shape, might be more frightening.

Due to an indiscretion, Uffa Fox was the "Royal Yacht Designer". Prince Phillip, friend and Flying 15 fan, claimed the boat when finished - at Dinard the French owner pphthh'd and sailed on his honeymoon, anchoring offshore at Lisbon.  A seaworthy boat; went about The Channel, Ouessant, to the Irish Sea, and the North Sea.

Elders (AYC) excluded her from an Annapolis-Newport Race: not a sea boat, jet drive not a real engine.  True: not the Seagull in the lazarette they had raced with.  Perhaps: light-air speed South on the Bay followed by prevailing broad reach to Newport with a possibility of strong winds.  Most likely: Old Guys.

CapriciaIISpaCreek.jpg.9fe151708e6ed43201a1b09da42e8e2d.jpg

Edited by pschwenn
clarification
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After delays due to forest fires, COVID, necessary repair discoveries, supply chain issues, two "atmospheric rivers", holidays, a blizzard, factory rep family health issues, and volcanic eruption resulting in a tsunami warning Kolibri finally returned to the water today. The new Electric Yachts motor is incredibly quiet and much more efficient than the factory engineer predicted in his overly conservative calculations. Playing with the throttle setting and seeing the controller's projection on remaining run time there's probably a 1.5x to 2.0x increase in range over his projections. Slower speed = longer range so the 2.0x corresponds to a speed of ~3.5 kts, 1.5x corresponds to a speed of ~4.2 kts.

Originally I was planning on using 4 of ePropulsions E80 batteries. Once the diesel was out and detailed measurements were made we found that these would not fit. I ended up going with 12 Battle Born 12V, 100 Ahr LFP batteries. Resulting bank is 48V with 300 Ahr. 

My daughter and I will be sailing from Berkeley Marina back down to Westpoint Harbor in Redwood City Tuesday morning with the incoming tide.

I'll post more info and photos on a new thread late next week. I have a quick trip home to Oahu on Thursday.

 

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We left Berkeley Marina at 7:15am with the incoming tide and made it down to Westpoint Harbor in Redwood City at ~12:45pm riding a nice ~2kt boost from the tidal current most of the way. Incoming tide is ideal for that direction of travel which takes you much farther up the bay. High tide was 11:50am during the approach to the marina. Wind was light (0 to 7 kts) so we motor sailed the entire way with the motor running between 800 and 1200 RPM. Speed over ground was 4.6 to 6.5 kts. Final battery state of charge was between 45 and 50%. Not bad for 24.75 nmi of motor sailing. Heading home to Hawaii on Thursday. I will post more details and photos after I return to CA on 1/25. Big difference from a diesel motor sail outing - no smell, about the same vibration level as the starter motor, and so quiet you can hear the propellor turning in the water.

 

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In the water at Panamarina in Panama in November, and on the hard till I get back to her in February.IMG_2506.thumb.jpg.571f06c3f76731f015cf2994c6f03176.jpgIMG_2541.thumb.jpg.4aff84e16b278ab75bc4358b93381b7d.jpg

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2 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Digging the semi-rigid dodger idea. You build that yourself?

No such skills. A long defunct company called Canvas Creations  There are other companies that make similar dodgers that are sill around. At first I thought it was silly - a soft sided dodger you can't take down easily - but the the rigidity and lack of leaks has warmed me up to it. 

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On 1/17/2022 at 12:37 AM, Priscilla said:

She reminds me a bit of Lively Lady.

 

Yes, there is quite alot if resemblance. Thanks, i never stumbled upon this boat. Alot of english cruising yachts of the beginning of the century are quite along the theme.

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20 hours ago, Elegua said:

No such skills. A long defunct company called Canvas Creations  There are other companies that make similar dodgers that are sill around. At first I thought it was silly - a soft sided dodger you can't take down easily - but the the rigidity and lack of leaks has warmed me up to it. 

I felt the same way, then thought: "How often will you really fold down the dodger? Be honest." An openable/removable skirt should accomplish much the same effect, while keeping the sunshade properties & a place to put some solar PV. Maybe a bit more rigidity as a hand-grab, too.

I've been fooling around with Naijad-style windscreens (+ soft top) or permanent hard dodger ideas, too. but your sort of dodger ticks more boxes.

 

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On 1/15/2022 at 11:51 PM, Student_Driver said:

Here’s a shot a few months back of my new boat on the day of the sea trial. Still debating what to do about the cocktail lounge on the back of the boat.   Yet to sail her   Can’t wait  

A918D907-0EED-453E-B4B8-F581A696376A.jpeg

The former Julia B, no? Was based in the same harbor in the BVI, many years back. That extension looks a *little* less wild in person, if memory serves.

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On 1/25/2022 at 2:04 PM, j 4 said:

The former Julia B, no? Was based in the same harbor in the BVI, many years back. That extension looks a *little* less wild in person, if memory serves.

J4. Sorry to not reply earlier. Been at sea for two weeks.  Just arriving in Antigua from Mindelo. 
 

Yes. She’s the former Julia B.  I’m going to keep the drinks/dance floor extension for a season and then decide.  Looking forward to getting to know her.  Were you ever onboard.  

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3 hours ago, Tranquilo said:

69 Columbia 43 and Moore 24 

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Nice! Where the heck have you been? Seems it's been some years? Were you always in Aruba? I seem to recall Bonaire but that was some years ago.

Hope all is well.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
1 hour ago, Beer fueled Mayhem said:

Not my boat but...I'm in the Caribbean and I spot this beauty!  Some of us know her. And she is not sailing. At least not today!

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Maybe this picture should go in the cool boats thread...

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C&C custom 61??  65??  Can't remember. 

Didja say Hi to B & P? It's a 61. 

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On 1/24/2022 at 10:41 AM, Diarmuid said:

I felt the same way, then thought: "How often will you really fold down the dodger? Be honest." An openable/removable skirt should accomplish much the same effect, while keeping the sunshade properties & a place to put some solar PV. Maybe a bit more rigidity as a hand-grab, too.

I've been fooling around with Naijad-style windscreens (+ soft top) or permanent hard dodger ideas, too. but your sort of dodger ticks more boxes.

 

The center panel of my dodger has zippers along the sides and can be rolled or flipped up, at anchor it lets the breeze flow through the cockpit. If it gets too cool, flip it down. 

Racing we often flip up the window and run the spin sheet through it to the trimmer. I'll try to find a pic.

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

The center panel of my dodger has zippers along the sides and can be rolled or flipped up, at anchor it lets the breeze flow through the cockpit. If it gets too cool, flip it down. 

Racing we often flip up the window and run the spin sheet through it to the trimmer. I'll try to find a pic.

We can remove the front and side panels from ours, leaving a bimini over the companionway, but we usually leave the side panels in to increase the funnel effect. 

dodger.thumb.jpg.46fe5753b187c5805822d48375ca48cf.jpg

 

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  • 1 month later...

Just bought it this February, my first very own boat (although we've always had boats in the family). Been busy the last few weekends cleaning it and trying to sort things out and find my way around this new-to-me boat. Got the topsides looking decent and threw on some new bottom paint.

Added a spinnaker halyard and found a genius way of pulling the mousing line through using two strong magnets. I even managed to pull it past a joint in the mast which surprised me.

Launching in about two weeks and I just can't wait, it's extremely exciting. It'll be very interesting to see how it sails and to try out the jib boom, I've never sailed with one of those before and this one is home-made so it will be interesting to see how (and if) it works.

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Nice to see everyone else’s baby not sailing. Sometimes I think we’re the only ones.

Now that I think about it we spend the vast majority of our time not sailing. You’d think we’d have album’s full of not sailing photos of the boat. Nope, hardly nuthin.

Dug around and came up with these. Nova Scotia, getting ready to splash and on a mooring in front of South Shore Marine. Can’t wait to get back to the old bucket.

 

 

 

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On 4/21/2022 at 9:14 AM, Tylo said:

Just bought it this February, my first very own boat (although we've always had boats in the family)

Nice looking! What kind of boat?

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

What is it? It looks very nice.

 

3 hours ago, loungesailor said:

Nice looking! What kind of boat?

Thank you!

It's a Rhapsody 34, Swedish-designed and built by a boat builder and his wife from what I've been able to gather.
This is one of the last, if not the last one built. Hull number 52. The 34 was designed in the late 70's/early 80's but this one was built around 1990, initially with flush decks, no interior and a 15% taller mast and 10% longer boom. Unfortunately from my understanding this one was never launched and sat in storage at the shipyard for a few years. After that it was bought by a gentleman who spent a number of years building a coach roof and adding an interior. He also added a custom (supposedly carbon fiber) jib boom which will be very interesting to test out as I've never sailed with one before. The design of the coach roof and the addition of the jib boom makes me think he may have been quite inspired by the Alerion Express which I believe was first launched around the early 90's as well.

Unfortunately he is no longer with us and his son inherited the boat who has had it, mostly in storage, for the past few years. From my understanding he's more into powerboats and didn't have time for this sailboat so he put it on the market.

It's 10,4 m/34 ft long and just over 2,4 m/8 ft wide so it's quite skinny and the interior is pretty cramped by modern standards but I'd say two people could a fair amount of time in it, especially with a good cockpit enclosure as the cockpit is huge. The coach roof has been a real divider among my friends and colleagues; some think it looks great and someone else said it looks like "he glued on an upside-down Optimist and cut some holes for windows". I think it looks okay and it contributes nicely to the space (read: headroom) inside so it's very functional. In front of the engine box the headroom is maybe 1,7 m/5'7" and then it gradually gets less going forward.

It's difficult to get pictures of it where it's stored now as it's quite cramped but I'll attach some older pictures that shows the boom and coach roof a bit more as well as a few interior shots. I've also attached a picture of the quarter berth where the basic structure isn't hidden behind wood veneer; the Rhapsody boats were renowned for their build quality and sturdiness. Admittedly I'm no expert and don't have any experience at all with boatbuilding but it looks quite good to my eyes with the stringers, the tapered deck reinforcements and the way all the bulkheads are installed with the fiberglass like that. All that sturdy construction means it weighs somewhere around 4 000 kg/8 800 lbs but 2 100 kg/4 600 lbs is in the form of lead in the keel. With the taller rig I think it carries around 58 sqm/620 sqft of sail with full main and jib. There's a genoa for it as well which would add around another 6 sqm/64 sqft to that.

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9 minutes ago, Tylo said:

Rhapsody 34

@Tylo I love it. I have an H-Boat, skinny-ish too.

Do you have a fractional rig? Wheel or tiller?

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@Tylo 

Thanks for the info!

Nosing around on the interweb I found the draft is stated at 1.65 meters. Is that correct?

I’m a fan of some of the early 70’s skinny Swedish and Norwegian boats but they can often have fairly deep draft so 1.65 doesn’t seem extreme at all.

I like the elliptical ports on your boat better then some of the space age treatments seen on some of the other examples.

Construction looks well thought out and robust as well.

You’ve got a great boat that you’ll have a lot of fun with. 

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2 minutes ago, Bull City said:

@Tylo I love it. I have an H-Boat, skinny-ish too.

Do you have a fractional rig? Wheel or tiller?

Oh yes, I remember reading your renovation thread. Great read, thank you!

Mine is a pretty "deep" fractional rig if that's the correct term - the mast stands something like 14,5 m/47 ft above deck and the forestay attachment is 10,8 m/35 ft above deck.

Tiller steering, I personally prefer it to a wheel.

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4 minutes ago, Tylo said:

Tiller steering, I personally prefer it to a wheel.

Yup, this,

Had a wheel on our boat for 13 years and swapped it out for a tiller, never been happier!

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1 minute ago, loungesailor said:

@Tylo 

Thanks for the info!

Nosing around on the interweb I found the draft is stated at 1.65 meters. Is that correct?

I’m a fan of some of the early 70’s skinny Swedish and Norwegian boats but they can often have fairly deep draft so 1.65 doesn’t seem extreme at all.

I like the elliptical ports on your boat better then some of the space age treatments seen on some of the other examples.

Construction looks well thought out and robust as well.

You’ve got a great boat that you’ll have a lot of fun with. 

Thank you!

Yes, that's the information I've found as well. I haven't actually checked on mine, I can take a look tomorrow and report back.

Some of these boats may have had deep drafts to aid in sailing very tight angles but there are a fair amount of classic, skinny boats with reasonable drafts as well. Usually they compensated with very heavy keels like mine has. The rocky bottoms in the archipelagos of the west- and east coasts of Sweden are best avoided and when anchoring with lines ashore as we like to do a shallow draft can mean the difference between finding a spot for the night or not.

20_0506_1872_xgaplus.jpg

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1 hour ago, Tylo said:

 

Thank you!

It's a Rhapsody 34, Swedish-designed and built by a boat builder and his wife from what I've been able to gather.
This is one of the last, if not the last one built. Hull number 52. The 34 was designed in the late 70's/early 80's but this one was built around 1990, initially with flush decks, no interior and a 15% taller mast and 10% longer boom. Unfortunately from my understanding this one was never launched and sat in storage at the shipyard for a few years. After that it was bought by a gentleman who spent a number of years building a coach roof and adding an interior. He also added a custom (supposedly carbon fiber) jib boom which will be very interesting to test out as I've never sailed with one before. The design of the coach roof and the addition of the jib boom makes me think he may have been quite inspired by the Alerion Express which I believe was first launched around the early 90's as well.

Unfortunately he is no longer with us and his son inherited the boat who has had it, mostly in storage, for the past few years. From my understanding he's more into powerboats and didn't have time for this sailboat so he put it on the market.

It's 10,4 m/34 ft long and just over 2,4 m/8 ft wide so it's quite skinny and the interior is pretty cramped by modern standards but I'd say two people could a fair amount of time in it, especially with a good cockpit enclosure as the cockpit is huge. The coach roof has been a real divider among my friends and colleagues; some think it looks great and someone else said it looks like "he glued on an upside-down Optimist and cut some holes for windows". I think it looks okay and it contributes nicely to the space (read: headroom) inside so it's very functional. In front of the engine box the headroom is maybe 1,7 m/5'7" and then it gradually gets less going forward.

It's difficult to get pictures of it where it's stored now as it's quite cramped but I'll attach some older pictures that shows the boom and coach roof a bit more as well as a few interior shots. I've also attached a picture of the quarter berth where the basic structure isn't hidden behind wood veneer; the Rhapsody boats were renowned for their build quality and sturdiness. Admittedly I'm no expert and don't have any experience at all with boatbuilding but it looks quite good to my eyes with the stringers, the tapered deck reinforcements and the way all the bulkheads are installed with the fiberglass like that. All that sturdy construction means it weighs somewhere around 4 000 kg/8 800 lbs but 2 100 kg/4 600 lbs is in the form of lead in the keel. With the taller rig I think it carries around 58 sqm/620 sqft of sail with full main and jib. There's a genoa for it as well which would add around another 6 sqm/64 sqft to that.

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image.png.dcbe1bc303afa30d07adbbeeec44ff0f.png

 

 

 

I think your "upside down opti guy"  was pretty harsh.  I think it looks pretty good, definately throttled the volume back to respect the flush decks and long and skinny bit.  Thanks for sharing.

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On 4/22/2022 at 4:03 PM, Tylo said:

 

Thank you!

It's a Rhapsody 34, Swedish-designed and built by a boat builder and his wife from what I've been able to gather.
This is one of the last, if not the last one built. Hull number 52. The 34 was designed in the late 70's/early 80's but this one was built around 1990, initially with flush decks, no interior and a 15% taller mast and 10% longer boom. Unfortunately from my understanding this one was never launched and sat in storage at the shipyard for a few years. After that it was bought by a gentleman who spent a number of years building a coach roof and adding an interior. He also added a custom (supposedly carbon fiber) jib boom which will be very interesting to test out as I've never sailed with one before. The design of the coach roof and the addition of the jib boom makes me think he may have been quite inspired by the Alerion Express which I believe was first launched around the early 90's as well.

Unfortunately he is no longer with us and his son inherited the boat who has had it, mostly in storage, for the past few years. From my understanding he's more into powerboats and didn't have time for this sailboat so he put it on the market.

It's 10,4 m/34 ft long and just over 2,4 m/8 ft wide so it's quite skinny and the interior is pretty cramped by modern standards but I'd say two people could a fair amount of time in it, especially with a good cockpit enclosure as the cockpit is huge. The coach roof has been a real divider among my friends and colleagues; some think it looks great and someone else said it looks like "he glued on an upside-down Optimist and cut some holes for windows". I think it looks okay and it contributes nicely to the space (read: headroom) inside so it's very functional. In front of the engine box the headroom is maybe 1,7 m/5'7" and then it gradually gets less going forward.

It's difficult to get pictures of it where it's stored now as it's quite cramped but I'll attach some older pictures that shows the boom and coach roof a bit more as well as a few interior shots. I've also attached a picture of the quarter berth where the basic structure isn't hidden behind wood veneer; the Rhapsody boats were renowned for their build quality and sturdiness. Admittedly I'm no expert and don't have any experience at all with boatbuilding but it looks quite good to my eyes with the stringers, the tapered deck reinforcements and the way all the bulkheads are installed with the fiberglass like that. All that sturdy construction means it weighs somewhere around 4 000 kg/8 800 lbs but 2 100 kg/4 600 lbs is in the form of lead in the keel. With the taller rig I think it carries around 58 sqm/620 sqft of sail with full main and jib. There's a genoa for it as well which would add around another 6 sqm/64 sqft to that.

2.thumb.jpg.e45ea06cefba26075300c7945f49e6f3.jpg

image.png.dcbe1bc303afa30d07adbbeeec44ff0f.png

1.thumb.jpg.0aa93942dfbfd0726b70386598fcaee8.jpg

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I think there is a lot to be said for boats that may be tight for a crowd but great for two people.  Afterall, except for racing how many times do we take a half dozen or more people out sailing with us much less extended cruising?  Frankly, I would rather have a 40 foot boat with a 28 foot interior stretched out than a 28 foot boat with a 40 foot interior crammed in. 

 Room for two, works if only two are going.  And, again except for racing (and even then often still only two) two is enough.  

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